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Sample records for resonant structure evaluated

  1. Evaluation of resonant tunneling transmission coefficient from multilayer structures GaAlAs/GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moghaddasi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available   A theoretical study of resonant tunneling in multilayered GaAlAs/GaAs structures are presented. The spectrum of resonant energies and its dependence on the barrier structure are analyzed from calculated profiles of barrier transparency versus energy, and from current voltage characteristics computed at selected temperatures and Fermi levels. The present formalism is based on the effective mass approximation and results are via direct numerical evaluations.

  2. 12 O resonant structure evaluated by two-proton emission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, T.N.; Teruya, N.; Goncalves, M.

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics of 12 O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of 11 N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of 12 O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of 12 O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes. (author)

  3. 12O resonant structure evaluated by the two-proton emission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, T. N.; Teruya, N.; Dimarco, A.; Duarte, S. B.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Goncalves, M.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the 12 O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of 11 N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of the 12 O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of the 12 O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes.

  4. {sup 12} O resonant structure evaluated by two-proton emission process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, T.N. [Fundacao Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco (UNIVASF), Juazeiro, BA (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Dimarco, A. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    The characteristics of {sup 12}O resonant ground state are investigated through the analysis of the experimental data for the two-proton decay process. The sequential and simultaneous two-proton emission decay modes have been considered in a statistical calculation of the decay energy distribution. The resonant structures of {sup 11} N have been employed as intermediate states for the sequential mode, having their parameters determined by considering the structure of single particle resonance in quantum scattering problem. The width of {sup 12}O resonant ground state has been extracted from a best fit to the experimental data. The contributions from the different channels to the decay energy distribution have been evaluated, and width and peak location parameters of {sup 12}O resonant ground state are compared with results of other works for the sequential and simultaneous two-proton decay modes. (author)

  5. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Ohara, Nobutoshi; Takagi, Junichi; Sato, Noboru; Kato, Hirohisa; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of anatomical structure and function of the ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Usui, Masahiro; Takenaka, Katsu

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being widely employed for evaluation of cardiovascular anatomies and functions. However, the indications for cardiac MRI to obtain information which cannot be obtained using other conventional methods have not yet been determined. To demonstrate the usefulness of MRI in delineating the apex of the left ventricle and free wall of the right ventricle, end-diastolic short axis MRI images were obtained in 20 patients with apical hypertrophy and in 9 normal volunteers. To compare the accuracy of estimations of left ventricular volumes obtained using the modified Simpson's method of MRI with that using the MRI area length method, 19 patients, in whom left ventriculography had been performed, were studied. The apex of the left ventricle was evaluated circumferentially and distribution of hypertrophied muscles was defined. Sixty-five percent of the length of the right ventricular free wall was clearly delineated. Correlation coefficients of the ejection fraction between MRI and angiography were 0.85 with the modified Simpson's method of MRI, and 0.62 with the area length method of MRI. Three themes were chosen to demonstrate good clinical indications for cardiac MRI. (author)

  7. Looking inside giant resonance fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Voronov, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopic calculations of the fine structure of giant resonances for spherical nuclei are presented. Excited states are treated by wave function which takes into account coupling of simple one-phonon configurations with more complex ones. Nuclear structure calculations are applied to the description of the γ-decay of resonances into the ground and low-lying excited states. 16 refs.; 4 figs

  8. Resonance contribution to electromagnetic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, A.L. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The part of the pion and proton electromagnetic structure functions due to direct channel resonances in the virtual Compton amplitude is discussed. After a phenomenological discussion, based on the work of Bloom and Gilman, of resonance production in inelastic electroproduction, the single resonance contribution to the pion and proton structure functions is expressed in terms of transition form factors. Froissart-Gribov representations of the Compton amplitude partial waves are presented and are used to specify the spin dependence of the transition form factors. The dependence of the form factors on momentum transfer and resonance mass is assumed on the basis of the behavior of exclusive resonance electroproduction. The single resonance contributions are summed in the Bjorken limit, and the result exhibits Bjorken scaling. Transverse photons are found to dominate in the Bjorken limit, and the threshold behavior of the resonant part of the structure functions is related to the asymptotic behavior of exclusive form factors at large momentum transfer. The resonant parts of the annihilation structure functions are not in general given by simple analytic continuation in the scaling vari []ble ω' of the electroproduction structure functions. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  9. Resonant Electromagnetic Shunt Damping of Flexible Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic transducers convert mechanical energy to electrical energy and vice versa. Effective passive vibration damping of flexible structures can therefore be introduced by shunting with an accurately calibrated resonant electrical network thatcontains a capacitor to create the desired...

  10. Active resonance tuning of stretchable plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    Active resonance tuning is highly desired for the applications of plasmonic structures, such as optical switches and surface enhanced Raman substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the active tunable plasmonic structures, which composed of monolayer arrays of metallic semishells with dielectric...... cores on stretchable elastic substrates. These composite structures support Bragg-type surface plasmon resonances whose frequencies are sensitive to the arrangement of the metallic semishells. Under uniaxial stretching, the lattice symmetry of these plasmonic structures can be reconfigured from...... applications of the stretch-tunable plasmonic structures in sensing, switching, and filtering....

  11. Resonant coupling applied to superconducting accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, James M.; Krawczyk, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of resonant coupling and the benefits that accrue from its application is well known in the world of room temperature coupled cavity linacs. Design studies show that it can be applied successfully between sections of conventional elliptical superconducting coupled cavity accelerator structures and internally to structures with spoked cavity resonators. The coupling mechanisms can be designed without creating problems with high field regions or multipactoring. The application of resonant coupling to superconducting accelerators eliminates the need for complex cryogenic mechanical tuners and reduces the time needed to bring a superconducting accelerator into operation.

  12. Magnetic resonance in zero-field: construction of a spectrometer, evaluation of a method for structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llor, M.

    1987-01-01

    The method known as Nuclear Resonance in the zero-field, applied to the spectral analysis of powders, is discussed. In the method, the anisotropy due to the preferential direction of the magnetic field is suppressed, but a high sensitivity is keeped. For powders spectra, the process allows the obtention resolutions, of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, in the range of those only obtained on monocrystals under strong fields. By suitable magnetic field oscillations, and by the effect of the high field on the RMN signal, the transient evolutions of the spins are obtained. Concerning the absence of a preferred direction in the zero-field, a powder or the monocrystals show nearly the same behavior. In such conditions, a much more interesting spectra than those from a powder in a strong field, can be obtained. The RMN spectrometer is described. The possibilities, the experimental and theoretical limits of the proposed method, are analyzed. Applications on dipolar (proton and phosphor) and quadrupolar (deuterium) interactions, on hydrated salts and on cyclophasphazenes are carried out [fr

  13. Evaluation of stable tungsten isotopes in the resolved resonance region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillebeeckx P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade benchmark experiments and simulations, together with newly obtained neutron cross section data, have pointed out deficiencies in evaluated data files of W isotopes. The role of W as a fundamental structural material in different nuclear applications fully justifies a new evaluation of 182, 183, 184, 186W neutron resonance parameters. In this regard transmission and capture cross section measurements on natural and enriched tungsten samples were performed at the GELINA facility of the EC-JRC-IRMM. A resonance parameter file used as input in the resonance shape analysis was prepared based on the available literature and adjusted in first instance to transmission data.

  14. Mode structure of active resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Witteman, W.J.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis is made of the mode structure of lasers when the interaction with the active medium is taken into account. We consider the combined effect of gain and refractive-index variations for arbitrary mirror configurations. Using a dimensionless round-trip matrix for a medium with a quadratic

  15. A walk along the steep neutron resonance data evaluation path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouland, O. [CEA Cadarache (DEN/CAD/DER/SPRC/LEPh), Physics Studies Lab., 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs

    2008-07-01

    This paper goes through some major steps of a 'resonance evaluator' work and in particular on actual tricky questions: the nature of the experimental data base, the life without R-matrix approximations, the external level gambling, the influence of level structures in observables other than cross sections, the puzzling unresolved resonance range and the disused average sub-threshold fission cross sections. (authors)

  16. Impact of Surgical Evaluation of Additional Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Advanced Thymoma with Infiltration of Adjacent Structures: The Thoracic Surgeon's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Michael; Hnevkovsky, Stefanie; Neu, Reiner; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka W; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Background  Preoperative radiological assessment is important for clarification of surgical operability for advanced thymic tumors. Objective was to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine sequences for evaluation of cardiovascular tumor invasion. Patients and Methods  This prospective study included patients with advanced thymoma, who underwent surgical resection. All patients received preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and cine MRI. Results  Tumor infiltration was surgically confirmed in the pericardium ( n  = 12), myocardium ( n  = 1), superior caval vein (SCV; n  = 3), and aorta ( n  = 2). A macroscopic complete resection was possible in 10 patients, whereas 2 patients with aortic or myocardial tumor invasion had R2 resection. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 50% for cine MRI compared with 0% for CT scan regarding myocardial tumor infiltration. The PPV for tumor infiltration of the aorta was 50%, with a higher sensitivity for the CT scan (100 vs. 50%). Infiltration of the SCV could be detected slightly better with cine MRI (PPV 75 vs. 66.7%). Conclusion  Cine MRI seems to improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of advanced thymoma regarding infiltration of cardiovascular structures and supports the surgical approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Average resonance parameters evaluation for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porodzinskij, Yu.V.; Sukhovitskij, E.Sh. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    New evaluated <{Gamma}{sub n}{sup 0}> and values for {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 243}Cm, {sup 245}Cm, {sup 246}Cm and {sup 241}Am nuclei in the resolved resonance region are presented. The applied method based on the idea that experimental resonance missing results in correlated changes of reduced neutron widths and level spacings distributions is discussed. (author)

  18. Evaluation of temperature dependent neutron resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Sahni, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Fourier transform method is extended for evaluating temperature dependent resonance integrals and Doppler coefficients. With the temperature dependent cross-sections, the slowing-down equation is transformed into a Fredholm integral equation of second kind. A method of solution is presented using the familiar Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulae. As a byproduct of the above technique, a fast and accurate method for computing the resonance integral J-function is given. (orig.) [de

  19. Optimal resonant control of flexible structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2009-01-01

    When introducing a resonant controller for a particular vibration mode in a structure this mode splits into two. A design principle is developed for resonant control based oil equal damping of these two modes. First the design principle is developed for control of a system with a single degree...... of freedom, and then it is extended to multi-mode structures. A root locus analysis of the controlled single-mode structure identifies the equal modal damping property as a condition oil the linear and Cubic terms of the characteristic equation. Particular solutions for filtered displacement feedback...... and filtered acceleration feedback are developed by combining the root locus analysis with optimal properties of the displacement amplification frequency curve. The results are then extended to multi-mode structures by including a quasi-static representation of the background modes in the equations...

  20. Nucleon structure functions, resonance form factors, and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovsky, V.V.; Struminsky, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nucleon structure functions in the resonance region is explored. For form factors that describe resonance production, expressions are obtained that are dependent on the photon virtuality Q 2 , which have a correct threshold behavior, and which take into account available experimental data on resonance decay. Resonance contributions to nucleon structure functions are calculated. The resulting expressions are used to investigate quark-hadron duality in electron-nucleon scattering by taking the example of the structure function F 2

  1. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  2. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  3. Spectral structure of the pygmy dipole resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A P; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Rusev, G; Tornow, W; Tsoneva, N

    2010-02-19

    High-sensitivity studies of E1 and M1 transitions observed in the reaction 138Ba(gamma,gamma{'}) at energies below the one-neutron separation energy have been performed using the nearly monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams of the HIgammaS facility. The electric dipole character of the so-called "pygmy" dipole resonance was experimentally verified for excitations from 4.0 to 8.6 MeV. The fine structure of the M1 "spin-flip" mode was observed for the first time in N=82 nuclei.

  4. Future prospects of superfine structure of neutron resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideno, Kazumi

    1996-01-01

    Neutron resonance spectra appear simply and regularly in the light of superfine structure (SFS). It is found that the relative shifts (i.e. the relative distances) between the SFSs for groups of nuclei have definite values and are closely interrelated to the symmetry properties of the compound systems if we treat neutron zero energy as a common reference point. An origin of the SFSs and its possible application to an evaluation of nuclear data are discussed. (author)

  5. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  6. Evaluation and analysis of nuclear resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohner, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    A probabilistic foundations of data evaluation are reviewed, with special emphasis on parameter estimation based on Bayes' theorem and a quadratic loss function, and on modern methods for the assignment of prior probabilities. The data reduction process leading from raw experimental data to evaluated computer files of nuclear reaction cross sections is outlined, with a discussion of systematic and statistical errors and their propagation and of the generalized least squares formalism including prior information and nonlinear theoretical models. It is explained how common errors induce correlations between data, what consequences they have for uncertainty propagation and sensitivity studies, and how evaluators can construct covariance matrices from the usual error information provided by experimentalists. New techniques for evaluation of inconsistent data are also presented. The general principles are then applied specifically to the analysis and evaluation of neutron resonance data in terms of theoretical models - R-matrix theory (and especially its practically used multi-level Breit-Wigner and Reich-Moore variants) in the resolved region, and resonance-averaged R-matrix theory (Hauser-Feshbach theory with width-fluctuation corrections) in the unresolved region. Complications arise because the measured transmission data, capture and fission yields, self-indication ratios and other observables are not yet the wanted cross sections. These are obtained only by means of parametrisation. The intervening effects - Doppler and resolution broadening, self-shielding, multiple scattering, backgrounds, sample impurities, energy-dependent detector efficiencies, inaccurate reference data etc - are therefore also discussed. (author)

  7. Self-consistent modelling of resonant tunnelling structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, T.; Jauho, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of self-consistency on the I-V-characteristics of resonant tunnelling structures. The calculational method is based on a simultaneous solution of the effective-mass Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation, and the current is evaluated...... applied voltages and carrier densities at the emitter-barrier interface. We include the two-dimensional accumulation layer charge and the quantum well charge in our self-consistent scheme. We discuss the evaluation of the current contribution originating from the two-dimensional accumulation layer charges......, and our qualitative estimates seem consistent with recent experimental studies. The intrinsic bistability of resonant tunnelling diodes is analyzed within several different approximation schemes....

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility

  9. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  10. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; Knight, C.; McCalla, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of elastic modules of structural ceramic by acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Young; Lee Seong Suck; Kim, Young Gil

    1993-01-01

    Elastic moduli of structural ceramic materials, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 , were measured by acoustic resonance method. Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the torsional and flexural resonant frequencies, densities, and the dimensions of the specimen. The results by acoustic resonance method were compared with the results by ultrasonic method and the differences were less than 4%.

  12. Use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate cardiac structure, function and fibrosis in children with infantile Pompe disease on enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Piers C A; Pasquali, Sara K; Darty, Stephen; Ing, Richard J; Li, Jennifer S; Kim, Raymond J; DeArmey, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Campbell, Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency) is one of several lysosomal storage diseases amenable to treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). While echocardiography (echo) has been the standard method to evaluate the cardiac response to ERT, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has the advantage of a better tissue definition and characterization of myocardial fibrosis. However, CMR for Pompe disease is not frequently performed due to a high risk of sedation. We report the first use of CMR in a feasible protocol to quantify left ventricular (LV) mass, function, and the presence of myocardial fibrosis in the Pompe population. Children with Pompe disease on ERT were assessed with transthoracic echo and CMR over a 3 year period at a single institution. Echocardiography was performed using standard techniques without sedation. CMR was performed using retrospectively gated and real-time imaging, with and without sedation. LV mass indexed to body surface area (LVMI) and ejection fraction (EF) were measured by both echo and CMR, and evaluated for change over time. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed by CMR with delayed enhancement imaging 5-10 min after gadolinium contrast using single shot inversion recovery sequences with inversion time set to null the signal from normal myocardium. Seventeen CMR scans were successfully performed in 10 subjects with Pompe disease (median age at first CMR is 9 months, range 1-38 months, 80% male), with sedation only performed in 4 studies. There was a median interval of 5 months (range 0-34 months) from the start of ERT to first CMR (baseline). At baseline, the median indexed LVMI by CMR (140.0 g/m(2), range 43.8-334.0) tended to be lower than that assessed by echo (median 204.0 g/m(2), range 52.0-385.0), but did not reach statistical significance. At baseline, CMR EF was similar to that assessed by echo (55% vs. 55%). Overall, there was no significant decrease in CMR measured LVMI over time (CMR median LVMI at baseline 94 g

  13. Improved switching using Fano resonances in photonic crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Elesin, Yuriy

    2013-01-01

    difference time domain simulations taking into account the signal bandwidth. The results suggest a significant energy reduction by employing Fano resonances compared to more well established Lorentzian resonance structures. A specific example of a Kerr nonlinearity shows an order of magnitude energy...

  14. Second harmonic generation in resonant optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Matt; Moore, Jeremy; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Olsson, Roy H.; Wiwi, Michael; Padilla, Camille; Douglas, James Kenneth; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    2018-01-09

    An optical second-harmonic generator (or spontaneous parametric down-converter) includes a microresonator formed of a nonlinear optical medium. The microresonator supports at least two modes that can be phase matched at different frequencies so that light can be converted between them: A first resonant mode having substantially radial polarization and a second resonant mode having substantially vertical polarization. The first and second modes have the same radial order. The thickness of the nonlinear medium is less than one-half the pump wavelength within the medium.

  15. High-Q microwave resonators with a photonic crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, M.

    2001-08-01

    The localisation of electromagnetic energy at a defect in a photonic crystal is similar to a well known effect employed to construct high-Q microwave resonators: In a whispering gallery (WHG-) mode resonator the high Q-factor is achieved by localisation of the electromagnetic field energy by total reflection inside a disk made of dielectric material. The topic of this work is to demonstrate, that WHG-like modes can exist in an air defect in a photonic crystal that extends over several lattice periods; and that a high-Q microwave resonator can be made, utilizing these resonant modes. In numerical simulations, the transmission properties of a photonic crystal structure with hexagonal lattice symmetry have been investigated with a transfer-matrix-method. The eigenmodes of a defect structure in a photonic crystal have been calculated with a quasi-3d finite element integration technique. Experimental results confirm the simulated transmission properties and show the existence of modes inside the band gap, when a defect is introduced in the crystal. Resonator measurements show that a microwave resonator can be operated with those defect modes. It was found out that the main losses of the resonator were caused by bad microwave properties of the used dielectric material and by metal losses on the top and bottom resonator walls. Furthermore, it turned out that the detection of the photonic crystal defect mode was difficult because of a lack of simulation possibilities and high housing mode density in the resonator. (orig.)

  16. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  17. Resonant tunneling through double-barrier structures on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wei-Yin; Zhu Rui; Deng Wen-Ji; Xiao Yun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Quantum resonant tunneling behaviors of double-barrier structures on graphene are investigated under the tight-binding approximation. The Klein tunneling and resonant tunneling are demonstrated for the quasiparticles with energy close to the Dirac points. The Klein tunneling vanishes by increasing the height of the potential barriers to more than 300 meV. The Dirac transport properties continuously change to the Schrödinger ones. It is found that the peaks of resonant tunneling approximate to the eigen-levels of graphene nanoribbons under appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison between the zigzag- and armchair-edge barriers is given. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. STRUCTURED CLINICAL EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabela Maria Barbosa Sampaio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a world experiencing profound technological and socio-political changes in areas of knowledge and capacity, healthcare can not remain static. A new kind of professional is required, whose practice is based on ethics, scientific standards, integrity, citizenship, and health promotion, who develops skills beyond healthcare, such as decision making, communication,leadership, management, and continuing education. No single method can assess all of these elements (knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and only a combination of methods is able to produce a valid evaluation. An alternative method exists: structured clinical assessments based on observation of "to do, or how to do" that aim to complete this evaluation by focusing attention on the performance of specific skills. In order to broaden the scope of evaluation methods that have been used in health education, this article, a literature review, intends to offer readers an overview of the diverse types of structured clinical evaluation, emphasizing Objective Structured Clinical Examination, the most widely used in Brazil, with a goal of advancing opportunities for health professionals to make use of this evaluative tool.

  19. Experimental study on moonpool resonance of offshore floating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating structures have so-called moonpool in the centre area for the purpose of drilling, installation of subsea structures, recovery of Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV and divers. However, this vertical opening has an effect on the operating performance of floating offshore structure in the vicinity of moonpool resonance frequency; piston mode and sloshing mode. Experimental study based on model test was carried out. Moonpool resonance of floating offshore structure on fixed condition and motion free condition were investigated. And, the effect of cofferdam which is representative inner structure inside moonpool was examined. Model test results showed that Molin's theoretical formula can predict moonpool resonance on fixed condition quite accurately. However, motion free condition has higher resonance frequency when it is compared with that of motion fixed. The installation of cofferdam moves resonance frequency to higher region and also generates secondary resonance at lower frequency. Furthermore, it was found that cofferdam was the cause of generating waves in the longitudinal direction when the vessel was in beam sea.

  20. Fabrication of nanoplate resonating structures via micro-masonry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaswara, A; Legrand, B; Mathieu, F; Nicu, L; Leichle, T; Keum, H; Rhee, S; Kim, S

    2014-01-01

    Advantages of using nanoscale membrane and plate resonators over more common cantilever shapes include higher quality factor (Q factor) for an equivalent mass and better suitability to mass sensing applications in fluid. Unfortunately, the current fabrication methods used to obtain such membranes and plates are limited in terms of materials and thickness range, and can potentially cause stiction. This study presents a new method to fabricate nanoplate resonating structures based on micro-masonry, which is the advanced form of the transfer printing technique. Nanoplate resonators were fabricated by transfer printing 0.34 µm thick square-shaped silicon plates by means of polydimethylsiloxane microtip stamps on top of silicon oxide base structures displaying 20 µm diameter cavities, followed by a thermal annealing step to create a rigid bond. Typical resulting suspended structures display vibration characteristics, i.e. a resonance frequency of a few MHz and Q factors above 10 in air at atmospheric pressure, which are in accordance with theory. Moreover, the presented fabrication method enables the realization of multiple suspended structures in a single step and on the same single base, without mechanical crosstalk between the resonators. This work thus demonstrates the suitability and the advantages of the micro-masonry technique for the fabrication of plate resonators for mass sensing purpose. (paper)

  1. Structural resonance and mode of flutter of hummingbird tail feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher J; Elias, Damian O; Girard, Madeline B; Prum, Richard O

    2013-09-15

    Feathers can produce sound by fluttering in airflow. This flutter is hypothesized to be aeroelastic, arising from the coupling of aerodynamic forces to one or more of the feather's intrinsic structural resonance frequencies. We investigated how mode of flutter varied among a sample of hummingbird tail feathers tested in a wind tunnel. Feather vibration was measured directly at ~100 points across the surface of the feather with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV), as a function of airspeed, Uair. Most feathers exhibited multiple discrete modes of flutter, which we classified into types including tip, trailing vane and torsional modes. Vibratory behavior within a given mode was usually stable, but changes in independent variables such as airspeed or orientation sometimes caused feathers to abruptly 'jump' from one mode to another. We measured structural resonance frequencies and mode shapes directly by measuring the free response of 64 feathers stimulated with a shaker and recorded with the SLDV. As predicted by the aeroelastic flutter hypothesis, the mode shape (spatial distribution) of flutter corresponded to a bending or torsional structural resonance frequency of the feather. However, the match between structural resonance mode and flutter mode was better for tip or torsional mode shapes, and poorer for trailing vane modes. Often, the 3rd bending structural harmonic matched the expressed mode of flutter, rather than the fundamental. We conclude that flutter occurs when airflow excites one or more structural resonance frequencies of a feather, most akin to a vibrating violin string.

  2. Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in Sn-124

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, J.; Savran, D.; Butler, P. A.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harissopulos, S.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Kruecken, R.; Lagoyannis, A.; Litvinova, E.; Pietralla, N.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Popescu, L.; Ring, P.; Scheck, M.; Schlueter, F.; Sonnabend, K.; Stoica, V. I.; Zilges, A.; Wortche, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Background: In atomic nuclei, a concentration of electric dipole strength around the particle threshold, commonly denoted as pygmy dipole resonance, may have a significant impact on nuclear structure properties and astrophysical scenarios. A clear identification of these states and the structure of

  3. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Velopharyngeal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youkyung; Kuehn, David P.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Conway, Charles A.; Perry, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility of using a 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol for examining velopharyngeal structures. Using collected 3D MRI data, the authors investigated the effect of sex on the midsagittal velopharyngeal structures and the levator veli palatini (levator) muscle configurations. Method: Ten Caucasian…

  4. Threedimensional imaging of organ structures by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, W.; Smolorz, J.; Wellner, U.

    1985-01-01

    A simple method for threedimensional imaging of organ structures is presented. The method is based on a special acquisition mode in a nuclear resonance tomograph, exciting layers of 20 cm thickness at different angulations. The display is done by cinematography (which is usually used in nuclear cardiology) projecting the structures in a rotating movement. (orig.) [de

  5. Statistical Modelling of Resonant Cross Section Structure in URR, Model of the Characteristic Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyumdjieva, N.

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model for the resonant cross section structure in the Unresolved Resonance Region has been developed in the framework of the R-matrix formalism in Reich Moore approach with effective accounting of the resonance parameters fluctuations. The model uses only the average resonance parameters and can be effectively applied for analyses of cross sections functional, averaged over many resonances. Those are cross section moments, transmission and self-indication functions measured through thick sample. In this statistical model the resonant cross sections structure is accepted to be periodic and the R-matrix is a function of ε=E/D with period 0≤ε≤N; R nc (ε)=π/2√(S n *S c )1/NΣ(i=1,N)(β in *β ic *ctg[π(ε i - = ε-iS i )/N]; Here S n ,S c ,S i is respectively neutron strength function, strength function for fission or inelastic channel and strength function for radiative capture, N is the number of resonances (ε i ,β i ) that obey the statistic of Porter-Thomas and Wigner's one. The simple case of this statistical model concerns the resonant cross section structure for non-fissile nuclei under the threshold for inelastic scattering - the model of the characteristic function with HARFOR program. In the above model some improvements of calculation of the phases and logarithmic derivatives of neutron channels have been done. In the parameterization we use the free parameter R l ∞ , which accounts the influence of long-distant resonances. The above scheme for statistical modelling of the resonant cross section structure has been applied for evaluation of experimental data for total, capture and inelastic cross sections for 232 Th in the URR (4-150) keV and also the transmission and self-indication functions in (4-175) keV. The set of evaluated average resonance parameters have been obtained. The evaluated average resonance parameters in the URR are consistent with those in the Resolved Resonance Region (CRP for Th-U cycle, Vienna, 2006

  6. Resonant Tunneling in Gated Vertical One- dimensional Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagunta, V. R.; Janes, D. B.; Melloch, M. R.; Webb, K. J.

    1997-03-01

    Vertical sub-micron transistors incorporating resonant tunneling multiple quantum well heterostructures are interesting in applications for both multi-valued logic devices and the study of quantization effects in vertical quasi- one-, zero- dimensional structures. Earlier we have demonstrated room temperature pinch-off of the resonant peak in sub-micron vertical resonant tunneling transistors structures using a self-aligned sidewall gating technique ( V.R. Kolagunta et. al., Applied Physics Lett., 69), 374(1996). In this paper we present the study of gating effects in vertical multiple quantum well resonant tunneling transistors. Multiple well quasi-1-D sidewall gated transistors with mesa dimensions of L_x=0.5-0.9μm and L_y=10-40μm were fabricated. The quantum heterostructure in these devices consists of two non-symmetric (180 ÅÅi-GaAs wells separated from each other and from the top and bottom n^+ GaAs/contacts region using Al_0.3Ga_0.7As tunneling barriers. Room temperature pinch-off of the multiple resonant peaks similar to that reported in the case of single well devices is observed in these devices^1. Current-voltage characteristics at liquid nitrogen temperatures show splitting of the resonant peaks into sub-bands with increasing negative gate bias indicative of quasi- 1-D confinement. Room-temperature and low-temperature current-voltage measurements shall be presented and discussed.

  7. FDTD method using for electrodynamic simulation of resonator accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorogushin, M.F.; Svistunov, Yu.A.; Chetverikov, I.O.; Malyshev, V.N.; Malyukhov, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The finite difference method in the time area (FDTD) makes it possible to model both stationary and nonstationary processes, originating by the beam and field interaction. Possibilities of the method by modeling the fields in the resonant accelerating structures are demonstrated. The possibility of considering the transition processes is important besides the solution of the problem on determination of frequencies and distribution in the space of the resonators oscillations proper types. The program presented makes it possible to obtain practical results for modeling accelerating structures on personal computers [ru

  8. New evaluation of 238U neutron resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C.; Larson, Nancy M.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238 U were obtained in the energy range 1 keV to 20 keV from a SAMMY Reich-Moore analysis of high resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA. In the energy range 1 keV to 10 keV, the analysis used as prior values the ENDF/B-VI resonance parameters. The analysis in the energy range 10 keV to 20 keV resulted in the creation of a set of resonance parameters for the representation of the cross section in this energy range. The results are compared to the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. Some statistical properties of the new resonance parameters are examined. (author)

  9. Evaluation of urogenital fistulas by magnetic resonance urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamere, Augusto Elias; Coelho, Rafael Darahem Souza; Cecin, Alexandre Oliveira; Feltrin, Leonir Terezinha; Lucchesi, Fabiano Rubiao; Seabra, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistulas are unusual complications secondary to pelvic surgery or pelvic diseases. The therapeutic success in these cases depends on an appropriate preoperative evaluation for diagnosis and visualization of the fistulous tract. The present study is aimed at demonstrating the potential of magnetic resonance urography for the diagnosis of vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistulas as well as for defining the fistulous tracts. Materials And Methods: Seven female patients clinically diagnosed with vesicovaginal or ureterovaginal fistulas had their medical records, radiological and magnetic resonance images retrospectively reviewed. Magnetic resonance urography included 3D-HASTE sequences with fat saturation. Results: Six patients presented vesicovaginal fistulas and, in one patient, a right-sided ureterovaginal fistula was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance urography allowed the demonstration of the fistulous tract in six (85.7%) of the seven patients evaluated in the present study, without the need of bladder catheterization or contrast injection. Conclusion: This study demonstrates both the potential and applicability of magnetic resonance urography in the evaluation of these types of fistulas. (author)

  10. Structuring Light to Manipulate Multipolar Resonances for Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanya

    Multipolar electromagnetic phenomena in sub-wavelength resonators are at the heart of metamaterial science and technology. Typically, researchers engineer multipolar light-matter interactions by modifying the size, shape, and composition of the resonators. Here, we instead engineer multipolar interactions by modifying properties of the incident radiation. In this dissertation, we propose a new framework for determining the scattering response of resonators based on properties of the local excitation field. First, we derive an analytical theory to determine the scattering response of spherical nanoparticles under any type of illumination. Using this theory, we demonstrate the ability to drastically manipulate the scattering properties of a spherical nanoparticle by varying the illumination and demonstrate excitation of a longitudinal quadrupole mode that cannot be accessed with conventional illumination. Next, we investigate the response of dielectric dimer structures illuminated by cylindrical vector beams. Using finite-difference time-domain simulations, we demonstrate significant modification of the scattering spectra of dimer antennas and reveal how the illumination condition gives rise to these spectra through manipulation of electric and magnetic mode hybridization. Finally, we present a simple and efficient numerical simulation based on local field principles for extracting the multipolar response of any resonator under illumination by structured light. This dissertation enhances the understanding of fundamental light-matter interactions in metamaterials and lays the foundation for researchers to identify, quantify, and manipulate multipolar light-matter interactions through optical beam engineering.

  11. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  12. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently investigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable results. Aim of the work: To ...

  13. Determining the helicity structure of third generation resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefstathiou, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    We examine methods that have been proposed for determining the helicity structure of decays of new resonances to third generation quarks and/or leptons. We present analytical and semi-analytical predictions and assess the applicability of the relevant variables in realistic reconstruction scenarios using Monte Carlo-generated events, including the effects of QCD radiation and multiple parton interactions, combinatoric ambiguities and fast detector simulation. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino, E-mail: marcello@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica; Sa, Jose Luiz de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cecilio Vieira de [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Tomoson, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Engel, Edgard Eduard [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biomecanica, Medicina e Reabilitacao do Aparelho Locomotor

    2010-07-15

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino; Engel, Edgard Eduard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  16. Tunneling and resonant conductance in one-dimensional molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozhushner, M.A.; Posvyanskii, V.S.; Oleynik, I.I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a theory of tunneling and resonant transitions in one-dimensional molecular systems which is based on Green's function theory of electron sub-barrier scattering off the structural units (or functional groups) of a molecular chain. We show that the many-electron effects are of paramount importance in electron transport and they are effectively treated using a formalism of sub-barrier scattering operators. The method which calculates the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule not only predicts the enhancement of the amplitude of tunneling transitions in course of tunneling electron transfer through onedimensional molecular structures but also allows us to interpret conductance mechanisms by calculating the bound energy spectrum of the tunneling electron, the energies being obtained as poles of the total scattering amplitude of the bridge molecule. We found that the resonant tunneling via bound states of the tunneling electron is the major mechanism of electron conductivity in relatively long organic molecules. The sub-barrier scattering technique naturally includes a description of tunneling in applied electric fields which allows us to calculate I-V curves at finite bias. The developed theory is applied to explain experimental findings such as bridge effect due to tunneling through organic molecules, and threshold versus Ohmic behavior of the conductance due to resonant electron transfer

  17. On the quark structure of resonance states in dual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.V.; Zheltukhin, A.A.; Pashnev, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown using as an example the Veneziano dual model, that each particular dual model already contains a certain latent quark structure unambiauously determined by internal properties of the dual model. To prove this degeneration of the resonance state spectrum is studied by introducing an additional disturbing interaction into the model being considered. Induced transitions of particles into a vacuum act as such an additional disturbance. This method complements the known factorization method of Fubini, Gordon and Veneziano and turns out to be free from an essential limitation of the latter connected with implicit assumption about the basence of internal additive laws of conservation in the model. By using the method of induced transitions of particles into a vacuum it has been possible to show that the resonance state spectrum is indeed more degenerated than it should be expected from the factorization theorem, and that the supplementary degeneration corresponds to the quark model with an infinite number of quarks of the increasing mass. Structures of some terms of the dual amplitude expansion over the degrees of the constant of the induced transition of particles to vacuum are considered; it is shown that the summation of this expansion may be reduced to a solution of a certain integral equation. On the basis of the integral equation obtained an integral representation ofr dual amplitudes is established. The problems related with degeneration of resonance states and with determination of additive quantum numbers leading to the quark interpretation of the degeneration being considered are discussed

  18. Resonance analysis and evaluation of the 235U neutron induced cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, L.C.

    1990-06-01

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding,and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the 235 U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Δ 3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high-resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron-nucleus cross sections. The results of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the 235 U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the 235 U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations. 44 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Studies of nucleon resonance structure in exclusive meson electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Bashir, A.; Braun, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the structure of excited baryons are key factors to the N* program at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Within the first year of data taking with the Hall B CLAS12 detector following the 12 GeV upgrade, a dedicated experiment will aim to extract the N* electrocouplings at high photon virtualities Q 2 . This experiment will allow exploration of the structure of N* resonances at the highest photon virtualities ever achieved, with a kinematic reach up to Q 2 = 12 GeV 2 . This high-Q 2 reach will make it possible to probe the excited nucleon structures at distance scales ranging from where effective degrees of freedom, such as constituent quarks, are dominant through the transition to where nearly massless bare-quark degrees of freedom are relevant. In this document, we present a detailed description of the physics that can be addressed through N* structure studies in exclusive meson electroproduction. The discussion includes recent advances in reaction theory for extracting N* electrocouplings from meson electroproduction off protons, along with Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)-based approaches to the theoretical interpretation of these fundamental quantities. This program will afford access to the dynamics of the nonperturbative strong interaction responsible for resonance formation, and will be crucial in understanding the nature of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in baryons, and how excited nucleons emerge from QCD. (author)

  20. Risk evaluation for structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenthal, A.M.; Schueller, G.I.

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles of the risk analysis, which is based on classical statistics is discussed. The significance of the Asymptotic (Extreme Value) distributions as well as the method of basing the level of acceptable risk on economical optimization procedures is pointed out. The application of the risk analysis to special type structures such as fixed offshore platforms, television towers, reactor containments and the reliability of reactor components under creep and fatigue load is elaborated by carrying out numerical examples. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  2. Resonance structure of $\\tau^{-} \\to K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D M; Gronberg, J B; Hill, T S; Lange, D J; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Valant-Spaight, B L; Watburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J; Brandenburg, G; Ershov, A; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kravchenko, I V; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Mahmood, A H; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Menon, N; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Kwon, Y; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Kopp, S E; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Eigen, G; Lipeles, E; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V

    2000-01-01

    Using a sample of 4.7 fb/sup -1/ integrated luminosity accumulated with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) , we investigate the mass spectrum and resonant structure in tau /sup -/ to K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ nu /sub tau / decays. We measure the relative fractions of K/sub 1/(1270) and K/sub 1/(1400) resonances in these decays, as well as the K/sub 1/ masses and widths. Our fitted K/sub 1/ resonances are somewhat broader than previous hadroproduction measurements, and in agreement with recent CERN LEP results from tau decay. The larger central value of our measured width supports models which attribute the small tau /sup -/ to K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ nu /sub tau / branching fraction to larger K/sub 1/ widths than are presently tabulated. We also determine the K/sub a/-K/sub b/ mixing angle theta /sub K/. (22 refs) .

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Oesophageal Motility Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Covotta, Francesco; Piretta, Luca; Badiali, Danilo; Laghi, Andrea; Biondi, Tommaso; Corazziari, Enrico S.; Panebianco, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been recently proposed for the evaluation of the esophagus. Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering...

  4. Evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Mochizuki, Yoshihiko; Iida, Hiroshi; Mori, Hideaki; Sugita, You-ichi; Shimada, Kou-ichirou

    1997-01-01

    Currently, the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating coronary artery disease has been reported. In this study, we have evaluated the usefulness and the problems of MRI for evaluating the patency of coronary artery bypass grafts. Thirty-five patients who received coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were evaluated by using MRI for determining the graft patency compared with conventional coronary angiography. There were 30 men and 5 women. The mean age was 61.2 years (range 45 to 75). The 35 patients had a total of 92 grafts (28 internal thoracic artery, 7 gastroepiploic artery and 57 saphenous vein grafts). Magnetic resonance coronary angiogram (MRCA) was performed with SIGNA HORIZON 1.5 T (GE Inc.) by using 2D-FASTCARD sequence. All patients underwent imaging in the transverse and coronal planes, most had imaging in the sagittal plane, and a few had in the oblique plane. By using MRCA, 82 of 90 grafts were diagnosed correctly as patent, and 1 of 2 grafts were diagnosed correctly as occluded. Thirty-four of 40 LAD grafts (85%), 20 of 22 RCA grafts (91%) and 29 of 30 Cx grafts (97%) were correctly evaluated. The efficacy of MRCA for evaluating the patency of coronary artery bypass grafts was recognized. But the sternal wire (stainless steel) and hemoclip interfere with the interpretation and reduce the sensitivity. Higher sensitivity may be obtained by changing the material of the sternal wires and hemoclips at coronary surgery. (author)

  5. Authentication Sensing System Using Resonance Evaluation Spectroscopy (ASSURES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Lal, Amit K.; Dimas, Dave

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes an ongoing instrument development project to distinguish genuine manufactured components from counterfeit components; we call the instrument ASSURES (Authentication Sensing System Using Resonance Evaluation Spectroscopy). The system combines Laser Doppler Vibrometry with acoustical resonance spectroscopy, augmented with finite element analysis. Vibrational properties of components, such as resonant modes, damping, and spectral frequency response to various forcing functions depend strongly upon the mechanical properties of the material, including its size, shape, internal hardness, tensile strength, alloy/composite compositions, flaws, defects, and other internal material properties. Although acoustic resonant spectroscopy has seen limited application, the information rich signals in the vibrational spectra of objects provide a pathway to many new applications. Components with the same shape but made of different materials, different fatigue histories, damage, tampering, or heat treatment, will respond differently to high frequency stimulation. Laser Doppler Vibrometry offers high sensitivity and frequency bandwidth to measure the component's frequency spectrum, and overcomes many issues that limit conventional acoustical resonance spectroscopy, since the sensor laser beam can be aimed anywhere along the part as well as to multiple locations on a part in a non-contact way. ASSURES is especially promising for use in additive manufacturing technology by providing signatures as digital codes that are unique to specific objects and even to specific locations on objects. We believe that such signatures can be employed to address many important issues in the manufacturing industry. These include insuring the part meets the often very rigid specifications of the customer and being able to detect non-visible internal manufacturing defects or non-visible damage that has occurred after manufacturing.

  6. Structure and direct decay of Giant Monopole Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avez, B.; Simenel, C.

    2013-01-01

    We study structure and direct decay of the Giant Monopole Resonance (GMR) at the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) level using the time-dependent energy density functional method in the linear response regime in a few doubly magic nuclei. A proper treatment of the continuum, through the use of large coordinate space, allows for a separation between the nucleus and its emitted nucleons. The microscopic structure of the GMR is investigated with the decomposition of the strength function into individual single-particle quantum numbers. A similar microscopic decomposition of the spectra of emitted nucleons by direct decay of the GMR is performed. In this harmonic picture of giant resonance, shifting every contribution by the initial single-particle energy allows to reconstruct the GMR strength function. The RPA residual interaction couples bound 1-particle 1-hole states to unbound ones, allowing for the total decay of the GMR. In this article, we then intend to get an understanding of the direct decay mechanism from coherent one-particle-one-hole superpositions, while neglecting more complex configurations. Time-dependent beyond mean-field approaches should be used, in the future, to extend this method. (orig.)

  7. Charge-exchange giant resonances as probes of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2001-09-01

    Giant resonances populated in charge-exchange reactions can reveal detailed information about nuclear structure properties, in spite of their apparent featurelessness. The (p,n) and (n,p) reactions - as well as their analog reactions - proceed via the same nuclear matrix element as beta decay. Thereby, they are useful for probing electroweak properties in nuclei, especially for those not accessible to beta decay. The nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay might be investigated in double charge-exchange reactions. detailed nuclear structure information, such as the presence of ground-state correlations, can be revealed via identification of 'first-forbidden' transitions. In addition, astrophysics aspects and halo properties of nuclei have been investigated in charge exchange. Finally, these experiments have questioned our knowledge of the absolute strength of the strong interaction

  8. Structural and conformational study of polysaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossennec, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    As some natural polysaccharides are involved in important biological processes, the use of nuclear magnetic resonance appears to be an adapted mean to determine their structure-activity relationship and is therefore the object of this research thesis. By using bi-dimensional proton-based NMR techniques, it is possible to identify minority saccharide units, to determine their conformation, and to identify units which they are bound to. The author reports the application of these methods to swine mucosa heparin, and to heparins displaying a high and low anticoagulant activity. The dermatan sulphate has also been studied, and the NMR analysis allowed some polymer structure irregularities to be identified. A molecular modelling of dermatan sulphate has been performed [fr

  9. Finite element analysis for structural modification and control resonance of a vertical pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia M. El-Gazzar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to evaluate and enhance dynamic performance for a vertical pumping unit. The original electric motor of the pump unit had been replaced by another one different in design and weights. Vibration has been increased greatly after installing the new motor. Consequently, it is necessary to estimate the change in the vibration characteristics owing to the difference in the boundary conditions of the new motor. Measured vibration levels and frequency analysis were dangerous at 1× due to resonance problem. Finite Element Analysis was used to model the motor structure in order to find its natural frequencies and mode shapes. The results confirm that the third natural frequency is very close to 1× operating speed with deviation about 1%. To solve the resonance problem, it was recommended to increase the structure stiffness. The results after modifications confirmed that the overall vibration level decreases by 89%. Keywords: Vibration, Vertical pump, Modal analysis

  10. Tunable Fano Resonance in Asymmetric MIM Waveguide Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Zhang, Zhidong; Yan, Shubin

    2017-06-25

    A plasmonic waveguide coupled system that uses a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide with two silver baffles and a coupled ring cavity is proposed in this study. The transmission properties of the plasmonic system were investigated using the finite element method. The simulation results show a Fano profile in the transmission spectrum, which was caused by the interaction of the broadband resonance of the Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity and the narrow band resonance of the ring cavity. The Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity in this case was formed by two silver baffles dividing the MIM waveguide. The maximum sensitivity of 718 nm/RIU and the maximum figure of merit of 4354 were achieved. Furthermore, the effects of the structural parameters of the F-P cavity and the ring cavity on the transmission properties of the plasmonic system were analyzed. The results can provide a guide for designing highly sensitive on-chip sensors based on surface plasmon polaritons.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging identification of muscular and ligamentous structures of the female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Maria Rita Lima; Soares, Adriano Fleury F.; Faintuch, Salomao; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio A.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Girao, Manoel

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency and to assess the interobserver agreement of identification of muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures using magnetic resonance imaging. The method: twenty asymptomatic female volunteers (aged 20-80 years old; mean: 50) were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) examinations of the pelvis. Turbo spin-echo sequences were employed to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images on axial and sagittal planes. Two independent observers evaluated the scans in order to identify the levator ani (coccygeal, pubococcygeal, iliococcygeal and puborectalis muscles), obturatorius internus and urethral sphincter muscles, and the pubovesical and pubourethral ligaments. The frequency and the interobserver agreement of the identification of the anatomical structures were assessed (kappa statistic - κ). The results: the frequency of identification of the structures ranged from 50 to 100%, and was slightly lower for identification of the ligaments. Interobserver agreement was as follows: levator ani and obturatorius internus muscle (κ=1), pubococcygeal (κ=0.62), iliococcygeal (κ=0.86), puborectalis (κ= 0.27), coccygeal (κ=0) and urethral sphincter muscles (κ=1), pubovesical (κ=0.50) and pubourethral (κ=0.58) ligaments. The conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis allowed precise identification of the main muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures in most individuals, whereas interobserver agreement was considered good. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of cruciate ligaments after arthroscopic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kharat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to increase in road traffic and sports injuries, tears of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL of the knee are common. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an important tool of diagnosis and evaluation of these injuries. Methods: We carried out a prospective study on role of MRI on ten patients who had undergone ACL or PCL repair over a period of six months. In this report we present three illustrative cases to capture the spectrum of findings in our series to underline the role of MRI in management of such injuries and discuss the modalities of the procedure. Results: In our series, as demonstrated by the cases, MRI had an important role in diagnosis and evaluation of injuries to the cruciate ligaments. Conclusion: MRI can play an important role, particularly in tertiary centres, in diagnosis and evaluation of reconstructed ACL and PCL ligaments of the knee joint.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of traumatic muscle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Elisa Pompeu; Marchiori, Edson

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated 43 magnetic resonance scans of the leg or thigh of patients suffering from sports trauma. Strains were the most frequent lesions observed. These lesions presented iso- or hypointense signal on T1 and hyperintense signal on T2 images, and were classified according to the intensity of the injury of the fibers into grades 1, 2 and 3. The second most common lesions in these series were contusions that appeared iso- or hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 images. Fibrosis was also observed as low signal lesions on T1 and T2 images. (author)

  14. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging of Arnold-Chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Kimihiro; Suga, Masakazu; Takemoto, Motohisa

    1987-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of the Arnold-Chiari malformation. The patient, a 52-year-old man, complained of dizziness on walking. He initially refused to undergone myelography, but 4 months later, underwent MRI test, which lead to the diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformation (I type). Not all patients with symptoms of Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, syringobulbia and cervical spinal tumor, undergone myelography, which is an invasive technique, therefore MRI should be the first examination for the patients with disorders involving the craniocervical junction.

  15. Hemoglobin structural dynamics as monitored by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the heme group are now understood at a level sufficient to provide a useful monitor of several heme structural features. Some porphyrin vibrational frequencies are sensitive to Fe oxidation state, or π-electron distribution, and give insight into the electronic structure of O 2 , CO and NO hemes. Others are sensitive to Fe spin-state, via the associated geometry variation, and provide an accurate index of the porphyrin core size. When examined during the photolysis of CO-hemoglobin via short laser pulses, these frequencies indicate that conversion from low- to h+gh-spin Fe 11 takes place within 30 ps of photolysis, presumably via intersystem-crossing in the excited state, but that the subsequent relaxation of the Fe atom out of the heme plane takes longer than 20 ns, probably because of restraint by the protein. Axial ligand modes have been identified for several heme derivatives. The Fe-imidazole frequency in deoxyhemoglobin is appreciably lowered in the T quaternary structure, as determined in both static and kinetic experiments, suggesting molecular tension or proximal imidazole H-bond weakening in the T state. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Parkinson's disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedolin, Leonardo; Marchiori, Edson; Rieder, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Parkinson's disease. In the period from October 1999 to October 2002, 42 patients with parkinsonism were investigated using a 1.5 T MR equipment. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 26) and patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome (n = 16). The results were compared with a control group (n = 18). The following variables were evaluated: thickness of the mesencephalon compact pars, hypointense signal in the putamen, degree of brain atrophy, lesions in the mesencephalon, lesions in the white matter, and the presence of lesions in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen. Statistical data analysis was carried out using the SPSS program. Results: The mean age was 58.2 years for the Parkinson's disease and control groups, and 60.5 years for the atypical Parkinsonian syndrome group. Patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes presented decreased thickness of the compact pars and a higher degree of signal hypointensity in the putamen. Cerebral atrophy was more prominent in the patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome. Lesions in mesencephalon and white matter were similar in both groups. The frequency of hyperintense signal in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen was low within the studied population, although that could suggest multiple-system atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the detection of brain morphological changes that may help in the diagnosis of Parkinsonian syndromes. (author)

  17. Evaluation of Blalock-Taussig shunts using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Yoshitomo; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Terai, Masaru; Niwa, Koichirou.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients aged 3 to 18 months (mean 13 months) with a total of five Blalock-Taussig shunts (BT shunts; two were original BT shunts and three were modified BT shunts using GOLASKI grafts) underwent evaluation by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging. There were two cases with pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, one with double outlet right ventricle with pulmonary stenosis and one with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia who underwent bilateral BT shunts. At the time of study, an auscultory shunt murmur was audible in all patients. The magnetic resonance images were obtained with a Picker International Vista MR with a superconducting magnet operating at 0.5 Tesla. A spin echo sequence (echo time 40 msec) was used. All patients were placed within a 30 cm head coil radio antenna and sedated with chloral hydrate or diazepam. Four of 5 shunts were imaged on both coronal sections and sagittal sections during enddiastole. And there was no signal within the grafts. When the velocity of blood flow is beyond the cutoff velocity, the signal intensity of flowing blood is near background level. So we judged these grafts were patient. Our results showed that MRI was a very useful noninvasive method for evaluation of BT shunts. (author)

  18. Evaluation of Blalock-Taussig shunts using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, Yoshitomo; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Terai, Masaru; Niwa, Koichirou.

    1988-10-01

    Four patients aged 3 to 18 months (mean 13 months) with a total of five Blalock-Taussig shunts (BT shunts; two were original BT shunts and three were modified BT shunts using GOLASKI grafts) underwent evaluation by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging. There were two cases with pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, one with double outlet right ventricle with pulmonary stenosis and one with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia who underwent bilateral BT shunts. At the time of study, an auscultory shunt murmur was audible in all patients. The magnetic resonance images were obtained with a Picker International Vista MR with a superconducting magnet operating at 0.5 Tesla. A spin echo sequence (echo time 40 msec) was used. All patients were placed within a 30 cm head coil radio antenna and sedated with chloral hydrate or diazepam. Four of 5 shunts were imaged on both coronal sections and sagittal sections during enddiastole. And there was no signal within the grafts. When the velocity of blood flow is beyond the cutoff velocity, the signal intensity of flowing blood is near background level. So we judged these grafts were patient. Our results showed that MRI was a very useful noninvasive method for evaluation of BT shunts.

  19. Evaluation of dampers using a resonance adhesion tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Koláček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the diagnostics of dampers using resonant adhesion tester. This kind of test is non-invasive and evaluation is based on the EUSAMA methodology. The main goals of this method were to practically measure and evaluate technical condition of the shock absorbers. However, this method does not measure only damper properties, but the whole axle, too. During measurements, one must take into account the fact that the results can be easily influenced by external factors. These include e.g. wrong tire pressure, different kind of shock absorbers, and tires. The actual testing revealed that the measurement results are also influenced by bad condition of the vehicle axles. If we eliminate all these draw-backs, dampers testing can be very accurate.

  20. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan; Pretell-Mazzini, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  1. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan [Infanta Leonor University Hospital, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Madrid (Spain); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellow, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  2. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  3. Nanomechanical resonant structures in single-crystal diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Burek, Michael J.; Ramos, Daniel; Patel, Parth; Frank, Ian W.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    With its host of outstanding material properties, single-crystal diamond is an attractive material for nanomechanical systems. Here, the mechanical resonance characteristics of freestanding, single-crystal diamond nanobeams fabricated by an angled-etching methodology are reported. Resonance frequencies displayed evidence of significant compressive stress in doubly clamped diamond nanobeams, while cantilever resonance modes followed the expected inverse-length-squared trend. Q-factors on the o...

  4. Evaluation of human thyroid tumors by proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deCertaines, J.; Herry, J.Y.; Lancien, G.; Benoist, L.; Bernard, A.M.; LeClech, G.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used in a study of 40 patients with thyroid tumors following partial or total thyroidectomy. Three patient groups were considered: those with nodules showing increased uptake, those with solitary nodules with decreased uptake, and those with multinodular goiters. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T 1 and T 2 ) were measured on samples of nodular and extranodular tissue from each patient. Increased T 1 and T 2 were observed for benign cold nodules, an increase in T 1 alone for nodules with increased uptake, and a wide fluctuation in T 1 and T 2 for multinodular goiters. The four cancers in the series did not show a distinctive proton NMR pattern in comparison with the other nodular structures studied. The results point to the feasibility of applying NMR techniques to the detection of thyroid disease

  5. Multiple Fano-Like MIM Plasmonic Structure Based on Triangular Resonator for Refractive Index Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Jankovic, Nikolina; Cselyuszka, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Fano metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure based on an isosceles triangular cavity resonator for refractive index sensing applications. Due to the specific feeding scheme and asymmetry introduced in the triangular cavity, the resonator exhibits four sharp Fano-like resonances. The behavior of the structure is analyzed in detail and its sensing capabilities demonstrated through the responses for various refractive indices. The results show that the sensor has very g...

  6. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  7. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2011-01-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.S.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Kaufman, B.; Benson, J.E.; Alfidi, R.J.; Clampitt, M.; Van Dyke, C.; Huss, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brainstem region from 100 normal or asymptomatic individuals were reviewed in addition to those of 17 patients with intra-axial brainstem lesions and 15 patients with extra-axial masses around the brainstem. MR was able to demonstrate consistently the normal anatomy of the brainstem and adjacent cisterns, though the distinction between gray and white matter was seldom possible with the present technology. Masses in and around the brainstem were all accurately identified on MR and its sensitivity was superior to that of x-ray computed tomography (CT). These study results show that despite its technical limitations, MR is presently the examination of choice for the evaluation of brainstem abnormalities and eventually it will undoubtedly replace metrizamide CT cisternography

  9. Atherosclerosis of the carotid artery: evaluation by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, K S; Yuan, C; Tsuruda, J S; Ferguson, M S; Wen, N; Subramaniam, D S; Strandness, D E

    1996-01-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques (APs) can lead to brain ischemia, an event shown to correlate with both the degree of stenosis and the composition of the AP. Currently, accurate estimates of stenosis can be obtained by either x-ray angiography or three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Our purpose was to determine whether three-dimensional TOF MRA images could also provide information on plaque location, morphology, and composition. Seven pre-endarterectomy patients underwent three-dimensional TOF MRA. After endarterectomy, plaque histology was evaluated. Three-dimensional TOF MRA images contained sufficient soft tissue contrast to differentiate the plaques from the surrounding tissues in all cases. Estimation of plaque morphology had 80% correlation with histology. Finally, intraplaque hemorrhage and calcification were deplicted as regions of moderately high and very low intensity, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that three-dimensional TOF MRA may be useful in studying the development and progression of carotid atherosclerosis.

  10. Examination of total cross section resonance structure of niobium and silicon in neutron transmission experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, Olga; Lomakov, Gleb; Manturov, Gennady

    2017-09-01

    The neutron transmission experiments are one of the main sources of information about the neutron cross section resonance structure and effect in the self-shielding. Such kind of data for niobium and silicon nuclides in energy range 7 keV to 3 MeV can be obtained from low-resolution transmission measurements performed earlier in Russia (with samples of 0.027 to 0.871 atom/barn for niobium and 0.076 to 1.803 atom/barn for silicon). A significant calculation-to-experiment discrepancy in energy range 100 to 600 keV and 300 to 800 keV for niobium and silicon, respectively, obtained using the evaluated nuclear data library ROSFOND, were found. The EVPAR code was used for estimation the average resonance parameters in energy range 7 to 600 keV for niobium. For silicon a stochastic optimization method was used to modify the resolved resonance parameters in energy range 300 to 800 keV. The improved ROSFOND evaluated nuclear data files were tested in calculation of ICSBEP integral benchmark experiments.

  11. Morphological evaluation of complex congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Osahiro

    1993-01-01

    Ninety infants and children with complex congenital heart disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and the accuracy of morphological diagnoses by MRI was tested by comparison to the final diagnoses primarily based on angiocardiography. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI diagnoses were generally excellent in evaluating vena caval and atrial morphology, type of AV connection, ventricular morphology, type of VA connection and great vessel morphology. Although some difficulty with evaluating the detailed anatomy of the AV valve and its suspension system and fine vascular structures, MRI could demonstrate the entire cardiac structures clearly and provide the 3-dimensional information regarding the intracardiac structures, and it was extremely valuable in morphological assessment of complex congenital heart disease. (author)

  12. Structural building screening and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawandy, Alex; Nakazawa, Shoji; Hendry, Andy; Ridwan, Firdaus, Rahmatul

    2017-10-01

    An earthquake is a disaster that can be harmful to the community, such as financial loss and also dead injuries. Pekanbaru is a city that located in the middle of Sumatera Island. Even though the city of Pekanbaru is a city that rarely occurs earthquake, but Pekanbaru has ever felt the impact of the big earthquake that occurred in West Sumatera on September 2009. As we know, Indonesia located between Eurasia plate, Pacific plate, and Indo-Australian plate. Particularly the Sumatera Island, It has the Semangko fault or the great Sumatra fault along the island from north to south due to the shift of Eurasia and Indo-Australian Plates. An earthquake is not killing people but the building around the people that could be killing them. The failure of the building can be early prevented by doing an evaluation. In this research, the methods of evaluation have used a guideline for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-154 and Applied Technology Council (ATC) 40. FEMA P-154 is a rapid visual screening of buildings for potential seismic hazards and ATC-40 is seismic evaluation and retrofit of Concrete Buildings. ATC-40 is a more complex evaluation rather than FEMA P-154. The samples to be evaluated are taken in the surroundings of Universitas Riau facility in Pekanbaru. There are four buildings as case study such as the rent student building, the building of mathematics and natural science faculty, the building teacher training and education faculty and the buildings in the faculty of Social political sciences. Vulnerability for every building facing an earthquake is different, this is depending on structural and non-structural components of the building. Among all of the samples, only the building of mathematics and the natural science faculty is in critical condition according to the FEMA P-154 evaluation. Furthermore, the results of evaluation using ATC-40 for the teacher training building are in damage control conditions, despite the other three buildings are

  13. Structure of bending resonances frequencies in supercritical rotors of gaseous centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronov, I.N.; Grigor'ev, G.Yu.; Vyazovetskij, Yu.V.; Senchenkov, A.P.; Senchenkov, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The position and the structure bending resonances for the model supercritical rotors with different construction of the tube are measured. Considerable complication of the resonance system for the tubes with nonuniform properties was established. The effect of the structure of the resonance on the complication of its realization and the ways of optimization of the rotor resonance system is discussed. Made measuring point to possibility for creation highly productive centrifuges relating to supercritical rotors with uniform concrete size carbon composite tube and structure of winding, working after the third bending resonance. The frequency of the fifth resonance falls in the zone of the performance frequency on the rotors with bellows crimps. Carbon composite tubes with the areas of raised flexibility is provided with greater in several times decrement [ru

  14. Evaluation of acoustic resonance at branch section in main steam line. Part 1. Effects of steam wetness on acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Morita, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    The power uprating of the nuclear power plant (NPP) is conducted in United States, EU countries and so on, and also is planned in Japan. However, the degradation phenomena such as flow-induced vibration and wall thinning may increase or expose in the power uprate condition. In U.S. NPP, the dryer had been damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration under a 17% extended power uprating (EPU) condition. This is caused by acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSL). Increased velocity by uprating excites the pressure fluctuations and makes large amplitude resonance. To evaluate the acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of SRVs in actual BWR, it is necessary to clarify the acoustic characteristics in steam flow. Although there are several previous studies about acoustic resonance, most of them are not steam flow but air flow. Therefore in this study, to investigate the acoustic characteristics in steam flow, we conducted steam flow experiments in each dry and wet steam conditions, and also nearly saturated condition. We measured pressure fluctuation at the top of the single stub pipe and in main steam piping. As a result, acoustic resonance in dry steam flow could be evaluated as same as that in air flow. It is clarified that resonance amplitude of fluctuating pressure at the top of the stub pipe in wet steam was reduced to one-tenth compared with that in dry. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimura, Hiroshi; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kasamo, Shizuya; Asakura, Tetsuhiko

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with medulloblastomas were evaluated with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and the results were compared with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT). On CT, medulloblastomas generally appeared as isodense or hyperdense masses and were enhanced uniformly with a contrast agent. On MRI, medulloblastomas appeared as low-intensity masses in T 1 -weighted images and as high-intensity masses in T 2 -weighted images. Moreover, the tumors were clearly differentiated from the surrounding tissue. In sagittal images, we could easily recognize the relation between the brainstem or the fourth ventiricle and the tumors. In spite of these merits, though, on MRI we could not detect the boundary between the tumors and the perifocal edema. In this point, we had to be dependent on CT. In one case, we could measure the T 1 value and the T 2 value both before and after irradiation. The T 2 value was markedly decreased after irradiation. Henceforth, the T 1 and T 2 values can be used to evaluate the effects of irradiation. Medulloblastomas are often disseminated through cerebrospinal fluid. We could detect this type of metastasis by means of the sagittal image on MRI. As has been mentioned above, MRI is very useful in diagnosing medulloblastomas and for the post-operative follow-up those tumors. (author)

  16. Bandgap properties in locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structures with periodically attached spring–mass resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Denghui, E-mail: qdhsd318@163.com; Shi, Zhiyu, E-mail: zyshi@nuaa.edu.cn

    2016-10-07

    Bandgap properties of the locally resonant phononic crystal double panel structure made of a two-dimensional periodic array of a spring–mass resonator surrounded by n springs (n equals to zero at the beginning of the study) connected between the upper and lower plates are investigated in this paper. The finite element method is applied to calculate the band structure, of which the accuracy is confirmed in comparison with the one calculated by the extended plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the transmission spectrum. Numerical results and further analysis demonstrate that two bands corresponding to the antisymmetric vibration mode open a wide band gap but is cut narrower by a band corresponding to the symmetric mode. One of the regulation rules shows that the lowest frequency on the symmetric mode band is proportional to the spring stiffness. Then, a new design idea of adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell (n is not equal to zero now) is proposed in the need of widening the bandwidth and lowering the starting frequency. Results show that the bandwidth of the band gap increases from 50 Hz to nearly 200 Hz. By introducing the quality factor, the regulation rules with the comprehensive consideration of the whole structure quality limitation, the wide band gap and the low starting frequency are also discussed. - Highlights: • The locally resonant double panel structure opens a band gap in the low frequency region. • The band gap is the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric vibration modes. • The band structure of the double panel is the evolution of that of the single plate. • By adding springs around the resonator in a unit cell, the bandwidth gets wider. • The band gap can be controlled by tuning the parameters.

  17. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-07-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar16+. (orig.)

  18. Modified multipole structure for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suominen, P.

    2006-01-01

    Highly-charged heavy-ion beams are usually produced with Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) where the microwave heated plasma is confined in a strong magnetic field. The magnetic field is divided into an axial part (produced by solenoid magnets) and to a radial part (produced by multipole magnet). Experiments have shown that the radial magnetic field component plays a crucial role in the production of highly-charged ions. However, in several modern ECRIS the radial magnetic field strength is below the optimum value, mainly due to the limits in permanent magnet technology. Unfortunately, methods to increase the radial magnetic field strength while still using permanent magnets are often limited. In this thesis work new techniques to improve the radial magnetic field have been studied by simulations and experiments. Due to the computer simulations performed a remarkable radial magnetic field improvement was reached with a relatively simple and cost-effective idea called the Modified MultiPole Structure (MMPS). The MMPS differs strongly from former studies as here the magnetic field is increased only locally without affecting the plasma size. It was not known how this would affect the properties of the plasma and production of highly-charged heavy ions. Consequently, the idea had to be studied experimentally and a new MMPS plasma chamber prototype was designed and constructed for the JYFL 6.4 GHz ECRIS. The new construction is versatile and made it possible to perform several new types of measurements. These showed that the MMPS works well and is especially applicable to increase very high charge-state ion production. Typically the ion current increases by a factor of 2 - 3 in the case of highly charged ions such as Ar 16+ . (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance cisternography for preoperative evaluation of arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awaji, M. [Niigata University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Niigata University, Center for Integrated Human Brain Science, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan); Nishiyama, K. [Niigata University, Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    With a high likelihood of clinical improvement and low rates of complications, minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery is becoming the treatment of choice for symptomatic or growing arachnoid cysts. In neuroendoscopic surgery, visualization of anatomical landmarks is essential in achieving successful fenestration without complications. Because of the restricted visual field in neuroendoscopic surgery, preoperative anatomical assessment is very helpful. Magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) with high spatial resolution and contrast, using for example 3-D Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (CISS) or fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences, is able to detect the arachnoid cyst wall and neighboring anatomical structures as the anatomical landmarks. We retrospectively reviewed T2-weighted (T2-W) fast spin-echo images, and the MRC and intraoperative findings. Axial and coronal T2-W images (6 and 3 mm thickness, respectively) and axial and coronal 0.8 mm thick MRC images with CISS or FIESTA were obtained from four patients with arachnoid cysts treated by neuroendoscopic surgery. Intraoperative findings were reviewed on videotape recorded during the procedures. At the brain surface, the arachnoid cyst wall could be detected clearly in any of the four patients on MRC images, and was only partly seen in the fourth patient T2-W images. Adjacent important anatomical structures including vessels and cranial nerves, and an enough space for cystocisternostomy were identified on MRC images, and the findings were consistent with the findings during neuroendoscopic surgery. Preoperative identification of the arachnoid cyst wall and surrounding anatomical structures by MRC may help avoid complications and allow safer neuroendoscopic surgery. (orig.)

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure investigations on crosslinked polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobelny, J.

    1999-01-01

    Styrene-crosslinked mixed polyesters derived from maleic anhydride, 2,2-di(4-hydroxypropoxyphenyl)propane, oligo(propylene oxide) and 1,2-propylene glycol were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The structural modifications accompanying crosslinking were characterized in terms of spin-lattice relaxation times as a function of unsaturated polyester composition. Copolymerization and crosslinking effects were individually evaluated and the latter effect was related to variations in crosslinking density associated with the chemical structure of the unsaturated prepolymer. As the crosslinking effect is suppressed, the mechanical properties undergo expected changes, e.g., impact strength is increased and modulus of elasticity in tension is decreased. (author)

  2. Acromioclavicular dislocation: postoperative evaluation of the coracoclavicular ligaments using magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Salomon Silva Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To radiologically evaluate the healing of the coracoclavicular ligaments after surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation.METHODS: Ten patients who had undergone surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation via a posterosuperior route at least one year earlier were invited to return for radiological assessment using magnetic resonance. This evaluation was done by means of analogy with the scale described in the literature for studying the healing of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and for measuring the healed coracoclavicular ligaments.RESULTS: A scar structure of fibrous appearance had formed in 100% of the cases. In 50% of the cases, the images of this structure had a good appearance, while the other 50% were deficient.CONCLUSION: Late postoperative evaluation using magnetic resonance, on patients who had been treated for acute acromioclavicular dislocation using a posterosuperior route in the shoulder, showed that the coracoclavicular ligaments had healed in 100% of the cases, but that this healing was deficient in 50%.

  3. Structural Evaluation Procedures for Heavy Wood Truss Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Issa, Mohsen

    1998-01-01

    .... An evaluation procedure for wood structures differs from conventional methods used in steel, concrete, and masonry structures because, in wood construction, the allowable stresses used in design...

  4. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Jeremy K; Astur, Nelson; Scott, Stephanie; Kelly, Derek M; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Warner, William C

    2015-01-01

    In early studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had low sensitivity and positive predictive value in the evaluation of the pars interarticularis pathology; however, more recent reports have suggested an expanded role for MRI. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of MRI in the diagnosis of pars injuries and compare it to computed tomography (CT), which was used as the reference "gold standard" for the detection of fractures. The radiographic and clinic data of 93 adolescents and young adults with a presumptive diagnosis of spondylolysis based upon history and clinic examination were reviewed. Only 26 patients who had MRI and CT images obtained within 30 days of each other were included. All images were reviewed by a fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist and fellowship-trained pediatric orthopaedist. Overall, 39 individual pars lesions (stress reaction or fracture) were identified. MRI was effective in identifying 36 pars lesions. MRI identified 11 lesions in 9 patients with negative CT. Seven of these lesions were stress reactions (grade 1), whereas 4 were frank fractures. Three pars injuries were noted on CT while the MRI was negative. MRI is an effective method (92% sensitivity) for detecting pars injuries. It can detect stress reactions when a fracture is not visible on CT scan, allowing early treatment of these prelysis lesions. The 92% sensitivity of MRI is comparable with that of other diagnostic modalities such as bone scan, with the advantage of no radiation exposure. MRI should be strongly considered as the advanced imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected spondylolysis. Level III-diagnostic study.

  5. Nondestructive evaluation of warm mix asphalt through resonant column testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Non-destructive testing has been used for decades to characterize engineering properties of hot-mix asphalt. Among such tests is the resonant column (RC) test, which is commonly used to characterize soil materials. The resonant column device at Penn ...

  6. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  7. Magnetic structure and resonance properties of hexagonal antidot lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, A.I.; Krivoruchko, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Static and resonance properties of ferromagnetic films with an antidot lattice (pores in the film) are studied. The description of the system is based on micromagnetic modeling and analytical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The dependences of ferromagnetic resonance spectra on the in-plane direction of applied magnetic field and on the lattice parameters are investigated. The dependences of a dynamic system response on frequency at fixed magnetic field and on field at fixed frequency, when the field changes cause the static magnetic order to change are explored. It is found that the specific peculiarities of the system dynamics leave unchange for both of these experimental conditions. Namely, for low damping the resonance spectra contain three quasi-homogeneous modes which are due to the resonance of different regions (domains) of the antidot lattice cell. It is shown the angular field dependences of each mode are characterized by a twofold symmetry and the related easy axes are mutually rotated by 60 degrees. As the result, a hexagonal symmetry of the system static and dynamic magnetic characteristics is realized. The existence in the resonance spectrum of several quasi-homogeneous modes related to different regions of the unit cell could be fundamental for working elements of magnonic devices.

  8. Suspected invasive placenta: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bour, Laurence; Place, Vinciane; Bendavid, Sandra; Fargeaudou, Yann; Portal, Jean-Jacques; Ricbourg, Aude; Sebbag, Delphine; Dohan, Anthony; Soyer, Philippe; Vicaut, Eric

    2014-01-01

    To determine the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing invasive placenta (IP). MRI findings in 32 women with suspected IP were evaluated independently by four readers. Interobserver agreement was calculated with kappa (κ) statistics. Associations between MRI findings and IP were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of IP were estimated. Sixteen women (16/32; 50 %) had confirmed IP. Interobserver correlation for the diagnosis of IP was fair (κ = 0.40). Univariate analysis revealed that thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface (P < 0.0001) was the most discriminating MRI variable in the differentiation between normal and IP. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for the diagnosis of IP were 84 % [95 % CI: 75-94 %] and 80 % [95 % CI: 66-93 %], respectively. Thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface was the most accurate finding (88 %) in the diagnosis of IP. Multivariate analysis revealed that thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface was the single independent predictor of IP (P = 0.0006; OR = 64.99). MR imaging has 84 % sensitivity [95 % CI: 75-94 %] and 80 % specificity [95 % CI: 66-93 %] for the diagnosis of IP. Thinning or focal defect of the uteroplacental interface is the most discriminating independent MR variable in differentiating between normal placenta and IP. (orig.)

  9. Usefulness of magnetic resonance in the evaluation of perianal fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, M.; Isusi, M.; Oleaga, L.; Grande, D.; Fernandez, G.; Tardaguila, F.

    2003-01-01

    Our aim was to confirm the usefulness of magnetic resonance in the evaluation of perianal fistulas, and in conjunction with a thought anatomical review of affected areas. This would allow for the building of a proper surgical plan, which would necessarily differ according to the fistula's complexity. We studied 75 patients with perianal fistulas and performed 81 MR studies by means of axial, sagittal and coronal T1 and T2 sequences. Fistula type, degree, etiology and correlation to surgical findings were all studied. Fifty-five patients underwent surgical treatment, and 26 underwent a more conservative treatment with MR follow-up. Ninety-nine fistulas were observed and classified according to norms set down by St. James University Hospital. Of the 55 cases submitted to surgery, 46 showed concordance between the surgical report and MR, whose sensitivity was 84%. In 9 patients, there was no correlation. In the study of perianal fistulas, it is important to establish both the fistulous tract and relationship to the sphincter complex. MR permits an identification of the sprinter complex and a more precise anatomical localization of the fistulous trajectory. It is also capable of differentiating between fibrosis and abscess. Therefore, MR is an appropriate technique for the study of perianal fistulas and related surgical planning. (Author) 6 refs

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation of diastolic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, F.; Reiser, M.F.; Theisen, D.; Schwab, F.; Beckmann, B.M.; Schuessler, F.; Kaeaeb, S.; Zinsser, D.; Goelz, T.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has a prevalence of approximately 0.2% and is clinically asymptomatic in many patients or presents with unspecific symptoms. This explains the importance of imaging for the diagnosis of HCM as well as for the assessment of the clinical course. The definitive finding in HCM is myocardial hypertrophy with thickening of the ventricular wall ≥ 15 mm. While echocardiography is an excellent screening tool magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a comprehensive analysis of the heart in HCM. This includes a detailed analysis of the distribution and extent of myocardial hypertrophy, a thorough evaluation of systolic and diastolic cardiac function, the assessment of the presence and extent of dynamic outflow tract obstruction as well as the description of the systolic anterior motion (SAM) phenomenon of the mitral valve with secondary mitral insufficiency. When contrast material is administered, additional information about myocardial perfusion as well as the presence and extent of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. This study compared systolic functional parameters as well as end systolic and end diastolic wall thickness of patients with and without diastolic dysfunction. (orig.) [de

  11. Evaluation of mitral regurgitation by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Kishi, Naohiro; Kumai, Toshihiko

    1993-01-01

    Valvular regurgitation can be detected as a region of signal loss ('flow void') by cardiac cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cine MR images of 36 patients with mitral regurgitation caused by mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and non-MVP were evaluated and compared with color Doppler flow images. The direction, distance, area and timing of flow void were detected in all patients in several different planes at mitral level with a 0.5 Tesla superconducting magnet by an ECG-gated fast field echo technique. In 23 of the 36 patients contiguous multiple transaxial images were also obtained to calculate the volumes of flow void and the left atrium. The direction of flow void tended to deviate to the opposite side within the left atrium in MVP. The frame showing maximal area of flow void was demonstrated in mid-systole in 24 of the 36 patients (67%). The distance, area and volume of flow void were concordant with the grade from color Doppler flow images. The volumes of flow void and the left atrium correlated (n=19, r=0.74, p<0.05) in MVP. In conclusion, cine MR images in several different planes or contiguous multiple slices are useful in determining spatial orientation and the extent and timing of mitral regurgitation noninvasively. Furthermore, calculation of the volume of flow void enables the assessment of the semiquantitation of mitral regurgitation. (author)

  12. Rapid Evaluation of Platelet Function With T2 Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuker, Adam; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Marturano, Joseph E.; Massefski, Walter; Lowery, Thomas J.; Lambert, Michele P.; Abrams, Charles S.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical diagnosis of qualitative platelet disorders (QPDs) based on light transmission aggregometry (LTA) requires significant blood volume, time, and expertise, all of which can be barriers to utilization in some populations and settings. Our objective was to develop a more rapid assay of platelet function by measuring platelet-mediated clot contraction in small volumes (35 µL) of whole blood using T2 magnetic resonance (T2MR). Methods: We established normal ranges for platelet-mediated clot contraction using T2MR, used these ranges to study patients with known platelet dysfunction, and then evaluated agreement between T2MR and LTA with arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor activator peptide. Results: Blood from 21 healthy donors was studied. T2MR showed 100% agreement with LTA with each of the four agonists and their cognate inhibitors tested. T2MR successfully detected abnormalities in each of seven patients with known QPDs, with the exception of one patient with a novel mutation leading to Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. T2MR appeared to detect platelet function at similar or lower platelet counts than LTA. Conclusions: T2MR may provide a clinically useful approach to diagnose QPDs using small volumes of whole blood, while also providing new insight into platelet biology not evident using plasma-based platelet aggregation tests. PMID:28028118

  13. Silicon coupled-ring resonator structures for slow light applications: potential, impairments and ultimate limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canciamilla, A; Torregiani, M; Ferrari, C; Morichetti, F; Melloni, A; De La Rue, R M; Samarelli, A; Sorel, M

    2010-01-01

    Coupled-ring resonator-based slow light structures are reported and discussed. By combining the advantages of high index contrast silicon-on-insulator technology with an efficient thermo-optical activation, they provide an on-chip solution with a bandwidth of up to 100 GHz and a slowdown factor of up to 16, as well as a continuous reconfiguration scheme and a fine tunability. The performance of these devices is investigated in detail for both static and dynamic operation, in order to evaluate their potential in optical signal processing applications at high bit rate. The main impairments imposed by fabrication imperfections are also discussed in relation to the slowdown factor. In particular, the analysis of the impact of backscatter, disorder and two-photon absorption on the device transfer function reveals the ultimate limits of these structures and provides valuable design rules for their optimization

  14. Dual resonant structure for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a design with dual resonant structure which can harvest energy from random vibration sources at low frequency range. The dual resonant structure consists of two spring-mass subsystems with different frequency responses, which exhibit strong coupling and broad bandwidth when the two masses collide with each other. Experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure can generate higher power output than the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources.

  15. Resonant Tunnelling in Barrier-in-Well and Well-in-Well Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang-Hong, Yao; Zhang-Yan; Wei-Wu, Li; Yong-Chun, Shu; Zhan-Guo, Wang; Jing-Jun, Xu; Guo-Zhi, Jia

    2008-01-01

    A Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for a barrier in a quantum well and a quantum well in another well structure by the transfer matrix technique. Effect of structure parameters on the transmission probabilities is investigated in detail. The results suggest that symmetry plays an important role in the coupling effect between the quantum wells. The relationship between the width of the inner well and the resonant energy levels in well-in-well structures is also studied. It is found that the ground state energy and the second resonant energy decrease with increasing width of the inner well, while the first resonant energy remains constant

  16. Resonant Quasi-Optical Systems with Multi-Row Periodic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksandr, Rybalko; Rybalko, Yu A.; Buriak, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Selective properties of resonant quasi-optical systems with periodical multi-row structures in millimeter wavelength range are described. The possibility of selection fluctuations in the volume of open resonator using double-row periodic elements was shown in the experiment at 70-80 GHz. Advantages...... and possibility of control the energy characteristics of such structures are also described. The obtained experimental data is used to confirm the results of computational analysis previously described in the literature. Implementation of resonant quasi-optical systems with multi-row periodic structures...

  17. Enhanced Faraday rotation in one dimensional magneto-plasmonic structure due to Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S.; Hamidi, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Enhanced Faraday rotation in a new type of magneto-plasmonic structure with the capability of Fano resonance, has been reported theoretically. A magneto-plasmonic structure composed of a gold corrugated layer deposited on a magneto-optically active layer was studied by means of Lumerical software based on finite-difference time-domain. In our proposed structure, plasmonic Fano resonance and localized surface plasmon have induced enhancement in magneto-optical Faraday rotation. It is shown that the influence of geometrical parameters in gold layer offers a desirable platform for engineering spectral position of Fano resonance and enhancement of Faraday rotation.

  18. Survey of structures revealed in nucleon-nucleon scattering experiments and dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, K.; Yokosawa, A.

    1979-01-01

    Structures appearing in various experimental data (particularly those with polarized beams) in nucleon-nucleon systems are reviewed. Evidence is presented for the existence of dibaryon resonances with an emphasis on a diproton resonance in 3 F 3 (J/sup P/ = 3 - ) state. 38 references

  19. Evaluation of pituitary lesions on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Sakamoto, Tatsuo; Sekino, Hiroaki; Inada, Yoichi; Ishikawa, Toru; Sato, Mitsuya

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of seventeen patients with pituitary adenomas (10 cases of prolactin secreting ; 2, growth hormone secreting and 5, non-functioning adenomas) and three patients with pituitary enlargement due to hypothyroidism. The volume of the functional adenomas or the enlarged pituitary glands correlated by MRI correlated with the level of serum pituitary hormone. We evaluated the points of differences on the T 1 weighted images of MRI between microadenomas and pituitary enlargements. The microadenomas appeared as the enlarged pituitary gland with isointensity area, but following administration of Gd-DTPA, the adenomas were recognized as a low intensity area (mass) with in an enhanced high intensity area of the normal gland with a shift of the pituitary stalk. On the other hand, the pituitary enlargements appeared as a large iso intensity area on T 1 weighted images, and were homogeneously enhanced as a high intensity area after Gd-DTPA administration, but without a shift of the pituitary stalk. Signal intensity ratios (SIR) and contrast enhancement ratios (CER) of all cases with pituitary adenomas were calculated using MRI. Differences in SIR and CER could not be demonstrated among the hormone-secreting adenomas. Thus, it is difficult to differentiate the various types of adenomas by using the differences in SIR or CER, since there are many, interfering factors, including hemorrhage, cyst, and necrosis. Postoperative permanent diabetes insipidus (DI) appeared in the cases that had no visualization of posterior high signal intensity area and a tumoral mass effect on the hypothalamus on preoperative MRI. The reason for postoperative permanent DI is thought to be the result of a disturbance of blood circulation in the pituitary gland due to a mass effect and surgical burden to the proximal pituitary stalk or the hypothalamus. (author)

  20. Quantitative magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of intracranial tuberculomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudev, M.K.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Srikanth, S.G.; Nagarajan, K.; Mohanty, A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intracranial tuberculomas using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques such as T2 relaxometry, magnetization transfer (MT), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Material and Methods: Thirty-three patients with intracranial tuberculomas (histologically confirmed in 22) were evaluated using proton density/T2-weighted, T1-weighted (with and without MT), and echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging sequences. T2 relaxation times, MT ratios (MTR), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated from the center of the lesion, the periphery, perilesional edema, and contralateral normal white matter. The mean and standard deviation values of each variable were calculated and correlated using Pearson's test (P = 0.05). Results: The measured mean values of T2 relaxation time, MTR, and ADC in the center of lesions were 155.5 ms, 14.1, and 1.27x10-3 mm 2 /s, respectively, compared to 117 ms, 23.72, and 0.74x10-3 mm 2 /s in normal white matter, and a T2 relaxation time of 187.45 ms in normal gray matter. Significant inverse correlations were noted between T2 relaxation values and MTR (P<0.001) and between MTR and ADC (P = 0.046). Significant positive correlation was seen between T2 relaxation and ADC values (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Intracranial tuberculomas are characterized by relatively short T2 relaxation times (compared to normal gray matter), decreased MTR, and mostly no restriction of diffusion. A combination of these quantitative parameters could be of help in the noninvasive diagnosis of tuberculomas

  1. Structure of the giant dipole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme is devised to study the giant resonance in the heavy magic nucleus 208 Pb. The effect of the 4 + and 5 - collective excitations of the nucleus core is demonstrated. The calculated cross section is compared with the experimental data. (author)

  2. Hydrodynamic loading and viscous damping of patterned perforations on microfabricated resonant structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kidong; Shim, Jeong; Solovyeva, Vita

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hydrodynamic loading of vertically resonating microfabricated plates immersed in liquids with different viscosities. The planar structures were patterned with focused ion beam, perforating various shapes with identical area but varying perimeters. The hydrodynamic loading of various...

  3. Layered Graph Drawing for Visualizing Evaluation Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Yosuke; Kukimoto, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Naohisa; Misue, Kazuo; Koyamada, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An evaluation structure is a hierarchical structure of human cognition extracted from interviews based on the evaluation grid method. An evaluation structure can be defined as a directed acyclic graph (DAG). The authors propose a layer-assignment method that is part of the Sugiyama framework, a popular method for drawing DAGs, to satisfy the requirements for drawing evaluation structures. Their evaluations demonstrate that the layered graph drawing produced by the proposed layer-assignment method is preferred by users and aids in the understanding of evaluation structures.

  4. Theoretical study of platonic crystals with periodically structured N-beam resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Penglin; Climente, Alfonso; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Wu, Linzhi

    2018-03-01

    A multiple scattering theory is applied to study the properties of flexural waves propagating in a plate with periodically structured N-beam resonators. Each resonator consists of a circular hole containing an inner disk connected to background plate with N rectangular beams. The Bloch theorem is employed to obtain the band structure of a two-dimensional lattice containing a single resonator per unit cell. Also, a numerical algorithm has been developed to get the transmittance through resonator slabs infinitely long in the direction perpendicular to the incident wave. For the numerical validation, a square lattice of 2-beam resonators has been comprehensively analyzed. Its band structure exhibits several flat bands, indicating the existence of local resonances embedded in the structure. Particularly, the one featured as the fundamental mode of the inner disk opens a bandgap at low frequencies. This mode has been fully described in terms of a simple spring-mass model. As a practical application of the results obtained, a homogenization approach has been employed to design a focusing lens for flexural waves, where the index gradient is obtained by adjusting the orientation of the resonators beams. Numerical experiments performed within the framework of a three-dimensional finite element method have been employed to discuss the accuracy of the models described here.

  5. Analysis of Ultrasonic Resonance Signal in Multi-Layered Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dong Ryun

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing are far superior to other nondestructive tests for detecting the disbond interface which occurred in adhesive interface. However, a solid rocket motor consisting of a steel case, rubber insulation, liner, and propellant poses many difficulties for analyzing ultrasonic waves because of the superposition of reflected waves and large differences in acoustic impedance of various materials. Therefore, ultrasonic tests for detecting the disbond interface in solid rocket motor have been applied in very limited areas between the steel case and rubber insulation using an automatic C-scan system. The existing ultrasonic test cannot detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant of a solid rocket motor because most of the ultrasonic waves are absorbed in the rubber material which has low acoustic impedance. This problem could be overcome by analyzing the resonance frequency from the frequency spectrum using the ultrasonic resonance method. In this paper, a new technique to detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant using ultrasonic resonance characteristics is discussed in detail.

  6. Analysis of Ultrasonic Resonance Signal in Multi-Layered Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Ryun [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Ultrasonic testing are far superior to other nondestructive tests for detecting the disbond interface which occurred in adhesive interface. However, a solid rocket motor consisting of a steel case, rubber insulation, liner, and propellant poses many difficulties for analyzing ultrasonic waves because of the superposition of reflected waves and large differences in acoustic impedance of various materials. Therefore, ultrasonic tests for detecting the disbond interface in solid rocket motor have been applied in very limited areas between the steel case and rubber insulation using an automatic C-scan system. The existing ultrasonic test cannot detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant of a solid rocket motor because most of the ultrasonic waves are absorbed in the rubber material which has low acoustic impedance. This problem could be overcome by analyzing the resonance frequency from the frequency spectrum using the ultrasonic resonance method. In this paper, a new technique to detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant using ultrasonic resonance characteristics is discussed in detail.

  7. Robustness Evaluation of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Robustness of structural systems has obtained a renewed interest due to a much more frequent use of advanced types of structures with limited redundancy and serious consequences in case of failure.......Robustness of structural systems has obtained a renewed interest due to a much more frequent use of advanced types of structures with limited redundancy and serious consequences in case of failure....

  8. Banded Structures in Electron Pitch Angle Diffusion Coefficients from Resonant Wave Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron pitch angle (D (alpha)) and momentum (D(pp)) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies 10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = +/-1, +/-2,...+/-5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (alpha) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D alpha and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D alpha coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D alpha coefficients for the case n does not = 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of D alpha coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89 deg and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle

  9. Banded Structures in Electron Pitch Angle Diffusion Coefficients from Resonant Wave-Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron pitch angle (D(sub (alpha alpha))) and momentum (D(sub pp)) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L=4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies less than or equal to 10 keV. Landau (n=0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n= +/- 1, +/-2, ... +/-5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (alpha) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n=+1 and n=+2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n=+2. However, the banded structures in D(sub alpha alpha) and D(sub pp) coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n=+2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D(sub pp) diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients. For chorus waves, D(sub pp) coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients for the case n does not equal 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D(sub pp) coefficient are generally larger than the values of D(sub alpha alpha) coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89 deg and harmonic resonances

  10. Effect of eddy current damping on phononic band gaps generated by locally resonant periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Efe; Yilmaz, Cetin

    2017-02-01

    The effect of eddy current damping on a novel locally resonant periodic structure is investigated. The frequency response characteristics are obtained by using a lumped parameter and a finite element model. In order to obtain wide band gaps at low frequencies, the periodic structure is optimized according to certain constraints, such as mass distribution in the unit cell, lower limit of the band gap, stiffness between the components in the unit cell, the size of magnets used for eddy current damping, and the number of unit cells in the periodic structure. Then, the locally resonant periodic structure with eddy current damping is manufactured and its experimental frequency response is obtained. The frequency response results obtained analytically, numerically and experimentally match quite well. The inclusion of eddy current damping to the periodic structure decreases amplitudes of resonance peaks without disturbing stop band width.

  11. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  12. Evaluation of magnetic resonance velocimetry for steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Biancheri, C L; Pettigrew, R I; Peifer, J W; Markou, C P; Engels, H

    1990-11-01

    Whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently become an important diagnostic tool for cardiovascular diseases. The technique of magnetic resonance phase velocity encoding allows the quantitative measurement of velocity for an arbitrary component direction. A study was initiated to determine the ability and accuracy of MR velocimetry to measure a wide range of flow conditions including flow separation, three-dimensional secondary flow, high velocity gradients, and turbulence. A steady flow system pumped water doped with manganese chloride through a variety of test sections. Images were produced using gradient echo sequences on test sections including a straight tube, a curved tube, a smoothly converging-diverging nozzle, and an orifice. Magnetic resonance measurements of laminar and turbulent flows were depicted as cross-sectional velocity profiles. MR velocity measurements revealed such flow behavior as spatially varying velocity, recirculation and secondary flows over a wide range of conditions. Comparisons made with published experimental laser Doppler anemometry measurements and theoretical calculations for similar flow conditions revealed excellent accuracy and precision levels. The successful measurement of velocity profiles for a variety of flow conditions and geometries indicate that magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate, non-contacting velocimeter.

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  14. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  15. Cardiac structure and function in Cushing's syndrome: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenický, Peter; Redheuil, Alban; Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2-12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Tateno, Shigeru; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Hayao; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Tashima, Kazuyuki.

    1992-01-01

    We applied the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images for evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD). One hundred and ninety-three patients with CHD, ranging in age from 20 days to 18 years old, were studied by MRI. This study compared the effectiveness of MRI with cardiac angiography and echocardiography for the evaluation of major diagnosis of CHD and all components of cardiovascular anatomy. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients not only cardiovascular anatomies of CHD but all structures relevant to the identification of arrangement of organs were displayed. In diagnosing a total of 193 of major cardiac anomalies and 741 segments of the vein, the atrium, the ventricle and the great vessels by MRI and angiocardiogram and/or echocardiogram, descrepancies were found in 6 patients (3.1%), and only 18 segments (2.4%), respectively. For vascular and complex cardiac anatomies MRI was able to provide good anatomical details. Based on these findings, the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images was found useful for achieving a systematic diagnosis of CHD. (author)

  17. A setup for measuring characteristics of microwave electric vacuum devices with open resonance structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Ruban, A. I.; Vorob’ev, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    -tuning range, an additional periodic metal–dielectric structure is introduced into the open resonator. The experimental results of investigations of the energy, volt–ampere, and frequency characteristics of the modified diffraction-radiation generator prototype are compared to the characteristics...... of the generator without a metal–dielectric structure....

  18. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  19. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  20. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  1. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s 2 at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance parameters and local structure for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HUA-MING ZHANG. 1. , GUANG-DUO LU. 1 ... the above ZFSs, the local structure information for the impurity Gd. 3+ is obtained, i.e., .... parameters, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements and crystal-field spectrum ...

  3. Hints for electric-field compensation in multicell resonant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, P; Parodi, R

    1981-03-31

    We propose a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit for a TM/sub 01/ multicell standing wave accelerating structure with full end cells. By the suggested model we can predict the amount of end cell frequency compensation needed to achieve field flatness in the highest mode of the structure.

  4. Plasmon resonance optical tuning based on photosensitive composite structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a numerical investigation of a periodic metallic structure sandwiched between two quartz plates. The volume comprised between the quartz plates and the metallic structure is infiltrated by a mixture of azo-dye-doped liquid crystal. The exposure to a low power visible light beam...

  5. Evaluation of support loss in micro-beam resonators: A revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. Y.; Liu, J. Z.; Guo, F. L.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical study on evaluation of support loss in micromechanical resonators undergoing in-plane flexural vibrations. Two-dimensional elastic wave theory is used to determine the energy transmission from the vibrating resonator to the support. Fourier transform and Green's function technique are adopted to solve the problem of wave motions on the surface of the support excited by the forces transmitted by the resonator onto the support. Analytical expressions of support loss in terms of quality factor, taking into account distributed normal stress and shear stress in the attachment region, and coupling between the normal stress and shear stress as well as material disparity between the support and the resonator, have been derived. Effects of geometry of micro-beam resonators, and material dissimilarity between support and resonator on support loss are examined. Numerical results show that 'harder resonator' and 'softer support' combination leads to larger support loss. In addition, the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) numerical simulation technique is employed for validation of the proposed analytical model. Comparing with results of quality factor obtained by PML technique, we find that the present model agrees well with the results of PML technique and the pure-shear model overestimates support loss noticeably, especially for resonators with small aspect ratio and large material dissimilarity between the support and resonator.

  6. Evaluation of potential practical oral contrast agents for pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, G.S. III; Cincinnati Univ., OH; Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

    1989-01-01

    Development of a practical oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to improve differentiation of bowel from adjacent structures. In order to find a readily available, inexpensive, non-toxic, palatable solution for use in the pediatric population, several formulas, milk products and a common oral sedative were evaluated in vitro. T1, T2 and signal intensity measurements were performed on a 1.5 T system. Similac with standard iron proved to be a useful high signal intensity agent on multiple pulse sequences. Early in vivo experience in four normal volunteers indicates that this agent provides excellent delineation of the stomach and duodenum from contiguous viscera. Distal small bowel visualization is less predictabel. Further clinical trials should confirm the utility of this solution, which contains a combination of iron salts and paramagnetic metallic ions. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  8. Evaluation of Floor Response Spectrum considering Ductility of Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Junhee; Choi, In-Kil

    2014-01-01

    The FRS (floor response spectrum) is directly influenced by the behavior of structure under the seismic load. If the structure is nonlinear range, the energy dissipation will be occurred by the damage of structure and the maximum force will be reduced. In Zion method, the inelastic energy abortion factor has been used to consider the nonlinearity of structure. This factor was used for the seismic fragility of structure. For the seismic fragility of equipment, the uncertainty of this factor was used differently according to the story level. But this method is not warranted under the strong earthquake leads to the structural damage. Therefore it is needed to evaluate the FRS considering the nonlinear behavior of structure and to assessment the conservatism related to nonlinear behavior of structure in FRS. In this study, the nonlinear analysis was performed for the conservatism of FRS under the damage of structure. The conservatism of FRS by the nonlinear analysis was compared by that proposed by the Zion method. The conservatism of floor acceleration response for the equipment was evaluated by performing the nonlinear analysis. From the nonlinear analysis results, it was showed that the median and β c of FRSR was increased with the ductility of structure and the response of equipment had the resonance effect between the frequency of equipment and structure. The seismic capacity of equipment by the Zion method can be different from the real seismic capacity of equipment because the inelastic structure response factor has nothing to do with the ductility of structure. Therefore the median and COV for FRSR should be defined considering the ductility of structure and the frequency of equipment for more exactly evaluating the seismic capacity of equipment

  9. Evaluation of Floor Response Spectrum considering Ductility of Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junhee; Choi, In-Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The FRS (floor response spectrum) is directly influenced by the behavior of structure under the seismic load. If the structure is nonlinear range, the energy dissipation will be occurred by the damage of structure and the maximum force will be reduced. In Zion method, the inelastic energy abortion factor has been used to consider the nonlinearity of structure. This factor was used for the seismic fragility of structure. For the seismic fragility of equipment, the uncertainty of this factor was used differently according to the story level. But this method is not warranted under the strong earthquake leads to the structural damage. Therefore it is needed to evaluate the FRS considering the nonlinear behavior of structure and to assessment the conservatism related to nonlinear behavior of structure in FRS. In this study, the nonlinear analysis was performed for the conservatism of FRS under the damage of structure. The conservatism of FRS by the nonlinear analysis was compared by that proposed by the Zion method. The conservatism of floor acceleration response for the equipment was evaluated by performing the nonlinear analysis. From the nonlinear analysis results, it was showed that the median and β{sub c} of FRSR was increased with the ductility of structure and the response of equipment had the resonance effect between the frequency of equipment and structure. The seismic capacity of equipment by the Zion method can be different from the real seismic capacity of equipment because the inelastic structure response factor has nothing to do with the ductility of structure. Therefore the median and COV for FRSR should be defined considering the ductility of structure and the frequency of equipment for more exactly evaluating the seismic capacity of equipment.

  10. Spatial confinement of acoustic and optical waves in stubbed slab structure as optomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changsheng, E-mail: lcs135@163.com; Huang, Dan; Guo, Jierong

    2015-02-20

    We theoretically demonstrate that acoustic waves and optical waves can be spatially confined in the same micro-cavity by specially designed stubbed slab structure. The proposed structure presents both phononic and photonic band gaps from finite element calculation. The creation of cavity mode inside the band gap region provides strong localization of phonon and photon in the defect region. The practical parameters to inject cavity and work experimentally at telecommunication range are discussed. This structure can be precisely fabricated, hold promises to enhance acousto-optical interactions and design new applications as optomechanical resonator. - Highlights: • A resonator simultaneously supports acoustic and optical modes. • Strong spatial confinement and slow group velocity. • Potential to work as active optomechanical resonator.

  11. Robustness Evaluation of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; čizmar, D.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper outlines results from working group 3 (WG3) in the EU COST Action E55 – ‘Modelling of the performance of timber structures’. The objectives of the project are related to the three main research activities: the identification and modelling of relevant load and environmental...... exposure scenarios, the improvement of knowledge concerning the behaviour of timber structural elements and the development of a generic framework for the assessment of the life-cycle vulnerability and robustness of timber structures....

  12. Symposium KK, Resonant Optics in Dielectric and Metallic Structures: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larouche, Stephane [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caldwell, Joshua [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Symposium KK focused on the design, fabrication, characterization of novel nanoscale optical resonators and alternative materials for sub-diffraction scale resonant particles. Contributions discussed all aspects of this field, and the organizers had more than 130 contributing participants to this session alone, spanning North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. Participants discussed cutting edge research results focused on the structure, physical and optical properties, and ultrafast dynamic response of nanoscale resonators such as plasmonic and dielectric nanoparticles. A strong focus on state-of-the-art characterization and fabrication approaches, as well as presentations on novel materials for sub-diffraction resonators took place. As expected, the sessions provided strong interdisciplinary interactions and lively debate among presenters and participants.

  13. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in thoracic inlet tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Eiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-06-01

    To evaluate the detectability of tumor invasion to the thoracic inlet, MRI was performed in 57 patients with thoracic inlet tumor, and the diagnostic accuracy of MRI was compared with that of CT concerning the utility for thoracic inlet lesions. And we assessed abnormal findings in comparison with surgical or autopsy findings. In the local extent of the tumor, the accuracy for tumor invasion to the vessels such as subclavian artery and vein was 94.9% for MRI, and 83.5% for CT, and to the brachial plexus was 95.0% for MRI, and 60.0% for CT. MRI was superior to CT, but MRI was equivalent to CT with regard to invasion to the base of the neck, lateral chest wall, ribs, and vertebral bodies. However on MRI, it is easier to understand the longitudinal tumor extent than on CT. CT has superior spatial resolusion but CT has also disadvantages, such as streak artifact caused by shoulder joints, resulting in image degradation. In contrast, MRI has inherent advantages, and multiple images which facilitate the relationship between tumor and normal structures. Coronal and sagittal MR images facilitated three-dimensional observation of tumor of invasion in the thoracic inlet. Furthermore to improve image quality of MRI for the thoracic inlet, we newly devised a high molecular polyester shell for fixing a surface coil. On the high resolution MR (HR-MR) imaging using our shell, normal lymph nodes, muscles, blood vessels and the branches of the branchial plexus were clearly visualized in detail. Our shell was simple to process and facilitated immobilization of a surface coil. HR-MR technique produces images of high resolution after simple preparation. In conclusion, MRI was very useful for detecting lesions of the thoracic inlet and in deciding surgical indication and the planning for radiotherapy. (author).

  14. Low frequency torsional vibration gaps in the shaft with locally resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dianlong; Liu Yaozong; Wang Gang; Cai Li; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of torsional wave in the shaft with periodically attached local resonators is studied with the transfer matrix theory and the finite element method. The analytical dispersion relation and the complex band structure of such a structure is presented for the first time, which indicates the existence of low frequency gaps. The effect of shaft material on the vibration attenuation in band gap is investigated. The frequency response function of the shaft with finite periodic locally resonant oscillators is simulated with finite element method, which shows large vibration attenuation in the frequency range of the gap as expected. The low frequency torsional gap in shafts provides a new idea for vibration control

  15. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‿loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‿loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  16. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  17. Resonant frequency of the silicon micro-structure of MEMS vector hydrophone in fluid-structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The MEMS vector hydrophone developed by the North University of China has advantages of high Signal to Noise Ratio, ease of array integration, etc. However, the resonance frequency of the MEMS device in the liquid is different from that in the air due to the fluid-structure interaction (FSI. Based on the theory of Fluid-Solid Coupling, a generalized distributed mass attached on the micro-structure has been found, which results in the resonance frequency of the microstructure in the liquid being lower than that in the air. Then, an FSI simulation was conducted by ANSYS software. Finally, the hydrophone was measured by using a shaking table and a vector hydrophone calibration system respectively. Results show that, due to the FSI, the resonance frequency of the MEMS devices of the bionic vector hydrophone in the liquid declines approximately 30% compared to the case in the air.

  18. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  19. Evaluation of neutron nuclear data for 233U in thermal and resonance regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuyuki

    1981-02-01

    The thermal and resonance cross sections of 233 U were evaluated for JENDL-2. The cross sections below 1 eV are given as point-wise data and were evaluated by the use of the measured fission and capture cross sections. The resolved resonance parameters are derived up to 100 eV. The parameters were obtained by using NDES so as to reproduce the measured total and fission cross sections. The cross sections from 100 eV to 30 keV are represented by the unresolved resonance parameters. The fission and capture resonance integrals calculated from these parameters are 771 and 138 barns, respectively, which agree with the measured data within the quoted errors. (author)

  20. The Spin Structure of the Proton in the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Renee H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries have been measured for $\\vec{p}$($\\vec{e}$,e') using the CLAS detector and a polarized 15NH3 target at Jefferson Lab in 1998. The virtual photon asymmetry A1, the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment Γ$1\\atop{p}$, have been extracted for a Q2 range of 0.15-2.0 GeV2. These results provide insight into the low Q2 evolution of spin dependent asymmetries and structure functions as well as the transition of Γ$1\\atop{p}$ from the photon point, where the Gerasimov, Drell and Hearn Sum Rule is expected to be satisfied, to the deep inelastic region.

  1. Importance of complex band structure and resonant states for tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dederichs, P. H.; Mavropoulos, Ph.; Wunnicke, O.; Papanikolaou, N.; Bellini, V.; Zeller, R.; Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 240, - (2002), s. 108-113 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA MŠk OC P5.30 Grant - others:TSR(XX) 01398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetoresistance * tunneling * band structure * interface effects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.046, year: 2002

  2. A New Tuning Module for Resonant Coupling Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Vittorio G; De Martinis, Carlo; Giove, Dario; Masullo, Maria R; Mauri, Marco; Rainò, Antonio; Variale, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    In order to have efficient particle acceleration it is fundamental that the particles experience, in the accelerating gap, field amplitudes as uniform and as high as possible from gap to gap. Because of the unavoidable fabrication errors, an accelerating structure, when assembled, exhibits field values lower than the nominal ones and/or not uniform. All the usual procedures developed in order to adjust the parameter deviations responsible of the malfunction of these structures, are based on field amplitude measurements, by using the bead pull technique, which is a very invasive technique. In this paper the philosophy is reversed: it is assumed that all the information can be got by Sounding the Modes of the whole System (SMS) and correct the deviation of each frequency mode from its nominal value by means of an appropriate tuning of the cavities: resorting to a perturbative technique applied to a circuit model representing this kind of structures, it is possible to calculate the amount of tuning to give to th...

  3. ENSDF: The evaluated nuclear structure data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The structure, organization, and contents of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File, ENSDF, will be discussed. This file summarizes the state of experimental nuclear structure data for all nuclei as determined from consideration of measurements reported world wide. Special emphasis will be given to the data evaluation procedures and consistency checks utilized at the input stage and to the retrieval capabilities of the system at the output stage

  4. Evaluation of aortic regurgitation using cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Takuya; Konishi, Tokuji; Okamoto, Shinya; Sakuma, Hajime; Takeda, Kan; Nakano, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess aortic regurgitation (AR) in 13 patients with valvular disease and 3 normal subjects, and the results were compared to color Doppler flow mapping findings. AR produced a signal void in the left ventricle during the diastolic phase in all patients by MRI. There were no false positive or negative results compared with echocardiographic findings. Visual grading of cine MRI gave results similar to color flow Doppler echocardiography (88%). The distance and the area of aortic regurgitation using MRI correlated well with color Doppler flow mapping (r=0.82 and 0.88). However, measurements of distance and area by color flow Doppler tended to be larger than those by cine MRI. With current techniques echocardiography may overestimate the severity of AR as compared with cine MRI. In addition, MRI gives clinically useful information in patients in whom transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is not adequate. (author)

  5. Conservative treatment of bronchobiliary fistula evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić-Vukičević Tatjana N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bronchobiliary fistula (BBF is a pathological communication between the bronchial system and the biliary tree that presents with bilioptysis. Many conditions can cause its development. There is still no optimal therapy for BBF. Conservative treatment is rarely indicated, as was published before in a few cases. Case report. We presented a 71-year-old Caucasian Serbian woman with BBF secondary to previous laparotomy due to multiple echinococcus liver cysts. The diagnosis was established by the presence of bilirubin and bile acids in sputum and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP. A repeat MRCP performed after conservative procedure, did not reveal fistulous communication. Conclusion. We suggest that in small and less severe fistulas between the biliary and the bronchial tract, conservative treatment may be used successfully, and invasive treatment methods are not needed in all patients.

  6. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    stroke volume was calculated as the difference between end-diastolic and end-systolic volume and compared to left ventricular stroke volume and to stroke volume determined simultaneously by a classical indicator dilution technique. There was good agreement between right ventricular stroke volume......Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...... determined by MRI and by the indicator dilution method and between right and left ventricular stroke volume determined by MRI. Thus, MRI gives reliable values not only for left ventricular volumes, but also for right ventricular volumes. By MRI it is possible to obtain volumes from both ventricles...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating workers' compensation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbel, Daniel; Rayan, Ghazi

    2012-04-01

    We studied the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies for workers' compensation patients with hand conditions in which the referring doctor obtained the images. We compared the MRI findings with the eventual clinical findings. We also investigated the approximate cost of these MRI studies. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all workers' compensation patients seen in a hand and upper extremity practice over the course of 3 years. We selected patients who had MRI studies of the affected upper extremities before referral to the senior author (G.R.). We reviewed the charts for information regarding demographics, referral diagnoses, MRI diagnoses made by the radiologist, the area of the upper extremity studied, and eventual clinical diagnoses by the senior author. We made a determination as to whether a hand surgeon could have adequately diagnosed and treated the patients' conditions without the imaging studies. We also investigated the cost associated with these MRIs. We included 62 patients with a total of 67 MRI scans in this study. The MRI studies did not contribute to clinically diagnosing the patients' conditions in any of the cases we reviewed. The hand surgeon's clinical diagnosis disagreed with the radiologist's MRI diagnosis in 63% of patients. The MRI was unnecessary to arrive at the clinical diagnosis and did not influence the treatment offered for any of the 62 patients. The total cost for the 67 non-contrast MRI studies was approximately $53,000. Costly imaging studies are frequently done to determine the validity of a patient's reported problems; unfortunately, these tests are frequently unnecessary and waste resources. Magnetic resonance imaging scans may not be the standard for accurate diagnosis and can misdirect care. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic ...... reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realiza- tion of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1mW.......We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of Müllerian Remnants in Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2013-01-01

    To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Müllerian remnants in young females clinically suspected of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome in a primary amenorrhea workup. Fifteen young females underwent multiplanar T2- and transverse T1-weighted MRI at either a 1.5T or 3.0T MR imager. Two gynecologic radiologists reached consensus decisions for the evaluation of Müllerian remnants, vagina, ovaries, and associated findings. All cases had bilateral uterine buds in the pelvic cavity, with unilateral cavitation in two cases. The buds had an average long-axis diameter of 2.64 ± 0.65 cm. In all cases, bilateral buds were connected with fibrous band-like structures. In 13 cases, the band-like structures converged at the midline or a paramedian triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome. The lower one-third of the vagina was identified in 14 cases. Fourteen cases showed bilateral normal ovaries near the uterine buds. One unilateral pelvic kidney, one unilateral renal agenesis, one mild scoliosis, and three lumbar sacralization cases were found as associated findings. Typical Müllerian remnants in MRKH syndrome consist of bilateral uterine buds connected by the fibrous band-like structures, which converge at the midline triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome

  10. Evaluation of atrial, ventricular and atrioventricular septal defects by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kato, Hirohisa; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Saiki, Kuninobu; Suzuki, Kazushige; Eto, Takaharu

    1992-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 20 patients (mean age: 5.3±4.4 years) with atrial, ventricular, or atrioventricular septal defects for evaluation of cardiac structure and blood flow. Prior to cine MRI, electrocardiographycally gated MRI using multislice scquisition was performed on all patients to localize optimal slice location. Cine-MRI was obtained with a 30 deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, and 30 msec pulse repetition time, on a 256 x 256 or 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were well defined in all patients by gated cardiac imaging. In 18 of the 20 patients, cine-MRI was able to detect shunt flow, visualized as a low intensity signal in comparison with the surrounding blood flow. Cine-MRI can provide not only accurate anatomy of cardiac structures but functional assessment of the cardiac chamber, wall topology and flow relations. Cine-MRI will become an important noninvasive technique for assessment of anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease. (author)

  11. Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of Müllerian Remnants in Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Müllerian remnants in young females clinically suspected of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome in a primary amenorrhea workup. Fifteen young females underwent multiplanar T2- and transverse T1-weighted MRI at either a 1.5T or 3.0T MR imager. Two gynecologic radiologists reached consensus decisions for the evaluation of Müllerian remnants, vagina, ovaries, and associated findings. All cases had bilateral uterine buds in the pelvic cavity, with unilateral cavitation in two cases. The buds had an average long-axis diameter of 2.64 ± 0.65 cm. In all cases, bilateral buds were connected with fibrous band-like structures. In 13 cases, the band-like structures converged at the midline or a paramedian triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome. The lower one-third of the vagina was identified in 14 cases. Fourteen cases showed bilateral normal ovaries near the uterine buds. One unilateral pelvic kidney, one unilateral renal agenesis, one mild scoliosis, and three lumbar sacralization cases were found as associated findings. Typical Müllerian remnants in MRKH syndrome consist of bilateral uterine buds connected by the fibrous band-like structures, which converge at the midline triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome.

  12. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Cm-247 neutron cross sections in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, T.; Menapace, E.; Motta, M.; Vaccari, M.

    1980-01-01

    The neutron cross sections of Cm-247 are evaluated in the resonance (resolved and unresolved) region up to 10 keV. Average resonance parameters (i.e. spacing D, fission and radiative widths, neutron strength functions) are determined for unresolved region calculations. Moreover for a better comparison with the experimental data, fission cross section is calculated up to 10 MeV. In addition, the average number of neutrons emitted per fission as a function of energy is estimated

  14. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  15. Multiple Fano-Like MIM Plasmonic Structure Based on Triangular Resonator for Refractive Index Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Nikolina; Cselyuszka, Norbert

    2018-01-19

    In this paper, we present a Fano metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure based on an isosceles triangular cavity resonator for refractive index sensing applications. Due to the specific feeding scheme and asymmetry introduced in the triangular cavity, the resonator exhibits four sharp Fano-like resonances. The behavior of the structure is analyzed in detail and its sensing capabilities demonstrated through the responses for various refractive indices. The results show that the sensor has very good sensitivity and maximal figure of merit (FOM) value of 3.2 × 10⁵. In comparison to other similar sensors, the proposed one has comparable sensitivity and significantly higher FOM, which clearly demonstrates its high sensing potential.

  16. Bound states in the continuum on periodic structures surrounded by strong resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2018-04-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are trapped or guided modes with their frequencies in the frequency intervals of the radiation modes. On periodic structures, a BIC is surrounded by a family of resonant modes with their quality factors approaching infinity. Typically the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|2 , where β and β* are the Bloch wave vectors of the resonant modes and the BIC, respectively. But for some special BICs, the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|4 . In this paper, a general condition is derived for such special BICs on two-dimensional periodic structures. As a numerical example, we use the general condition to calculate special BICs, which are antisymmetric standing waves, on a periodic array of circular cylinders, and show their dependence on parameters. The special BICs are important for practical applications, because they produce resonances with large quality factors for a very large range of β .

  17. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiography in the evaluation of biliary anatomy in living liver donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, Elaine Cristina de Moraes; Coelho, Julio Cezar Uili; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the accuracy of magnetic resonance cholangiography in the assessment of the biliary anatomy in living liver donors in correlation with surgical findings. Materials And Methods: Fifty living liver donors were retrospectively evaluated at Hospital de Clinicas da Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. Cholangiographic images were analyzed and results were compared with intraoperative findings. Only anatomical alterations that affected the surgical strategy and had not been previously observed at magnetic resonance cholangiography were considered as being in disagreement. Results: Anatomical variations were found in 7 donors at magnetic resonance cholangiography, and in 14 during surgery. Agreement between imaging and surgical findings was observed in 41 of the 50 patients, and disagreement in 9. Magnetic resonance cholangiography sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were respectively 43%, 97%, 86%, 81% and 81.6%. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and non invasive method for preoperative evaluation of the biliary tract in living liver donors. However some anatomical abnormalities are not detected by magnetic resonance cholangiography. (author)

  18. A set of triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds in mixture samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri, E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi [VERIFIN, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR pulse experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of organophosphorus (OP) compounds in complex matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selective extraction of {sup 1}H, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and connectivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More precise NMR identification of OP nerve agents and their degradation products. - Abstract: The {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy utilizes J{sub CH} couplings in molecules, and provides important structural information from small organic molecules in the form of carbon chemical shifts and carbon-proton connectivities. The full potential of the {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy has not been realized in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) related verification analyses due to the sample matrix, which usually contains a high amount of non-related compounds obscuring the correlations of the relevant compounds. Here, the results of the application of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy in characterization of OP compounds related to the CWC are presented. With a set of two-dimensional triple-resonance experiments the J{sub HP}, J{sub CH} and J{sub PC} couplings are utilized to map the connectivities of the atoms in OP compounds and to extract the carbon chemical shift information. With the use of the proposed pulse sequences the correlations from the OP compounds can be recorded without significant artifacts from the non-OP compound impurities in the sample. Further selectivity of the observed correlations is achieved with the application of phosphorus band-selective pulse in the pulse sequences to assist the analysis of multiple OP compounds in mixture samples. The use of the triple-resonance experiments in the analysis of a complex sample is shown with a test mixture containing typical scheduled OP compounds, including the characteristic degradation

  19. Structure resonances due to space charge in periodic focusing channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Jameson, R. A.

    2018-02-01

    The Vlasov-Poisson model is one of the most effective methods to study the space charge dominated beam evolution self-consistently in a periodic focusing channel. Since the approach to get the solution with this model is not trivial, previous studies are limited in degenerated conditions, either in smoothed channel (constant focusing) [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. E 57, 4713 (1998)] or in alternating gradient focusing channel with equal initial beam emittance condition in the degrees of freedom [I. Hofmann et al., Part. Accel. 13, 145 (1983); Chao Li et al., THOBA02, IPAC2016]. To establish a basis, we intentionally limit this article to the study of the pure transverse periodic focusing lattice with arbitrary initial beam condition, and the same lattice structure in both degrees of freedom, but with possibility of different focusing strengths. This will show the extension of the existing work. The full Hamiltonian is invoked for a pure transverse focusing lattice in various initial beam conditions, revealing different mode structure and additional modes beyond those of the degenerated cases. Application of the extended method to realistic lattices (including longitudinal accelerating elements) and further details will then reveal many new insights, and will be presented in later work.

  20. Nuclear data project in Korea and resonance parameter evaluation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Oh, Soo-Youl

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data activities in the fields of evaluation, processing, measurement, and service in Korea are presented in this paper. As one of the current activities, the neutron resonance parameters for stable or long-lived nineteen fission products have been evaluated and the results are presented here. (author)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD- AISA 542 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS RESEARCH LABS ST LOUIS MO FIG 7/4 MAGNETIC RESONANCE DETERMINATIONS OF STRUCTURE AND REACTION KIN--ETC (U) DEC Al I M...solvent content (methylene chloride). DD I JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Doe Fntered

  2. LALAGE - a computer program to calculate the TM01 modes of cylindrically symmetrical multicell resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    1982-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the LALA program to compute resonant frequencies and fields for all the modes of the lowest TM 01 band-pass of multicell structures. The results are compared with those calculated by another popular rf cavity code and with experimentally measured quantities. (author)

  3. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  4. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures

  5. Dose evaluation due to electron spin resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dosimeter has been developed with free radical created in sucrose. Free radical was observed with using the electron spin resonance (ESR) equipment. The ESR absorption due to free radical in sucrose appeared at the magnetic field between the third and fourth ESR ones of Mn +2 standard sample. Sucrose as radiation dosimeter can linearly measure the dose from 5 x 10 -3 Gy to 10 5 Gy. If the new model of the ESR equipment is used and ESR observation is carried out at lower temperature such as liquid nitrogen or liquid helium temperature, the sucrose ESR dosimeter will be detectable about 5 x 10 -4 Gy or less. Fading of the free radicals in the irradiated sucrose was scarcely obtained about six months after irradiation and in the irradiated sucrose stored at 55deg C and 100deg C for one hour or more also scarcely observed. It is concluded from these radiation property that sucrose is useful for the accidental or emergency dosimeter for the inhabitants. (author)

  6. Seismic evaluation of a hot cell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of the structural capacity of and the seismic demand on an existing hot cell structure in a nuclear facility is described. An ANSYS finite-element model of the cell was constructed, treating the walls as plates and the floor and ceiling as a system of discrete beams. A modal analysis showed that the fundamental frequencies of the cell walls lie far above the earthquake frequency range. An equivalent static analysis of the structure was performed. Based on the analysis it was demonstrated that the hot cell structure, would readily withstand the evaluation basis earthquake

  7. Dosimetry with alanine/electron spin resonance. Measuring and evaluating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.

    2007-02-01

    In the first part of the present report a short outline of the theoretical foundations in view of the parameters and evaluation programs described in the following is given. The second part described the measurement procedures and the handling of the measuring data including the applied data formats. In the third part the collection SPAD of MATLAB programs is described, which are necessary for the processing of the measurment data and the subsequent evaluations. Routine evaluations can by means of the present graphic user surface simply be performed. But the described routines can (and shall) be used also as kit in order to solve special evaluation problems. The third part closes with a listing of all programs including the online available aid texts. All functions were tested both under MATLAB 6 and under MATLAB 7

  8. Polarization dependence of the metamagnetic resonance of cut-wire-pair structure by using plasmon hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, Nguyen Van; Yoo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Pak; Tung, Nguyen Thanh; Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh

    2014-01-01

    The influence of lattice constants on the electromagnetic behavior of a cut-wire-pair (CWP) structure has been elucidated. In this report, we performed both simulations and experiments to determine the influence of polarization on the metamagnetic resonance of the CWP structure. The key finding is the result of an investigation on the plasmon hybridization between the two CWs, which showed that the polarization of the incident wave was affected. Good agreement between numerical simulation and measurement is achieved.

  9. Age-related normal structural and functional ventricular values in cardiac function assessed by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechter, Michael; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gebhard, Catherine; Stehli, Julia; Klaeser, Bernd; Stähli, Barbara E; Manka, Robert; Manes, Costantina; Tanner, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    The heart is subject to structural and functional changes with advancing age. However, the magnitude of cardiac age-dependent transformation has not been conclusively elucidated. This retrospective cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study included 183 subjects with normal structural and functional ventricular values. End systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were obtained from the left and the right ventricle in breath-hold cine CMR. Patients were classified into four age groups (20–29, 30–49, 50–69, and ≥70 years) and cardiac measurements were compared using Pearson’s rank correlation over the four different groups. With advanced age a slight but significant decrease in ESV (r=−0.41 for both ventricles, P<0.001) and EDV (r=−0.39 for left ventricle, r=−0.35 for right ventricle, P<0.001) were observed associated with a significant increase in left (r=0.28, P<0.001) and right (r=0.27, P<0.01) ventricular EF reaching a maximal increase in EF of +8.4% (P<0.001) for the left and +6.1% (P<0.01) for the right ventricle in the oldest compared to the youngest patient group. Left ventricular myocardial mass significantly decreased over the four different age groups (P<0.05). The aging process is associated with significant changes in left and right ventricular EF, ESV and EDV in subjects with no cardiac functional and structural abnormalities. These findings underline the importance of using age adapted values as standard of reference when evaluating CMR studies

  10. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  11. Evaluation of breast implants with breast magnetic resonance: Practical utility in comparison with other methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez, Florencia; Blejman, Oscar; Lamattina Mariano; Villamea, Victoria; Sarquis, Flavio; Torrillo, Fabiana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the utility of Breast Magnetic Resonance (BMR) in the evaluation of breast implants comparing Mammography and Breast ultrasound in an ambulatory private institute setting. Method: Between May 2008 and April 2010, 729 BRM were performed in patients between 22 and 77 years of age, 474 were evaluated for implant integrity. The studies were performed in a high field equipment (1.5T) with T1, T2, fat Sat, Silicone only and silicone suppression sequences. Results: Of the 474 patients that were evaluated for implant integrity: 291 patients (61.39%) presented with intact implants, 252 (86.6%) showed concordant findings with mammography and or ultrasound and 39 (13.4%) showed discordant findings. Then, 116 patients (24.47%) presented signs of intracapsular rupture, 82 (70.7%) were concordant with ultrasound findings and 34 (29.3%) had normal ultrasound evaluation. 44 patients (9.28%) presented extracapsular rupture, 40 (90.9%) were concordant with mammography and ultrasound and 4 (9.10%) were discordant. Finally, 23 patients (4.85%) presented residual silicone granulomas, with history of previous implant rupture and explanted surgery, 13 (56.52%) concordant with mammography and ultrasound and 10 (43.48%) were discordant. Conclusion: Non contrast BMR, using multiples planes and sequences is very useful in the evaluation of the internal structure of the implants and extracapsular silicone. It's the most sensible study to demonstrate intra and extracapsular rupture. BMR exceeds mammography and ultrasound in the detection of implant rupture and residual granulomas following explanted surgery.

  12. Nonlinear properties of double and triple barrier resonant tunneling structures in the sub-THz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuzskij, A.L.; Perestoronin, A.V.; Volchkov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-frequency nonlinear properties of GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode (RTD) nanostructures and perspectives of implementation of the quantum regime of amplification in such structures, which is especially efficient in the range of sub-THz and THz ranges, are investigated. It is shown that in a triple barrier RTD the symmetry between the processes of amplification and dissipation can be avoided because of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with both of resonant states in two quantum wells, that results in the significant growth of an RTD efficiency [ru

  13. Resonant structure of the 3d electron's angular distribution in a free Mn+Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Y.; Dolmatov, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3d-electron angular anisotropy parameter of the free Mn + ion is calculated using the open-quotes spin-polarizedclose quotes random-phase approximation with exchange. Strong resonance structure is discovered, which is due to interference with the powerful 3p → 3d discrete excitation. The effect of the 3p → 4s transition is also noticeable. The ordering of these respective resonances with phonon energy increase proved to be opposite in angular anisotropy parameter to that in 3d-photoionization cross section. A paper describing these results was published

  14. Compound grating structures in photonic crystals for resonant excitation of azobenzene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahns, Sabrina; Kallweit, Christine; Adam, Jost

    Photo-switchable molecules such as azobenzene are of high interest for “smart” surfaces. Such “smart” surfaces respond to external light excitation by changing their macroscopic properties. The absorbance of light on a single normal path through a layer of azobenzene immobilized on a surface......-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations for determination of resonance positions and electric field strengths in compound grating structures. By superimposing two single-period gratings a photonic crystal can be designed supporting multiple guided mode resonances suitable to switch azobenzenes between...

  15. Observation of new resonance structure in the natural spin parity strange meson system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1981-04-01

    New data from the LASS spectrometer are presented on the reaction K - p → K - π + n. An energy independent partial wave analysis of this data yields unique K - π + elastic scattering partial wave amplitudes in the invariant mass region from 0.7 GeV to 1.8 GeV, and two distinguishable sets of amplitudes between 1.8 GeV and 2.3 GeV. These amplitudes confirm all of the well known Kπ resonances, and display clear evidence for new resonance structure in the S, P and G waves in the mass region above 1.6 GeV

  16. Search Path Evaluation Incorporating Object Placement Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baylog, John G; Wettergren, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a computationally robust approach to search path performance evaluation where the objects of search interest exhibit structure in the way in which they occur within the search space...

  17. Correlative magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of aortic and pulmonary artery abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risius, B.; O' Donnell, J.K.; Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; George, C.R.; Graor, R.A.; Moodie, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields excellent quality images of the cardiovascular system utilizing the inherent natural contrast between flowing blood and the surrounding anatomic structures. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of MRI in the noninvasive diagnosis of large vessel disorders, the authors have performed MRI on 40 pts with either aortic or pulmonary artery abnormalities (18 thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, 8 aorto-occlusive disease, 6 dissecting aneurysms, 4 Marfan's syndrome, 2 pulmonary artery aneurysms 1 pulmonary artery occlusion, 1 aortic coarctation). Images were obtained in the transverse, coronal and sagital body planes utilizing a 0.6T superconductive magnet. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating was employed in most cases. Correlation was made for all studies with conventional or digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography, and/or ultrasound. The diagnostic information obtained by MRI equaled or exceeded that obtained by other imaging techniques except for the few cases where cardiac arrhythmias precluded adequate gated acquisition. All aneurysms and their relationships to adjacent structures were readily demonstrated as were the presence or absence of mural thrombi and dissecting intimal flaps. Angiographically demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques and luminal stenoses were seen by MRI in all patients without arrhythmias. The authors concluded that MRI is a powerful noninvasive diagnostic aid in the delineation of large vessel disorders, especially where knowledge of anatomic interrelationships can guide surgical or other interventional planning.

  18. Exploratory use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in liver transplantation: a one-stop shop for preoperative cardiohepatic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sahadev T; Thai, Ngoc L; Fakhri, Asghar A; Oliva, Jose; Tom, Kusum B; Dishart, Michael K; Doyle, Mark; Yamrozik, June A; Williams, Ronald B; Grant, Saundra B; Poydence, Jacqueline; Shah, Moneal; Singh, Anil; Nathan, Swami; Biederman, Robert W W

    2013-11-15

    Preoperative cardiovascular risk stratification in orthotopic liver transplantation candidates has proven challenging due to limitations of current noninvasive modalities. Additionally, the preoperative workup is logistically cumbersome and expensive given the need for separate cardiac, vascular, and abdominal imaging. We evaluated the feasibility of a "one-stop shop" in a magnetic resonance suite, performing assessment of cardiac structure, function, and viability, along with simultaneous evaluation of thoracoabdominal vasculature and liver anatomy. In this pilot study, patients underwent steady-state free precession sequences and stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), thoracoabdominal magnetic resonance angiography, and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a standard MRI scanner. Pharmacologic stress was performed using regadenoson, adenosine, or dobutamine. Viability was assessed using late gadolinium enhancement. Over 2 years, 51 of 77 liver transplant candidates (mean age, 56 years; 35% female; mean Model for End-stage Liver Disease score, 10.8; range, 6-40) underwent MRI. All referred patients completed standard dynamic CMR, 98% completed stress CMR, 82% completed late gadolinium enhancement for viability, 94% completed liver MRI, and 88% completed magnetic resonance angiography. The mean duration of the entire study was 72 min, and 45 patients were able to complete the entire examination. Among all 51 patients, 4 required follow-up coronary angiography (3 for evidence of ischemia on perfusion CMR and 1 for postoperative ischemia), and none had flow-limiting coronary disease. Nine proceeded to orthotopic liver transplantation (mean 74 days to transplantation after MRI). There were six ascertained mortalities in the nontransplant group and one death in the transplanted group. Explant pathology confirmed 100% detection/exclusion of hepatocellular carcinoma. No complications during CMR examination were encountered. In this proof-of-concept study, it

  19. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolicki, L.; Bak, M.; Grieb, P.

    1996-01-01

    The article presents the current results of MR spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system. This method is useful in examination of brain ischemia, brain tumors, epilepsy; white matter disorders and degeneration diseases. MR spectroscopy is unique technique for in vivo examination of the brain in physiological and pathophysiological states. (author)

  20. Size modulated transition in the fluid–structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pratap, R., E-mail: pratap@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012 (India); Pandey, A. K., E-mail: ashok@iith.ac.in [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Kandi, Sangareddy - 502285 (India); Parpia, J. M.; Craighead, H. G. [Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Verbridge, S. S. [Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachisuka, Hiroki; Kimori, Kenji; Tsuge, Kenya; Murakami, Tsuneji

    2006-01-01

    In many reports, the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is evaluated by subjective symptoms and nerve conduction findings of the median nerve. However, nerve conduction studies are complicated and the patients occasionally experience pain. In this report, we quantified a morphological change in the median nerve by using MRI, and reviewed a new noninvasive method of CTS evaluation. The survey was carried out on 55 idiopathic CTS patients (45 females and 10 males). The affected areas were 33 right hands and 22 left hands. The average age of the patients was 59 years. We used Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 Tesla MRI. T2 weighted axial image of the carpal canal sliced by width of 1 mm was used to measure a minimum axis/maximum axis (median nerve compression rate; MNCR). Simultaneously, we measured the nerve conduction velocity and terminal latency of the motor and sensory nerves; we evaluated the thumb motor disturbance by Hamada's classification and sensory disturbance by Semmes-Weinstein test. The statistical correlations between these items and MNCR were analyzed. MNCR had a significant correlation with all items, particularly with motor nerve conduction velocity and latency, and Hamada's classification. There have been some trials regarding the application of MRI findings for CTS evaluation. In these reports, they measured the cross section of the median nerve or brightness of the median nerve, flexor tendon, or intrinsic muscle. However, it is difficult to measure an MRI cross section or brightness in common practice. MNCR has a statistical correlation with the nerve conduction study, is easy to measure, and noninvasive. MNCR is useful as an objective evaluation method of CTS severity. (author)

  2. Shot noise and electronic properties in the inversion-symmetric Weyl semimetal resonant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanling; Bai, Chunxu; Xu, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the authors combine the analytical formula with numerical calculation to explore the shot noise and conductance of massless Weyl fermions in the Weyl semimetal resonant junction. By varying the barrier strength, the structure of the junction, the Fermi energy, and the crystallographic angle, the shot noise and conductance can be tuned efficiently. For a quasiperiodic superlattice, in complete contrast to the conventional junction case, the effect of the disorder strength on the shot noise and conductance depends on the competition of classical tunneling and Klein tunneling. Moreover, the delta barrier structure is also vital in determining the shot noise and conductance. In particular, a universal Fano factor has been found in a single delta potential case, whereas the resonant structure of the Fano factor perfectly matches with the number of barriers in a delta potential superlattice. These results are crucial for engineering nanoelectronic devices based on this topological semimetal material.

  3. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  4. Transmission resonances in a semiconductor-superconductor junction quantum interference structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Transport properties in a quantum resonator structure of a normal-conductor endash superconductor (NS) junction are calculated. Quasiparticles in a cavity region undergo multiple reflections due to an abrupt change in the width of the wire and the NS interface. Quantum interference of the reflections modulates the nominal normal reflection probability at the NS boundary. We show that various NS structures can be regarded as the quantum resonator because of the absence of propagation along the NS interface. When the incident energy coincides with the quasibound state energy levels, the zero-voltage conductance exhibits peaks for small voltages applied to the NS junction. The transmission peaks change to dips of nearly perfect reflection when the applied voltage exceeds a critical value. Two branches of the resonance, which are roughly characterized by electron and hole wavelengths, emerge from the individual dip, and the energy difference between them increases with increasing voltage. The electronlike and holelike resonance dips originating from different quasibound states at zero-voltage cross one after another when the voltage approaches the superconducting gap. We find that both crossing and anticrossing can be produced. It is shown that the individual resonance state in the NS system is associated with two zeros and two poles in the complex energy plane. The behavior of the resonance is explained in terms of splitting and merging of the zero-pole pairs. We examine the Green close-quote s function of a one-dimensional NS system in order to find out how the transmission properties are influenced by the scattering from the NS interface. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Flexible structured high-frequency film bulk acoustic resonator for flexible wireless electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changjian; Shu, Yi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling; Jin, Hao; Dong, Shu-Rong; Chan, Mansun

    2015-01-01

    Flexible electronics have inspired many novel and very important applications in recent years and various flexible electronic devices such as diodes, transistors, circuits, sensors, and radiofrequency (RF) passive devices including antennas and inductors have been reported. However, the lack of a high-performance RF resonator is one of the key bottlenecks to implement flexible wireless electronics. In this study, for the first time, a novel ultra-flexible structured film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is proposed. The flexible FBAR is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride (AlN) for acoustic wave excitation. Both the shear wave and longitudinal wave can be excited under the surface interdigital electrodes configuration we proposed. In the case of the thickness extension mode, a flexible resonator with a working frequency as high as of 5.2325 GHz has been realized. The resonators stay fully functional under bending status and after repeated bending and re-flattening operations. This flexible high-frequency resonator will serve as a key building block for the future flexible wireless electronics, greatly expanding the application scope of flexible electronics. (paper)

  6. Application of resonant backscattering spectrometry for determination of pore structure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszti, F. E-mail: paszti@rmki.kfki.hu; Szilagyi, E.; Manuaba, A.; Battistig, G

    2000-03-01

    In the present work slightly oxidised porous silicon samples of columnar type were investigated by resonant elastic scattering using the 3045 keV resonance in the {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a characteristic peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered particles. In porous material the individual ions travel fluctuating distance in pores, hence, the peak width depends on the structure of the sample. When changing the direction of the analysing beam to the sample, the width of the resonance peak changes in a special way characterising the angular distribution of the pore walls. This resonance method was applied to columnar type porous Si samples implanted by 4 MeV N ions at various tilt angles and fluences. It was shown that the beam tilts the pore walls by an angle proportional to the fluence and the sine of the angle between the beam and the pore walls. Meantime, the angular divergence of the pore walls also increases. The underlying mechanism is briefly discussed.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging textural evaluation of posterior cranial fossa tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joelson Alves dos; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lacerda, Maria Teresa Carvalho de; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Matsushita, Hamilton

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish healthy from pathological tissues in pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using calculated textural parameters from magnetic resonance images. Materials And Methods: We evaluated 14 pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using the software MaZda to define the texture parameters in selected regions of interest representing healthy and pathological tissues based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between normal and tumoral tissues as well as between supposedly normal tissues adjacent and distant from the tumoral lesion. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance textural evaluation is an useful tool for determining differences among various tissues, including tissues that appear apparently normal on visual analysis. (author)

  8. Theoretical evaluation of self-shielding factors due to scattering resonances in foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selander, W.N.

    1960-06-01

    A semi-analytical method is given for evaluating self-shielding factors for activation measurements which use thin foils having neutron scattering resonances. The energy loss by scattering in the foil is taken into account. The energy-dependent neutron angular distribution is expanded as a double series, the coefficients of which are (energy dependent) solutions of an infinite set of coupled integral equations. These are truncated in some suitable manner and solved numerically. The leading term of the series is proportional to the average, or effective flux in the activation sample. The product of this terra and the neutron capture cross-section is integrated numerically over the resonance to give the resonance self-shielding correction. Figure 4 shows resonance self-shielding factors derived in this mariner for the 132ev resonance in Co-59 and figure 5 shows similar results for the two Mn-55 resonances at 337ev and 1080ev. Self-shielding factors for 1/v capture are not significantly different from unity. (author)

  9. Evaluating Hierarchical Structure in Music Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, Brian; Nieto, Oriol; Farbood, Morwaread M; Bello, Juan Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Music exhibits structure at multiple scales, ranging from motifs to large-scale functional components. When inferring the structure of a piece, different listeners may attend to different temporal scales, which can result in disagreements when they describe the same piece. In the field of music informatics research (MIR), it is common to use corpora annotated with structural boundaries at different levels. By quantifying disagreements between multiple annotators, previous research has yielded several insights relevant to the study of music cognition. First, annotators tend to agree when structural boundaries are ambiguous. Second, this ambiguity seems to depend on musical features, time scale, and genre. Furthermore, it is possible to tune current annotation evaluation metrics to better align with these perceptual differences. However, previous work has not directly analyzed the effects of hierarchical structure because the existing methods for comparing structural annotations are designed for "flat" descriptions, and do not readily generalize to hierarchical annotations. In this paper, we extend and generalize previous work on the evaluation of hierarchical descriptions of musical structure. We derive an evaluation metric which can compare hierarchical annotations holistically across multiple levels. sing this metric, we investigate inter-annotator agreement on the multilevel annotations of two different music corpora, investigate the influence of acoustic properties on hierarchical annotations, and evaluate existing hierarchical segmentation algorithms against the distribution of inter-annotator agreement.

  10. Evaluating Hierarchical Structure in Music Annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McFee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Music exhibits structure at multiple scales, ranging from motifs to large-scale functional components. When inferring the structure of a piece, different listeners may attend to different temporal scales, which can result in disagreements when they describe the same piece. In the field of music informatics research (MIR, it is common to use corpora annotated with structural boundaries at different levels. By quantifying disagreements between multiple annotators, previous research has yielded several insights relevant to the study of music cognition. First, annotators tend to agree when structural boundaries are ambiguous. Second, this ambiguity seems to depend on musical features, time scale, and genre. Furthermore, it is possible to tune current annotation evaluation metrics to better align with these perceptual differences. However, previous work has not directly analyzed the effects of hierarchical structure because the existing methods for comparing structural annotations are designed for “flat” descriptions, and do not readily generalize to hierarchical annotations. In this paper, we extend and generalize previous work on the evaluation of hierarchical descriptions of musical structure. We derive an evaluation metric which can compare hierarchical annotations holistically across multiple levels. sing this metric, we investigate inter-annotator agreement on the multilevel annotations of two different music corpora, investigate the influence of acoustic properties on hierarchical annotations, and evaluate existing hierarchical segmentation algorithms against the distribution of inter-annotator agreement.

  11. Evaluation of pleural and pericardial effusions by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tscholakoff, D.; Sechtem, U.; De Geer, G.; Schmidt, H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-08-01

    MR examinations of 36 patients with pleural and/or pericardial effusions were retrospectively evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine of MR imaging is capable of differentiating between pleural and pericardial effusions of different compositions using standard electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated and nongated spin echo pulse sequences. Additional data was obtained from experimental pleural effusions in 10 dogs. The results of this study indicate that old haemorhages into the pleural or pericardial space can be differentiated from other pleural or pericardial effusions. However, further differentiation between transudates, exudates and sanguinous effusions is not possible on MR images acquired with standard spin echo pulse sequences. (orig./MG)

  12. Evaluation of RF seals for resonant cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Spalek, G.; Bolme, G.O.; Bultman, N.; Klapetkzy, A.; Kemp, E.L.; Stovall, J.E.; Rose, J.

    1991-01-01

    In radio-frequency quadrupoles (RFQ) and drift-tube linacs (DTL), electrical seals are required at mechanical interfaces to preserve the cavity quality factor (Q). Studies determined the response of copper-plated C-seals to continuous wave (cw), highfield operating conditions. In addition, low-power evaluations of machined-surface, knife-edge, indium wire, C-type, and multilam seals were done at room temperature and cryogenic (25 K) temperatures. For the high-field tests, the Q as well as seal temperature, was measured with power. For the low power test, the Q was measured as a function of temperature

  13. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  14. Sensitivity of 238U resonance absorption to library multigroup structure as calculated by WIMS-AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughton, P.J.; Donnelly, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    In simulations of the TRX-1 experimental lattice, WIMS-AECL overpredicts, relative to MCNP, resonance absorption in neutron-energy groups containing the three large, low-lying resonances of 238 U when a standard ENDF/B-V-based library is used. A total excess in these groups of 4.0 neutron captures by 238 U per thousand fission neutrons has been observed. Similar comparisons are made in this work for the MIT-4 experimental lattice and simplified CANDU lattice cells containing 37-element fuel, with and without heavy-water coolant. Eleven different 89-group cross-section libraries were constructed for WIMS-AECL from ENDF/B-V data: only the neutron-energy-group boundaries used in generating multigroup cross sections and the Goldstein-Cohen correction factors differ from one library to the next. The first library uses the original 89-group structure, and the other ten involve energy groups of varying widths centred on the three large, low-lying resonances of 238 U. For TRX-1, some reduction in total discrepancy in 238 U capture can be achieved by using a new structure, although the improvement is small. The discrepancies in 238 U capture are of the same order for the MIT-4 case as those observed for TRX-1 for both the original group structure and the ten new structures. The WIMS-AECL calculation of 238 U resonance absorption in the same ranges of energy for the simplified CANDU 37-element lattice are in better agreement with MCNP than they are for TRX-1 and MIT-4: when the original structure is used, WIMS-AECL underpredicts total capture rate by 238 U in the energy range of interest by only 0.56 per thousand fission neutrons (coolant present) and 0.88 per thousand fission neutrons (voided coolant channel). The discrepancies are reduced when some of the new structures are used. For almost all of the cases considered here-TRX-1, MIT-4 and CANDU with coolant-better group-by-group agreement of 238 U capture around the 6.67-eV resonance is achieved by using a new library

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Oesophageal Motility Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Covotta

    2011-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering that fMRI was shown to offer valuable information on bolus transit and on the caliber of the esophagus, variations of these two parameters in the different types of esophageal motor alterations have been assessed. fMRI, compared to manometry and videofluoroscopy, showed that a deranged or absent peristalsis is significantly associated with slower transit time and with increased esophageal diameter. Although further studies are needed, fMRI represents a promising noninvasive technique for the integrated functional and morphological evaluation of esophageal motility disorders.

  16. Application of electron spin resonance for evaluation of the level of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In order to identify and quantify free radicals in the tissues of patients with normal physiological and pathological states of births, we developed a method to evaluate the amount of free radicals in myometrium of subplacental area and from body of uterus, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Analysis of the ...

  17. Methodologies for semiquantitative evaluation of hip osteoarthritis by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaremko, Jacob L; Lambert, Robert G W; Zubler, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    As a wider variety of therapeutic options for osteoarthritis (OA) becomes available, there is an increasing need to objectively evaluate disease severity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is more technically challenging at the hip than at the knee, and as a result, few systematic scoring...

  18. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of psoriatic dactylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakewell, Catherine J; Olivieri, Ignazio; Aydin, Sibel Z

    2013-01-01

    ) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) literature to better define imaging elements that contribute to the dactylitic digit seen in PsA. Our objectives were to determine first the level of homogeneity of each imaging modality's definition of the components of dactylitis, and second, to evaluate the metric...

  19. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  20. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1 in the Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Perry Anthony; Antonov, R.; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Bauer, J.M.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Vincent Breton; Button-Shafer, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; T.E. Chupp; J. Clendenin; C. Comptour; K.P. Coulter; G. Court; Donald Crabb; M. Daoudi; Donal Day; F.S. Dietrich; James Dunne; H. Dutz; R. Erbacher; J. Fellbaum; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; D. Garvey; R. Gearhart; Javier Gomez; P. Grenier; Keith Griffioen; S. Hoeibraten; Emlyn Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; J.R. Johnson; D. Kawall; Andreas Klein; Sebastian Kuhn; M. Kuriki; Richard Lindgren; T.J. Liu; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; Tomoyuki Maruyama; X.K. Maruyama; James Mccarthy; Werner Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; J. Morgenstern; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; C. Prescott; R. Prepost; P. Raines; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; A. Rijllart; Yves Roblin; L. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Ingo Sick; Lee Smith; Tim Smith; M. Spengos; F. Staley; P. Steiner; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; F. Suekane; Z.M. Szalata; Huabin Tang; Y. Terrien; Tracy Usher; Dieter Walz; Frank Wesselmann; J.L. White; K. Witte; C. Young; Brad Youngman; Haruo Yuta; G. Zapalac; Benedikt Zihlmann; Zimmermann, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g 1 p and g 1 d in the region of the nucleon resonances for W 2 2 and Q 2 ≅ 0.5 and Q 2 ≅ 1.2 GeV 2 by inelastically scattering 9.7 GeV polarized electrons off polarized 15 NH 3 and 15 ND 3 targets. We observe significant structure in g 1 p in the resonance region. We have used the present results, together with the deep-inelastic data at higher W 2 , to extract Γ(Q 2 ) (triple b ond) ∫ 0 1 g 1 (x,Q 2 ) dx. This is the first information on the low-Q 2 evolution of Gamma toward the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn limit at Q 2 = 0

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of incision healing after cesarean sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicle, O. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Dokuz Eyluel University, Izmir (Turkey); Kuecuekler, C. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Dokuz Eyluel University, Izmir (Turkey); Pirnar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Dokuz Eyluel University, Izmir (Turkey); Erata, Y. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Dokuz Eyluel University, Izmir (Turkey); Posaci, C. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Dokuz Eyluel University, Izmir (Turkey)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the healing period of incision scar in myometrial wall and the normal pelvis after cesarean sections by means of MRI. In this study 17 voluntary women were examined after their first delivery with cesarean section in the early postpartum period (first 5 days), and following this, three more times in 3-month intervals. The MRI examinations were performed on a 1.0-T system (Magnetom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), and sagittal T1-weighted (550/17 TR/TE) and T2-weighted (2000/80 TR/TE) spin-echo (SE) images of the pelvis were obtained. During follow-up examinations incision scar tissues lost their signals within the first 3 months on both SE sequences, and little alteration was observed in the subsequent tests. Zonal anatomy of the uterus reappeared completely 6 months after cesarean sections. The time for the involution of the uterus was independent of the zonal anatomy recovery, and the maximum involution was inspected within the first 3 months. In conclusion, the maturation time of myometrial scar tissue in uncomplicated cesarean sections, which can be evaluated by the signal alterations in MRI, is approximately 3 months, whereas the complete involution and the recovery of the zonal anatomy need at least 6 months. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of incision healing after cesarean sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicle, O.; Kuecuekler, C.; Pirnar, T.; Erata, Y.; Posaci, C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the healing period of incision scar in myometrial wall and the normal pelvis after cesarean sections by means of MRI. In this study 17 voluntary women were examined after their first delivery with cesarean section in the early postpartum period (first 5 days), and following this, three more times in 3-month intervals. The MRI examinations were performed on a 1.0-T system (Magnetom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), and sagittal T1-weighted (550/17 TR/TE) and T2-weighted (2000/80 TR/TE) spin-echo (SE) images of the pelvis were obtained. During follow-up examinations incision scar tissues lost their signals within the first 3 months on both SE sequences, and little alteration was observed in the subsequent tests. Zonal anatomy of the uterus reappeared completely 6 months after cesarean sections. The time for the involution of the uterus was independent of the zonal anatomy recovery, and the maximum involution was inspected within the first 3 months. In conclusion, the maturation time of myometrial scar tissue in uncomplicated cesarean sections, which can be evaluated by the signal alterations in MRI, is approximately 3 months, whereas the complete involution and the recovery of the zonal anatomy need at least 6 months. (orig.). With 6 figs

  3. Development of Technology for Structural Integrity Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Choi, I. K.; Kim, M. K. and others

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study is a development of seismic safety and structural integrity evaluation method of the structure in the Nuclear Power plant (NPP). The purpose of 1st sub-Topic is the development and improvement of the seismic safety evaluation methodology for the Nuclear Power Plant structures and safety related equipment. The purpose of 2nd sub-topic is the increasing of structure and equipment seismic capacity through the reducing of seismic force. The purpose of 3rd sub-topic is the development of 3-D nonlinear finite element analysis program for prestressed concrete containment building. The last purpose if the evaluation of the failure mechanism of containment structure and structure capacity and the assessment of integrity of containment through the of leakage test. As a result of this research, there are many research results were produced. The scenario earthquake developing method was developed and the effect of the structures and equipment was analyzed. The effectiveness of isolation system was determined and optimum isolation systems for each equipment were selected. The NUCAS-3D program for the 3 dimensional numerical analysis of containment building using the embedded tendon element and rebar element was developed. The tension behavior of containment building was examined and the leakage rate of the concrete crack was determined. The results of this research can be successfully used for many fields of integrity of NPP site. It can be used for development of design earthquake for the seismic design and safety evaluation and establishment of seismic safety evaluation program and seismic capacity improvement program for existing NPP. In case of seismic isolation part, it can be used for the application to the selection of optimum isolation devices for equipment isolation and to the effective evaluation of each seismic isolation devices. In containment analysis part, it can be used for ultimate pressure capacity evaluation of prestressed concrete

  4. Derivative corrections to the symmetry energy and the isovector dipole-resonance structure in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J P; Magner, A G; Ring, P

    2015-01-01

    The effective surface approximation is extended accounting for derivatives of the symmetry energy density per particle. The new expressions for the isovector surface energy constants are used for calculations of improved energies and sum rules of the isovector dipole-resonance strength structure within the Fermi-liquid droplet model. Our results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data and with other theoretical approaches. (paper)

  5. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the labral capsular ligamentous complex: a pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, D.A.; Potter, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder is a common imaging test, and in the course of routine evaluation it can provide accurate information regarding the labral capsular ligamentous complex (LCLC). Common patterns of labral injury include fraying, flap tears and labral distraction, which can be readily identified on both coronal and axial planes by paying attention to signal and morphological characteristics. Capsular and ligamentous pathology may be subtle, but is recognizable using a high-resolution technique that has differential contrast between native intra-articular fluid and the adjacent labrum and capsular restraints. Common patterns of capsular injury include a thickened, hyperintense capsule, sometimes with disruption and retraction. The inferior glenohumeral ligament is the primary stabilizer of the shoulder joint, and although failure of this structure is uncommon, the injury is easily identified. Shoulder instability is a common presentation, the diagnosis of which is dependent upon recognising various injury patterns including Bankart lesions, reverse Bankart lesions, anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA) and failure of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Evaluation of TFC tears with magnetic resonance imaging; Comparison with arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushida, Manabu; Imamura, Koutaro; Sumi, Mitsuhiro; Uetani, Masataka (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Nagatani, Yoshifumi

    1993-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of tears of the trianglar fibrocartilage (TFC). Eighteen patients with chronic pain in the ulnar side of their wrist were examined by MRI and arthrography. Compared with arthrography, MRI was effective in the evaluation of TFC tears with a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 67%, and an accuracy of 83%. (author).

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Althaf S.; Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the de...

  8. Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) on behalf of the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network organized under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. ENSDF provides evaluated experimental nuclear structure and decay data for basic and applied research. The activities of the NSDD network, the publication of the evaluations, and their use in different applications are described. Since 1986, the ENSDF and related numeric and bibliographic data bases have been made available for on-line access. The current status of these data bases, and future plans to improve the on-line access to their contents are discussed. 8 refs., 4 tabs

  9. One-step sol-gel imprint lithography for guided-mode resonance structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Longju; Johnson, Michael; C Hillier, Andrew; Lu, Meng

    2016-03-04

    Guided-mode resonance (GMR) structures consisting of sub-wavelength periodic gratings are capable of producing narrow-linewidth optical resonances. This paper describes a sol-gel-based imprint lithography method for the fabrication of submicron 1D and 2D GMR structures. This method utilizes a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to fabricate the grating coupler and waveguide for a GMR device using a sol-gel thin film in a single step. An organic-inorganic hybrid sol-gel film was selected as the imprint material because of its relatively high refractive index. The optical responses of several sol-gel GMR devices were characterized, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results of electromagnetic simulations. The influence of processing parameters was investigated in order to determine how finely the spectral response and resonant wavelength of the GMR devices could be tuned. As an example potential application, refractometric sensing experiments were performed using a 1D sol-gel device. The results demonstrated a refractive index sensitivity of 50 nm/refractive index unit. This one-step fabrication process offers a simple, rapid, and low-cost means of fabricating GMR structures. We anticipate that this method can be valuable in the development of various GMR-based devices as it can readily enable the fabrication of complex shapes and allow the doping of optically active materials into sol-gel thin film.

  10. One-step sol–gel imprint lithography for guided-mode resonance structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Liu, Longju; Lu, Meng; Johnson, Michael; C Hillier, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided-mode resonance (GMR) structures consisting of sub-wavelength periodic gratings are capable of producing narrow-linewidth optical resonances. This paper describes a sol–gel-based imprint lithography method for the fabrication of submicron 1D and 2D GMR structures. This method utilizes a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold to fabricate the grating coupler and waveguide for a GMR device using a sol–gel thin film in a single step. An organic–inorganic hybrid sol–gel film was selected as the imprint material because of its relatively high refractive index. The optical responses of several sol–gel GMR devices were characterized, and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results of electromagnetic simulations. The influence of processing parameters was investigated in order to determine how finely the spectral response and resonant wavelength of the GMR devices could be tuned. As an example potential application, refractometric sensing experiments were performed using a 1D sol–gel device. The results demonstrated a refractive index sensitivity of 50 nm/refractive index unit. This one-step fabrication process offers a simple, rapid, and low-cost means of fabricating GMR structures. We anticipate that this method can be valuable in the development of various GMR-based devices as it can readily enable the fabrication of complex shapes and allow the doping of optically active materials into sol–gel thin film. (paper)

  11. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.

    1993-01-01

    Absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) are measured for position (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV) krypton (6.7-400 eV) and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures are found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke [1] for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. [2] supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  12. Observations of resonance-like structures for positron-atom elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, L.; Kauppila, W.E.; Kwan, C.K.; Stein, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured absolute values of elastic differential cross sections (DCS's) for positron (e + ) scattering by argon (8.7-300 eV), krypton (6.7-400 eV), and also neon (13.6-400 eV) using a crossed-beam experimental setup. When the DCS's are plotted at fixed scattering angles of 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees versus energy it has been found that well-defined resonance-like structures were found at an energy of 55-60 eV for argon and at 25 and 200 eV for krypton, with a broader structure found between 100-200 eV for neon. These observed resonance-like structures are unusual because they occur at energies well above the known inelastic thresholds for these atoms. They may represent examples of open-quotes coupled channel shape resonancesclose quotes, first predicted by Higgins and Burke for e + -H scattering in the vicinity of 36 eV (width ∼ 4 eV), which occurs only when both the elastic and positronium formation scattering channels are considered together. A more recent e + -H calculation by Hewitt et al. supports the Higgins and Burke prediction. These predictions and the present observations suggest the existence of a new type of atomic scattering resonance

  13. Vibrational structures in electron-CO2 scattering below the 2Πu shape resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Structures of vibrational origin were discovered in vibrationally inelastic electron-CO 2 cross sections in the energy range 0.4-0.9 eV, well below the 2 Π u shape resonance. They appear in the excitation of higher vibrational levels, in particular the highest members of the Fermi polyads of the type (n, 2m, 0) with n+m=2-4. The lowest two structures, at 0.445 and 0.525 eV, are narrow; higher-lying structures are broader and boomerang-like. The structures are absent when the antisymmetric stretch is co-excited. The structures are interpreted in terms of a wavepacket of the nuclei reflected from a potential surface of the CO 2 - anion in a bent and stretched geometry. A state emerging from the virtual state upon bending and stretching and the state resulting from bending the 2 Π u shape resonance are discussed as possibly being responsible for the structures. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  14. Theoretical study of ferromagnetic resonance in exchange - coupled magnetic / nonmagnetic / magnetic multilayer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdogan, K.; Oezdemir, M.; Yalcin, O.; Aktas, B.

    2002-01-01

    The dispersion relation on ferromagnetic films was calculation by using torque equation of motion with a damping term. The total energy including zeeman, demagnetizing and anisotropy energy terms was used to get ferromagnetic resonance frequency for both uniform and higher order spin wave modes. In antiferromagnetic films, the torque equation of motion for each sub-lattice were written to derive an expression for the dispersion relation. The magnetic trilayer system under investigation consist of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic layer. The dispersion relation of magnetic/nonmagnetic/magnetic three layers is calculated by using Landau-Lifshitz dynamic equation of motion for the magnetization with interlayer exchange energy. As for the exchange-coupled resonance of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), the theoretical study has been calculated for both symmetrical and asymmetrical structures. In this systems, the exchange-coupling parameter A 12 between neighboring layers was used to get resonance fields as a function of the angle between the magnetization vectors of each magnetic layers

  15. A novel nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation effect for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a theoretical model able to predict the generation of nonlinear elastic effects associated to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the steady-state nonlinear response of local defect resonance (LDR). The LDR effect is used in nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy to enhance the excitation of the material damage at its local resonance, thus to dramatically increase the vibrational amplitude of material nonlinear phenomena. The main result of this work is to prove both analytically and experimentally the generation of novel nonlinear elastic wave effects, here named as nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation, which correspond to a nonlinear intermodulation between the driving frequency and the LDR one. Beside this intermodulation effect, other nonlinear elastic wave phenomena such as higher harmonics of the input frequency and superharmonics of LDR frequency were found. The analytical model relies on solving the nonlinear equation of motion governing bending displacement under the assumption of both quadratic and cubic nonlinear defect approximation. Experimental tests on a damaged composite laminate confirmed and validated these predictions and showed that using continuous periodic excitation, the nonlinear structural phenomena associated to LDR could also be featured at locations different from the damage resonance. These findings will provide new opportunities for material damage detection using nonlinear ultrasounds.

  16. A new design of a miniature filter on microstrip resonators with an interdigital structure of conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Serzhantov, A. M.; Bal'va, Ya. F.; Leksikov, An. A.; Galeev, R. G.

    2015-05-01

    A microstrip bandpass filter of new design based on original resonators with an interdigital structure of conductors has been studied. The proposed filters of third to sixth order are distinguished for their high frequency-selective properties and much smaller size than analogs. It is established that a broad stop band, extending up to a sixfold central bandpass frequency, is determined by low unloaded Q of higher resonance mode and weak coupling of resonators in the pass band. It is shown for the first time that, as the spacing of interdigital stripe conductors decreases, the Q of higher resonance mode monotonically drops, while the Q value for the first operating mode remains high. A prototype fourth-order filter with a central frequency of 0.9 GHz manufactured on a ceramic substrate with dielectric permittivity ɛ = 80 has microstrip topology dimensions of 9.5 × 4.6 × 1 mm3. The electrodynamic 3D model simulations of the filter characteristics agree well with the results of measurements.

  17. Peculiarities of the fundamental mode structure in stable-resonator lasers upon spatially inhomogeneous amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunkov, Mikhail V; Kostryukov, P V; Telegin, L S; Tunkin, V G; Yakovlev, D V

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fundamental mode of a laser is calculated by the iteration Fox-Li method in the case of inhomogeneous unsaturated amplification produced by axially symmetric longitudinal pumping. The calculation is performed for different parameters g 1 and g 2 of the resonator within the entire stability region. It is shown that in the case of inhomogeneous amplification, the fundamental mode considerably deviates from the Gaussian mode of an empty resonator only in the so-called critical configurations of the resonator, when the quantity [arccos(g 1 g 2 ) 1/2 ]/π is zero or takes a number of values expressed by irreducible fractions m/n. For the Fresnel number N F = 9, configurations with m/n = 1/2, 2/5, 3/8, 1/3, 3/10, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, and 1/10 are pronounced. As N F increases, the number of critical configurations increases. The expansion in a system of Laguerre-Gaussian beams shows that the fundamental mode in critical configurations is formed by a set of beams with certain radial indices p phased in the active medium. (resonators. modes)

  18. Processing covariance data for the resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation, V. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, M.; Leal, L.C.; Wiarda, D.; Jacqmin, R.; Kodeli, I.; ); Chiba, G.; Shibata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Oh, S.; Nikolaev, M.; Kahler, A.C. Jr.; Kawano, T.; Arcilla, R.

    2014-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are ENDF (United States), JEF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Cooperation with evaluation projects of non- OECD countries is organized through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the work performed by WPEC Subgroup 28 (SG28) on issues pertinent to the methodology used to process covariance data in the resonance region. Specifically, SG28 has developed the requisite processing methods needed to process resonance parameter covariance data, generate cross-section covariance data files and demonstrate the use of covariance data in radiation transport analyses. The work performed by SG28 and documented in this report addresses the following tasks: - Produce resonance parameter covariance evaluation for 235 U; - Develop resonance parameter covariance processing methods in widely used processing systems (e.g., NJOY, AMPX, etc.); - Use the updated cross-section processing systems to generate covariance data files for use in radiation transport analyses. In addition, use sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses to demonstrate the propagation of the covariance data in specific radiation transport applications

  19. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]--evaluation and prediction of violin makers' quality-grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksnowitz, Christoph; Teischinger, Alfred; Müller, Ulrich; Pahler, Andreas; Evans, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The definition of quality in the field of resonance wood for musical instrument making has attracted considerable interest over decades but has remained incomplete. The current work compares the traditional knowledge and practical experience of violin makers with a material-science approach to objectively characterize the properties of resonance wood. Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] has earned a very high reputation for the construction of resonance tops of stringed instruments and resonance boards of keyboard instruments, and was therefore chosen as the focus of the investigation. The samples were obtained from numerous renowned resonance wood regions in the European Alps and cover the whole range of available qualities. A set of acoustical, anatomical, mechanical and optical material properties was measured on each sample. These measurements were compared with subjective quality grading by violin makers, who estimated the acoustical, optical and overall suitability for violin making. Multiple linear regression models were applied to evaluate the predictability of the subjective grading using the measured material characteristics as predictors. The results show that luthiers are able to estimate wood quality related to visible features, but predictions of mechanical and acoustical properties proved to be very poor.

  20. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-01-01

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples

  1. Bi-resonant structure with piezoelectric PVDF films for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Shanshan; Crovetto, Andrea; Peng, Zhuoteng

    2016-01-01

    and experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with the bi-resonant structure can generate higher power output than that of the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources at low frequency, and hence significantly improves the vibration-to- electricity......This paper reports on a bi-resonant structure of piezoelectric PVDF films energy harvester (PPEH), which consists of two cantilevers with resonant frequencies of 15 Hz and 22 Hz. With increased acceleration, the vibration amplitudes of the two cantilever-mass structures are increased and collision...

  2. Broadband Acoustic Transmission Enhancement through a Structured Stiff Plate with Locally Resonant Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Liang Bin; Zou Xin-Ye; Cheng Jian-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Broadband acoustic transmission enhancement (ATE) is realized for a periodically structured stiff plate without any opening that is conventionally thought to be only capable of supporting narrowband ATE, by introducing locally resonant (LR) elements. This exotic phenomenon is interpreted by analyzing the vibration pattern of the structure-induced LR modes, and is well modeled by a simple 'spring-mass' system which reveals the contribution of the LR effect to the important broadband performance. Our findings should help to better understand the physical mechanism of ATE and may have potential impact on ultrasonic applications such as broadband acoustic filters or compact acoustic devices in subwavelength scale

  3. Magnetophonon resonance in multimode lattices and two-dimensional structures (DQW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, D.; Sheregii, E.; Marchewka, M.; Tomaka, G.

    2007-12-01

    The experimental results obtained for the magneto-transport in the InGaAs/InAlAs double quantum wells (DQW) structures of two different shapes of wells are reported. The Magnetophonon Resonance (MPR) o was observed for both types of the structures at 77-125K temperatures in the pulsed magnetic field. Four kinds of LO-phonons are taken into account to interpret the MPR oscillations in DQW. The particularity of MPR in DQW is the great number Landau levels caused by SAS-splitting all electron states.

  4. Magnetophonon resonance in multimode lattices and two-dimensional structures (DQW)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploch, D; Sheregii, E; Marchewka, M; Tomaka, G [Institute of Physics University of Rzeszow, 35-310 Rzeszow, Rejtana 16 (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The experimental results obtained for the magneto-transport in the InGaAs/InAlAs double quantum wells (DQW) structures of two different shapes of wells are reported. The Magnetophonon Resonance (MPR) o was observed for both types of the structures at 77-125K temperatures in the pulsed magnetic field. Four kinds of LO-phonons are taken into account to interpret the MPR oscillations in DQW. The particularity of MPR in DQW is the great number Landau levels caused by SAS-splitting all electron states.

  5. Resonance structure of 32S+n from measurements of neutron total and capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.; Johnson, C.H.; Winters, R.R.; Macklin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron total and capture cross sections of 32 S have been measured up to 1100 keV neutron energy [E/sub exc/( 33 S) =9700 keV]. Spin and parity assignments have been made for 28 of the 64 resonances found in this region. Values of total radiation widths, reduced neutron widths, level spacings, and neutron strength functions have been evaluated for s/sub 1/2/, p/sub 1/2/, p/sub 3/2/, and d/sub 5/2/ levels. Single particle contributions using the valency model account for a significant portion of the total radiation width only for the p/sub 1/2/-wave resonances. A significant number of resonances can be identified with reported levels excited in 32 S(d,p) and 29 Si(α,n) reactions. A calculation of the Maxwellian average cross section appropriate to stellar interiors indicates an average capture cross section at 30 keV, sigma-bar approx. = 4.2(2) mb, a result that is relatively insensitive to the assumed stellar temperature. Direct (potential) capture and the s-wave resonance capture contributions to the thermal capture cross section do not fully account for the reported thermal cross section (530 +- 40 mb) and a bound state is invoked to account for the discrepancy

  6. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 ( 3 He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for 3 He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, 1 H MRI and hyperpolarized 3 He MRI at 3.0 T. 3 He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from 3 He static ventilation images and 1 H thoracic images and the 3 He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant 3 He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for 3 He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  7. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in biometric evaluation of corpus callosum in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Garhwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Corpus callosum (CC has an important role in establishing hemispheric lateralization of function. Significance of this structure which is the primary white matter commissure of the brain lies in the fact that damage to the CC during development has been found to be associated with poor neurological outcome and neuropsychological performance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can precisely detect, localize, and evaluate damage to CC in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE patients and assist in reaching to at an accurate anatomical diagnosis, thus heeling in further management of the patient. Objectives: The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of HIE on CC morphometry by assessing various diameters of CC. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients with history of hypoxic-ischemic injury referred to the Department of Radiodiagnosis were included in the study. All the patients were made to undergo MRI of the brain using Siemens Symphony Magnetom 1.5 Tesla scanner after taking informed consent for the same. The findings of MRI brain were assessed and analyzed. Data analysis was done using percentages of different diagnosis and outcomes made by MRI brain were computed and compiled. Results: In the present study, male predominance is seen, 77.78% patients were male and 22.22% were female. In the present study, maximum numbers of patients were <1 year of age (37.04%. In the present study, we see that the isthmus was the most commonly affected portion of CC. Children who did not cry at birth, born with low birth weight, low Apgar score were positively correlated with severity of damage to CC. Conclusion: From the present study, it was noted that MRI is very efficient tool in evaluating morphometry of CC in HIE. Its noninvasiveness and no exposure to ionizing radiation is an added advantage. However, experience and understanding of the principles are essential for accurate diagnosis.

  8. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  9. Structural Robustness Evaluation of Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Bontempi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    in the framework of a safe design: it depends on different factors, like exposure, vulnerability and robustness. Particularly, the requirement of structural vulnerability and robustness are discussed in this paper and a numerical application is presented, in order to evaluate the effects of a ship collision...

  10. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents methodologies for residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components using linear elastic and nonlinear fracture mechanics principles. The effect of cohesive forces due to aggregate bridging has been represented mathematically by employing tension softening models. Various tension ...

  11. LOW AND MEAN RADIATION DOSES IMPACT ON THE CEREBRAL TRACTS STRUCTURE OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT LIQUIDATORS IN THE REMOTE PERIOD (BASED ON ROUTINE AND DIFFUSION-TENSOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING DATA)

    OpenAIRE

    I. M. Levashkina; S. S. Aleksanin; S. V. Serebryakova; T. G. Gribanova

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate correlation between brain structural damages and radiation exposure level for the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident liquidators, routine and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging methods are efficient to visualize and evaluate those damages; it is also important to compare magnetic resonance imaging data of liquidators with results, received for people of the same age and the same stage of cerebral vascular disease (the discirculatory encephalopathy of I and II stage), ...

  12. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging

  13. Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a system failure is a concept supported by the finding of consistent extramotor as well as motor cerebral pathology. The functional correlates of the structural changes detected using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry have not been extensively studied. A group of 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was compared to healthy control subjects using a multi-modal neuroimaging approach comprising T(1)-weighted, diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography, a grey matter connection network was defined based upon the prominent corticospinal tract and corpus callosum involvement demonstrated by white matter tract-based spatial statistics. This 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-specific' network included motor, premotor and supplementary motor cortices, pars opercularis and motor-related thalamic nuclei. A novel analysis protocol, using this disease-specific grey matter network as an input for a dual-regression analysis, was then used to assess changes in functional connectivity directly associated with this network. A spatial pattern of increased functional connectivity spanning sensorimotor, premotor, prefrontal and thalamic regions was found. A composite of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures also allowed the qualitative discrimination of patients from controls. An integrated structural and functional connectivity approach therefore identified apparently dichotomous processes characterizing the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cerebral network failure, in which there was increased functional connectivity within regions of decreased structural connectivity. Patients with slower rates of disease progression showed connectivity measures with values closer to healthy controls, raising the possibility that functional connectivity increases might not simply represent a

  14. Evaluation of covariances for resolved resonance parameters of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu in JENDL-3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Shibata, Keiichi

    2003-02-01

    Evaluation of covariances for resolved resonance parameters of 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu was carried out. Although a large number of resolved resonances are observed for major actinides, uncertainties in averaged cross sections are more important than those in resonance parameters in reactor calculations. We developed a simple method which derives a covariance matrix for the resolved resonance parameters from uncertainties in the averaged cross sections. The method was adopted to evaluate the covariance data for some important actinides, and the results were compiled in the JENDL-3.2 covariance file. (author)

  15. HIGHER MODE FREQUENCY EFFECTS ON RESONANCE IN MACHINERY, STRUCTURES, AND PIPE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.

    2010-05-02

    The complexities of resonance in multi-degree of freedom systems (multi-DOF) may be clarified using graphic presentations. Multi-DOF systems represent actual systems, such as beams or springs, where multiple, higher order, natural frequencies occur. Resonance occurs when a cyclic load is applied to a structure, and the frequency of the applied load equals one of the natural frequencies. Both equations and graphic presentations are available in the literature for single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems, which describe the response of spring-mass-damper systems to harmonically applied, or cyclic, loads. Loads may be forces, moments, or forced displacements applied to one end of a structure. Multi-DOF systems are typically described only by equations in the literature, and while equations certainly permit a case by case analysis for specific conditions, graphs provide an overall comprehension not gleaned from single equations. In fact, this collection of graphed equations provides novel results, which describe the interactions between multiple natural frequencies, as well as a comprehensive description of increased vibrations near resonance.

  16. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) Observations of Ionospheric Feedback in the Alfven Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Lessard, Marc; Lund, Eric J.; Bounds, Scott R.; Kletzing, Craig; Kaeppler, Stephen R.; Sigsbee, Kristine M.; Streltsov, Anatoly V.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) High and Low sounding rockets were launched from the Poker Flat Rocket Range (PFRR) in Alaska, with the science objective of gathering in-situ data to quantify current closure in a discrete auroral arc. As ACES High crossed through the return current of an arc (that was monitored using an all sky camera from the ground at Fort Yukon), its instruments recorded clear Alfv nic signatures both poleward and equatorward of the return current region, but not within the main region of the return current itself. These data provide an excellent opportunity to study ionospheric feedback and how it interacts with the Alfv n resonator. We compare the observations with predictions and new results from a model of ionospheric feedback in the ionospheric Alfv n resonator (IAR) and report the significance and impact of these new data for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfv n Resonator (MICA) rocket mission to launch from PFRR this winter. MICA s primary science objectives specifically focus on better understanding the small-scale structure that the model predicts should exist within the return current region.

  17. Evaluation criteria of structural steel reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zav'yalov, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Different low-carbon and medium-carbon structural steels are investigated. It is stated that steel reliability evaluation criteria depend on the fracture mode, steel suffering from the brittle fracture under the influence of the stresses (despite their great variety) arising in articles during the production and operation. Fibrous steel fracture at the given temperature and article thickness says about its high ductility and toughness and brittle fractures are impossible. Brittle fractures take place in case of a crystalline and mixed fracture with a predominant crystalline component. Evaluation methods of article and sample steel structural strength differing greatly from real articles in a thickness (diameter) or used at temperatures higher than possible operation temperatures cannot be reliability evaluation criteria because at a great thickness (diameter) and lower operation temperatures steel fracture and its strain mode can change resulting in a sharp reliability degradation

  18. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation: Applications in magnetism of layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlage, Kai; Röhlsberger, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Depth-resolved determination of magnetic spin structures. •Isotopic probe layers allow for probing selected depths in the sample. •High sensitivity to magnetic domain patterns via diffuse scattering. -- Abstract: Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation has become an established tool within condensed-matter research. Synchrotron radiation with its outstanding brilliance, transverse coherence and polarization has opened this field for many unique studies, for fundamental research in the field of light-matter interaction as well as for materials science. This applies in particular for the electronic and magnetic structure of very small sample volumes like micro- and nano-structures and samples under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. This article is devoted to the application of the technique to nanomagnetic systems such as thin films and multilayers. After a basic introduction into the method, a number of our experiments are presented to illustrate how magnetic spin structures within such layer systems can be revealed

  19. A New XOR Structure Based on Resonant-Tunneling High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Sharifi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structure for an exclusive-OR (XOR gate based on the resonant-tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT is introduced which comprises only an RTHEMT and two FETs. Calculations are done by utilizing a new subcircuit model for simulating the RTHEMT in the SPICE simulator. Details of the design, input, and output values and margins, delay of each transition, maximum operating frequency, static and dynamic power dissipations of the new structure are discussed and calculated and the performance is compared with other XOR gates which confirm that the presented structure has a high performance. Furthermore, to the best of authors' knowledge, it has the least component count in comparison to the existing structures.

  20. Proton resonance elastic scattering of $^{30}$Mg for single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg

    CERN Multimedia

    The single particle structure of $^{31}$Mg, which is located in the so-called “island of inversion”, will be studied through measuring Isobaric Analog Resonances (IARs) of bound states of $^{31}$Mg. They are located in the high excitation energy of $^{31}$Al. We are going to determine the spectroscopic factors and angular momenta of the parent states by measuring the excitation function of the proton resonance elastic scattering around 0 degrees in the laboratory frame with around 3 MeV/nucleon $^{30}$Mg beam. The present study will reveal the shell evolution around $^{32}$Mg. In addition, the spectroscopic factor of the (7/2)$^{−}$ state which was not yet determined experimentally, may allow one to study the shape coexistence in this nucleus.

  1. Investigation of ferromagnetic resonance and magnetoresistance in anti-spin ice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, I. R. B.; Felix, J. F.; Figueiredo, L. C.; Morais, P. C.; Ferreira, S. O.; Moura-Melo, W. A.; Pereira, A. R.; Quindeau, A.; de Araujo, C. I. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we report experimental and theoretical investigations performed in anti-spin ice structures, composed by square lattice of elongated antidots, patterned in nickel thin film. The magnetic vortex crystal state was obtained by micromagnetic simulation as the ground state magnetization, which arises due to the magnetic stray field at the antidot edges inducing chirality in the magnetization of platters among antidots. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements were utilized to investigate the vortex crystal magnetization dynamics and magnetoelectric response. By using FMR, it was possible to detect the spin wave modes and vortex crystal resonance, in good agreement with dynamic micromagnetic simulation results. The vortex crystal magnetization configuration and its response to the external magnetic field, were used to explain the isotropic MR behaviour observed.

  2. Inelastic electron scattering, fine structure of M1 giant resonances and Gamow-Teller states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining detailed fine structure distributions of magnetic giant resonances in nuclei using high resolution inelastic electron scattering at low energy is discussed. Specific examples chosen are the medium heavy nuclei 40 42 44 48 Ca in which M1 excitations are due to neutron spin-flip transitions and the N=28 isotones 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 54 Fe where in addition also proton excitations contribute to the measured M1 strength. It is found that the M1 strength is very fragmented and considerably quenched in comparison to predictions of shell model calculations in a model space that includes up to 2p-2h excitations. Finally, the old problem of M1 strength in 208 Pb is revisited and the results of a form factor measurement of a recently discovered low lying Jsup(π)=1 + state by nuclear resonance fluorescence are presented. (Auth.)

  3. Resonances, cusp effects and a virtual state in e/sup -/-He scattering near the n = 3 thresholds. [Variational methods, resonance, threshold structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbet, R K [International Business Machines Corp., San Jose, Calif. (USA). Research Lab.

    1978-01-14

    Variational calculations locate and identify resonances and new threshold structures in electron impact excitation of He metastable states, in the region of the 3/sup 3/S and 3/sup 1/S excitation thresholds. A virtual state is found at the 3/sup 3/S threshold.

  4. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  5. Bone injuries in the post-traumatic knee: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grossi, Carla Martins; Marchiori, Edson; Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of 50 patients with trauma of the knee submitted to magnetic resonance imaging in the period of January 1996 to December 1997. The appearance and incidence of the main bone lesions were evaluated and correlated with the mechanisms of aggression and with clinical data. Associated lesions were also evaluated. Bone contusions were the most commonly findings encountered and were observed in 38 patients (76%). Osteochondral fractures occurred in five patients (10%) and bone fractures were detected in five patients (10%), of which two were associated with contusions in other adjoining bone compartments. Chondromalacia of the patella was observed only in two patients (4%). We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice for the diagnosis of bone lesions in patients with trauma of the knee. (author)

  6. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  7. When structure affects function--the need for partial volume effect correction in functional and resting state magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukart, Juergen; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Both functional and also more recently resting state magnetic resonance imaging have become established tools to investigate functional brain networks. Most studies use these tools to compare different populations without controlling for potential differences in underlying brain structure which might affect the functional measurements of interest. Here, we adapt a simulation approach combined with evaluation of real resting state magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate the potential impact of partial volume effects on established functional and resting state magnetic resonance imaging analyses. We demonstrate that differences in the underlying structure lead to a significant increase in detected functional differences in both types of analyses. Largest increases in functional differences are observed for highest signal-to-noise ratios and when signal with the lowest amount of partial volume effects is compared to any other partial volume effect constellation. In real data, structural information explains about 25% of within-subject variance observed in degree centrality--an established resting state connectivity measurement. Controlling this measurement for structural information can substantially alter correlational maps obtained in group analyses. Our results question current approaches of evaluating these measurements in diseased population with known structural changes without controlling for potential differences in these measurements.

  8. Clinically low-risk prostate cancer: evaluation with transrectal doppler ultrasound and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Novis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate transrectal ultrasound, amplitude Doppler ultrasound, conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in localizing and locally staging low-risk prostate cancer. INTRODUCTION: Prostate cancer has been diagnosed at earlier stages and the most accepted classification for low-risk prostate cancer is based on clinical stage T1c or T2a, Gleason score <6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng/ml. METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 42 patients, and transrectal ultrasound in 26 of these patients. Seven patients were excluded from the study. Mean patient age was 64.94 years and mean serum PSA was 6.05 ng/ml. The examinations were analyzed for tumor identification and location in prostate sextants, detection of extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, using surgical pathology findings as the gold standard. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (45.7% had pathologically proven organ-confined disease, 11 (31.4% had positive surgical margin, 8 (28.9% had extracapsular extension, and 3 (8.6% presented with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy values for localizing low-risk prostate cancer were 53.1%, 48.3%, 63.4%, 37.8% and 51.3% for transrectal ultrasound; 70.4%, 36.2%, 65.1%, 42.0% and 57.7% for amplitude Doppler ultrasound; 71.5%, 58.9%, 76.6%, 52.4% and 67.1% for magnetic resonance imaging; 70.4%, 58.7%, 78.4%, 48.2% and 66.7% for magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 67.2%, 65.7%, 79.3%, 50.6% and 66.7% for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy values for detecting extracapsular extension were 33.3%, 92%, 14.3%, 97.2% and 89.7% for transrectal ultrasound and 50.0%, 77.6%, 13.7%, 95.6% and 75.7% for magnetic resonance imaging

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  10. Structure determination of human Lck unique and SH3 domains by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willbold Dieter

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth, differentiation, activation and transformation. Human lymphocyte specific kinase (Lck is a 56 kDa protein involved in T-cell- and IL2-receptor signaling. Three-dimensional structures are known for SH3, SH2 and kinase domains of Lck as well as for other tyrosine kinases. No structure is known for the unique domain of any Src-type tyrosine kinase. Results Lck(1–120 comprising unique and SH3 domains was structurally investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found the unique domain, in contrast to the SH3 part, to have basically no defined structural elements. The solution structure of the SH3 part could be determined with very high precision. It does not show significant differences to Lck SH3 in the absence of the unique domain. Minor differences were observed to the X-ray structure of Lck SH3. Conclusion The unique domain of Lck does not contain any defined structure elements in the absence of ligands and membranes. Presence of the unique domain is not relevant to the three-dimensional structure of the Lck SH3 domain.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of developmental delay in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Althaf S; Syed, Naziya P; Murthy, G S N; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B K; Venkateswarlu, J

    2015-01-01

    Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child's ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was found to be 68% and higher yield was seen in patients presenting with

  12. Evaluation Method for Fieldlike-Torque Efficiency by Modulation of the Resonance Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Dongseuk; Chun, Byong Sun; Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2018-05-01

    The spin Hall effect has attracted a lot of interest in spintronics because it offers the possibility of a faster switching route with an electric current than with a spin-transfer-torque device. Recently, fieldlike spin-orbit torque has been shown to play an important role in the magnetization switching mechanism. However, there is no simple method for observing the fieldlike spin-orbit torque efficiency. We suggest a method for measuring fieldlike spin-orbit torque using a linear change in the resonance field in spectra of direct-current (dc)-tuned spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The fieldlike spin-orbit torque efficiency can be obtained in both a macrospin simulation and in experiments by simply subtracting the Oersted field from the shifted amount of resonance field. This method analyzes the effect of fieldlike torque using dc in a normal metal; therefore, only the dc resistivity and the dimensions of each layer are considered in estimating the fieldlike spin-torque efficiency. The evaluation of fieldlike-torque efficiency of a newly emerging material by modulation of the resonance field provides a shortcut in the development of an alternative magnetization switching device.

  13. Nucleon Resonance Structure from Exclusive Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and CLAS12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, P.L. [Idaho State University, Department of Physics, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8106 (United States); Burkert, V.D. [Jefferson Lab., 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Gothe, R.W. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Mokeev, V.I. [Jefferson Lab., 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Institute, Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    The CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab is a unique instrument, which has provided the lion's share of the world's data on meson photo- and electroproduction in the resonance excitation region. The electroexcitation amplitudes for the low-lying resonances P{sub 33}(1232), P{sub 11}(1440), D{sub 13}(1520), and S{sub 11}(1535) were determined over a wide range of Q{sup 2}<5.0GeV{sup 2} in a comprehensive analysis of exclusive single-meson (π{sup +}n,π{sup 0}p) reactions in the electroproduction off protons. Further, CLAS was able to precisely measure π{sup +}π{sup −}p electroproduction differential cross sections provided by the nearly full kinematic coverage of the detector. The electrocouplings of the P{sub 11}(1440) and D{sub 13}(1520) excited states are determined from the exclusive-π{sup +}π{sup −}p reaction. Consistent results on the electrocouplings from two-independent analyses (single- and double-pion electroproduction) have provided compelling evidence for the reliable extraction of the N{sup ⁎} electrocouplings. Preliminary results on the electrocouplings of the S{sub 31}(1620), S{sub 11}(1650), D{sub 33}(1700), and P{sub 13}(1720) states have recently become available. Theoretical analyses of these results have revealed that there are two major contributions to the resonance structure: a) an internal quark core and b) an external meson-baryon cloud. These CLAS results have had considerable impact on QCD-based studies on N{sup ⁎} structure and in the search for manifestations of the dynamical masses of the dressed quarks. Future CLAS12 N{sup ⁎} structure studies at high photon virtualities will considerably extend our capabilities in exploring the nature of confinement in baryons.

  14. Damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural system interaction by phase resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poterasu, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method and the phase resonance for damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural interaction. The algorithm can be applied in case of any, not necessarily, damping characteristic of the system examined. For the identification, the system is harmonically excited and are considered the super-harmonic amplitudes for odd and even powers of the x. The response of shear beam system for different levels of base excitation and for different locations of the load is considered. (Author) [pt

  15. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  16. Study of loading by beam of dual-resonator structure of linear electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanov, O.S.; Smirnov, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Loading by the beam of the accelerating structure of an Argus dual-resonator linear electron accelerator with a kinetic energy of ∼ 1 MeV and a pulsed beam current of up to 0.5 A is studied experimentally. It is shown that the conditions for stable single-frequency operation of the magnetron are disrupted and the acceleration process is cut off at certain electron-beam currents. Experimental curves of the maximum beam current and maximum electron efficiency of the Argus linear electron accelerator as functions of rf power are given

  17. Fine structure of the giant M1 resonance in 90Zr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusev, G; Tsoneva, N; Dönau, F; Frauendorf, S; Schwengner, R; Tonchev, A P; Adekola, A S; Hammond, S L; Kelley, J H; Kwan, E; Lenske, H; Tornow, W; Wagner, A

    2013-01-11

    The M1 excitations in the nuclide 90Zr have been studied in a photon-scattering experiment with monoenergetic and linearly polarized beams from 7 to 11 MeV. More than 40 J(π)=1+ states have been identified from observed ground-state transitions, revealing the fine structure of the giant M1 resonance with a centroid energy of 9 MeV and a sum strength of 4.17(56) μ(N)(2). The result for the total M1 strength and its fragmentation are discussed in the framework of the three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model.

  18. Transverse Resonant Vibration of Non-Bearing Structures Caused by Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendzelovsky, Norbert; Antal, Roland

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, there are increasing use of very thin, subtle and light structures in the field of building constructions. We can find such a structures as part of roofs or design facades. By using these lamellas like, non-bearing structures as a part of architectural design of buildings, it is necessary to consider wind effects on these structures. Subtle structures of this type are prone to vibration in the transverse direction of the wind flow. The fact that the vibration occurs depends on wind parameters (wind velocity, direction of an air flow) and it also depends on the properties of lamella (shape, length, mass, natural frequency, support type). The principal idea of this article is to show susceptibility of lamellae-like structures to transverse resonant vibration caused by the phenomenon called Von Karman effect. Comparison of susceptibility to transverse resonance vibration was analysed on the different shapes of lamellas loaded by different wind speed. Analysis was based on usage of empirically derived equations. Von Karman effect arise from wind flow past an object. Turbulence in the form of vortices are formed at the object and shed into the flowing stream intermittently. The potential problem is that this turbulence can induce vibrations into the lamella itself. In terms of this vibration problem, two frequencies are interesting. Von Karman shedding frequency is the frequency at which the vortices are formed and shed at the object. The vortex-shedding frequency increases with the velocity of the wind flow and decreases with the size of the object. Natural frequency of the object depends on the construction of the lamella itself. Parameters of lamella as a shape, mass, length, elasticity modulus of material and support types are directly involved in the calculation of natural frequency. Worst case scenario in the term of transverse resonant vibration occurs when the natural frequency of lamella is equal to the vortex-shedding frequency. In this case

  19. Structural evaluation in the design of electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Blomquist, C.A.; Herceg, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The electrorefiner (ER) is one piece of the process equipment for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. The ER's principal function is to perform the pyrochemical and electrochemical refining of spent and experimental fuel elements. Its principal components include a primary vessel, a heater assembly, a support-structure assembly, a cover assembly, four electrode assemblies, four elevator and rotator assemblies, and a cover-gas system. In addition, there are various miscellaneous tools and fixtures. The electrorefiner is to be installed within an existing enclosed cell. Design requirements dictate that all equipment within the cell should not be anchored. To assess the integrity of the electrorefiner during operational and seismic loads, extensive structural analyses have been performed. This paper presents some of the major structural evaluations for the electrorefiner and its auxiliary equipment. Results show that the design code requirements are satisfied, and the integrity of the electrorefiner will not be jeopardized during operational and seismic loadings

  20. Structural evaluation in the design of electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Blomquist, C.A.; Herceg, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The electrorefiner is one piece of the process equipment for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. Its principal components include a primary vessel, a heater assembly, a support-structure assembly, a cover assembly, four electrode assemblies, four elevator and rotator assemblies, and a cover-gas system. In addition, there are various miscellaneous tools and fixtures. The electrorefiner is to be installed within an existing enclosed cell. Design requirements dictate that all equipment within the cell should not be anchored. To assess the integrity of the electrorefiner during operational and seismic loads, extensive structural analyses have been performed. This paper presents some of the major structural evaluations for the electrorefiner and its auxiliary equipment. Results show that the design code requirements are satisfied, and the integrity of the electrorefiner will not be jeopardized during operational and seismic loadings

  1. Small scale structure of magnetospheric electron density through on-line tracking of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higel, B.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma resonance phenomena observed at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) by the GEOS-1 S-301 relaxation sounder are identified through a pattern recognition software process implemented in a mini-computer which receives on-line the compressed data. First, this processing system distributes in real time fsub(pe) and fsub(ce) measurements to the ground media. Second, it drives and controls automatically the S-301 on-board experiment by sending appropriate telecommands: the tracking of resonances is performed by shortening the frequency sweeps to a narrow range centered on the resonance location. Examples of such tracking sequences are presented, exhibiting sampling rates of the electron density measurements from once every 22s (slowest rate) to once every 86 ms (highest rate available). The results give evidence of the existence of very small scale structures in the magnetospheric density, having characteristic sizes of the order of a few 10 2 m or/and a few 10 -1 s. The relative amplitude of these density fluctuations is typically 1%. Because of satellite spinning, fixed frequency sounding sequences allow to measure in a few seconds the directivity features of the plasma resonance signals. Examples of directional patterns in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are presented: the electrostatic nature of the waves received at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) being consistent with these patterns, the corresponding k vector orientations become available. The Bernstein modes properties are used to interpret the nfsub(ce) and fsub(qn) results. (Auth.)

  2. Evaluation of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals of protactinium, americium, curium, and berkelium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanova, T.S.

    1994-12-01

    Data on the thermal neutron fission and capture cross-sections as well as their corresponding resonance integrals are reviewed and analysed. The data are classified according to the form of neutron spectra under investigation. The weighted mean values of the cross-sections and resonance integrals for every type of neutron spectra were adopted as evaluated data. (author). 87 refs, 2 tabs

  3. Evaluation of the radiation width of the 27.7 keV resonance in 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A critical review is given of measurements of the radiation width of the 27.7 keV resonance in 56 Fe. An evaluation of results yields a recommended value of GAMMA #betta# + 1.00 +- 0.04 eV for this resonance

  4. Clinical role of non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography for evaluation of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nomitsu, Yohei; Komeda, Yosuke; Okigawa, Takashi; Urata, Joji; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The association between a gadolinium-based contrast material and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been discussed. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) might provide sufficient information of renal artery stenosis. The non-contrast MRA of 26 patients with hypertension was retrospectively reviewed in the present study. The significant renal artery stenosis was visually evaluated by comparing non-contrast MRA with computed tomography or conventional angiographic finding. Difference of the intensities between the proximal and distal aorta was quantitatively evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of non-contrast MRA in the evaluation of the renal artery stenosis was 78%, 91%, 64% and 96%, respectively. The distal abdominal aorta showed less signal intensity than the proximal aorta by 16.9±12.2%. Non-contrast MRA is a non-invasive and effective method that allows evaluation of the renal artery stenosis. (author)

  5. Carcinomatous involvement of the hilum and mediastinum: computed tomographic and magnetic resonance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heelan, R.T.; Martini, N.; Westcott, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 20 patients who had primary lung tumors, and the results were correlated with findings at surgery and pathologic evaluation. Both studies demonstrated a similar ability to detect hilar and mediastinal tumor. MR imaging detected more enlarged nodes in the mediastinum, but in several patients these enlarged nodes did not contain tumor. Consequently, MR imaging has a slightly higher false-positive rate in the evaluation of the mediastinum. Both modalities were highly sensitive, with specificity limited by the presence of enlarged benign lymph nodes in this series of patients

  6. Evaluation of some resonance self-shielding procedures employed in high conversion light water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, N.E.; Abbate, M.J.; Sbaffoni, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The procedures employed in the treatment of the resonance shielding effect have been identified as one of the causes of the large discrepancies found in the neutronic calculation of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), indicating the need for a revision of the self-shielding procedures employed. In this work some well known techniques applied in HCLWR self-shielding calculations are evaluated; the study involves the comparison of methods for the generation of group constants, the analysis of the impact of considering some isotopes as infinitely diluted and the evaluation of the usual approximations utilized for the treatment of heterogeneities

  7. An evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging at the Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorby, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility have been evaluated of 2810 consecutive magnetic-resonance-imaging examinations that were performed on a 1.5-T Signa magnetic-resonance-imaging unit at The Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney between November 1986 and December 1987. The average accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging was 80%, and ranged from 21%-98% in various brain-disease and spinal-disease categories, compared with the average provisional premagnetic-resonance-imaging diagnostic accuracy of 64%, and an average accuracy of computed tomography of 45%. Clinical follow-up at three months after magnetic-resonance-imaging investigation indicated that, as a result of the magnetic-resonance-imaging examination, patient management was altered in 70% of cases, and patient outcome was altered in 62% of cases. 32 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Advancements in vibroacoustic evaluation of satellite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinidis, C.; Witting, M.; Ikoss, S. I.; Klein, M.

    2001-02-01

    The importance of the launcher vibroacoustic environment is increasing with respect to satellite loads due to the increase in size and decrease in surface mass of lightweight appendages like antennas and solar arrays. The loads generated by the vibroacoustic environment need to be covered adequately to ensure satellite structural integrity. This is of particular importance in the low-frequency range where the low frequencies of light appendages and equipment couple with the acoustic environment. In order to cope with the increasing demand for prediction of structural loads due to the acoustic environment, various methods have been developed in the frame of ESA research and development activities. These range from simplified approaches with partial fluid-structure coupling, e.g. the POSTAR package provided by INTESPACE (France) to more sophisticated approaches with full fluid-structure coupling. In the frequency domain this includes pure finite element modelling techniques, where specific tools have been developed by FFA (Sweden) using the ASKA package, as well as coupled finite element—boundary element approaches that have been developed in cooperation with DASA-Dornier (Germany), STRACO (France) and FFA using the commercial packages ASKA and RAYON. For fully coupled fluid structure analysis in the time domain the ASTRYD code from METRAVIB (France) is employed where advancements have been supported by CNES. Applications of these tools range from simple benchmarks such as simply supported plates, cavity enclosures or generic satellite-fairing models to complex satellite structure configurations. Evaluations of antenna reflector structures (Artemis communication antenna) and satellite equipment panels (polar platform) are presented. The paper covers also the investigation of payload/fairing effects (influence of fairing helium purging on the coupled-system response) together with DASA-Dornier, FFA and STRACO, as well as the vibroacoustic analysis of solar array

  9. Evaluation in the resonance range of nuclei with a mass number above 220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribon, P.

    1970-01-01

    The author discusses the problems posed by the evaluation of neutron data for fissile or fertile nuclei in the range of resolved or unresolved resonances. It appears to take several years until the data of an experiment are used by the reactor physicists. If one wants to have recent data at one's disposal, one cannot have recourse to evaluated-data libraries. Moreover, the existing parameter sets are only fragmentary. A new evaluation is, therefore, necessary for nearly all of these nuclei, but it cannot be based upon different parameter sets; these are indeed contradictory, and the evaluator will have to go back to the original data. The author shows for the set of σ f of 235 U, that a careful comparison of the data shows up unsuspected local defects. Some examples illustrate the deviation between analyses carried out by different methods and between the results on the established divergences. The parameters or cross-sections are far from being known with the precision one would desire. This fact gives rise to anomalies in the interpretation of data necessary for understanding and simulation in the range of unresolved resonances. But the introduction of concepts connected with sub-threshold fission noticeably furthers this understanding. Therefore a comparison of the methods of analysis must be made in more and more accurate measurements (evaluation and correction of systematic errors). (author) [fr

  10. Resonance parameter and covariance evaluation for 16O up to 6 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A resolved resonance evaluation was performed for 16O in the energy range 0 eV to 6 MeV using the computer code SAMMY resulting in a set of resonance parameters (RPs that describes well the experimental data used in the evaluation. A RP covariance matrix (RPC was also generated. The RP were converted to the evaluated nuclear data file format using the R-Matrix Limited format and the compact format was used to represent the RPC. In contrast to the customary use of RP, which are frequently intended for the generation of total, capture, and scattering cross sections only, the present RP evaluation permits the computation of angle dependent cross sections. Furthermore, the RPs are capable of representing the (n, α cross section from the energy threshold (2.354 MeV of the (n, α reaction to 6 MeV. The intent of this paper is to describe the procedures used in the evaluation of the RP and RPC, the use of the RPC in benchmark calculations and to assess the impact of the 16O nuclear data uncertainties in the calculate dkeff for critical benchmark experiments.

  11. Site effects and soil-structure resonance study in the Kobarid basin (NW Slovenia) using microtremors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosar, A.

    2010-04-01

    The town of Kobarid is located in one of three areas with the highest seismic hazard in Slovenia. It was hit by several 1976-1977 Friuli sequence earthquakes and recently by the 1998 and 2004 Krn Mountains earthquakes which caused damage of intensity up to VII EMS-98 scale. The town is located in a small basin filled with heterogeneous glaciofluvial Quaternary sediments in which site effects due to soft sediments are expected. The existing microzonation which is based on surface geological data only is inadequate, and no borehole or geophysical data are available in the basin that would allow a modelling approach of site effects assessment. The microtremor horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method was therefore applied in order to assess the fundamental frequency of the sediments. Investigations were performed on a 100×100 m dense grid and 106 free-field measurements acquired. Clear HVSR peaks were obtained in the majority of the surveyed area. The eastern part of the basin is characterized by two well separated peaks which indicate distinct shallow and deep impedance contrasts. The iso-frequency map of sediments shows a distribution in a broad range of 1.8-22.2 Hz. The observed frequencies can be related to the total thickness of Quaternary sediments (sand, gravel) in the western part of the basin only. They are deposited over bedrock built of Cretaceous flysch. In the eastern part the obtained fundamental frequencies are influenced by the presence of a shallow conglomerate layer inside sandy gravel or lacustrine chalk. The extent of these layers was not known before. Microtremor measurements were also performed inside 19 characteristic buildings of various heights (from two to four stories), and longitudinal and transverse fundamental frequencies determined from amplitude spectra. A potential of soil-structure resonance was assessed by comparing building frequencies with the free-field sediments frequencies derived from the iso-frequency map. For two

  12. Site effects and soil-structure resonance study in the Kobarid basin (NW Slovenia using microtremors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gosar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The town of Kobarid is located in one of three areas with the highest seismic hazard in Slovenia. It was hit by several 1976–1977 Friuli sequence earthquakes and recently by the 1998 and 2004 Krn Mountains earthquakes which caused damage of intensity up to VII EMS-98 scale. The town is located in a small basin filled with heterogeneous glaciofluvial Quaternary sediments in which site effects due to soft sediments are expected. The existing microzonation which is based on surface geological data only is inadequate, and no borehole or geophysical data are available in the basin that would allow a modelling approach of site effects assessment. The microtremor horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR method was therefore applied in order to assess the fundamental frequency of the sediments. Investigations were performed on a 100×100 m dense grid and 106 free-field measurements acquired. Clear HVSR peaks were obtained in the majority of the surveyed area. The eastern part of the basin is characterized by two well separated peaks which indicate distinct shallow and deep impedance contrasts. The iso-frequency map of sediments shows a distribution in a broad range of 1.8–22.2 Hz. The observed frequencies can be related to the total thickness of Quaternary sediments (sand, gravel in the western part of the basin only. They are deposited over bedrock built of Cretaceous flysch. In the eastern part the obtained fundamental frequencies are influenced by the presence of a shallow conglomerate layer inside sandy gravel or lacustrine chalk. The extent of these layers was not known before. Microtremor measurements were also performed inside 19 characteristic buildings of various heights (from two to four stories, and longitudinal and transverse fundamental frequencies determined from amplitude spectra. A potential of soil-structure resonance was assessed by comparing building frequencies with the free-field sediments frequencies derived from the iso

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Structural Characterization and Backbone Dynamics of Recombinant Bee Venom Melittin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Lisa; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti

    2018-04-30

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in melittin and its variants as their therapeutic potential has become increasingly evident. Melittin is a 26-residue peptide and a toxic component of honey bee venom. The versatility of melittin in interacting with various biological substrates, such as membranes, glycosaminoglycans, and a variety of proteins, has inspired a slew of studies that aim to improve our understanding of the structural basis of such interactions. However, these studies have largely focused on melittin solutions at high concentrations (>1 mM), even though melittin is generally effective at lower (micromolar) concentrations. Here we present high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies in the lower-concentration regime using a novel method to produce isotope-labeled ( 15 N and 13 C) recombinant melittin. We provide residue-specific structural characterization of melittin in dilute aqueous solution and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/water mixtures, which mimic melittin structure-function and interactions in aqueous and membrane-like environments, respectively. We find that the cis-trans isomerization of Pro14 is key to changes in the secondary structure of melittin. Thus, this study provides residue-specific structural information about melittin in the free state and in a model of the substrate-bound state. These results, taken together with published work from other laboratories, reveal the peptide's structural versatility that resembles that of intrinsically disordered proteins and peptides.

  14. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik - Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-08-15

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  15. New developments in high field electron paramagnetic resonance with applications in structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennati, Marina; Prisner, Thomas F

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in microwave technologies have led to a renaissance of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) due to the implementation of new spectrometers operating at frequencies ≥90 GHz. EPR at high fields and high frequencies (HF-EPR) has been established up to THz (very high frequency (VHF) EPR) in continuous wave (cw) operation and up to about 300 GHz in pulsed operation. To date, its most prominent application field is structural biology. This review article first gives an overview of the theoretical basics and the technical aspects of HF-EPR methodologies, such as cw and pulsed HF-EPR, as well as electron nuclear double resonance at high fields (HF-ENDOR). In the second part, the article illustrates different application areas of HF-EPR in studies of protein structure and function. In particular, HF-EPR has delivered essential contributions to disentangling complex spectra of radical cofactors or reaction intermediates in photosynthetic reaction centres, radical enzymes (such as ribonucleotide reductase) and in metalloproteins. Furthermore, HF-EPR combined with site-directed spin labelling in membranes and soluble proteins provides new methods of investigating complex molecular dynamics and intermolecular distances

  16. Protein structure analysis using the resonant recognition model and wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Q.; Cosic, I.

    1998-01-01

    An approach based on the resonant recognition model and the discrete wavelet transform is introduced here for characterising proteins' biological function. The protein sequence is converted into a numerical series by assigning the electron-ion interaction potential to each amino acid from N-terminal to C-terminal. A set of peaks is found after performing a wavelet transform onto a numerical series representing a group of homologous proteins. These peaks are related to protein structural and functional properties and named characteristic vector of that protein group. Further more, the amino acids contributing mostly to a protein's biological functions, the so-called 'hot spots' amino acids, are predicted by the continuous wavelet transform. It is found that the hot spots are clustered around the protein's cleft structure. The wavelets approach provides a novel methods for amino acid sequence analysis as well as an expansion for the newly established macromolecular interaction model: the resonant recognition model. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  17. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  18. On the synthesis of resonance lines in dynamical models of structured hot-star winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, J.; Owocki, S. P.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    We examine basic issues involved in synthesizing resonance-line profiles from 1-D, dynamical models of highly structured hot-star winds. Although these models exhibit extensive variations in density as well as velocity, the density scale length is still typically much greater than the Sobolev length. The line transfer is thus treated using a Sobolev approach, as generalized by Rybicki & Hummer (1978) to take proper account of the multiple Sobolev resonances arising from the nonmonotonic velocity field. The resulting reduced-lambda-matrix equation describing nonlocal coupling of the source function is solved by iteration, and line profiles are then derived from formal solution integration using this source function. Two more approximate methods that instead use either a stationary or a structured, local source function yield qualitatively similar line-profiles, but are found to violate photon conservation by 10% or more. The full results suggest that such models may indeed be able to reproduce naturally some of the qualitative properties long noted in observed UV line profiles, such as discrete absorption components in unsaturated lines, or the blue-edge variability in saturated lines. However, these particular models do not yet produce the black absorption troughs commonly observed in saturated lines, and it seems that this and other important discrepancies (e.g., in acceleration time scale of absorption components) may require development of more complete models that include rotation and other 2-D and/or 3-D effects.

  19. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  20. Anatomical pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging segmentation for regional structure-function measurements of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Svenningsen, S.; Eddy, R. L.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Sheikh, K. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Fenster, A.; Parraga, G., E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) and x-ray computed-tomography have provided strong evidence of spatially and temporally persistent lung structure-function abnormalities in asthmatics. This has generated a shift in their understanding of lung disease and supports the use of imaging biomarkers as intermediate endpoints of asthma severity and control. In particular, pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI can be used to provide quantitative lung structure-function measurements longitudinally and in response to treatment. However, to translate such biomarkers of asthma, robust methods are required to segment the lung from pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI. Therefore, their objective was to develop a pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI segmentation algorithm to provide regional measurements with the precision and speed required to support clinical studies. Methods: The authors developed a method to segment the left and right lung from {sup 1}H MRI acquired in 20 asthmatics including five well-controlled and 15 severe poorly controlled participants who provided written informed consent to a study protocol approved by Health Canada. Same-day spirometry and plethysmography measurements of lung function and volume were acquired as well as {sup 1}H MRI using a whole-body radiofrequency coil and fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence at a fixed lung volume (functional residual capacity + 1 l). We incorporated the left-to-right lung volume proportion prior based on the Potts model and derived a volume-proportion preserved Potts model, which was approximated through convex relaxation and further represented by a dual volume-proportion preserved max-flow model. The max-flow model led to a linear problem with convex and linear equality constraints that implicitly encoded the proportion prior. To implement the algorithm, {sup 1}H MRI was resampled into ∼3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxel space. Two observers placed seeds on each lung and on the background of 20 pulmonary {sup 1}H MR images

  1. On-chip optical filter comprising Fabri-Perot resonator structure and spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei; Arbabi, Amir

    2018-04-10

    An on-chip optical filter having Fabri-Perot resonators and a spectrometer may include a first sub-wavelength grating (SWG) reflecting layer and a second SWG reflecting layer facing each other. A plurality of Fabri-Perot resonators are formed by the first SWG reflecting layer and the second SWG reflecting layer facing each other. Each of the Fabri-Perot resonators may transmit light corresponding to a resonance wavelength of the Fabri-Perot resonator. The resonance wavelengths of the Fabri-Perot resonators may be determined according to duty cycles of grating patterns.

  2. Cavity resonance absorption in ultra-high bandwidth CRT deflection structure by a resistive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.E.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-05-11

    An improved ultra-high bandwidth helical coil deflection structure for a cathode ray tube is described comprising a first metal member having a bore therein, the metal walls of which form a first ground plane; a second metal member coaxially mounted in the bore of the first metal member and forming a second ground plane; a helical deflection coil coaxially mounted within the bore between the two ground planes; and a resistive load disposed in one end of the bore and electrically connected to the first and second ground planes, the resistive load having an impedance substantially equal to the characteristic impedance of the coaxial line formed by the two coaxial ground planes to inhibit cavity resonance in the structure within the ultra-high bandwidth of operation. Preferably, the resistive load comprises a carbon film on a surface of an end plug in one end of the bore.

  3. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 40Ca due to Landau damping?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, I.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G.R.J.; Fearick, R.W.; Foertsch, S.V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Shevchenko, A.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    The fragmentation of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) in 40 Ca has been investigated in high energy-resolution experiments using proton inelastic scattering at E p =200 MeV. Fine structure is observed in the region of the ISGQR and its characteristic energy scales are extracted from the experimental data by means of a wavelet analysis. The experimental scales are well described by Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and second-RPA calculations with an effective interaction derived from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction by the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM). In these results characteristic scales are already present at the mean-field level pointing to their origination in Landau damping, in contrast to the findings in heavier nuclei and also to SRPA calculations for 40 Ca based on phenomenological effective interactions, where fine structure is explained by the coupling to two-particle-two-hole (2p-2h) states.

  4. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction study of magnetic structure in magnetoelectric Y-type hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of magnetic field on the magnetic structure associated with magnetoelectric properties in a Y-type hexaferrite, Ba1.3Sr0.7CoZnFe11AlO22, was investigated by utilizing the soft x-ray resonant diffraction technique. In this hexaferrite, the so-called alternating longitudinal conical phase is stabilized at room temperature and zero magnetic field. Below room temperature, however, this phase is transformed into the so-called transverse conical phase by applying an in-plane magnetic field (≈ 0.3 T). The transverse conical phase persists even after removing the magnetic field. The magnetoelectricity, which is magnetically-induced electric polarization, observed in the hexaferrite is discussed in terms of the temperature-dependent magnetic structure at zero field.

  5. Origin of fine structure of the giant dipole resonance in s d -shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearick, R. W.; Erler, B.; Matsubara, H.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Tamii, A.

    2018-04-01

    A set of high-resolution zero-degree inelastic proton scattering data on 24Mg, 28Si, 32S, and 40Ca provides new insight into the long-standing puzzle of the origin of fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in s d -shell nuclei. Understanding is achieved by comparison with random phase approximation calculations for deformed nuclei using for the first time a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential with the unitary correlation operator method and supplemented by a phenomenological three-nucleon contact interaction. A wavelet analysis allows one to extract significant scales both in the data and calculations characterizing the fine structure of the GDR. The fair agreement for scales in the range of a few hundred keV supports the surmise that the fine structure arises from ground-state deformation driven by α clustering.

  6. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  7. Evaluation of ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy before and after aortic valve replacement using magnetic resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyerbacht, Hugo P.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Vliegen, Hubert W.; de Roos, Albert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evaluation of different electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH criteria) using left ventricular mass index (LVMI) determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, the relation between LVMI regression after aortic valve replacement and

  8. Soil-structure interaction - an engineering evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    The two methods of analysis for structure interaction, the impedance and the finite element methods, are reviewed with regard to their present capabilities to address the significant factors of the problem. The objective of the paper is to evaluate if an adequate engineering solution to the problem is provided by either approach. Questions related to the reduction of seismic motions with depth scattering of incident waves, the three-dimensionality of the real problem, soil damping, strain dependency of soil properties and the uncertainties associated with all of the above are discussed in sufficient detail. All conclusions made are based on referenced material. It appears that both methods as presently practised have not yet completely solved the problem, the impedance approach has come closer to addressing the more significant issues. Because of this finding, in addition to its simplicity and low cost, the impedance approach is the perfect engineering method for soil-structure interaction. (Auth.)

  9. [Functional neuro-navigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for the resection of gliomas involving eloquent language structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Wang, Fei; Meng, Xiang-hui; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Jin-li; Yu, Xin-guang; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2011-08-01

    To explore the clinical value of functional neuro-navigation and high-field-strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) for the resection of intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures. From April 2009 to April 2010, 48 patients with intracerebral gliomas involving eloquent language structures, were operated with functional neuro-navigation and iMRI. Blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) was used to depict both Broca and Wernicke cortex, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking was used to delineate arcuate fasciculus. The reconstructed language structures were integrated into a navigation system, so that intra-operative microscopic-based functional neuro-navigation could be achieved. iMRI was used to update the images for both language structures and residual tumors. All patients were evaluated for language function pre-operatively and post-operatively upon short-term and long-term follow-up. In all patients, functional neuro-navigation and iMRI were successfully achieved. In 38 cases (79.2%), gross total resection was accomplished, while in the rest 10 cases (20.8%), subtotal resection was achieved. Only 1 case (2.1%) developed long-term (more than 3 months) new language function deficits at post-operative follow-up. No peri-operative mortality was recorded. With functional neuro-navigation and iMRI, the eloquent structures for language can be precisely located, while the resection size can be accurately evaluated intra-operatively. This technique is safe and helpful for preservation of language function.

  10. Nuclearmagnetic resonance investigations to the character of the waterbinding for the structure of the native starch corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The signals of the proton and deuteron magnetic resonance from water molecules sorbed on native starch contain a splitting, caused from water molecules in ordered regions. This splitting could not be maintained from retrogradated crystalline amylose. The water molecules are ordered more uniform in potato starch then in wheat starch, which is related to the difference in the crystalline structures. The proton resonance of potato starch contains two further components from water molecules in amorphous regions and on the ions respectively. From the deuteron resonance and their dependence on temperature first insights were obtained into the processes occuring by simutaneous treatment with heat and moisture. (orig.) [de

  11. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  12. HETP evaluation of structured packing distillation column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Orlando Jr.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Several tests with a hydrocarbon mixture of known composition (C8-C14, obtained from DETEN Chemistry S.A., have been performed in a laboratory distillation column, having 40mm of nominal diameter and 2.2m high, with internals of Sulzer DX gauze stainless steel structured packing. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate HETP of a structured packing laboratory scale distillation column, operating continuously. Six HETP correlations available in the literature were compared in order to find out which is the most appropriate for structured packing columns working with medium distillates. Prior to the experimental tests, simulation studies using commercial software PRO/II® were performed in order to establish the optimum operational conditions for the distillation, especially concerning operating pressure, top and bottom temperatures, feed location and reflux ratio. The results of PRO/II® were very similar to the analysis of the products obtained during continuous operation, therefore permitting the use of the properties calculated by that software on the theoretical models investigated. The theoretical models chosen for HETP evaluation were: Bravo, Rocha and Fair (1985; Rocha, Bravo and Fair (1993, 1996; Brunazzi and Pagliant (1997; Carlo, Olujić and Pagliant (2006; Olujić et al., (2004. Modifications concerning calculation of specific areas were performed on the correlations in order to fit them for gauze packing HETP evaluation. As the laboratory distillation column was operated continuously, different HETP values were found by the models investigated for each section of the column. The low liquid flow rates in the top section of the column are a source of error for HETP evaluation by the models; therefore, more reliable HETP values were found in the bottom section, in which liquid flow rates were much greater. Among the theoretical models, Olujić et al. (2004 has shown good results relative to the experimental tests. In addition, the

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral trochlea: evaluation of anatomical landmarks and grading articular cartilage in cadaveric knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, Claus [Marienhospital Vechta, Department of Radiology, Vechta (Germany); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Mo Ahn, Joong [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to define magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings before and after contrast medium opacification of the knee joint in cadaveric specimens to demonstrate anatomical landmarks of the trochlear surface in relation to the neighboring structures, and to evaluate different MRI sequences in the detection of cartilage defects of the trochlear and patellar surface of the knee. The morphology and relationship of the proximal trochlear surface to the prefemoral fat of the distal femur were investigated by use of different MR sequences before and after intra-articular gadolinium administration into the knee joint in ten cadaveric knees. Anatomic sections were subsequently obtained. In addition, evaluation of the articular surface of the trochlea was performed by two independent observers. The cartilage surfaces were graded using a 2-point system, and results were compared with macroscopic findings. Of 40 cartilage surfaces evaluated, histopathologic findings showed 9 normal surfaces, 20 containing partial-thickness defects, and 11 containing full-thickness defects. Compared with macroscopic data, sensitivity of MR sequences for the two reviewers was between 17 and 90%; specificity, 75 and 100%; positive predictive value, 75 and 100%; negative predictive value, 20 and 100%, depending on patellar or trochlea lesions. Interobserver variability for the presence of disease, which was measured using the kappa statistic, was dependent on the MR sequence used between 0.243 and 0.851. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences can be used to evaluate the cartilage of the trochlear surface with less accuracy when compared with the results of grading the articular cartilage of the patella. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of sella turcica: evaluation of patients with galactorrhea, amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet M.D. dos; Moreira, Denise Madeira; Andreiuolo, Pedro Angelo

    1999-01-01

    We have selected 135 cases of patients who have done magnetic resonance imaging of sella region, carried out from September, 1991 to August, 1996, who had galactorrhea (G), amenorrhea(A), and hyperprolactinemia (H), isolated or in association. The patients were divided in seven groups, according to the presence of these symptoms and signs. All examinations were made in a private clinic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Correlating these patients with the results of the magnetic resonance images, we found 57 micro adenomas, 31 normal examinations, 22 macro adenomas, 11 pituitary hyperplasias, 7 empty sella and 7 cases included in other aspects. The micro adenoma predominated in groups 1 (GAH), 2 (GH), 3 (HA) and 5 (H), that is, in all groups whose patients had hyperprolactinemia. In macro adenomas, a bright signal on T 1-weighted images indicates pituitary apoplexy with intratumoral hemorrhage. All in all, the magnetic resonance imaging is excellent method to be used in the evaluation of patients with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. (author)

  15. The structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance and consequences for beta-delayed neutron spectra and element synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in β-delayed neutron emission are interpreted by structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross-theory' of β-decay. Inclusion of this structure of the β-decay function is important for calculations of β-decay production rates for heavy nuclides by astrophysical processes and thermonuclear explosions. (Auth.)

  16. Biomechanics of the Peacock’s Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; McCrossan, Owen; Hare, James F.; Montgomerie, Robert; Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus) perform a complex, multimodal “train-rattling” display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock’s visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots–which strongly influence female mate choice–to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background. PMID:27119380

  17. Biomechanics of the Peacock's Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn Dakin

    Full Text Available Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus perform a complex, multimodal "train-rattling" display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock's visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots-which strongly influence female mate choice-to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background.

  18. Biomechanics of the Peacock's Display: How Feather Structure and Resonance Influence Multimodal Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, Roslyn; McCrossan, Owen; Hare, James F; Montgomerie, Robert; Amador Kane, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Courtship displays may serve as signals of the quality of motor performance, but little is known about the underlying biomechanics that determines both their signal content and costs. Peacocks (Pavo cristatus) perform a complex, multimodal "train-rattling" display in which they court females by vibrating the iridescent feathers in their elaborate train ornament. Here we study how feather biomechanics influences the performance of this display using a combination of field recordings and laboratory experiments. Using high-speed video, we find that train-rattling peacocks stridulate their tail feathers against the train at 25.6 Hz, on average, generating a broadband, pulsating mechanical sound at that frequency. Laboratory measurements demonstrate that arrays of peacock tail and train feathers have a broad resonant peak in their vibrational spectra at the range of frequencies used for train-rattling during the display, and the motion of feathers is just as expected for feathers shaking near resonance. This indicates that peacocks are able to drive feather vibrations energetically efficiently over a relatively broad range of frequencies, enabling them to modulate the feather vibration frequency of their displays. Using our field data, we show that peacocks with longer trains use slightly higher vibration frequencies on average, even though longer train feathers are heavier and have lower resonant frequencies. Based on these results, we propose hypotheses for future studies of the function and energetics of this display that ask why its dynamic elements might attract and maintain female attention. Finally, we demonstrate how the mechanical structure of the train feathers affects the peacock's visual display by allowing the colorful iridescent eyespots-which strongly influence female mate choice-to remain nearly stationary against a dynamic iridescent background.

  19. Ferromagnetic resonance study of structure and relaxation of magnetization in NiFe/Ru superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayo, W., E-mail: willian.rodriguez@ufpel.edu.br [Depto. de Física, Univ. Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitário, 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Landi Jr, S. [Instituto Federal Goiano, Rio Verde 75901-970 (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74001-970 (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    The structural properties and relaxation processes of magnetization in [Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}(t{sub 1})/Ru(t{sub 2})]{sub N} superlattices (N=number of bilayers) were analyzed by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) with a fixed microwave frequency. One series of samples was deposited with constant NiFe layer thickness (t{sub 1}) and variable Ru layer thickness (t{sub 2}); the other series, with constant t{sub 2} and variable t{sub 1}. A single FMR mode was observed for t{sub 2}<15 Å and t{sub 1}>75 Å and it has been attributed to the resonance of the exchange-coupled NiFe layers across the Ru interlayers. For the other values of t{sub 1} and t{sub 2}, several FMR modes appeared and they were associated to non-coupled magnetic phases with different effective magnetization formed during the multilayer growth. The FMR linewidths were analyzed as a function of the magnetic layer thickness and a strong dependence on t{sub 1}{sup −2} was observed. It was attributed to the contribution of the two-magnon scattering mechanism for the linewidth. - Highlights: • We present a study of magnetic properties of NiFe/Ru superlattices by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). • The FMR spectra show several modes for large Ru thicknesses and for low NiFe thicknesses. • The above behavior is correlated with the interlayer exchange coupling. • The two-magnon scattering mechanism is revealed by the dependence of the FMR linewidth on the NiFe thickness.

  20. Testing of the structural evaluation test unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    In the evaluation of the safety of radioactive material transportation it is important to consider the response of Type B packages to environments more severe than that prescribed by the hypothetical accident sequence in Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations (NRC 1995). The impact event in this sequence is a 9-meter drop onto an essentially unyielding target, resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s. The behavior of 9 packages when subjected to impacts more severe than this is not well known. It is the purpose of this program to evaluate the structural response of a test package to these environments. Several types of structural response are considered. Of primary importance is the behavior of the package containment boundary, including the bolted closure and 0-rings. Other areas of concern are loss of shielding capability due to lead slump and the deceleration loading of package contents, that may cause damage to them. This type of information is essential for conducting accurate risk assessments on the transportation of radioactive materials. Currently very conservative estimates of the loss of package protection are used in these assessments. This paper will summarize the results of a regulatory impact test and three extra-regulatory impact tests on a sample package

  1. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  2. Cine-magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of communication between middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts and cisterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Nikaido, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuaki; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Taoka, Toshiaki.

    1996-01-01

    Cine-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in 10 patients with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts to evaluate communication between the cysts and the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space. Eight of 10 patients were evaluated by time of flight cine-MR imaging, and two by phase contrast cine-MR imaging. Two patients underwent membranectomy of the cysts, and were evaluated both pre-and postoperatively. Computed tomography cisternography was used to confirm communication between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns. Pulsatile fluid motion within the cysts was present in all patients. However, marked fluid motion and jet flow between the cysts and the surrounding cisterns were only observed in communicating cysts. In the two patients who underwent membranectomy, postoperative examination found greater fluid motion and jet flow not previously present. Cine-MR imaging demonstration of marked pulsatile fluid motion accompanied by jet flow suggests that a cyst communicates with the normal CSF space. (author)

  3. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of traumatic muscle injuries; Avaliacao por ressonancia magnetica das injurias musculares traumaticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Elisa Pompeu [Santa Casa de Misericordia do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Coutinho Junior, Antonio Carlos; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Domingues, Romeu Cortes [Centro Medico Barrashopping, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI)

    2001-12-01

    We evaluated 43 magnetic resonance scans of the leg or thigh of patients suffering from sports trauma. Strains were the most frequent lesions observed. These lesions presented iso- or hypointense signal on T1 and hyperintense signal on T2 images, and were classified according to the intensity of the injury of the fibers into grades 1, 2 and 3. The second most common lesions in these series were contusions that appeared iso- or hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 images. Fibrosis was also observed as low signal lesions on T1 and T2 images. (author)

  5. Evaluating Iron Content and Tissue Microstructure with Off-Resonance Saturation MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Sherif R.

    We present three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, each focused on applying off-resonance saturation (ORS) imaging to a different context or application. Particularly, we are interested in using ORS to evaluate the uptake of superparamagnetic MRI contrast agents in biological tissue, and to evaluate endogenous iron content. This relies on ORS being applied at low off-resonance frequency offsets where most of the negative contrast is due to signal loss from direct saturation of the water content of the sample. Additionally, we wish to combine this information with magnetization transfer contrast, which is obtained by applying ORS at offsets that are far from the resonance frequency, where magnetization transfer (MT) becomes the dominant effect rather than direct saturation (DS). In the first study, we observed the uptake of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles in a simple model system by imaging the uptake in healthy murine liver in vivo, and by testing different metrics to quantify the uptake. Through this process, we discovered an approach that provides high sensitivity and specificity in low-signal scenarios. In the second study, we evaluated image contrast between brain regions in healthy human adults, and related these to the expected iron content in different regions based on age. Images were evaluated based on different MRI contrast mechanisms including quantitative transverse relaxation rates, as well as parameters obtained from ORS imaging. We also performed a field inhomogeneity adjustment on low-offset ORS data using the information obtained from the coarsely sampled ORS spectrum, and this was sufficient to correct for the inhomogeneities. In the third study, we used transverse relaxation, DS - which is strongly dependent on iron content, and MT contrast, in order to classify ex vivo brain samples having Alzheimer's disease pathology and normal controls, and were able to find strong classifiers. The three studies helped

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1...... echoes. Applying biexponential curve analysis, a significant deviation from a monoexponential behaviour was recognized at a ratio of corresponding relaxation rates of about 3 and 2, estimating T1 and T2 relaxation, respectively (p less than 0.01, F-test). Requiring an SD less than or equal to 10 per cent...

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors.

  9. Structural integrity evaluations of CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, Vasile

    2003-01-01

    The core of a CANDU-6 pressurized heavy water reactor consists of some hundred horizontal pressure tubes that are manufactured from a Zr-2.5%Nb alloy and which contain the fuel bundles. These tubes are susceptible to a damaging phenomenon known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). The Zr-2.5%Nb alloy is susceptible to DHC phenomenon when there is diffusion of hydrogen atoms to a service-induced flaws, followed by the hydride platelets formation on the certain crystallographic planes in the matrix material. Finally, the development of hydride regions at the flaw-tip will happened. These hydride regions are able to fracture under stress-temperature conditions (DHC initiation) and the cracks can extend and grow by DHC mechanism. Some studies have been focused on the potential to initiate DHC at the blunt flaws in a CANDU reactor pressure tube and a methodology for structural integrity evaluation was developed. The methodology based on the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD's) consists in an integrated graphical plot, where the fracture failure and plastic collapse are simultaneously evaluated by means of two non-dimensional variables (K r and L r ). These two variables represent the ratio of the applied value of either stress or stress intensity factor and the resistance parameter of corresponding magnitude (yield stress or fracture toughness, respectively). Once the plotting plane is determined by the variables K r and L r , the procedure defines a critical failure line that establishes the safe area. The paper will demonstrate the possibility to perform structural integrity evaluations by means of Failure Assessment Diagrams for flaws occurring in CANDU pressure tubes. (author)

  10. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  11. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO) 0.5-x (Na 2 O) x (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q 2 phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na 2 O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases Na + → Ca 2+ . In the (CaO) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass most of the Ca 2+ ions are present in isolated CaO x polyhedra whereas in the (Na 2 O) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass the NaO x polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO) 0.4 (Na 2 O) 0.1 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 biomaterial

  12. Observation of Conducting Structures in Detonation Nanodiamond Powder by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to study high-purity detonation nanodiamond (DND) powders at room temperature. In recording the EPR signal with g factor 2.00247 and line width 0.890 mT, with automatic frequency control locking the frequency of the microwave generator (klystron) to the frequency of the experimental cavity, we observed a change in the shape of the EPR signal from the DND powder due to formation of an anisotropic electrically conducting structure in the powder. The electrical conductivity of the DND sample is apparent in the Dysonian EPR lineshape (strongly asymmetric signal with g factor 2.00146 and line width 0.281 mT) together with an abrupt shift of the baseline at the time of resonant absorption, and in the decrease in the cavity Q due to nonresonant microwave absorption. The observed effect can be explained by transition of the DND powder from a dielectric state to a state with metallic conductivity, due to spin ordering in a preferred direction.

  13. Automatic Mapping Extraction from Multiecho T2-Star Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images for Improving Morphological Evaluations in Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaode Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping extraction is useful in medical image analysis. Similarity coefficient mapping (SCM replaced signal response to time course in tissue similarity mapping with signal response to TE changes in multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agent. Since different tissues are with different sensitivities to reference signals, a new algorithm is proposed by adding a sensitivity index to SCM. It generates two mappings. One measures relative signal strength (SSM and the other depicts fluctuation magnitude (FMM. Meanwhile, the new method is adaptive to generate a proper reference signal by maximizing the sum of contrast index (CI from SSM and FMM without manual delineation. Based on four groups of images from multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the capacity of SSM and FMM in enhancing image contrast and morphological evaluation is validated. Average contrast improvement index (CII of SSM is 1.57, 1.38, 1.34, and 1.41. Average CII of FMM is 2.42, 2.30, 2.24, and 2.35. Visual analysis of regions of interest demonstrates that SSM and FMM show better morphological structures than original images, T2-star mapping and SCM. These extracted mappings can be further applied in information fusion, signal investigation, and tissue segmentation.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging identification of muscular and ligamentous structures of the female pelvic floor; Identificacao das estruturas musculo-ligamentares do assoalho pelvico feminino na ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Maria Rita Lima; Soares, Adriano Fleury F.; Faintuch, Salomao; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio A.; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: mrcfc@ig.com.br; Girao, Manoel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ginecologia

    2001-12-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency and to assess the interobserver agreement of identification of muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures using magnetic resonance imaging. The method: twenty asymptomatic female volunteers (aged 20-80 years old; mean: 50) were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) examinations of the pelvis. Turbo spin-echo sequences were employed to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images on axial and sagittal planes. Two independent observers evaluated the scans in order to identify the levator ani (coccygeal, pubococcygeal, iliococcygeal and puborectalis muscles), obturatorius internus and urethral sphincter muscles, and the pubovesical and pubourethral ligaments. The frequency and the interobserver agreement of the identification of the anatomical structures were assessed (kappa statistic - {kappa}). The results: the frequency of identification of the structures ranged from 50 to 100%, and was slightly lower for identification of the ligaments. Interobserver agreement was as follows: levator ani and obturatorius internus muscle ({kappa}=1), pubococcygeal ({kappa}=0.62), iliococcygeal ({kappa}=0.86), puborectalis ({kappa}= 0.27), coccygeal ({kappa}=0) and urethral sphincter muscles ({kappa}=1), pubovesical ({kappa}=0.50) and pubourethral ({kappa}=0.58) ligaments. The conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis allowed precise identification of the main muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures in most individuals, whereas interobserver agreement was considered good. (author)

  15. Electronic structure of Mo1-x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Phase, D. M.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1-x Re x alloys (0≤slant x≤slant 0.4 ) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23-70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  -6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  -4 to  -10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p-5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p-4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p-5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  -5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1-x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s-d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x.

  16. Evaluation of acoustic resonance at branch section in main steam line. Part 2. Proposal of method for predicting resonance frequency in steam flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Morita, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Flow-induced acoustic resonances of piping system containing closed side-branches are sometimes encountered in power plants. Acoustic standing waves with large amplitude pressure fluctuation in closed side-branches are excited by the unstable shear layer which separates the mean flow in the main piping from the stagnant fluid in the branch. In U.S. NPP, the steam dryer had been damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration under a power uprating condition. Our previous research developed the method for evaluating the acoustic resonance at the branch sections in actual power plants by using CFD. In the method, sound speed in wet steam is evaluated by its theory on the assumption of homogeneous flow, although it may be different from practical sound speed in wet steam. So, it is necessary to consider and introduce the most suitable model of practical sound speed in wet steam. In addition, we tried to develop simplified prediction method of the amplitude and frequency of pressure fluctuation in wet steam flow. Our previous experimental research clarified that resonance amplitude of fluctuating pressure at the top of the branch in wet steam. However, the resonance frequency in steam condition could not be estimated by using theoretical equation as the end correction in steam condition and sound speed in wet steam is not clarified as same reason as CFD. Therefore, in this study, we tried to evaluate the end correction in each dry and wet steam and sound speed of wet steam from experimental results. As a result, method for predicting resonance frequency by using theoretical equation in each wet and dry steam condition was proposed. (author)

  17. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  18. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, William G., E-mail: bp1@bu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hindson, David F. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Langmore, Susan E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zumwalt, Ann C. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  19. Operating and mathematical representation of resonances between flow parameters oscillations and structure vibrations of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Yang Shan Afshar, E.; Polyakov, N.I. [Nuclear Power Plant Department of Moscow Power Engineering Institute Technical Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The experimental data that have been obtained from the measurements of noise signals in primary circuit of NPP with reactor of WWER-1000 are presented. The causes of resonant interaction between Eigen-Frequencies of Oscillations of the Coolant Pressure (EFOCP) and structure vibrations are discussed. An application-oriented approach to the problem of identification of abnormal phenomena of thermal-hydraulic parameters is proposed. Logarithmic Decrement {delta} is determined. The bigger damping ratio {zeta} provides bigger {delta} and correspondingly smaller values of Q-factor and amplitude X(t)max. All experimental units intended for NPP severe accident investigation must satisfy to the NPP Q-factor criterion of similarity. (authors)

  20. Operating and mathematical representation of resonances between flow parameters oscillations and structure vibrations of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Yang Shan Afshar, E.; Polyakov, N.I.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental data that have been obtained from the measurements of noise signals in primary circuit of NPP with reactor of WWER-1000 are presented. The causes of resonant interaction between Eigen-Frequencies of Oscillations of the Coolant Pressure (EFOCP) and structure vibrations are discussed. An application-oriented approach to the problem of identification of abnormal phenomena of thermal-hydraulic parameters is proposed. Logarithmic Decrement δ is determined. The bigger damping ratio ζ provides bigger δ and correspondingly smaller values of Q-factor and amplitude X(t)max. All experimental units intended for NPP severe accident investigation must satisfy to the NPP Q-factor criterion of similarity. (authors)

  1. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn

    2011-01-01

    An accurate and efficient finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for characterizing transient waves interactions on axially symmetric structures is presented. The method achieves its accuracy and efficiency by employing localized and/or fast Fourier transform (FFT) accelerated exact absorbing conditions (EACs). The paper details the derivation of the EACs, discusses their implementation and discretization in an FDTD method, and proposes utilization of a blocked-FFT based algorithm for accelerating the computation of temporal convolutions present in nonlocal EACs. The proposed method allows transient analyses to be carried for long time intervals without any loss of accuracy and provides reliable numerical data pertinent to physical processes under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  2. Assessment of higher order structure comparability in therapeutic proteins using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Carlos A; Szabo, Christina M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to rapidly assess higher order structure (HOS) comparability in protein samples. Using a variation of the NMR fingerprinting approach described by Panjwani et al. [2010. J Pharm Sci 99(8):3334-3342], three nonglycosylated proteins spanning a molecular weight range of 6.5-67 kDa were analyzed. A simple statistical method termed easy comparability of HOS by NMR (ECHOS-NMR) was developed. In this method, HOS similarity between two samples is measured via the correlation coefficient derived from linear regression analysis of binned NMR spectra. Applications of this method include HOS comparability assessment during new product development, manufacturing process changes, supplier changes, next-generation products, and the development of biosimilars to name just a few. We foresee ECHOS-NMR becoming a routine technique applied to comparability exercises used to complement data from other analytical techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Compact and Wide Stopband Lowpass Filter Using Open Complementary Split Ring Resonator and Defected Ground Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Karthikeyan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A compact (0.16 λg x 0.08 λg and wide stop¬band lowpass filter design using open complementary split ring resonator (OCSRR and defected ground structure (DGS is presented in this paper. Low pass filter is con-structed using two cascaded stages of OCSRR. Since the rejection bandwidth of the OCSRR is narrow, tapered dumbbell shaped DGS section is placed under the OCSRR to enhance the bandwidth. The cutoff frequency (fc of the proposed lowpass filter is 1.09 GHz. The rejection band¬width of the filter covers the entire ultra wideband spec¬trum. Hence the spurious passband suppression is achieved up to 10 fc. The designed filter has been fabri¬cated and validated by experimental results

  4. The resonating group method three cluster approach to the ground state 9 Li nucleus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.A.; Terenetsky, K.O.; Verbitsky, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-cluster approach for light atomic nuclei is formulated in frame of the algebraic version of resonating group method. Overlap integral and Hamiltonian matrix elements on generating functions are obtained for 9 Li nucleus. All permissible by Pauli principle 9 Li different cluster nucleon permutations were taken into account in the calculations. The results obtained can be easily generalised on any three-cluster system up to 12 C. Matrix elements obtained in the work were used in the variational calculations of the ground state energetic and geometric 9 Li characteristics. It is shown that 9 Li ground state is not adequate to the shell model limit and has pronounced three-cluster structure. (author). 16 refs., 4 tab., 2 figs

  5. Structure and dynamics of olefin radical cation aggregates. Time-resolved fluorescence detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The time-resolved EPR spectra and thus the structure and dynamics of transient hydrocarbon radical cations are obtained by the pulse radiolysis-fluorescence detected magnetic resonance (FDMR) technique. Here the authors report the observation of short-lived radical cations from olefins. FDMR-EPR spectra of radical cations from tetramethylethylene and cyclohexadiene are illustrated. The olefin radical cations, FDMR spectra are concentration-dependent, since dimerization with neutral molecules takes place at higher (>10 -2 M) olefin concentration. Rate constants for the dimerization reaction are derived and the effect of solvent viscosity on aggregate formation is demonstrated. By monitoring the further reactions of dimer cations the authors have obtained EPR evidence for previously unobserved higher-order (multimer) radical cation aggregates of olefins. 16 references, 5 figures

  6. Field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2001-01-01

    The significance of basic experiments on field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) is claimed based on the historical development of the investigation on electric double layer and electrostatic potential confinement of open-ended fusion-oriented plasmas. In the presence of a single ECR point in simple mirror-type configurations of magnetic field, a potential dip (thermal barrier) appears around this point, being followed by a subsequent potential hump (plug potential) along a collisionless plasma flow. The observed phenomenon gives a clear-cut physics to the formation of field-aligned plug potential with thermal barrier, which is closely related to the double layer formation triggered by a negative dip. (author)

  7. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  8. Resonant tunneling diodes based on ZnO for quantum cascade structures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkov, Borislav; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Ristanic, Daniela; Schrenk, Werner; Hugues, Maxime; Chauveau, Jean-Michel; Strasser, Gottfried

    2017-02-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectral range (lambda 30µm - 300µm) is also known as the "THz-gap" because of the lack of compact semiconductor devices. Various real-world applications would strongly benefit from such sources like trace-gas spectroscopy or security-screening. A crucial step is the operation of THz-emitting lasers at room temperature. But this seems out of reach with current devices, of which GaAs-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) seem to be the most promising ones. They are limited by the parasitic, non-optical LO-phonon transitions (36meV in GaAs), being on the same order as the thermal energy at room temperature (kT = 26meV). This can be solved by using larger LO-phonon materials like ZnO (E_LO = 72meV). But to master the fabrication of ZnO-based QC structures, a high quality epitaxial growth is crucial followed by a well-controlled fabrication process including ZnO/ZnMgO etching. We use devices grown on m-plane ZnO-substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. They are patterned by reactive ion etching in a CH4-based chemistry (CH4:H2:Ar/30:3:3 sccm) into 50μm to 150μm square mesas. Resonant tunneling diode structures are investigated in this geometry and are presented including different barrier- and well-configurations. We extract contact resistances of 8e-5 Omega cm^2 for un-annealed Ti/Au contacts and an electron mobility of above 130cm^2/Vs, both in good agreement with literature. Proving that resonant electron tunneling can be achieved in ZnO is one of the crucial building blocks of a QCL. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 665107.

  9. Research on the Band Gap Characteristics of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals Microcavity with Local Resonant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional locally resonant phononic crystal with microcavity structure is proposed. The acoustic wave band gap characteristics of this new structure are studied using finite element method. At the same time, the corresponding displacement eigenmodes of the band edges of the lowest band gap and the transmission spectrum are calculated. The results proved that phononic crystals with microcavity structure exhibited complete band gaps in low-frequency range. The eigenfrequency of the lower edge of the first gap is lower than no microcavity structure. However, for no microcavity structure type of quadrilateral phononic crystal plate, the second band gap disappeared and the frequency range of the first band gap is relatively narrow. The main reason for appearing low-frequency band gaps is that the proposed phononic crystal introduced the local resonant microcavity structure. This study provides a good support for engineering application such as low-frequency vibration attenuation and noise control.

  10. Soil structure changes evaluated with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate in millimetric scale changes in soil bulk density and porosity, using the gamma-ray computed tomography in soil samples with disturbed structure due to wetting and drying (W-D) cycles. Soil samples with 98.1 cm 3 were sieved using a 2 mm mesh and homogeneously packed in PVC cylinders. Soil samples were submitted to 1, 2, and 3 W-D cycles. Control samples were not submitted to W-D cycles. After repetitions of W-D cycles, soil sample porosity decreased and soil layers became denser. Computed tomography allowed a continuous analysis of soil bulk density and also soil porosity along millimetric (0.08 cm) layers, what cannot be provided by traditional methods used in soil physics. (author)

  11. Resonant laser printing of structural colors on high-index dielectric metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Levy, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    -dependent resonances. Strong on-resonance energy absorption under pulsed laser irradiation locally elevates the lattice temperature (exceeding 1200 K) in an ultrashort time scale (1 ns). This forms the basis for resonant laser printing, where rapid melting allows for surface energy-driven morphology changes...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment response of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savnik, Anette; Jensen, Bente; Noerregaard, Jesper; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Egund, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the treatment response in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 30 patients with clinical symptoms of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using T1-, T2- and T2-weighted fat-saturated (FS) sequences. The patients were randomised to either i.m. corticosteroid injection (n=16) or immobilisation in a wrist splint (n=14). Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow was performed on a 1.5-T MR system at baseline and after 6 weeks. The extensor carpi radialis (ECRB) tendon, the radial collateral ligament, lateral humerus epicondyle at tendon insertion site, joint fluid and signal intensity changes within brachio-radialis and anconeus muscles were evaluated on the MR unit's workstation before and after 6 weeks of treatment. The MRI was performed once in 22 healthy controls for comparison and all images evaluated by an investigator blinded to the clinical status of the subjects. The MR images showed thickening with separation of the ECRB tendon from the radial collateral ligament and abnormal signal change in 25 of the 30 patients on the T1-weighted sequences at inclusion. The signal intensity of the ECRB tendon was increased in 24 of the 30 patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow on the T2-weighted FS sequences. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment response of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, Anette [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Hovmarksvej 39, 2920, Charlottenlund (Denmark); Jensen, Bente; Noerregaard, Jesper; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Egund, Niels [Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the treatment response in lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained in 30 patients with clinical symptoms of lateral epicondylitis of the elbow using T1-, T2- and T2-weighted fat-saturated (FS) sequences. The patients were randomised to either i.m. corticosteroid injection (n=16) or immobilisation in a wrist splint (n=14). Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow was performed on a 1.5-T MR system at baseline and after 6 weeks. The extensor carpi radialis (ECRB) tendon, the radial collateral ligament, lateral humerus epicondyle at tendon insertion site, joint fluid and signal intensity changes within brachio-radialis and anconeus muscles were evaluated on the MR unit's workstation before and after 6 weeks of treatment. The MRI was performed once in 22 healthy controls for comparison and all images evaluated by an investigator blinded to the clinical status of the subjects. The MR images showed thickening with separation of the ECRB tendon from the radial collateral ligament and abnormal signal change in 25 of the 30 patients on the T1-weighted sequences at inclusion. The signal intensity of the ECRB tendon was increased in 24 of the 30 patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow on the T2-weighted FS sequences. (orig.)

  14. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes

  15. Quantitative methods for structural characterization of proteins based on deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashilov, Victor A; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Popova, Ludmila A; Lednev, Igor K

    2010-09-01

    Here we report on novel quantitative approaches for protein structural characterization using deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy. Specifically, we propose a new method combining hydrogen-deuterium (HD) exchange and Bayesian source separation for extracting the DUVRR signatures of various structural elements of aggregated proteins including the cross-beta core and unordered parts of amyloid fibrils. The proposed method is demonstrated using the set of DUVRR spectra of hen egg white lysozyme acquired at various stages of HD exchange. Prior information about the concentration matrix and the spectral features of the individual components was incorporated into the Bayesian equation to eliminate the ill-conditioning of the problem caused by 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of protonated and deuterated species. Secondary structure fractions obtained by partial least squares (PLS) and least squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs) were used as the initial guess for the Bayessian source separation. Advantages of the PLS and LS-SVMs methods over the classical least squares calibration (CLSC) are discussed and illustrated using the DUVRR data of the prion protein in its native and aggregated forms. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  17. Fracture mechanics evaluation of heavy welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, I.; Ericksson, C.W.; Zilberstein, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes some applications of nondestructive examination (NDE) and engineering fracture mechanics to evaluation of flaws in heavy welded structures. The paper discusses not only widely recognized linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis, but also methods of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM), such as COD, J-integral, and Failure Assessment Diagram. Examples are given to highlight the importance of interaction between specialists providing input and the specialists performing the analysis. The paper points out that the critical parameters for as-welded structures when calculated by these methods are conservative since they are based on two pessimistic assumptions: that the magnitude of residual stress is always at the yield strength level, and that the residual stress always acts in the same direction as the applied (mechanical) stress. The suggestion is made that it would be prudent to use the COD or the FAD design curves for a conservative design. The appendix examines a J-design curve modified to include residual stresses

  18. Uses of Magnetic Resonance in Post-Surgical Evaluation of Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Pedro; Delgado Jorge Andres; Llano Serna, Juan Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients with tetralogy of Fallot who survive complete reparative surgery is increasing. For this reason the late complications of this procedure, such as pulmonary regurgitation, right ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias, pulmonary artery stenosis or pseudo aneurysms outflow tract, are becoming more common in clinical practice. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the global evaluation of these patients because the ability to evaluate the morphology, quantifying right ventricular function and characterization of the anatomy and function of the pulmonary valve. The knowledge of the embriopathology and the anatomy of this congenital heart disease, and the different interventions, palliative or corrective and the complications are essential for the proper interpretation of the images and making therapeutic decisions.

  19. Quantitative evaluations of left ventricular function obtained by electrocardiographically-gated magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tohru; Iida, Kaname; Sugishita, Yasuro; Anno, Izumi; Akisada, Masayoshi; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Akatsuka, Takao; Koseki, Susumu.

    1989-01-01

    Using electrocardiographically-gated magnetic resonance imaging, regional cardiac function was evaluated in 12 normal volunteers and in 10 cases of old myocardial infarction. The optimal short axis of the left ventricle was selected at the chordae tendineae level. The left ventricle was divided into 12 segments using a computer-aided system, and percentile shortening fraction (%SF) and percentile wall thickening (%WT) were calculated in each segment by the fixed coordinate method. In the normal volunteers, heterogeneity of both %FS and %WT was observed, ranging from 25±13% and 37±13%, respectively in the septal segment, to 49±13% and 60±21%, respectively in the posterior segment. In the cases of myocardial infarction, decreased %FS and %WT were detected at the affected regions. The abnormal regions revealed by %WT tended to be narrower than those revealed by %FS. Thus the MR technique at the optimal axis may be useful for quantitative evaluations of regional cardiac function. (author)

  20. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  1. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  2. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music. ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ correlates with both function (increased network centrality and structure (grey matter volume of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  3. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  4. Tunable superconducting resonators with integrated trap structures for coupling with ultracold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, Benedikt; Wiedmaier, Dominik; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Bothner, Daniel [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    We intend to investigate a hybrid quantum system where ultracold atomic gases play the role of a long-living quantum memory, coupled to a superconducting qubit via a coplanar waveguide transmission line resonator. As a first step we developed a resonator chip containing a Z-shaped trapping wire for the atom trap. In order to suppress parasitic resonances due to stray capacitances, and to achieve good ground connection we use hybrid superconductor - normal conductor chips. As an additional degree of freedom we add a ferroelectric capacitor making the resonators voltage-tunable. We furthermore show theoretical results on the expected coupling strength between resonator and atomic cloud.

  5. Evaluation of a magnetic resonance-compatible dentoalveolar tactile stimulus device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bereiter David A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few methods exist to study central nervous system processes following dentoalveolar tactile stimulation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, likely due to inherent technical difficulties. Our primary goal was to develop and perform feasibility testing of a novel device capable of delivering valid and reliable dentoalveolar stimuli at dental chair-side and during MRI. Details of a device designed to deliver dentoalveolar dynamic pressure stimuli are described. Device testing took place in three settings: a laboratory testing to assess range of stimulus force intensities, b dental chair-side to assess reliability, validity and discriminant ability in force-pain relationship; and c MRI to evaluate magnetic compatibility and ability to evoke brain activation in painfree subjects similar to those described in the literature. Results A novel device capable of delivering valid and reliable dentoalveolar somatosensory stimulation was developed (ICC = 0.89, 0.78-1 [95% CI]. Psychophysical data analysis showed high discriminant ability in differentiating painfree controls from cases with chronic dentoalveolar pain related to deafferenting dental procedures (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 86.7%, area under ROC curve = 0.99. FMRI results of dentoalveolar dynamic pressure pain in painfree subjects revealed activation of brain areas typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, primary/secondary somatosensory, insular and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions A novel psychophysical method to deliver dynamic dentoalveolar pressure stimulation was developed and validated, allowing non-invasive MRI-based exploration of central nervous system function in response to intraoral somatosensation. Background The organization of the trigeminal system is unique as it provides somatosensory innervation to the face, masticatory and oral structures, the majority of the intracranial contents 1 and to specialized structures

  6. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.

    2005-02-01

    In the present work the phenomenon of fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in a number of heavy and medium-heavy nuclei is systematically investigated for the first time. High energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering experiments were carried out in September-October 2001 and in October 2003 at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility in South Africa with an incident proton energy of 200 MeV. The obtained data with the energy resolution of triangle E 58 Ni, 89 Y, 90 Zr, 120 Sn, 142 Nd, 166 Er, 208 Pb), thereby establishing the global character of this phenomenon. Fine structure can be described using characteristic energy scales, appearing as a result of the decay of collective modes towards the compound nucleus through a hierarchy of couplings to complex degrees of freedom. For the extraction of the characteristic energy scales from the spectra an entropy index method and a novel technique based on the wavelet analysis are utilized. The global analysis of available data shows the presence of three groups of scales, according to their values. To the first group belong the scales with the values around and below 100 keV, which were detected in all the nuclei studied. The second group contains intermediate scales in the range of 100 keV to 1 MeV. These scales show large variations depending on the nuclear structure of the nucleus. The largest scales above 1 MeV are classified to the third group, describing the global structure of the resonance (the width). The interpretation of the observed scales is realized via the comparison with microscopic model calculations including the coupling of the initial one-particle-one-hole excitations to more complex configurations. A qualitative agreement of the experimentally observed scales with those obtained from the theoretical predictions supports the suggestion of the origin of fine structure from the coupling to the two-particle-two-hole states. However, quantitatively, large deviations are

  7. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of structure. 29.571... § 29.571 Fatigue evaluation of structure. (a) General. An evaluation of the strength of principal... (including tolerance to flaws). The structure must be shown by analysis supported by test evidence and, if...

  8. Assessment of structural lesions in sacroiliac joints enhances diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging in early spondylarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Lambert, Robert G W; Pedersen, Susanne J

    2010-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic utility of T1-weighted and STIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in early spondylarthritis (SpA) using a standardized approach to the evaluation of sacroiliac (SI) joints, and to test whether systematic calibration of readers directed at recognition of abnormal......To compare the diagnostic utility of T1-weighted and STIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in early spondylarthritis (SpA) using a standardized approach to the evaluation of sacroiliac (SI) joints, and to test whether systematic calibration of readers directed at recognition...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of clinical treatment of otospongiosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vicente, Andy; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Yamashita, Helio K; Cruz, Oswaldo Laercio M; Barros, Flavia A; Penido, Norma O

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a method for monitoring the activity of otospongiotic lesions before and after clinical treatment. Prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study. One single tertiary care institution in a large, cosmopolitan city. Twenty-six patients (n = 42 ears) with clinical, audiometric, and tomographic diagnosis of otosclerosis were enrolled. If computed tomography (CT) demonstrated active lesions, these patients underwent MRI to detect otospongiotic foci, seen as areas of gadolinium enhancement. Patients were divided into 3 groups and received treatment with placebo, sodium alendronate, or sodium fluoride for 6 months. After this period, clinical and audiometric evaluations and a second MRI were performed. Each MRI was evaluated by both a neuroradiologist and an otolaryngologist in a subjective (visual) and objective (using specific eFilm Workstation software) manner. Otospongiosis was most predominantly identified in the region anterior to the oval window, and this site was reliable for comparing pre- and posttreatment scans. The patients in the alendronate and sodium fluoride groups had MRI findings that suggested a decrease in activity of otospongiotic lesions, more relevant in the alendronate group. These findings were statistically significant for both subjective and objective MRI evaluations. MRI shows higher sensitivity than clinical or audiometric assessment for detecting reduction in activity of otospongiosis. The objective MRI evaluation based on software analysis was the most accurate method of monitoring clinical treatment response in otospongiosis. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  10. Incidence and Evaluation of Incidental Abnormal Bone Marrow Signal on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan L. Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The increased use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has resulted in reports of incidental abnormal bone marrow (BM signal. Our goal was to determine the evaluation of an incidental abnormal BM signal on MRI and the prevalence of a subsequent oncologic diagnosis. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients over age 18 undergoing MRI between May 2005 and October 2010 at Tufts Medical Center (TMC with follow-up through November 2013. The electronic medical record was queried to determine imaging site, reason for scan, evaluation following radiology report, and final diagnosis. Results. 49,678 MRIs were done with 110 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Twenty two percent underwent some evaluation, most commonly a complete blood count, serum protein electrophoresis, or bone scan. With median follow-up of 41 months, 6% of patients were diagnosed with malignancies including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, and metastatic adenocarcinoma. One patient who had not undergone evaluation developed breast cancer 24 months after the MRI. Conclusions. Incidentally noted abnormal or heterogeneous bone marrow signal on MRI was not inconsequential and should prompt further evaluation.

  11. Routine evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vido Diane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has excellent capabilities to assess ventricular systolic function. Current clinical scenarios warrant routine evaluation of ventricular diastolic function for complete evaluation, especially in congestive heart failure patients. To our knowledge, no systematic assessment of diastolic function over a range of lusitropy has been performed using CMR. Methods and Results Left ventricular diastolic function was assessed in 31 subjects (10 controls who underwent CMR and compared with Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE evaluation of mitral valve (MV and pulmonary vein (PV blood flow. Blood flow in the MV and PV were successfully imaged by CMR for all cases (31/31,100% while TTE evaluated flow in all MV (31/31,100% but only 21/31 PV (68% cases. Velocities of MV flow (E and A measured by CMR correlated well with TTE (r = 0.81, p Conclusion We have shown that there is homology between CMR and TTE for the assessment of diastolic inflow over a wide range of conditions, including normal, impaired relaxation and restrictive. There is excellent agreement of quantitative velocity measurements between CMR and TTE. Diastolic blood flow assessment by CMR can be performed in a single scan, with times ranging from 20 sec to 3 min, and we show that there is good indication for applying CMR to assess diastolic conditions, either as an adjunctive test when evaluating systolic function, or even as a primary test when TTE data cannot be obtained.

  12. A rational evaluation of structural design loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, S.

    1993-01-01

    The reliability-based seismic design of structures is a design method ensuring that the structural seismic capacity is not less than the maximum seismic load or load effect for a prescribed value of the reliability index, wherein the design reference period, n, is used to specify the n-year maximum load. In the conventional Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) method the design load is commonly determined on the basis of the n-year maximum the probability distribution of which may be given in some different ways. However, in contrast with the structural capacity the n-year maximum load usually involves much larger variabilities. The effort to decrease the variability would, hence, be effective for the purpose of avoiding nuclear power plant (NPP) structures having unnecessarily large capacities. A possible way to do this is to consider the joint probability distribution of the n-year 1st and 2nd maxima of the seismic load derived from the formula of extreme order statistics. Since the reliability index is conventionally associated with the n-year 1st maximum, the conditional probability distribution rather than the joint one of the n-year 1st maximum given a value of the n-year 2nd one will be considered. Three conditional extreme value distributions, which correspond to the usual extreme value distributions of Types I, II and III, and their statistical moments up to the second order are presented. Within the framework of the first-order second moment method, the conditional statistical moments are utilized to calculate the reliability index as well as the design value of the seismic load. The seismic load considered herein is represented by the peak ground acceleration (PGA) in n years. The present scheme is applied to evaluate the design PGA's at II sites in Japan where samples of the annual 1st and 2nd PGA's have been obtained by using historical seismic data. In this application the following two points are of our interest: (a) Define the reliability

  13. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  14. Contactless Abdominal Fat Reduction With Selective RF™ Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Jeanine; Kaspar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive body shaping methods seem to be an ascending part of the aesthetics market. As a result, the pressure to develop reliable methods for the collection and presentation of their results has also increased. The most used techniques currently include ultrasound measurements of fat thickness in the treated area, caliper measurements, bioimpedance-based scale measurements or circumferential tape measurements. Although these are the most used techniques, almost all of them have some limitations in reproducibility and/or accuracy. This study shows Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as the new method for the presentation of results in the body shaping industry. Six subjects were treated by a contactless selective radiofrequency device (BTL Vanquish ME, BTL Industries Inc., Boston, MA). The MRI fat thickness was measured at the baseline and at 4-weeks following the treatment. In addition to MRI images and measurements, digital photographs and anthropometric evaluations such as weight, abdominal circumference, and caliper fat thickness measurements were recorded. Abdominal fat thickness measurements from the MRI were performed from the same slices determined by the same tissue artefacts. The MRI fat thickness difference between the baseline measurement and follow up visit showed an average reduction of 5.36 mm as calculated from the data of 5 subjects. One subject dropped out of study due to non-study related issues. The results were statistically significant based on the Student's T-test evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging abdominal fat thickness measurements seems to be the best method for the evaluation of fat thickness reduction after non-invasive body shaping treatments. In this study, this method shows average fat thickness reduction of 5.36 mm while the weight of the subjects didn't change significantly. A large spot size measuring 1317 cm(2) (204 square inches) covers the abdomen flank to flank. The average thickness of 5.36 mm of the fat layer reduced

  15. Controlled modification of resonant tunneling in metal-insulator-insulator-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, I. Z.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Sedghi, N.; Ralph, J. F.; Hall, S.; Dhanak, V. R.; Luo, Z.; Beeby, S.

    2018-01-01

    We present comprehensive experimental and theoretical work on tunnel-barrier rectifiers comprising bilayer (Nb2O5/Al2O3) insulator configurations with similar (Nb/Nb) and dissimilar (Nb/Ag) metal electrodes. The electron affinity, valence band offset, and metal work function were ascertained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, and electrical measurements on fabricated reference structures. The experimental band line-up parameters were fed into a theoretical model to predict available bound states in the Nb2O5/Al2O3 quantum well and generate tunneling probability and transmittance curves under applied bias. The onset of strong resonance in the sub-V regime was found to be controlled by a work function difference of Nb/Ag electrodes in agreement with the experimental band alignment and theoretical model. A superior low-bias asymmetry of 35 at 0.1 V and a responsivity of 5 A/W at 0.25 V were observed for the Nb/4 nm Nb2O5/1 nm Al2O3/Ag structure, sufficient to achieve a rectification of over 90% of the input alternate current terahertz signal in a rectenna device.

  16. Composition and structure of natural organic matter through advanced nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainan Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural organic matter (NOM plays important roles in biological, chemical, and physical processes within the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. Despite its importance, a clear and exhaustive knowledge on NOM chemistry still lacks. Aiming to prove that advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR techniques may contribute to fill such a gap, in this paper we reported relevant examples of its applicability to NOM components, such as biomass, deposition material, sediments, and kerogen samples. It is found that nonhydrolyzable organic carbons (NHC, chars, and polymethylene carbons are important in the investigated samples. The structure of each of the NHC fractions is similar to that of kerogens, highlighting the importance of selective preservation of NOM to the kerogen origin in the investigated aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, during the artificial maturation experiments of kerogen, the chemical and structural characteristics such as protonated aromatic, nonprotonated carbons, and aromatic cluster size play important roles in the origin and variation of nanoporosity during kerogen maturation. Graphical abstract NMR parameters of thermally stimulated kerogens

  17. Structural and functional properties of hemoglobins from unicellular organisms as revealed by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobins have been discovered in organisms from virtually all kingdoms. Their presence in unicellular organisms suggests that the gene for hemoglobin is very ancient and that the hemoglobins must have functions other than oxygen transport, in view of the fact that O2 delivery is a diffusion-controlled process in these organisms. Based on sequence alignment, three groups of hemoglobins have been characterized in unicellular organisms. The group-one hemoglobins, termed truncated hemoglobins, consist of proteins with 110-140 amino acid residues and a novel two-over-two alpha-helical sandwich motif. The group-two hemoglobins, termed flavohemoglobins, consist of a hemoglobin domain, with a classical three-over-three alpha-helical sandwich motif, and a flavin-containing reductase domain that is covalently attached to it. The group-three hemoglobins consist of myoglobin-like proteins that have high sequence homology and structural similarity to the hemoglobin domain of flavohemoglobins. In this review, recent resonance Raman studies of each group of these proteins are presented. Their implications are discussed in the context of the structural and functional properties of these novel hemoglobins.

  18. Waveguide resonance mode response of stacked structures of metallic sub-wavelength slit arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasunori; Takano, Keisuke; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Kato, Kosaku; Nakajima, Makoto; Akiyama, Koichi

    2018-05-01

    Detailed measurements of the optical properties of two-tier systems composed of metallic plates perforated with periodic sub-wavelength slit patterns were carried out using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the transmission properties observed experimentally for various configurations can be reproduced successfully by simulations based on the finite-differential time-domain method. Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonance mode behaviors specific to this quasi-dielectric system were then investigated. For structures with no lateral displacement between the slit-array plates, mode disappearance phenomena, which are caused by destructive interference between the odd-order mode and the blue- or red-shifted even-order modes, were observed experimentally. The uncommon behavior of the even-order modes was examined precisely to explain the slit-width dependence. For structures with half-pitched displacement between the plates, extraordinarily strong transmission was observed experimentally, even when the optical paths were shut off. This result was interpreted in terms of the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons through very thin and labyrinthine spacings that inevitably exist between the metallic plates. Furthermore, the optical mode disappearance phenomena are revealed to be characterized by anticrossing of the two mixing modes formed by even- and odd-order modes. These experimental observations that are supported theoretically are indispensable to the practical use of this type of artificial dielectric and are expected to encourage interest in optical mode behaviors that are not typically observed in conventional dielectric systems.

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Reliability of qualitative evaluation of disc and muscle parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the intra- and interobserver reliability in grading disc and muscle parameters using low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI scans of 100 subjects representative of the general population were evaluated blindly by two radiologists. Criteria......: Convincing reliability was found in the evaluation of disc- and muscle-related MRI variables....

  20. Distribution and absorption of local anesthetics in inferior alveolar nerve block: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Sinan; Küçük, Dervisşhan; Gümüş, Cesur; Kara, M Isa

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution and absorption of local anesthetic solutions in inferior alveolar nerve block using magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers were divided into 4 groups and injected with 1.5 mL for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.3 mL for lingual nerve block. The solutions used for the different groups were 2% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine with 0.125 mg/mL epinephrine, 4% articaine with 0.006 mg/mL epinephrine, and 4% articaine with 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All subjects had axial T2-weighted and fat-suppressed images at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection. The localization, area, and intensity (signal characteristics) of the solutions were analyzed and onset and duration times of the anesthesia were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the intensity and area of the solutions at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection, but differences were found within each group. No between-group differences were found on magnetic resonance imaging in the distribution and absorption of lidocaine with or without epinephrine and articaine with 0.006 and 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All solutions were noticeably absorbed at 120 minutes after injection. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  2. Relevance of Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Images in Evaluating Epidural Hematoma After Thoracic Fixation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Choi, Il; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-11-01

    It is difficult to evaluate the significant findings of epidural hematoma in magnetic resonance images (MRIs) obtained immediately after thoracic posterior screw fixation (PSF). Prospectively, immediate postoperative MRI was performed in 10 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from April to December 2013. Additionally, we retrospectively analyzed the MRIs from 3 patients before hematoma evacuation out of 260 patients who underwent thoracic PSF from January 2000 to March 2013. The MRI findings of 9 out of the 10 patients, consecutively collected after thoracic PSF, showed neurologic recovery with a well-preserved cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space and no prominent hemorrhage. Even though there were metal artifacts at the level of the pedicle screws, the preserved CSF space was observed. In contrast, the MRI of 1 patient with poor neurologic outcome demonstrated a typical hematoma and slight spinal cord compression and reduced CSF space. In the retrospective analysis of the 3 patients who showed definite motor weakness in the lower extremities after their first thoracic fusion surgery and underwent hematoma evacuation, the magnetic resonance images before hematoma evacuation also revealed hematoma compressing the spinal cord and diminished CSF space. This study shows that epidural hematomas can be detected on MRI performed immediately after thoracic fixation surgery, despite metal artifacts and findings such as hematoma causing spinal cord compression. Loss of CSF space should be considered to be associated with neurologic deficit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of osteochondritis dissecans of the patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Sun; Cohen, Noah A.; Potter, Hollis G.; Mintz, Douglas N.

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of patellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). We retrospectively analyzed MR images of 16 patients (18 cases, mean age 20 years) using OCD of the patella. In 5 cases surgery was carried out, and we compared the surgical findings with the MR imaging findings in these cases. In all 18 cases, OCD was located central-inferiorly on the patella, and the average size was 11 x 11 x 7 mm. Subchondral deformities were present in 16 out of 18 cases (88.9%), subchondral cyst formation in 4 cases (22.2%), reactive bone marrow signal in 8 cases (44.4%), overlying patellar cartilage abnormality in 14 cases (77.8%), loose body in 2 cases (11.1%), patella alta in 8 cases (44.4%), hypoplastic sulcus in 7 cases (38.9%), and synovitis in 4 cases (22.2%). In all 5 cases in which surgery was carried out, the cartilage abnormality classified on the MR images was confirmed, and a loose body was removed at arthroscopy in 2 of the 5 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging of patellar OCD typically shows subchondral deformity and variable abnormalities of the overlying patellar cartilage located central-inferiorly on the patella. (orig.)

  4. Radiation response of hydrated urea evaluated using 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance is utilized to detect radiation-induced changes in urea over the 0- to 300-Gy dose range. The spin-spin relaxation time exhibits a consistent change as a function of delivered dose in hydrated urea under exposure to 60 Co gamma radiation. No changes to the spin-spin relaxation time are observed in urea samples that were not hydrated. The radiation-induced changes are attributed to indirect radiation interactions with the water surrounding the urea molecules and are explained by the formation of subtle changes in the electron bonding configurations surrounding the 14 N nuclei, not major structural rearrangements. These subtle changes may provide additional insight into the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems

  5. Dual breath-hold magnetic resonance cine evaluation of global and regional cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Dietrich, Olaf; Huber, Armin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Sincleair, Spencer; Runge, Val M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of a multislice cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with parallel imaging in regard to global and regional left ventricular function. Forty-two individuals underwent cine MRI on a 1.5-tesla scanner. Cine MRI used a steady-state free precession technique and was performed as a single-slice technique (nonTSENSE cine) and an accelerated multislice technique (TSENSE cine) with five slices per breath-hold. End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were evaluated for all data sets and in regard to regional wall motion and regional wall motion analysis, and quantitative regional wall thickness and systolic thickening were also assessed. EDV, ESV, and EF based on TSENSE cine showed excellent correlation to the nonTSENSE cine approach (all r 2 =0.99, P<0.001). While EDV evaluations showed a small underestimation for TSENSE cine, ESV and EF showed accurate results compared with nonTSENSE cine. Both readers showed good agreement (κ=0.72) in regional wall motion assessment comparing both techniques. Data acquisition for the multislice approach was significantly shorter (∝75%) that in single-slice cine. We conclude that accurate evaluation of regional wall motion and left ventricular EF is possible using accelerated multislice cine MR with high spatial and temporal resolution. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging pre- and postoperative evaluation of tetralogy of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, Renata Junqueira Moll; Simoes, Luiz Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre- and postoperative evaluation of patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Twenty patients aged 1 to 29 years were prospectively evaluated with black-blood and contrast-enhanced angiographic techniques, 11 with the classic form of tetralogy of Fallot and 9 with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia. MRI studies provided adequate visualization of the aorta that was classified as dilated or not dilated, and definition of its position in all cases. The use of contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques provided excellent imaging of the main right and left pulmonary arteries. The results suggest that MRI, including contrast-enhanced angiography techniques, is a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with tetralogy of Fallot before and after cardiac surgery since it provides important anatomical information that is not always obtained with echocardiography. MRI can be considered an alternative to cardiac catheterization, particularly in the evaluation of the pulmonary vascular anatomy. (author)

  7. EVALUATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROPHYLACTIC REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH HEMOPHILIC ARTHROPATHY IN DYNAMICS ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Remzantseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifications in treatment guidelines of hemophilic arthropathy changed the role of diagnostic X-ray imaging methods. Diagnostic methods are used both for determination of the degree of joint destruction and long-term evaluation of the joint conditions and therapy adequacy and effectiveness. Aim. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI dynamics for joint condition assessment in children with hemophilic arthropathy receiving prophylactic factor replacement therapy concentrated rolling VIII. Materials and methods. We studied 13 boys aged 5 to 14 years (mean age 8.9 years with hemophilia type A severe form of the disease (factor VIII deficiency <1% at the baseline. The average age of appearance of hemarthrosis is 2.1 years (from 1.8 to 2.9 years. The frequency of bleeding into the joints of patients older than 1 year was 2-3 times per year. Magnetic resonance imaging (ToshibaExcelArtVantage, 1,5 T was performed in 13 patients, 35 joints were examined, 57 studies were executed. Control study of joints was conducted in 1, 2 or 3 years depending on the frequency of hemarthrosis during the year and the severity of joint damage primarily identified. Results. The results included both the improvement along with the stabilization of intra-state structures and the negative dynamic shifts. MRI showed that the reduction of bleeding in the joints on the background of hemostatic replacement therapy led to subsiding inflammation in the joints and significant decrease in the amount of intra-articular effusion (n = 11; p = 0.03, decrease in the number of joints with symptoms of bone marrow edema (n = 8, the absence of observations with negative changes in the form of increasing the thickness of the synovial membrane. Negative dynamics of joint condition presented as increasing of the depth and length of erosive process (n = 5; 22.7%, degenerative changes in ligaments and menisci (n = 2; 9% under the condition of regular administration of clotting factors was associated

  8. Possible seismogenic origin of changes in the ULF EM resonant structure observed at Teoloyucan geomagnetic station, Mexico, 1999-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kotsarenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the ULF resonant structure observed at Teoloyucan geomagnetic station has been provisionally studied in a possible relation with seismic activity in Mexico in the period 1999-2001. Two resonant lines were observed in the H-component (linear polarization in the frequency bands fR2=10.2–11.1 mHz and fR2=13.6–14.5 mHz, sometimes accompanied by other harmonics. The source of the observed resonances is possibly related with the geomagnetic location of the station (geomagnetic latitude λ=29.1° and its proximity to the equatorial electrojet (λ~30°. An enhancement of the carrier frequency of both resonances in the period 1 month–2 weeks was found before the strongest EQs. Also, a depression of the resonant structure just a few days before and a few days after some EQs seems to be correlated with seismic activity.

  9. Aging Evaluation of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Y.; Takesue, N.; Tsukagoshi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, method on the aging evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. Problems on the durability evaluation of reinforced concrete structures were pointed out and an evaluation framework was considered. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration factors of thermal effect, irradiation, neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. And the evaluation framework of the deteriorated material constitutive model which can be used for the numerical analysis of the integrity evaluation for the concrete structure was proposed. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate patients after a palatoplasty to evaluate the nasopharyngeal results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroto [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Kadomatsu, Koichi; Hori, Shigeru; Miyata, Masayuki; Kozono, Kikuo; Onizuka, Takuya

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cleft palate patients was undertaken after a palatoplasty to evaluate the postoperative status of the nasopharyngeal soft tissue, the soft palate, and a pharyngeal flap. As MRI revealed no abnormal findings in the nasopharyngeal muscle of all 16 patients, we concluded that the palatoplasty had normalized the positioning and volume of the levator veli muscle and the muscle sling of the palate. Further, although most of the pharyngeal flaps had an adequate inner muscle volume, some flaps had shrunk and 1 flap was found to have more mucous tissue than muscle. These pharyngeal flap deficits may have been due to rough flap handling during the surgical intervention. Therefore, gentle manipulation of such flaps during the course of surgery is emphasized. (author).

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate patients after a palatoplasty to evaluate the nasopharyngeal results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroto; Kadomatsu, Koichi; Hori, Shigeru; Miyata, Masayuki; Kozono, Kikuo; Onizuka, Takuya.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cleft palate patients was undertaken after a palatoplasty to evaluate the postoperative status of the nasopharyngeal soft tissue, the soft palate, and a pharyngeal flap. As MRI revealed no abnormal findings in the nasopharyngeal muscle of all 16 patients, we concluded that the palatoplasty had normalized the positioning and volume of the levator veli muscle and the muscle sling of the palate. Further, although most of the pharyngeal flaps had an adequate inner muscle volume, some flaps had shrunk and 1 flap was found to have more mucous tissue than muscle. These pharyngeal flap deficits may have been due to rough flap handling during the surgical intervention. Therefore, gentle manipulation of such flaps during the course of surgery is emphasized. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2000-03-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the fetal abdomen by magnetic resonance imaging. Part 2: abdominal wall defects and tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Pinho Matos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although ultrasound is still the gold standard for the assessment of fetal malformations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has gained great prominence in recent years. In situations in which ultrasound has low sensitivity, such as maternal obesity, abdominal scarring, and oligohydramnios, MRI has proven to be a safe and accurate method. Regarding fetal abdominal wall defects, MRI appears to be widely used in the prognostic assessment of gastroschisis with intestinal atresia or of complications of omphalocele, allowing better perinatal management and parental counseling. In addition, MRI allows the assessment of local invasion of fetal abdominal tumors, with significant prognostic value for the postnatal period. In this article, we review the main MRI findings in the evaluation of fetal abdominal wall defects and tumors.

  15. Aortic compliance in patients with aortic regurgitation. Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Sachiko; Hamada, Seiki; Ueguchi, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess by means of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aortic compliance before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR with SJM (St. Jude Medical, St paul, MN) valve) in patients with aortic regurgitation (AR). Two groups (healthy controls and patients with severe isolated AR) of 10 subjects each were included in this study. Cine MRI was performed at three locations of the aorta, and aortic compliance was calculated by dividing the maximum change in the aortic area by pulse pressure. Cine MRI is useful to assess abnormalities of aortic compliance in patients with AR. Compared with the control group, aortic compliance in the AR group was significantly less in the ascending aorta (p<0.05), decreasing in order of aortic location. After AVR, aortic compliance improved for all locations. Cine MRI enables assessment of aortic biophysical properties such as a compliance for evaluating the progression of AR and the efficacy of treatment. (author)

  16. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation behaviour in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of individual biologic components in relaxation curves obtained in vivo may increase the specificity of tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, the potential of biexponential curve analysis was evaluated in T1 and T2 measurements on the human...... brain at 1.5 tesla. Optimal experimental conditions were carefully observed, including the use of long TR values and a very small voxel size. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination involved a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...... echoes. No genuine biexponentiality was demonstrated in the T1 and T2 relaxation processes of white matter, cortical grey matter, or cerebrospinal fluid. Thus, a monoexponential model seems adequate for description of the relaxation behaviour in these cases. Furthermore, the results suggest...

  17. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    , corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory...... arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105 +/- 31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate......Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APPENZELLER SIMONE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis.METHOD: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. RESULTS: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weighted images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behçet´s disease or systemic lupus erythematosus. After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSION: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients.

  19. Enhanced Sensitivity of Anti-Symmetrically Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors with Zinc Oxide Intermediate Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Fu Chiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel design wherein high-refractive-index zinc oxide (ZnO intermediary layers are used in anti-symmetrically structured surface plasmon resonance (SPR devices to enhance signal quality and improve the full width at half maximum (FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curve. The surface plasmon (SP modes of the ZnO intermediary layer were excited by irradiating both sides of the Au film, thus inducing a high electric field at the Au/ZnO interface. We demonstrated that an improvement in the ZnO (002 crystal orientation led to a decrease in the FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curves. We optimized the design of ZnO thin films using different parameters and performed analytical comparisons of the ZnO with conventional chromium (Cr and indium tin oxide (ITO intermediary layers. The present study is based on application of the Fresnel equation, which provides an explanation and verification for the observed narrow SPR reflectivity curve and optical transmittance spectra exhibited by (ZnO/Au, (Cr/Au, and (ITO/Au devices. On exposure to ethanol, the anti-symmetrically structured showed a huge electric field at the Au/ZnO interface and a 2-fold decrease in the FWHM value and a 1.3-fold larger shift in angle interrogation and a 4.5-fold high-sensitivity shift in intensity interrogation. The anti-symmetrically structured of ZnO intermediate layers exhibited a wider linearity range and much higher sensitivity. It also exhibited a good linear relationship between the incident angle and ethanol concentration in the tested range. Thus, we demonstrated a novel and simple method for fabricating high-sensitivity, high-resolution SPR biosensors that provide high accuracy and precision over relevant ranges of analyte measurement.

  20. Evaluation of handwriting movement kinematics: from an ecological to a magnetic resonance environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambra Bisio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a means of communication which requires complex motor, perceptual and cognitive skills. If one of these abilities gets lost following traumatic events or due to neurological diseases, handwriting could deteriorate. Occupational therapy practitioners provide rehabilitation services for people with impaired handwriting. However, to determine the effectiveness of handwriting interventions no studies assessed whether the proposed treatments improved the kinematics of writing movement or had an effect at the level of the central nervous system. There is need to find new quantitative methodologies able to describe the behavioral and the neural outcomes of the rehabilitative interventions for handwriting. In the present study we proposed a combined approach that allowed evaluating the kinematic parameters of handwriting movements, acquired by means of a magnetic resonance-compatible tablet, and their neural correlates obtained simultaneously from a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI examination. Results showed that the system was reliable in term of reproducibility of the kinematic data during a test/re-test procedure. Further, despite the modifications with respect to an ecological writing movement condition, the kinematic parameters acquired inside the MR-environment were descriptive of individuals’ movement features. At last, the imaging protocol succeeded to show the activation of the cerebral regions associated with the production of writing movement in healthy people. From these findings, this methodology seems to be promising to evaluate the handwriting movement deficits and the potential alterations in the neural activity in those individuals who have handwriting difficulties. Finally, it would provide a mean to quantitatively assess the effect of a rehabilitative treatment.

  1. Evaluation of Handwriting Movement Kinematics: From an Ecological to a Magnetic Resonance Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Ambra; Pedullà, Ludovico; Bonzano, Laura; Ruggeri, Piero; Brichetto, Giampaolo; Bove, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Writing is a means of communication which requires complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive skills. If one of these abilities gets lost following traumatic events or due to neurological diseases, handwriting could deteriorate. Occupational therapy practitioners provide rehabilitation services for people with impaired handwriting. However, to determine the effectiveness of handwriting interventions no studies assessed whether the proposed treatments improved the kinematics of writing movement or had an effect at the level of the central nervous system. There is need to find new quantitative methodologies able to describe the behavioral and the neural outcomes of the rehabilitative interventions for handwriting. In the present study we proposed a combined approach that allowed evaluating the kinematic parameters of handwriting movements, acquired by means of a magnetic resonance-compatible tablet, and their neural correlates obtained simultaneously from a functional magnetic resonance imaging examination. Results showed that the system was reliable in term of reproducibility of the kinematic data during a test/re-test procedure. Further, despite the modifications with respect to an ecological writing movement condition, the kinematic parameters acquired inside the MR-environment were descriptive of individuals’ movement features. At last, the imaging protocol succeeded to show the activation of the cerebral regions associated with the production of writing movement in healthy people. From these findings, this methodology seems to be promising to evaluate the handwriting movement deficits and the potential alterations in the neural activity in those individuals who have handwriting difficulties. Finally, it would provide a mean to quantitatively assess the effect of a rehabilitative treatment. PMID:27746727

  2. Peripheral collisions of heavy ions induced by 40Ar at intermediate energies: giant resonance high energy structures and projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.

    1987-09-01

    The results obtained in similar studies at low incident energies are first of all reviewed. The time of flight spectrometer built for the experiments is then described. A study of the properties of the projectile-like fragments shows numerous deviations from the relativistic energy fragmentation model. Evidence for a strong surface transfer reaction component is given and the persistence of mean field effects at intermediate energies is stressed. A calculation of the contribution of the transfer evaporation mechanism to the inelastic spectra shows that this mechanism is responible for the major part of the background measured at high excitation energy and can in some cases induce narrow structures in the spectra. The inelastic spectra shows a strong excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance. In the region between 20 and 80 MeV excitation energy narrow structures are present for all the studied systems. Statistical and Fourier analysises allow to quantify the probabilities of existence, the widths and the excitation energies of these structures. A transfer evaporation hypothesis cannot consistently reproduce all the observed structures. The excitation energies of the structures can be well described by phenomenological laws where the energies are proportional to the -1/3 power of the target mass. Complete calculations of the excitation probabilities of giant resonances and multiphonon states are performed within a model where the nuclear excitation are calculated microscopically in the Random Phase Approximation. It is shown that a possible interpretation of the structures is the excitation of multiphonon states built with 2 + giant resonances [fr

  3. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on iso-C2H2Cl2 around the chlorine K-edge: Structural and dynamical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawerk, Elie; Carniato, Stéphane; Journel, Loïc; Marchenko, Tatiana; Simon, Marc; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Bohnic, Rok

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical and experimental study of the high resolution resonant K α X-ray emission lines around the chlorine K-edge in gas phase 1,1-dichloroethylene. With the help of ab initio electronic structure calculations and cross section evaluation, we interpret the lowest lying peak in the X-ray absorption and emission spectra. The behavior of the K α emission lines with respect to frequency detuning highlights the existence of femtosecond nuclear dynamics on the dissociative Potential Energy Surface of the first K-shell core-excited state

  4. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on iso-C2H2Cl2 around the chlorine K-edge: Structural and dynamical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawerk, Elie; Carniato, Stéphane; Journel, Loïc; Marchenko, Tatiana; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Bohnic, Rok; Kavčič, Matjaž; Céolin, Denis; Khoury, Antonio; Simon, Marc

    2014-10-01

    We report a theoretical and experimental study of the high resolution resonant Kα X-ray emission lines around the chlorine K-edge in gas phase 1,1-dichloroethylene. With the help of ab initio electronic structure calculations and cross section evaluation, we interpret the lowest lying peak in the X-ray absorption and emission spectra. The behavior of the Kα emission lines with respect to frequency detuning highlights the existence of femtosecond nuclear dynamics on the dissociative Potential Energy Surface of the first K-shell core-excited state.

  5. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on iso-C₂H₂Cl₂ around the chlorine K-edge: structural and dynamical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawerk, Elie; Carniato, Stéphane; Journel, Loïc; Marchenko, Tatiana; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Bohnic, Rok; Kavčič, Matjaž; Céolin, Denis; Khoury, Antonio; Simon, Marc

    2014-10-14

    We report a theoretical and experimental study of the high resolution resonant K(α) X-ray emission lines around the chlorine K-edge in gas phase 1,1-dichloroethylene. With the help of ab initio electronic structure calculations and cross section evaluation, we interpret the lowest lying peak in the X-ray absorption and emission spectra. The behavior of the K(α) emission lines with respect to frequency detuning highlights the existence of femtosecond nuclear dynamics on the dissociative Potential Energy Surface of the first K-shell core-excited state.

  6. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  7. Evaluation of chondromalacia of the patellofemoral compartment with axial magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T R; Quinn, S F

    1993-01-01

    Axial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the patellofemoral compartment was performed in 75 patients with arthroscopic correlation. Proton density and T2(2500/20/80) weighted images were obtained in all patients. Chondromalacia in stages I and II could not be reliably identified with MR imaging. For the evaluation of stage III and IV chondromalacia, the accuracy of MR was 89%. Focal or diffuse areas of increased or decreased signal alterations of the hyaline cartilage without a contour deformity or cartilaginous thinning do not correlate reliably with arthroscopic staging of chondromalacia. A normal signal intensity is no assurance that softening of the cartilage is not present. The most reliable indicators of chondromalacia are focal contour irregularities of the hyaline cartilage and/or thinning of the hyaline cartilage associated with high signal intensity changes within frank defects or contour irregularities with T2-weighted images. The poor MR-arthroscopic correlation in earlier stages of chondromalacia may be due in part to the subjective basis of the arthroscopic diagnosis. In conclusion, stage I and II chondromalacia of the patellofemoral compartment cannot be reliably evaluated with MR imaging. Stage III and IV chondromalacia is reliably evaluated with MR using the combination of proton density and T2-weighted images.

  8. Healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits--evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wilson Campos; de Castro, Ubiratam Brum; Paulino, Eduardo; Vasconcellos, Leonardo de Souza; Madureira, Ana Paula; Magalhães, Maria Angélica Baron; Mendes, Daniel Victor Moreira; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Resende, Vivian

    2014-12-12

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide valuable findings for tendon regeneration. A non-invasive image method that can effectively evaluate the quality of the scar tissue has not yet been employed. Thirteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups: group 1--non-treated control (n = 4); group 2--surgical intervention (n = 9). The central portion of the Achilles tendon was resected, and after 30 days, DCE-MRI was performed. Contrast enhancement methods were applied using the region of interest (ROI) technique. In the medium third of the Achilles tendon, the intra-substantial signal intensity and the presence of hyper-intense intra-tendon focus points and of signal heterogeneity were evaluated. Antero-posterior and transversal diameters of the tendon were measured. The Achilles tendon was removed and dissected free from other tissues. Sections from the central part of the tendon were stained for histological analysis. The difference between the contrast enhancement curves of the control and surgical groups (p tendon sheath, which presented irregular contours and intense contrast enhancement. On histology, the Achilles tendon presented diffuse widening of the tendon sheath and wedge-shaped areas with scarring tissue rich in disordered collagen fibres. These findings were related to alteration in the intra-substantial signal intensity, with hyper-signal focus points in the DCE-MRI. MRI with perfusion could be a useful technique for evaluating tissue and fibrous scarring in tendons.

  9. Evaluation of chondromalacia of the patellofemoral compartment with axial magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.R. (Dept. of Radiology, Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)); Quinn, S.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Axial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the patellofemoral compartment was performed in 75 patients with arthroscopic correlation. Proton density and T2(2500/20/80) weighted images were obtained in all patients. Chondromalacia in stages I and II could not be reliably identified with MR imaging. For the evaluation of stage III and IV chondromalacia, the accuracy of MR was 89%. Focal or diffuse areas of increased or decreased signal alterations of the hyaline cartilage without a contour deformity or cartilaginous thinning do not correlate reliably with arthrosopic staging of chondromalacia. A normal signal intensity is no assurance that softening of the cartilage is not present. The most reliable indicators of chondromalacia are focal contour irregularities of the hyaline cartilage and/or thinning of the hyaline cartilage associated with high signal intensity changes within frank defects or contour irregularities with T2-weighted images. The poor MR-arthroscopic correlation in earlier stages of chondromalacia may be due in part to the subjective basis of the arthroscopic diagnosis. In conclusion, stage I and II chondromalacia of the patellofemoral compartment cannot be reliably evaluated with MR imaging. Stage III and IV chondromalacia is reliably evaluated with MR using the combination of proton density and T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  10. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  11. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Exertional muscle pain in familial Mediterranean fever patients evaluated by MRI and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushnir, T.; Eshed, I.; Heled, Y.; Livneh, A.; Langevitz, P.; Ben Zvi, I.; Konen, E.; Lidar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of physical activity on the structural, morphological, and metabolic characteristics of the gastrocnemius muscle in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, utilizing quantitative 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in order to elucidate the mechanism of their exertional leg pain. Materials and methods: Eleven FMF patients suffering from exertional leg pain (eight male, three female; mean age 33 years) and six healthy individuals (three male, three female; mean age 39 years) constituted the control group. All of the participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-selective 31 P MRS (3 T) of the leg muscles before and after graded exercise on a treadmill. Phosphocreatine (PCr):inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr:adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios and the intracellular pH of the leg muscles were measured using 31 P MRS. Results: For both groups, normal muscle mass with no signal alterations was observed on the MRI images after exercise. The normal range of pre- and post- exercise MRS muscle parameters was observed in both groups. However, the intracellular pH post-exercise, was significantly higher (less acidic) in the FMF group compared to the control group [pH (FMF) = 7.03 ± 0.02; pH (control) 7.00 ± 0.02; p < 0.0006]. Conclusions: The finding of a less prominent, post-exercise acidification of the gastrocnemius muscle in this FMF patient group suggests a forme fruste of glycogenosis. This preliminary observation should be further investigated in a future, larger-scale study

  13. Thickness-dependent surface plasmon resonance of ITO nanoparticles for ITO/In-Sn bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenzuo; Hong, Ruijin; Jing, Ming; Shao, Wen; Tao, Chunxian; Zhang, Dawei

    2018-01-05

    Tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in doped semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs), which represents an important characteristic in LSPR sensor applications, still remains a challenge. Here, indium tin oxide/indium tin alloy (ITO/In-Sn) bilayer films were deposited by electron beam evaporation and the properties, such as the LSPR and surface morphology, were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR double beam spectrophotometer and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. By simply engineering the thickness of ITO/In-Sn NPs without any microstructure fabrications, the LSPR wavelength of ITO NPs can be tuned by a large amount from 858 to 1758 nm. AFM images show that the strong LSPR of ITO NPs is closely related to the enhanced coupling between ITO and In-Sn NPs. Blue shifts of ITO LSPR from 1256 to 1104 nm are also observed in the as-annealed samples due to the higher free carrier concentration. Meanwhile, we also demonstrated that the ITO LSPR in ITO/In-Sn NPs structures has good sensitivity to the surrounding media and stability after 30 d exposure in air, enabling its application prospects in many biosensing devices.

  14. Approaching Resonant Absorption of Environmental Xenobiotics Harmonic Oscillation by Linear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia A. Bulucea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, it has become increasingly accepted that the term xenobiotic relates to environmental impact, since environmental xenobiotics are understood to be substances foreign to a biological system, which did not exist in nature before their synthesis by humans. In this context, xenobiotics are persistent pollutants such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, as well as plastics and pesticides. Dangerous and unstable situations can result from the presence of environmental xenobiotics since their harmful effects on humans and ecosystems are often unpredictable. For instance, the immune system is extremely vulnerable and sensitive to modulation by environmental xenobitics. Various experimental assays could be performed to ascertain the immunotoxic potential of environmental xenobiotics, taking into account genetic factors, the route of xenobiotic penetration, and the amount and duration of exposure, as well as the wave shape of the xenobiotic. In this paper, we propose an approach for the analysis of xenobiotic metabolism using mathematical models and corresponding methods. This study focuses on a pattern depicting mathematically modeled processes of resonant absorption of a xenobiotic harmonic oscillation by an organism modulated as an absorbing oscillator structure. We represent the xenobiotic concentration degree through a spatial concentration vector, and we model and simulate the oscillating regime of environmental xenobiotic absorption. It is anticipated that the results could be used to facilitate the assessment of the processes of environmental xenobiotic absorption, distribution, biotransformation and removal within the framework of compartmental analysis, by establishing appropriate mathematical models and simulations.

  15. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. [Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Leif

    2007-01-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the A MX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed.

  17. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andres Pizarro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  18. Automated Quality Assessment of Structural Magnetic Resonance Brain Images Based on a Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Ricardo A; Cheng, Xi; Barnett, Alan; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A; Goldman, Aaron L; Xiao, Ena; Luo, Qian; Berman, Karen F; Callicott, Joseph H; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI) is being increasingly used to delineate morphological changes underlying neuropsychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, artifacts frequently compromise the utility of 3D-MRI yielding irreproducible results, from both type I and type II errors. It is therefore critical to screen 3D-MRIs for artifacts before use. Currently, quality assessment involves slice-wise visual inspection of 3D-MRI volumes, a procedure that is both subjective and time consuming. Automating the quality rating of 3D-MRI could improve the efficiency and reproducibility of the procedure. The present study is one of the first efforts to apply a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm in the quality assessment of structural brain images, using global and region of interest (ROI) automated image quality features developed in-house. SVM is a supervised machine-learning algorithm that can predict the category of test datasets based on the knowledge acquired from a learning dataset. The performance (accuracy) of the automated SVM approach was assessed, by comparing the SVM-predicted quality labels to investigator-determined quality labels. The accuracy for classifying 1457 3D-MRI volumes from our database using the SVM approach is around 80%. These results are promising and illustrate the possibility of using SVM as an automated quality assessment tool for 3D-MRI.

  19. Evaluation of permanent I-125 prostate implants using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerland, Marinus A.; Wijrdeman, Harm K.; Beersma, Robert; Bakker, Chris J.G.; Battermann, Jan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is the evaluation of permanent I-125 prostate implants using radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients underwent radiography on the simulator and MRI within 3 days after implantation of the I-125 seeds. Isocentric radiographs were used for reconstruction of the seed distribution, after which registration with the seed-induced signal voids on MRI provided the seed positions in relation to the prostate. The prostate was contoured on the transversal magnetic resonance images, and dose-volume histograms were computed to evaluate the implants. The validity of the ellipsoidal prostate volume approximation, as applied in preimplant dose calculation, was assessed by comparison of ellipsoidal volumes given by prostate width, height, and length and prostate volumes obtained by a slice-by-slice contouring method, both on postimplant MRI. Prostate volume changes due to postimplant prostate swelling were assessed from radiographs taken at 3 days and 1 month after the implantation. Results: The seeds were readily identified on T 1 -weighted spin-echo images and matched with the seed distribution reconstructed from the isocentric radiographs. The matching error, averaged over 21 patients, amounted to 1.8 ± 0.4 mm (mean ± standard deviation). The fractions of the prostate volumes receiving the prescribed matched peripheral dose (MPD) ranged from 32 to 71% (mean ± standard deviation: 60 ± 10%). Prostate volumes, obtained by the contouring method on postimplant MRI, were a factor 1.5 ± 0.3 larger than the ellipsoidal volumes given by the prostate dimensions on postimplant MRI. Prostate volumes 3 days after the implantation were a factor 1.3 ± 0.2 larger than the prostate volumes 1 month after the implantation. Registration of the reconstructed seed distribution and the MR images showed inaccuracies in seed placement, for example, two or more seeds clustering together or seeds outside the prostate

  20. Phase modulation and structural effects in a D-shaped all-solid photonic crystal fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhixin; Hao, Xin; Shao, Yonghong; Chen, Yuzhi; Li, Xuejin; Fan, Ping

    2014-06-16

    We numerically investigate a D-shaped fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor based on all-solid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with finite element method. In the side-polished PCF sensor, field leakage is guided to penetrate through the gap between the rods, causing a pronounced phase modulation in the deep polishing case. Taking advantage of these amplified phase shifts, a high-performance fiber sensor design is proposed. The significant enhancements arising from this new sensor design should lift the performance of the fiber SPR sensor into the range capable of detecting a wide range of biochemical interactions, which makes it especially attractive for many in vivo and in situ bioanalysis applications. Several parameters which influence the field leakage, such as the polishing position, the pitch of the PCF, and the rod diameter, are inspected to evaluate their impacts. Furthermore, we develop a mathematical model to describe the effects of varying the structural parameters of a D-shaped PCF sensor on the evanescent field and the sensor performance.

  1. Evaluation of valvular regurgitation by cine magnetic resonance imaging in patients with various cardiac diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Shuuhei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical value and limitation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and quantification of valvular regurgitation, 98 patients with various cardiac diseases were studied by cine MRI and the results were compared with contrast angiography and doppler color-flow imaging. Cine MRI was carried out using FLASH (fast low angle shot) which employs TE of 10∼20 msec and TR of 30∼40 msec. 22 transverse tomograms per cardiac cycle with a slice thickness of 10 mm were obtained at the level of atrium and ventricle. The jet of valvular regurgitation was easily seen as a discrete are of low signal with cine MRI. Identification of the regurgitation and its severity were visually evaluated based on the relative size of the regurgitant jet from the incompetent valve orifice. Using contrast angiography as a gold standard, the sensitivity of cine MRI for detecting mitral regurgitation was 83% and was 94% for aortic regurgitation, with the specificity of 82% and 100%, respectively. For mitral requrgitation and aortic regurgitation, evaluation by cine MRI and severity agreed well with contrast angiography. By the comparative study with doppler color-flow imaging, relatively good agreement was found between the two methods in detection and quantitative evaluation of valvular regurgitation in any of four valves. Cine MRI was suggested to be useful for both the detection and semiquantification of valvular regurgitation in generally, but its clinical limitation at this point was also found because, 1)its images are not acquired in real times, as in contrast angiography or doppler color-flow imaging, but are compiled from the cumulative information from 128 heart beats, 2)the evaluation of regurgitation is made from only two-dimensional transverse tomograms. (author)

  2. Spin resonance in the new-structure-type iron-based superconductor CaKFe4As4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Kazuki; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Nagai, Yuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Christianson, Andrew D.; Murai, Naoki; Kawashima, Kenji; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Iyo, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical spin susceptibility in the new-structure-type iron-based superconductor CaKFe 4 As 4 was investigated by using a combination of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements and random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. Powder INS measurements show that the spin resonance at Q res = 1.17(1) Å -1 , corresponding to the (π, π) nesting wave vector in tetragonal notation, evolves below T c . The characteristic energy of the spin resonance E res = 12.5 meV is smaller than twice the size of the superconducting gap (2Δ). The broad energy feature of the dynamical susceptibility of the spin resonance can be explained by the RPA calculations, in which the different superconducting gaps on different Fermi surfaces are taken into account. Our INS and PRA studies demonstrate that the superconducting pairing nature in CaKFe 4 As 4 is the s ± symmetry. (author)

  3. Seismic response of the geologic structure underlying the Roman Colosseum and a 2-D resonance of a sediment valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Labak

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The seismic response of the geologic structure beneath the Colosseum is investigated using a two-dimensional modeling for a vertically incident plane SH wave. Computations indicate that the southern part of the Colosseum may be exposed to a seismic ground motion with significantly larger amplitudes, differential motion and longer duration than the northern part. because the southern part of the Colosseum is underlain by a sedimentfilled valley created by sedimentary filling of the former tributary of the River Tiber. A 2-D resonance may develop in the valley. Unlike the previous theoretical studies on 2-D resonance in sediment-filled valleys, an effect of heterogeneous valley surroundings on the resonance is partly investigated. A very small sensitivity of the maximum spectral amplifications connected with the fundamental and first higher modes to the presence of a horizontal surface layer (with an intermediate velocity in the valley surroundings is observed in the studied models.

  4. Testing the tetraquark structure for the X resonances in the low-lying region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hungchong [Kookmin University, Department of General Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.S. [Korea Aerospace University, School of Liberal Arts and Science, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Soongsil University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jido, Daisuke [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Oka, Makoto [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Meguro (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Assuming the four-quark structure for the X resonances in the low-lying region, we calculate their masses using the color-spin interaction. Specifically, the hyperfine masses of the color-spin interaction are calculated for the possible states in spin-0, spin-1, spin-2 channels. The two states in spin-0 channel as well as the two states in spin-1 channel are diagonalized in order to generate the physical hyperfine masses. By matching the difference in hyperfine masses with the splitting in corresponding hadron masses and using the X(3872) mass as an input, we estimate the masses corresponding to the states J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}, 1{sup +-}, 2{sup ++}. We find that the masses of two states in 1{sup +-} are close to those of X(3823), X(3900), and the mass of the 2{sup ++} state is close to that of X(3940). For them, the discrepancies are about ∝ 10 MeV. This may suggest that the quantum numbers of the controversial states are X(3823) = 1{sup +-}, X(3900) = 1{sup +-}, X(3940) = 2{sup ++}. In this work, we use the same inputs parameters, the constituent quark masses and the strength of the color-spin interaction, that have been adopted in the previous work on the D- or B-meson excited states. There, it was shown that the four-quark structure can be manifested in their excited states. Thus, our results in this work provide a consistent treatment on open- and hidden-charm mesons as far as the four-quark model is concerned. (orig.)

  5. Generate floor response spectra, Part 2: Response spectra for equipment-structure resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept of tRS is proposed to deal with tuning of equipment and structures. • Established statistical approaches for estimating tRS corresponding to given GRS. • Derived a new modal combination rule from the theory of random vibration. • Developed efficient and accurate direct method for generating floor response spectra. - Abstract: When generating floor response spectra (FRS) using the direct spectra-to-spectra method developed in the companion paper, probability distribution of t-response spectrum (tRS), which deals with equipment-structure resonance or tuning, corresponding to a specified ground response spectrum (GRS) is required. In this paper, simulation results using a large number of horizontal and vertical ground motions are employed to establish statistical relationships between tRS and GRS. It is observed that the influence of site conditions on horizontal statistical relationships is negligible, whereas the effect of site conditions on vertical statistical relationships cannot be ignored. Considering the influence of site conditions, horizontal statistical relationship suitable for all site conditions and vertical statistical relationships suitable for hard sites and soft sites, respectively, are established. The horizontal and vertical statistical relationships are suitable to estimate tRS for design spectra in USNRC R.G. 1.60 and NUREG/CR-0098, Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) in Western North America (WNA), or any GRS falling inside the valid coverage of the statistical relationship. For UHS with significant high frequency spectral accelerations, such as UHS in Central and Eastern North America (CENA), an amplification ratio method is proposed to estimate tRS. Numerical examples demonstrate that the statistical relationships and the amplification ratio method are acceptable to estimate tRS for given GRS and to generate FRS using the direct method in different practical situations.

  6. Generate floor response spectra, Part 2: Response spectra for equipment-structure resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo, E-mail: b68li@uwaterloo.ca; Jiang, Wei, E-mail: w46jiang@uwaterloo.ca; Xie, Wei-Chau, E-mail: xie@uwaterloo.ca; Pandey, Mahesh D., E-mail: mdpandey@uwaterloo.ca

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The concept of tRS is proposed to deal with tuning of equipment and structures. • Established statistical approaches for estimating tRS corresponding to given GRS. • Derived a new modal combination rule from the theory of random vibration. • Developed efficient and accurate direct method for generating floor response spectra. - Abstract: When generating floor response spectra (FRS) using the direct spectra-to-spectra method developed in the companion paper, probability distribution of t-response spectrum (tRS), which deals with equipment-structure resonance or tuning, corresponding to a specified ground response spectrum (GRS) is required. In this paper, simulation results using a large number of horizontal and vertical ground motions are employed to establish statistical relationships between tRS and GRS. It is observed that the influence of site conditions on horizontal statistical relationships is negligible, whereas the effect of site conditions on vertical statistical relationships cannot be ignored. Considering the influence of site conditions, horizontal statistical relationship suitable for all site conditions and vertical statistical relationships suitable for hard sites and soft sites, respectively, are established. The horizontal and vertical statistical relationships are suitable to estimate tRS for design spectra in USNRC R.G. 1.60 and NUREG/CR-0098, Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) in Western North America (WNA), or any GRS falling inside the valid coverage of the statistical relationship. For UHS with significant high frequency spectral accelerations, such as UHS in Central and Eastern North America (CENA), an amplification ratio method is proposed to estimate tRS. Numerical examples demonstrate that the statistical relationships and the amplification ratio method are acceptable to estimate tRS for given GRS and to generate FRS using the direct method in different practical situations.

  7. New WIMS library generation from ENDF/B6 and effect of resonance group structure on cell parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Tabesh, Alireza

    2002-01-01

    Due to inaccessibility to NJOY, steps were taken to create WIMS library, which can be extracted from ENDF/B6 without using NJOY. In addition to using preprocessing codes few programs were written to calculate integral resonance, slowing down power per unit lethargy, potential scattering, and differential scattering cross section, scattering matrices. For neutrons with energy above 4 eV, isotropic elastic scattering was assumed. For neutrons below 4 eV the free gas model was used, except for light elements, which tabulated values of S(α,β) in ENDF/B6 used. The Goldstein-Cohen factors are taken from WIMKAL88.Lib. The integral resonance with self absorption per unit lethargy was obtained from GROUPIE output. The P 1 scattering matrices are calculated only for four elements, namely H, D, C and O at 300 K. In order to examine the created libraries, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR are calculated using new WIMS library, WIMKAL88.Lib and NEA329.Lib. The results showed general agreement. The controversial issue of WIMS library group structure, particularly in resonance region has raised the question of whether the number of resonance group i.e., 13 is optimized. We generated different WIMS libraries consisting of 5, 8, 13, 18 and 23 resonance groups. The main aim was to examine the effect to resonance group structure on calculated core parameters, mainly, k eff , δ 28 , ρ 28 , ρ 25 and CR. These parameters are also calculated and compared with those obtained using WIMKAL88, and NEA329 libraries. (author)

  8. Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, R.N.; Toppel, B.J.; Henryson, H. II.

    1980-10-01

    Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC 2 -2

  9. In Vitro Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Fragmented, Open-Coil, Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellock, Frank G; Zare, Armaan; Ilfeld, Brian M; Chae, John; Strother, Robert B

    2018-04-01

    Percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) is an FDA-cleared pain treatment. Occasionally, fragments of the lead (MicroLead, SPR Therapeutics, LLC, Cleveland, OH, USA) may be retained following lead removal. Since the lead is metallic, there are associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) risks. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to evaluate MRI-related issues (i.e., magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts) for various lead fragments. Testing was conducted using standardized techniques on lead fragments of different lengths (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% of maximum possible fragment length of 12.7 cm) to determine MRI-related problems. Magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque) and artifacts were tested for the longest lead fragment at 3 Tesla. MRI-related heating was evaluated at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz and 3 Tesla/128 MHz with each lead fragment placed in a gelled-saline filled phantom. Temperatures were recorded on the lead fragments while using relatively high RF power levels. Artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo, and gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequences. The longest lead fragment produced only minor magnetic field interactions. For the lead fragments evaluated, physiologically inconsequential MRI-related heating occurred at 1.5 Tesla/64 MHz while under certain 3 Tesla/128 MHz conditions, excessive temperature elevations may occur. Artifacts extended approximately 7 mm from the lead fragment on the GRE pulse sequence, suggesting that anatomy located at a position greater than this distance may be visualized on MRI. MRI may be performed safely in patients with retained lead fragments at 1.5 Tesla using the specific conditions of this study (i.e., MR Conditional). Due to possible excessive temperature rises at 3 Tesla, performing MRI at that field strength is currently inadvisable. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  10. The accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the extent of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshioka, Masuo; Kosuge, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Yoshihiro; Musha, Terunaga; Yamauchi, Itaru; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the accuracy of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in evaluating the extent of the tumor in 36 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The CT and MRI findings were compared with the microscopic pathologic characteristics in all cases. Linear regression analysis for measurements of residual normal myometrium revealed significant positive correlations (p<0.001) between MRI (r=0.861) and CT (r=0.826) findings and pathologic evaluation. Thirty-six patients were divided into two groups according to our previous CT and MRI criteria: the superficial myometrial invasion group and advanced tumor group. In MRI findings, higher incidences of deep (≥1/2) myometrial invasion (p<0.001), vessel permeation (p<0.05) and cervical involvement (p<0.05) were observed in the advanced group. In CT findings, deep myometrial invasion (p<0.001) was observed in the advanced group. The incidence of extrauterine extension of the tumor did not differ significantly between CT and MRI findings. The accuracy figures for cervical involvement evaluated by CT and MRI were 83%, and 86%, respectively. In four of 6 patients, in whom an intact Junctional zone (j-zone) was detected by MRI, the tumor was localized in the endometrium. The remaining 2 patients had only superficial myometrial invasion histologically. In all 16 patients, in whom the j-zone was interrupted in MRI findings, myometrial invasion was confirmed pathologically. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the overall accuracy of MRI staging in patients with endometrial carcinoma is 61.1%, and CT, as well as MRI, is effective preoperatively in evaluating the extent of the tumor. (author)

  11. Evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture by using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Zhou Xiangping; Liu Rongbo; Song Bin; Yan Zhihan; Chen Xian; Wang Wentao; Xiong Yan; Xu Minsheng; Gu Jianping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreagraphy (MRCP) in the preoperative evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture. Methods: Eighteen cases, which were diagnosed as late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct strictures only by MRCP and proved by surgery and pathology, were classified according to Bismuth classification and the surgical operation strategy was planed on the basis of MR cholangiopancreagraphic findings before surgery. The results were compared with surgery. Results: Diagnostic MR Cholangiopancreagrams were acquired in 18 patients. Among all 18 patients, the level of stricture was classified as Bismuth I in 3 patients, Bismuth II in 7 patients, Bismuth III in 3 patients, and Bismuth IV in 3 patients. A Bismuth II stricture was incorrectly classified as a Bismuth III lesion. On the basis of MR cholangiopancreagraphic findings, a surgical operation strategy can be planed. The therapeutic plan anticipated with MRCP matched the actually used procedure in 16 of 18 patients. conclusion: MRCP plays an important role in the evaluation of late stage iatrogenic extrahepatic bile duct stricture

  12. Magnetic resonance cisternography using the fast spin echo method for the evaluation of vestibular schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Shigeru; Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Uemura, Kenichi [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Neuroimaging of vestibular schwannoma was performed with the fat-suppression spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) method and magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography, which is a fast spin echo method using a long echo train length, for the preoperative evaluation of the lateral extension of the tumor in the internal auditory canal, and the anatomical identification of the posterior semicircular canal and the nerves in the canal distal to the tumor. The SPGR method overestimated the lateral extension in eight cases, probably because of enhancement of the nerves adjacent to the tumor in the canal. The posterior semicircular canal could not be clearly identified, and the cranial nerves in the canal were shown only as a nerve bundle. In contrast, MR cisternography showed clear images of the lateral extension of the tumor and the facial and cochlear nerves adjacent to the tumor in the internal auditory canal. The anatomical location of the posterior semicircular canal was also clearly shown. These preoperative findings are very useful to plan the extent to which the internal auditory canal can be opened, and for intraoperative identification of the nerves in the canal. MR cisternography is less invasive since no contrast material or radiation is required, as with thin-slice high-resolution computed tomography (CT). MR cisternography should replace high-resolution CT for the preoperative neuroradiological evaluation of vestibular schwannoma. (author)

  13. Transcranial radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of osseous changes of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Beom; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of transcranial radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the assessment of osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence. Osseous changes of the TMJ were evaluated in forty-three patients. Osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence were observed in 41 joints and 64 joints, respectively on transcranial radiographs, and 48 joints and 59 joints, respectively on MRI. The flattening, sclerosis, erosion, and osteophyte formation of the condylar heads were observed in 36.6%, 43.9%, 12.2%, and 7.3%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 35.4%, 20.8%, 37.5%, and 6.3%, respectively on MRI. While, the flattening, sclerosis, and erosion of the articular eminences were observed in 26.6%, 67.2%, and 6.2%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 32.2%, 59.3%, and 8.5%, respectively on MRI. There were no statistical differences between transcranial radiographs and MRI scans in the detection of osseous changes of the TMJ. However, MRI scans were superior to the transcranial radiographs in the detection of erosion of the condylar head (p<0.01).

  14. Evaluation of cardiac motion and function by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Anno, Hirofumi

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied to evaluate the cardiac motion and function, and a water-stream phantom study was performed to clarify whether it was possible to quantitatively assess the valvular regurgitation flow by the size of the flow void. In normal subjects, the left ventricular (LV) epicardial apex swung up to the base only a few millimeters, and the mitral annulus ring moved about 14 mm as mean value toward the apex during systole. Those motions of mitral annulus ring may contribute to the left atrial filling. The LV longitudinal shortening and torsions were shown by the tagging method. This tagging method was the best method for estimating cardiac motions. Cardiac cine MRI using software including a modified Simpson's method program and a wall motion analysis program was useful for routine LV volumetry and wall motion analysis because it was a simple and reliable method. Our water-stream phantom studies demonstrated that it might be difficult to perform quantitative evaluation of valvular regurgitation flow by using only the size of the flow void without acquiring information relating to the orifice area. (author)

  15. Evaluation of colonic involvement in endometriosis: double-contrast barium enema vs. magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccioli, N; Foti, G; Manfredi, R; Mainardi, P; Spoto, E; Ruffo, G; Minelli, L; Mucelli, R Pozzi

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of intestinal endometriosis using the histological examination on resected specimen as comparative standard. Eighty-three consecutive patients with suspected intestinal endometriosis, resected between 2005 and 2007, were prospectively evaluated. All of the women underwent preoperative DCBE and MRI on the same day. We evaluated number, site (rectum, sigmoid, cecum), and size of the lesions. The imaging findings were correlated with those resulting at pathology. Among the 65 women who underwent surgery, 50/65 (76.9%) were found to have bowel endometriosis, with 9/50 (18%) patients presenting two lesions; DCBE allowed to detect 50/59 (84.7%) lesions. MRI allowed to detect 42/59 (71.1%) lesions. DCBE showed sensibility, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of respectively 84.7, 93.7, 98.0, 62.5, and 86.6%, MRI of 71.1, 83.3, 93.3, 46.8, and 74.6%. DCBE is more accurate than unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of bowel endometriosis, and should be preferred in the preoperative management of this disease, since it usually enables a proper surgical planning.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Presurgical Evaluation of Brain Vascular Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Natalia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas Sergio A

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe our experience in presurgical evaluation of intracranial vascular malformations by means of functional magnetic resonance (fMRI). Method: To evaluate eight patients with cerebral vascular malformations (seven arterio-venous malformation [AVM ] and one cavernous malformation) to send to the eloquent cortex with RMf pre-surgical mapping is assessed. Used a technique that is dependent on the level of oxygen (BOLD) to locate these areas in the cerebral vascular malformation, by applying different paradigms. Results: We found one AVM at the right temporal lobe with activation of the parahipocampal gyrus at the contralateral side using a memory paradigm; another patient with an AVM at the right mesotemporal lobe showed activation of visual and spatial memory of the contralateral hippocampus and parahippocampus. One patient with an AVM at the left parietal lobe without compromise of sensorial and motor cortex; a cavernous malformation at the left angular gyrus with hemispheric language dominance in that side; one right thalamic AVM, one periventricular AVM bilateral language dominance; one left occipital AVM with decreased activation in visual association cortex; one temporoccipital AVM with left language dominance and neurovascular uncoupling. Conclusion: fMRI can delineate anatomically the relationship between the lesion and eloquent cortex, providing useful information for presurgical planning and allowing risk estimation of intervention.

  17. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research (MS 210), Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Laningham, Fred H.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2007-01-01

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  19. Transcranial radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of osseous changes of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Beom; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of transcranial radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the assessment of osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence. Osseous changes of the TMJ were evaluated in forty-three patients. Osseous changes of the condylar head and articular eminence were observed in 41 joints and 64 joints, respectively on transcranial radiographs, and 48 joints and 59 joints, respectively on MRI. The flattening, sclerosis, erosion, and osteophyte formation of the condylar heads were observed in 36.6%, 43.9%, 12.2%, and 7.3%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 35.4%, 20.8%, 37.5%, and 6.3%, respectively on MRI. While, the flattening, sclerosis, and erosion of the articular eminences were observed in 26.6%, 67.2%, and 6.2%, respectively on transcranial radiographs compared with 32.2%, 59.3%, and 8.5%, respectively on MRI. There were no statistical differences between transcranial radiographs and MRI scans in the detection of osseous changes of the TMJ. However, MRI scans were superior to the transcranial radiographs in the detection of erosion of the condylar head (p<0.01).

  20. Comparative silicone breast implant evaluation using mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging: experience with 59 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C Y; DeBruhl, N D; Gorczyca, D P; Shaw, W W; Bassett, L W

    1994-10-01

    With the current controversy regarding the safety of silicone implants, the detection and evaluation of implant rupture are causing concern for both plastic surgeons and patients. Our study obtained comparative value analysis of mammography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of silicone implant rupture. Twenty-nine symptomatic patients (total of 59 silicone implants) were entered into the study. Intraoperative findings revealed 21 ruptured implants (36 percent). During physical examination, a positive "squeeze test" was highly suggestive of implant rupture. Mammograms were obtained of 51 implants (sensitivity 11 percent, specificity 89 percent). Sonography was performed on 57 implants (sensitivity 70 percent, specificity 92 percent). MRI was performed on 55 implants (sensitivity 81 percent, specificity 92 percent). Sonographically, implant rupture is demonstrated by the "stepladder sign." Double-lumen implants may appear as false-positive results for rupture on sonography. On MRI, the "linguine sign" represents disrupted fragments of a ruptured implant. The most reliable imaging modality for implant rupture detection is MRI, followed by sonogram. Mammogram is the least reliable. Our study supports the clinical indication and diagnostic value of sonogram and MRI in the evaluation of symptomatic breast implant patients.

  1. Magnetic resonance evaluation of cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, A; Tripathi, R.P.; Gorthi, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate and delineate the characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis lesions using a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, diffusion, and perfusion studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 8 patients with 23 lesions were evaluated on a 1.5-T MR system. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with three 'b' values of 50, 500, and 1000 s/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated. The diffusion-weighted appearances and the T2-weighted MR appearances of the lesions were compared. MR spectroscopy was performed using the point-resolved single-voxel technique with two TE values of 135 ms and 270 ms. Perfusion studies were carried out using the dynamic contrast-enhanced technique, and the relative cerebral blood volume maps were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. RESULTS: DWI revealed the majority of the lesions as having increased diffusion within their necrotic centers, with the ADC ranging from 0.5 to 3.01 (mean ± SD: 1.49 ± 0.7). All the lesions revealed a predominant lipid peak on MR spectroscopy and were extremely hypovascular on perfusion MR studies. CONCLUSION: MR diffusion, spectroscopy, and perfusion studies help in characterizing toxoplasmosis lesions and, in most cases, can be used in combination to help establish the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis

  2. Magnetic resonance evaluation of cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batra, A; Tripathi, R.P.; Gorthi, S.P. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India). NMR Research Center

    2004-04-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate and delineate the characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis lesions using a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, diffusion, and perfusion studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 8 patients with 23 lesions were evaluated on a 1.5-T MR system. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with three 'b' values of 50, 500, and 1000 s/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated. The diffusion-weighted appearances and the T2-weighted MR appearances of the lesions were compared. MR spectroscopy was performed using the point-resolved single-voxel technique with two TE values of 135 ms and 270 ms. Perfusion studies were carried out using the dynamic contrast-enhanced technique, and the relative cerebral blood volume maps were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. RESULTS: DWI revealed the majority of the lesions as having increased diffusion within their necrotic centers, with the ADC ranging from 0.5 to 3.01 (mean {+-} SD: 1.49 {+-} 0.7). All the lesions revealed a predominant lipid peak on MR spectroscopy and were extremely hypovascular on perfusion MR studies. CONCLUSION: MR diffusion, spectroscopy, and perfusion studies help in characterizing toxoplasmosis lesions and, in most cases, can be used in combination to help establish the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for stress incontinence: evaluation of patients before and after surgical correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, Hakki E-mail: hakkiperk@yahoo.com; Oral, Baha; Yesildag, Ahmet; Serel, T. Ahmet; Oezsoy, Mesut; Turgut, Tayfun

    2002-10-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre and postoperative assessment of stress urinary incontinence. Methods: Fifteen female patients with clinical evidence of stress urinary incontinence were included in this prospective study. All the patients underwent MRI in the supine position both preoperatively and postoperatively. For imaging, we used a 1.0 T magnet, T2-weighted images were obtained in the midline sagittal plane with patients at rest. Images were evaluated for anatomical stress urinary incontinence alterations, such as the increased distance between the pubococcygeal line and the bladder base and the posterior urethro-vesical angle and the urethral inclination angle changes. Wilcoxon signed rank test allowed comparisons of pre and postoperative results. Results: Compared with postoperative measurements, the bladder base was lowered significantly by an average of 9.4{+-}4.0 mm (P<0.01), posterior urethro-vesical angle was significantly increased by an average of 127.8{+-}11.4 deg. (P<0.01), and the urethral inclination angle was significantly increased by an average of 54.9{+-}10.1 deg. (P<0.01) preoperatively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that MRI can play a major role in the preoperative and postoperative assessment of stress urinary incontinence. It can reliably detect anatomical urinary incontinence alterations. MRI should be considered in failed surgery, complex prolapse, and in differentiating genuine stress incontinence resulting from malposition of the bladder neck from stress incontinence due to intrinsic urethral damage.

  4. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  5. Structure and resonances of the e+–He(1s2s 3Se) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhenzhong; Han Huili; Shi Tingyun; Mitroy, J

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the geometry and resonances of the e + He( 3 S e ) system in the framework of hyperspherical coordinates. A model potential proposed by us is used to describe the interaction between the out electron with the He + ionic core. The calculated binding energy and expectation distance of the system are in agreement with other calculations. In addition, two resonances below the e + –He(1s3s 3 S e ) threshold and one resonance below the Ps(n=2)–He + threshold are identified. (paper)

  6. Localized surface plasmon polariton resonance in holographically structured Al-doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, David; Lowell, David; Mao, Michelle; Hassan, Safaa; Philipose, Usha [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Li, Li; Jiang, Yan; Cui, Jingbiao [Department of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152 (United States); Ding, Jun; Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Lin, Yuankun [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Research and Technology, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we studied the localized surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonance in hole arrays in transparent conducting aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO). CMOS-compatible fabrication process was demonstrated for the AZO devices. The localized SPP resonance was observed and confirmed by electromagnetic simulations. Using a standing wave model, the observed SPP was dominated by the standing-wave resonance along (1,1) direction in square lattices. This research lays the groundwork for a fabrication technique that can contribute to the core technology of future integrated photonics through its extension into tunable conductive materials.

  7. Interference of laser-induced resonances in the continuous structures of a helium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magunov, A I; Strakhova, S I

    2003-01-01

    Coherent effects in the interference of overlapping laser-induced resonances in helium atoms are considered. The simultaneous action of single-mode radiation of the 294-nm second harmonic of a cw dye laser and a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser on helium atoms provides the overlap of two resonances induced by transitions from the 1s2s 1 S and 1s4s 1 S helium levels. The shape of the overlapping laser-induced resonances in the rotating-wave approximation is described by analytic expressions, which depend on the laser radiation intensities and the ratio of laser frequencies. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  8. Resonant ionization by laser beams: application to ions sources and to study the nuclear structure of radioactive tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sifi, R.

    2007-07-01

    The radioactive ion beams that are produced through current isotope separators are well separated according to the A mass but not according to the Z parameter. The resonant ionization through laser beams applied to ion sources allows the production of radioactive ion beam in a very selective and efficient way by eliminating the isobaric contamination. The first chapter is dedicated to the resonant ionization by laser beams, we describe the principle, the experimental setting, the lasers used, the ionization schemes and the domain of application. The second chapter deals with the application of resonant ionization to laser ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams. We present experimental tests performed for getting copper ion beams. Resonant ionization through laser is also used in the spectroscopy experiments performed at the Isolde (isotope separation on-line device) installation in CERN where more than 20 elements are ionized very efficiently. The technique is based on a frequency scanning around the excitation transition of the atoms in order to probe the hyperfine structure. Laser spectroscopy allows the determination of the hyperfine structure as well as the isotopic shift of atoms. In the third chapter the method is applied to the spectroscopy of tellurium atoms. First, we define the 2 parameters on which the extraction is based: charge radius and nuclear moments, then we present several theoretical models that we have used to assess our experimental results. (A.C.)

  9. Development and preliminary validation of the spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada magnetic resonance imaging sacroiliac joint structural score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2015-01-01

    on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) SIJ Structural Score (SSS). METHODS: The SSS method for assessment of structural lesions is based on T1-weighted spin echo MRI, validated lesion definitions, slice selection according to well-defined anatomical...... in scores, and was highest for fat metaplasia when both ICC and SDC values were compared. CONCLUSION: The new SPARCC MRI SSS method can detect structural changes in the SIJ with acceptable reliability over a 1-2-year timeframe, and should be further validated in patients with SpA....

  10. Uterus and ovaries in girls and young women with Turner syndrome evaluated by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Holm, Kirsten; Fallentin, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine uterine and ovarian size in Turner syndrome (TS) and to compare uterine and ovarian size evaluated by transabdominal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in girls with TS and two groups of controls. Design A cross-sectional study. Patients Forty-one girls...

  11. Is there an indication for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, R.; van der Zaag-Loonen HJ, [No Value; Willems, T.P.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for bypass graft occlusion and stenosis detection compared with coronary angiography in post-coronary artery bypass graft patients. The indication for noninvasive

  12. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging used for the evaluation of water presence in wood plastic composite boards exposed to exterior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek Gnatowski; Rebecca Ibach; Mathew Leung; Grace Sun

    2014-01-01

    Two wood plastic composite (WPC) boards, one experimental and one commercial, were exposed to exterior conditions and evaluated non-destructively using a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) unit for moisture content (MC) and distribution. The experimental board was exposed in Vancouver, British Columbia, for more than 8 years, and the commercial board was exposed...

  14. How evaluation and need for structure affect motivation and creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, Marjette; Rietzschel, Eric F.; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that evaluation can have negative effects when it is perceived as controlling rather than informational. We hypothesized that Personal Need for Structure (PNS) would moderate the effects of (perceptions of) evaluative situations. Specifically, we expected that informational

  15. Quantum-well charge and voltage distribution in a metal–insulator–semiconductor structure upon resonant electron Tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vexler, M. I., E-mail: vexler@mail.ioffe.ru; Illarionov, Yu. Yu.; Grekhov, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The prerequisites for electron storage in the quantum well of a metal–oxide–p{sup +}-Si resonant-tunneling structure and the effect of the stored charge on the voltage distribution are theoretically investigated. Systems with SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} insulators are studied. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of a charge in the well in the case of resonant transport can be expected in structures on substrates with an acceptor concentration from (5–6) × 10{sup 18} to (2–3) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3} in the range of oxide thicknesses dependent on this concentration. In particular, the oxide layer thickness in the structures with SiO{sub 2}/p{sup +}-Si(10{sup 19} cm{sup –3}) should exceed ~3 nm. The electron density in the well can reach ~10{sup 12} cm{sup –2} and higher. However, the effect of this charge on the electrostatics of the structure becomes noticeable only at relatively high voltages far above the activation of resonant transport through the first subband.

  16. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard; Gao, Xin; Li, Ming

    2011-01-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg's contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  17. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  18. Evaluation of structural reliability using simulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baballëku Markel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eurocode describes the 'index of reliability' as a measure of structural reliability, related to the 'probability of failure'. This paper is focused on the assessment of this index for a reinforced concrete bridge pier. It is rare to explicitly use reliability concepts for design of structures, but the problems of structural engineering are better known through them. Some of the main methods for the estimation of the probability of failure are the exact analytical integration, numerical integration, approximate analytical methods and simulation methods. Monte Carlo Simulation is used in this paper, because it offers a very good tool for the estimation of probability in multivariate functions. Complicated probability and statistics problems are solved through computer aided simulations of a large number of tests. The procedures of structural reliability assessment for the bridge pier and the comparison with the partial factor method of the Eurocodes have been demonstrated in this paper.

  19. An FFT-accelerated fdtd scheme with exact absorbing conditions for characterizing axially symmetric resonant structures

    KAUST Repository

    Sirenko, Kostyantyn; Pazynin, Vadim L.; Sirenko, Yu K.; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    under resonant conditions. This renders the method highly useful in characterization of high-Q microwave radiators and energy compressors. Numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method are presented.

  20. A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnah, Susan K.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to accommodate the interpolation of these molecules. The spatial arrangement adopted by each of these species appeared to dictate its effect on the lipids. Doxorubicin and menadione, both known to cause oxidative stress, were added to K562 cells. Although both agents are known to act by different mechanisms, the NMR data and scanning electron microscopy suggested that both caused similar alterations in the membrane organisation and lipid fluidity. Protrusions were formed indicating areas of weakness in the membrane. Spin-echo NMR was employed to investigate the action of the thiol-containing compounds, penicillamine, captopril and N-acetylcysteine in erythrocytes under conditions of oxidative stress. Results indicate that while captopril acts as a free radical scavenger, penicillamine may act as either oxidant or reductant. N-acetylcysteine was observed to act as a reducing agent. (author)

  1. A {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnah, Susan K

    2000-07-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to accommodate the interpolation of these molecules. The spatial arrangement adopted by each of these species appeared to dictate its effect on the lipids. Doxorubicin and menadione, both known to cause oxidative stress, were added to K562 cells. Although both agents are known to act by different mechanisms, the NMR data and scanning electron microscopy suggested that both caused similar alterations in the membrane organisation and lipid fluidity. Protrusions were formed indicating areas of weakness in the membrane. Spin-echo NMR was employed to investigate the action of the thiol-containing compounds, penicillamine, captopril and N-acetylcysteine in erythrocytes under conditions of oxidative stress. Results indicate that while captopril acts as a free radical scavenger, penicillamine may act as either oxidant or reductant. N-acetylcysteine was observed to act as a reducing agent. (author)

  2. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  3. Conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters: correlation of resonance Raman spectra with structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Angus, R.H.; Storer, A.C.; Varughese, K.I.; Carey, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters, involving rotational isomers about the RC(=O)NH-CH(CH 3 ) and NHCH(CH 3 )-C(=S) bonds, are defined and compared to those of N-acylglycine dithio esters. The structure of N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester has been determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis; it is a B-type conformer with the amide N atom cis to the thiol sulfur. Raman and resonance Raman (RR) measurements on this compound and for the B conformers of solid N-benzoyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and its NHCH(CD 3 )C(=S) and NHCH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) analogues are used to set up a library of RR data for alanine-based dithio esters in a B-conformer state. RR data for this solid material in its isotopically unsubstituted and CH(C-D 3 )C(=S) and CH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) forms provide information on the RR signatures of alanine dithio esters in A-like conformations. RR spectra are compared for the solid compounds, for N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine, N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine, and (methyloxycarbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester, and for several 13 C=S- and CD 3 -substituted analogues in CCl 4 or aqueous solutions. The RR data demonstrate that the alanine-based dithio esters take up A, B, and C 5 conformations in solution. The RR spectra of these conformers are clearly distinguishable from those for the same conformers of N-acylglycine dithio esters. However, the crystallographic and spectroscopic results show that the results show that the conformational properties of N-acylglycine and N-acylalanine dithio esters are very similar

  4. The Usefulness of the Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Evaluation of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Lee, Sheen Woo; Jeong, Yu Mi; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong Gi; Kwak, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Gil Hospital, Gacheon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to access the diverse conditions that lead to the clinical manifestations of tarsal tunnel syndrome and evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation. Thirty-three patients who underwent ankle MRI and surgery under the impression of tarsal tunnel syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The findings on ankle MRI were categorized into space occupying lesions within the tarsal tunnel, space occupying lesions of the tunnel wall, and non-space occupying lesions. Associated plantar muscle atrophy was also evaluated. Medical records were reviewed for correlation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and surgical findings. There were 21 space occupying lesions of the tarsal tunnel, and eight lesions of tarsal tunnel wall. There were three cases with accessory muscle, three with tarsal coalition, five with ganglion cysts, one neurogenic tumor, five flexor retinaculum hypertrophy, three varicose veins, and nine with tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis, flexor digitorum longus, or flexor hallucis longus tendon. One patient was found to have a deltoid ligament sprain. Of the 32, eight patients experienced fatty atrophic change within any one of the foot muscles. NCV was positive in 79% of the MRI-positive lesions. MRI provides detailed information on ankle anatomy, which includes that of tarsal tunnel and beyond. Pathologic conditions that cause or mimic tarsal tunnel syndrome are well demonstrated. MRI can enhance surgical planning by indicating the extent of decompression required, and help with further patient management. Patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome can greatly benefit from preoperative MRI. However, it should be noted that not all cases with tarsal tunnel syndrome have MRI-demonstrable causes.

  5. The Usefulness of the Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Evaluation of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Lee, Sheen Woo; Jeong, Yu Mi; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hong Gi; Kwak, Ji Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to access the diverse conditions that lead to the clinical manifestations of tarsal tunnel syndrome and evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation. Thirty-three patients who underwent ankle MRI and surgery under the impression of tarsal tunnel syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. The findings on ankle MRI were categorized into space occupying lesions within the tarsal tunnel, space occupying lesions of the tunnel wall, and non-space occupying lesions. Associated plantar muscle atrophy was also evaluated. Medical records were reviewed for correlation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and surgical findings. There were 21 space occupying lesions of the tarsal tunnel, and eight lesions of tarsal tunnel wall. There were three cases with accessory muscle, three with tarsal coalition, five with ganglion cysts, one neurogenic tumor, five flexor retinaculum hypertrophy, three varicose veins, and nine with tenosynovitis of the posterior tibialis, flexor digitorum longus, or flexor hallucis longus tendon. One patient was found to have a deltoid ligament sprain. Of the 32, eight patients experienced fatty atrophic change within any one of the foot muscles. NCV was positive in 79% of the MRI-positive lesions. MRI provides detailed information on ankle anatomy, which includes that of tarsal tunnel and beyond. Pathologic conditions that cause or mimic tarsal tunnel syndrome are well demonstrated. MRI can enhance surgical planning by indicating the extent of decompression required, and help with further patient management. Patients with tarsal tunnel syndrome can greatly benefit from preoperative MRI. However, it should be noted that not all cases with tarsal tunnel syndrome have MRI-demonstrable causes.

  6. Evaluation of the acromiohumeral distance by means of magnetic resonance imaging umerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Oliveira França

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the relationship between the size, degree of retraction and topography of rotator cuff injuries and the degree of rise of the humeral head, and to evaluate the influence of gravity, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: We evaluated 181 shoulder MRIs from 160 patients aged over 45 years, between November 2013 and July 2014. The patients were divided into two groups: one control (no lesion or partial damage to the rotator cuff; and the other with complete tears of the rotator cuff. We measured the acromiohumeral distance in the sagittal plane, and established the shortest distance between the apex of the head and the acromion. RESULTS: In this study, 96 examinations on female patients (53.04% and 58 on male patients (46.96% were evaluated. The mean age was 63.27 years: in the control group, 61.46; and in the group with injuries, 65.19. From analysis on the measurements of the subacromial space, we observed significantly higher values in the control group (7.71 mm than in the group with injuries (6.99. In comparing the control group with some specific subgroup, i.e. posterosuperior (6.77, anteroposterior-superior (4.16 and retraction Patte III (5.01, we confirmed the importance of topography and degree of retraction in relation to the rise of the humeral head. CONCLUSION: The rise of the humeral head was directly related to the size, degree of retraction and topography of the rotator cuff injuries, with greater degrees of rise in cases of superior and posterior lesions and anteroposterior-superior (massive lesions. The assessment using MRI was not influenced by the force of gravity.

  7. Residual strength evaluation of concrete structural components ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fundamental material parameters that can be determined for use in design or evaluation. ... of plain and reinforced concrete beams using fracture mechanics principles. Design equations ... components accounting for tension softening effect.

  8. Structural integrity evaluation of nuclear piping cracket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadiz Deleito, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The methodology to evaluation of cracks in nuclear piping is exposed. Linear elastic fracture mechanic is used to prediction of growing crack and the net section collapse theory compared with acceptation criteria of both ASME III and ASME XI code. A case allowable under ASME XI criteria is analysed under ASME III requirements. Consideration must be given to local phenomenon in crack area and local stress evaluated and compared with ASME III acceptation criteria. (author)

  9. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, L; Stiebing, K E; Dobrescu, S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut für Kernphysik der Universität Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the "MD source" as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an "all stainless steel" ECRIS.

  10. Influence of the electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement on reducing the bremsstrahlung production of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with metal-dielectric structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of metal-dielectric (MD) layers (MD structures) inserted into the plasma chamber of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) onto the production of electron bremsstrahlung radiation has been studied in a series of dedicated experiments at the 14 GHz ECRIS of the Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet Frankfurt. The IKF-ECRIS was equipped with a MD liner, covering the inner walls of the plasma chamber, and a MD electrode, covering the plasma-facing side of the extraction electrode. On the basis of similar extracted currents of highly charged ions, significantly reduced yields of bremsstrahlung radiation for the 'MD source' as compared to the standard (stainless steel) source have been measured and can be explained by the significantly better plasma confinement in a MD source as compared to an ''all stainless steel'' ECRIS.

  11. Definition of pertinent parameters for the evaluation of articular cartilage repair tissue with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Striessnig, Gabriele; Resinger, Christoph T.; Aldrian, Silke M.; Vecsei, Vilmos; Imhof, Herwig; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate articular cartilage repair tissue after biological cartilage repair, we propose a new technique of non-invasive, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and define a new classification system. For the definition of pertinent variables the repair tissue of 45 patients treated with three different techniques for cartilage repair (microfracture, autologous osteochondral transplantation, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation) was analyzed 6 and 12 months after the procedure. High-resolution imaging was obtained with a surface phased array coil placed over the knee compartment of interest and adapted sequences were used on a 1 T MRI scanner. The analysis of the repair tissue included the definition and rating of nine pertinent variables: the degree of filling of the defect, the integration to the border zone, the description of the surface and structure, the signal intensity, the status of the subchondral lamina and subchondral bone, the appearance of adhesions and the presence of synovitis. High-resolution MRI, using a surface phased array coil and specific sequences, can be used on every standard 1 or 1.5 T MRI scanner according to the in-house standard protocols for knee imaging in patients who have had cartilage repair procedures without substantially prolonging the total imaging time. The new classification and grading system allows a subtle description and suitable assessment of the articular cartilage repair tissue

  12. Brain structural changes in spasmodic dysphonia: A multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Vladimir S; Agosta, Federica; Sarro, Lidia; Tomić, Aleksandra; Kresojević, Nikola; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Svetel, Marina; Valsasina, Paola; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is poorly understood. This study evaluated patterns of cortical morphology, basal ganglia, and white matter microstructural alterations in patients with spasmodic dysphonia relative to healthy controls. T1-weighted and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained from 13 spasmodic dysphonia patients and 30 controls. Tract-based spatial statistics was applied to compare diffusion tensor MRI indices (i.e., mean, radial and axial diffusivities, and fractional anisotropy) between groups on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Cortical measures were analyzed using surface-based morphometry. Basal ganglia were segmented on T1-weighted images, and volumes and diffusion tensor MRI metrics of nuclei were measured. Relative to controls, patients with spasmodic dysphonia showed increased cortical surface area of the primary somatosensory cortex bilaterally in a region consistent with the buccal sensory representation, as well as right primary motor cortex, left superior temporal, supramarginal and superior frontal gyri. A decreased cortical area was found in the rolandic operculum bilaterally, left superior/inferior parietal and lingual gyri, as well as in the right angular gyrus. Compared to controls, spasmodic dysphonia patients showed increased diffusivities and decreased fractional anisotropy of the corpus callosum and major white matter tracts, in the right hemisphere. Altered diffusion tensor MRI measures were found in the right caudate and putamen nuclei with no volumetric changes. Multi-level alterations in voice-controlling networks, that included regions devoted not only to sensorimotor integration, motor preparation and motor execution, but also processing of auditory and visual information during speech, might have a role in the pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reliability Evaluation of a Structure at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    Conventional design practice for coastal structures is deterministic in nature and is based on the concept of a design load, which should not exceed the resistance (carrying capacity) of the structure. The design load is usually defined on a probabilistic basis as a characteristic value of the load......, e.g. the expectation (mean) value of the lOO-year return period event, however, often without consideration of the involved uncertainties. The resistance is in most cases defined in terms of the load which causes a certain design impact or damage to the structure and is not given as an ultimate...... formulae are semi-empirical being based mainly on central fitting to model test results. The often considerable scatter in test results is not considered in general because the formulae normally express only the mean values. Consequently, the applied characteristic value of the resistance is then the mean...

  14. Reliability Evaluation of a Structure at Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional design practice for coastal structures is deterministic in nature and is based on the concept of a design load, which should not exceed the resistance (carrying capacity) of the structure. The design load is usually defined on a probabilistic basis as a characteristic value of the load......, e.g. the expectation (mean) value of the 100-year return period event, however, often without consideration of the involved uncertainties. The resistance is in most cases defined in terms of the load which causes a certain design impact or damage to the structure and is not given as an ultimate...... formulae are semi-empirical being based mainly on central fitting to model test results. The often considerable scatter in test results is not considered in general because the formulae normally express only the mean values. Consequently, the applied characteristic value of the resistance is then the mean...

  15. Reliability and Robustness Evaluation of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizmar, Dean; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In the last few decades there have been intensely research concerning reliability of timber structures. This is primarily because there is an increased focus on society on sustainability and environmental aspects. Modern timber as a building material is also being competitive compared to concrete...... and steel. However, reliability models applied to timber were always related to individual components but not the systems. as any real structure is a complex system, system behaviour must be of a particular interest. In the chapter 1 of this document an overview of stochastic models for strength and loads...... (deterministic, probabilistic and risk based approaches) of the robustness are given. Chapter 3 deals more detailed with the robustness of timber structures....

  16. Determination of retinal chromophore structure in bacteriorhodopsin with resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S O; Lugtenburg, J; Mathies, R A

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the vibrational spectrum of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin with isotopic derivatives provides a powerful "structural dictionary" for the translation of vibrational frequencies and intensities into structural information. Of importance for the proton-pumping mechanism is the unambiguous determination of the configuration about the C13=C14 and C=N bonds, and the protonation state of the Schiff base nitrogen. Vibrational studies have shown that in light-adapted BR568 the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated and both the C13=C14 and C=N bonds are in a trans geometry. The formation of K625 involves the photochemical isomerization about only the C13=C14 bond which displaces the Schiff base proton into a different protein environment. Subsequent Schiff base deprotonation produces the M412 intermediate. Thermal reisomerization of the C13=C14 bond and reprotonation of the Schiff base occur in the M412------O640 transition, resetting the proton-pumping mechanism. The vibrational spectra can also be used to examine the conformation about the C--C single bonds. The frequency of the C14--C15 stretching vibration in BR568, K625, L550 and O640 argues that the C14--C15 conformation in these intermediates is s-trans. Conformational distortions of the chromophore have been identified in K625 and O640 through the observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane wagging vibrations in the Raman spectra (see Fig. 2). These two intermediates are the direct products of chromophore isomerization. Thus it appears that following isomerization in a tight protein binding pocket, the chromophore cannot easily relax to a planar geometry. The analogous observation of intense hydrogen out-of-plane modes in the primary photoproduct in vision (Eyring et al., 1982) suggests that this may be a general phenomenon in protein-bound isomerizations. Future resonance Raman studies should provide even more details on how bacterio-opsin and retinal act in concert to produce an

  17. Using Functional or Structural Magnetic Resonance Images and Personal Characteristic Data to Identify ADHD and Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ghiassian

    Full Text Available A clinical tool that can diagnose psychiatric illness using functional or structural magnetic resonance (MR brain images has the potential to greatly assist physicians and improve treatment efficacy. Working toward the goal of automated diagnosis, we propose an approach for automated classification of ADHD and autism based on histogram of oriented gradients (HOG features extracted from MR brain images, as well as personal characteristic data features. We describe a learning algorithm that can produce effective classifiers for ADHD and autism when run on two large public datasets. The algorithm is able to distinguish ADHD from control with hold-out accuracy of 69.6% (over baseline 55.0% using personal characteristics and structural brain scan features when trained on the ADHD-200 dataset (769 participants in training set, 171 in test set. It is able to distinguish autism from control with hold-out accuracy of 65.0% (over baseline 51.6% using functional images with personal characteristic data when trained on the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE dataset (889 participants in training set, 222 in test set. These results outperform all previously presented methods on both datasets. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a single automated learning process that can produce classifiers for distinguishing patients vs. controls from brain imaging data with above-chance accuracy on large datasets for two different psychiatric illnesses (ADHD and autism. Working toward clinical applications requires robustness against real-world conditions, including the substantial variability that often exists among data collected at different institutions. It is therefore important that our algorithm was successful with the large ADHD-200 and ABIDE datasets, which include data from hundreds of participants collected at multiple institutions. While the resulting classifiers are not yet clinically relevant, this work shows that there is a signal in

  18. Segmentation of internal brain structures in three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraud, Th.

    1998-01-01

    For neurological studies, the in vivo aspect of imaging systems is very attractive. Brain images are currently a classical tool used in clinical routine and research. The most appropriate system to observe brain anatomy is tridimensional magnetic resonance imaging, and a major issue of image processing is to segment automatically cerebral structures. This is the scope of our thesis. The number of applications is steadily growing: morphometric measurements, pathology detection, surgery planning, getting a reference for functional studies,a and so forth. The use of pattern recognition to classify the different cerebral tissues from the only radiometric levels of the images is limited. Even supervised, these methods can not lead to distinguish easily several classes of grey matter. When these methods are automatic, their use has to be empirical in order to ensure robust results, and has to be restricted to regions of interest in order to get reliable results. As these methods do not fully respect the spatial consistency of classes in the images, we have introduced contextual information with the help of different formalisms. With Markovian regularization, we have shown that energetic terms of localization permit the separation of two grey classes: cortex and central nuclei. With mathematical morphology, we have proposed processing chains dedicated to several cerebral objects; in particular, brain segmentation is robust and reproducible, and we have successfully obtained individual markers for lateral ventricles, caudate nuclei, putamen and thalami. We have also proposed a contextual method to estimate pure tissue characteristics from a rough segmentation. Our main contribution has been to present a recognition method which is progressive and atlas guided. The originality of this method is manifold. At first, it takes into account structural information processed as flexible spatial constraints the formalism of which relies on fuzzy set theory and information fusion

  19. gamma-decay of resonance-like structure observed in sup 3 sup 0 Si(p,gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kachan, A S; Korda, L P; Mishchenko, V M; Korda, V Y

    2002-01-01

    gamma-Decay of a resonance-like structure observed in the reaction sup 3 sup 0 Si (p, gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P in the energy region E sub p = 1.4 - 2.7 MeV of accelerated protons is studied. The M1 resonance built on the ground state of sup 3 sup 1 P is identified. The position of the M1 resonance is explained taking into account pairing forces.

  20. ENSL and CDRL: evaluated nuclear structure libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Two files of nuclear structure data derived largely from the seventh edition of the Table of Isotopes are described. The files are computer oriented, and have been constructed so that every decay can be traced either to an eventual ground state or to a positive flag that indicates nothing is known about further decay. 1 table

  1. Evaluation of Compressive Strength Characteristics of Structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    2017-12-17

    Dec 17, 2017 ... The results of the reliability analysis show that Apa and Opon timber species have ... This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CCL), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any ... cheaper, better and more reliable structural system in.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the evaluation of the pericardium. A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francone, Mario; Dymarkowski, Steven; Kalantzi, Maria; Bogaert, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is an ideal technique for the evaluation of the pericardium since it enables the combination of high resolution anatomical images of the pericardial layers with functional information concerning the impact of pathology on diastolic heart function and cardiac filling in particular. In comparison with echocardiography, which remains the first choice techniques for the study of the pericardium, MR provides larger fields of view allowing the visualization of the entire chest, higher spatial and contrast resolution and greater reproducibility. The technique becomes particularly useful when ultrasound imaging does not provide adequate diagnostic information or requires further characterisation; non echoic patients, loculated pericardial effusions, focal thickening of the layers and pericardial effusions, focal thickening of the layers and pericardial masses are usually better assessed with MR. The method also provides valuable diagnostic information for establishing the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and to differentiate this condition from restrictive cardiomyopathy. The aim of this paper is to present the role of MR imaging in the assessment of a patient with suspected pericardial disease, and discuss the MR technique, anatomy and the main pathological conditions [it

  3. Evaluation of head at risk sign in legg-Calve-Perthes disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kazushige; Kaichi, Itsurou; Sugi, Mototsugu; Tanigawa, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-seven hips with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease were studied to evaluate head at risk signs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The mean age at the first presentation was 6 years ranging from 3 years to 10 years, and the mean follow-up period was 48 months, ranging from 23 months to 96 months. There were 25 hips with lateral subluxation, 5 with calcification, 15 with metaphyseal cyst, 9 with Gage's sign, and 7 with horizontal growth plate. Lateral subluxation resulted from enlargement of the articular cartilage on MRI. Calcification existed in the enlarged lateral articular cartilage on MRI. The defect in the lateral part of the epiphysis on the radiographs called Gage's sign showed intermediate intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted image, suggesting that Gage's sign represents reparation at an early stage. The metaphyseal cyst presented various signal intensity on MRI, and it was thought that metaphyseal cyst involved growth plate influenced prognosis. The growth plates were not horizontal on MRI. (author)

  4. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  5. Feasibility Study Evaluating Four Weeks Stochastic Resonance Whole-Body Vibration Training with Healthy Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Rogan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the feasibility of stochastic resonance whole-body vibration (SR-WBV training and its impact on isometric maximal voluntary contraction (IMVC, isometric rate of force development (IRFD and a drop jump test (DJ in healthy female students. Twelve participants were randomised to static squats during SR-WBV 6 Hz, noise level 4, over 4 weeks or to a control group (no training. Feasibility outcomes included the number of students agreeing to participate, the number of drop-outs, the adherence to the SR-WBV and the evaluation of the protocol. Secondary outcomes were IMVC, IRFD and DJ. Results: Among 35 eligible students, 12 agreed to participate and two dropped out. The adherence was 41 of 60 possible sessions. There were moderate to large, but statistically non-significant, gains in the secondary outcomes. Conclusion: These results suggest that such a study would be feasible although with some modifications such as a better familiarisation to the DJ.

  6. Left-ventricular reduction surgery: pre- and postoperative evaluation by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivelitz, D.E.; Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Wiese, T.H.; Lembcke, A.; Hamm, B.; Hotz, H.; Konertz, W.; Borges, A.C.; Baumann, G.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment and postoperative follow-up of patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) reduction surgery. Patients and Methods: 6 patients with cardiomegaly were examined on a 1.5 T MR imager before and after LV reduction surgery. The heart was imaged along the short and long axes using a breath-hold ECG-triggered cine gradient-echo sequence for assessing ventricular and valvular morphology and function and performing volumetry (end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction). Results: Postoperatively, the mean ejection fraction increased from 21.7% to 33.4% and the enddiastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes decreased in all patients (304.0 and 252.5 ml before to 205.0 and 141.9 ml after surgery). Mean myocardial mass decreased slightly from 283.8 g to 242.7 g. Differences were significant for all parameters (p [de

  7. Anisotropic multi-scale fluid registration: evaluation in magnetic resonance breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, W R; Tanner, C; Hawkes, D J

    2005-01-01

    Registration using models of compressible viscous fluids has not found the general application of some other techniques (e.g., free-form-deformation (FFD)) despite its ability to model large diffeomorphic deformations. We report on a multi-resolution fluid registration algorithm which improves on previous work by (a) directly solving the Navier-Stokes equation at the resolution of the images (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using semi-coarsening and implicit smoothing in a full multi-grid (FMG) solver and (c) exploiting the inherent multi-resolution nature of FMG to implement a multi-scale approach. Evaluation is on five magnetic resonance (MR) breast images subject to six biomechanical deformation fields over 11 multi-resolution schemes. Quantitative assessment is by tissue overlaps and target registration errors and by registering using the known correspondences rather than image features to validate the fluid model. Context is given by comparison with a validated FFD algorithm and by application to images of volunteers subjected to large applied deformation. The results show that fluid registration of 3D breast MR images to sub-voxel accuracy is possible in minutes on a 1.6 GHz Linux-based Athlon processor with coarse solutions obtainable in a few tens of seconds. Accuracy and computation time are comparable to FFD techniques validated for this application

  8. Clinical significance of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of wrist joint in Rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yong Woon; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    To assess the role of contrast-enhanced dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in evaluation disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Forty-seven wrist joints with rheumatoid arthritis were examined prospectively. Coronal images of the wrist were obtained using fat-suppression Fast multi-planar spoiled gradient recalled (FMPSPGR) acquisition in the steady state ; TR/TE 102/6.4 msec, flip angle = 60, 4 slices per sequence, FOV = 8 cm, matrix 256 X 192 at 1.5 Tesla. Scans were carried out once before and five to eight times after an intravenous Gd-DPTA injection, at 30-second-intervals. The enhancement of synovium were measured, the enhancement ratio was calculated(postcontrast SNR/precontrast SNR) and time-enhancement ratio curves were plotted. Patients were divided into three groups according to the ratio of initial to peak enhancement : less than 30% ; 30-80% more than 80%. Differences among the three groups were statistically tested using clinical indices and laboratory data as variable. Comparing one group with another, there were no significant differences in clinical indices and laboratory data except for the parameter of grip strength. Enhancement pattern measured in a single wrist joint was not comparable to a clinical index in predicting disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

  9. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report.

  10. Evaluation of the use of blueberry juice in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori; Fujita, Osamu; Yuuki, Masako; Matsuoka, Takae; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Tadahumi; Narabayashi, Isamu; Nishio, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the use of blueberry juice (BJ), which is rich in manganese, as an oral negative contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and compared the findings thus obtained with corresponding findings for ferric ammonium citrate solution (FerriSeltz; FS). The optimum concentrations for the two oral contrast agents were determined by a phantom examination. Precontrast and postcontrast MRCP images were obtained in 26 patients and 4 volunteers using BJ and in 30 patients using FS. The pulse sequence applied for MRCP was a single shot fast spin-echo (ssfse) with an echo time of 950 to 1300 ms. In several cases, multislice ssfse with 90 ms echo time was conducted using both BJ and FS. Additionally, 8 volunteers who had recently consumed food or liquids underwent precontrast and postcontrast MRCP using BJ. BJ and FS eliminated the high signal intensity of gastrointestinal fluids which degrade MRCP images. In the multislice ssfse images with 90 ms. Echo time, BJ reduced the intragastrointestinal high intensity signal, but FS did not. In all volunteers whose stomachs were filled with food and/or water, intragastrointestinal high intensity signal was eliminated with use of BJ. We concluded that BJ is very useful as an MRCP negative contrast agent. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of meniscoid superior labrum: normal variant or superior labral tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Novelino Simão

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of a "meniscoid" superior labrum. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 582 magnetic resonance imaging examinations of shoulders. Of those 582 examinations, 110 were excluded, for a variety of reasons, and the final analysis therefore included 472 cases. Consensus readings were performed by three musculoskeletal radiologists using specific criteria to diagnose meniscoid labra. Results: A meniscoid superior labrum was identified in 48 (10.2% of the 472 cases evaluated. Arthroscopic proof was available in 21 cases (43.8%. In 10 (47.6% of those 21 cases, the operative report did not include the mention a superior labral tear, thus suggesting the presence of a meniscoid labrum. In only one of those cases were there specific comments about a mobile superior labrum (i.e., meniscoid labrum. In the remaining 11 (52.4%, surgical correlation demonstrated superior labral tears. Conclusion: A meniscoid superior labrum is not an infrequent finding. Depending upon assumptions and the requirement of surgical proof, the prevalence of a meniscoid superior labrum in this study was between 2.1% (surgically proven and 4.8% (projected. However, superior labral tears are just as common and are often confused with meniscoid labra.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of the Presence of an Extensive Intraductal Component in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, O.; Nishimura, R.; Miyayama, H.; Yasunaga, T.; Ozaki, Y.; Tsuji, A.; Yamashita, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the presence of extensive intraductal components (EIC) in breast carcinomas can be accurately evaluated on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Ninety-three women with breast cancer, aged between 32 and 79 years (mean 54 years), underwent three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging (dyMRI) with fat suppression and magnetization transfer contrast before breast-conserving surgery. The tumors were classified on dyMRI as circumscribed, microlobulated, and/or speculated, and their size was measured. Spotty or linear continuous enhancement (SLE) from the main tumor to the nipple and segmental enhancement surrounding the main tumor (SE) were considered indicative of intraductal tumor spread. The correlation between preoperative MRI and macroscopic and microscopic findings was examined. Results: On MR images, the tumor sizes ranged from 0.8 to 3.4 cm. These measurements coincided with histologic measurements in circumscribed tumors. However, in tumors with microlobulated or spiculated borders, tumor size tended to be underestimated on MR images. Of 93 patients, 59 (63.4%) had histologically confirmed EIC; 42 of the 59 cancers (71.2%) manifested SLE or SE on MR images. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR imaging in detecting EIC were 71%, 85%, and 76%, respectively. Conclusion: MR imaging facilitates the detection of EIC in breast masses. This information is valuable for the planning of breast-conserving surgery

  13. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of extension in uterine cervical cancer cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masaki; Okamura, Shinsuke; Ueki, Minoru; Sugimoto, Osamu

    1990-01-01

    To prove the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the invasion of uterine cervical cancer with imaging planes, we evaluated 44 patients with histologically proved cervical cancer. MRI was performed with a Signa 1.5 T (General Electric), and a T 2 -weighted image was used. In coronal planes, the accuracy was 75.0% for parametrial invasion. It was impossible to diagnose in 77.8%, 92.1% and 63.2% the invasion of the uterine body, bladder, and rectum, respectively. In axial planes, the accuracy was 76.3%, 92.1% and 78.9% for the invasion of parametrium, bladder and rectum, respectively. It was impossible to diagnose in 72.2% the invasion of the uterine body. In sagittal planes, the accuracy was 80.6%, 97.4% and 89.7% for invasion of the uterine body, bladder and rectum, respectively. In all 39 cases it was impossible to diagnose parametrial invasion. In five cases, MRI failed to detect the tumor in any of the three planes, but in three cases it was able to detect the tumor in at least one of the three. We conclude as follows: MRI is a useful method in determining the invasion of cervical cancer. Coronal planes are recommended for the determination of parametrial invasion, axial planes for the parametrium, bladder and rectum, and sagittal planes for the uterine body, bladder and rectum. All three planes are needed to determine cervical cancer. (author)

  14. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Staahlberg, F.; Thomsen, C.; Moegelvang, J.; Persson, B.; Lund Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve, corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105±31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate that in vivo blood flow measurements made with MRI based on wash-out effects, commonly used in multiple spin echo imaging, do not give reliable absolute values for blood flow in the femoral artery or vein. (orig.)

  15. Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Evaluation of Skin Carotenoids as a Biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Susan T.; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes. PMID:23823930

  16. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  17. Proceedings CORENDE: Regional congress on nondestructive and structural evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Works are presented at the CORENDE: Regional Congress on Nondestructive and Structural Evaluation organized by the National Atomic Energy Commission and the National Technological University (Mendoza). This congress wants to be the forum where people from research, industry and marketing might meet and discuss ideas towards the fostering of these new cultural habits. Papers covering all disciplines contributing to the evaluation of components, systems and structures are welcome: nondestructive evaluation methods and techniques (ultrasound, eddy currents and other electromagnetic methods, acoustic emission, radiography, thermography, leak testing, dye-penetrants, visual inspection, etc.), personnel certification, welding inspection, nondestructive metallography, optics and lasers, fluid-structure interaction, vibrations, extensometry, modelling of structures [es

  18. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA ≤0.3 ng/mL (P 3 and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA. Further study is necessary to determine whether eMRI can

  19. Methods of Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis for Evaluating Renal Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI has recently been utilized as a noninvasive tool for evaluating renal oxygenation. Several methods have been proposed for analyzing BOLD images. Regional ROI selection is the earliest and most widely used method for BOLD analysis. In the last 20 years, many investigators have used this method to evaluate cortical and medullary oxygenation in patients with ischemic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, chronic kidney disease (CKD, acute kidney injury and renal allograft rejection. However, clinical trials of BOLD MRI using regional ROI selection revealed that it was difficult to distinguish the renal cortico-medullary zones with this method, and that it was susceptible to observer variability. To overcome these deficiencies, several new methods were proposed for analyzing BOLD images, including the compartmental approach, fractional hypoxia method, concentric objects (CO method and twelve-layer concentric objects (TLCO method. The compartmental approach provides an algorithm to judge whether the pixel belongs to the cortex or medulla. Fractional kidney hypoxia, measured by using BOLD MRI, was negatively correlated with renal blood flow, tissue perfusion and glomerular filtration rate (GFR in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CO method divides the renal parenchyma into six or twelve layers of thickness in each coronal slice of BOLD images and provides a R2* radial profile curve. The slope of the R2* curve associated positively with eGFR in CKD patients. Indeed, each method invariably has advantages and disadvantages, and there is generally no consensus method so far. Undoubtedly, analytic approaches for BOLD MRI with better reproducibility would assist clinicians in monitoring the degree of kidney hypoxia and thus facilitating timely reversal of tissue hypoxia.

  20. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver Hospital and Helath Services Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: schang@vanhosp.bc.ca; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, St. Paul' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Llewellyn, P.A. [Lion' s Gate Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Bilbey, J.H. [Royal Inland Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Kamloops, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echoT{sub 1}-weighted localizer and a fast spin-echoT{sub 2}-weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpful in 79 of the 81 cases (98%). Fifty-two of the 81 masses (64%) were leiomyomas. One was a leiomyosarcoma. The extrauterine masses (26/81 [32%]) were identified as 14 ovarian malignancies, 4 endometriomas, 3 dermoids, an ovarian fibroma, an infarcted fibrothecoma, an infarcted hemorrhagic cyst, a sigmoid diverticular abscess and a gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum. In the other 2 cases (2/81 [2%]), the origin of the pelvic mass remained indeterminate. Both of these indeterminate masses showed low signal onT{sub 2}-weighted images and were interpreted as probable leiomyomas. They were not surgically removed but were followed clinically and had a stable course. Limited-sequence MRI is a quick and efficient way to further evaluate ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. Limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis can suffice, in these cases, without requiring a full MRI examination. (author)