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Sample records for resonant heating icrh

  1. Science Court on ICRH [ion cyclotron resonance heating] modeling of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sadowski, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    The Applied Plasma Physics (APP) Theory program in the Office of Fusion Energy is charged with supporting the development of advanced physics models for fusion research. One such effort is ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), which has seen substantial progress recently. However, due to serious questions about the adequacy of present models for CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak), a Science Court was formed to assess ICRH models, including: validity of theoretical and computational approximations; underlying physics assumptions and corresponding limits on the results; self-consistency; any subsidiary issues needing resolution (e.g., new computer tools); adequacy of the models in simulating experiments (especially CIT); and new or improved experiments to validate and refine the models. The Court did not review work by specific individuals, institutions, or programs, thereby avoiding any biases along these lines. Rather, the Science Court was carefully structured as a technical review of ICRH theory and modeling in the US. This paper discusses the Science Court process, findings, and conclusions

  2. Calculation of heat fluxes induced by radio frequency heating on the actively cooled protections of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid (LH) antennas in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, G., E-mail: Guillaume.ritz@gmail.com [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Corre, Y., E-mail: Yann.corre@cea.fr [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rault, M.; Missirlian, M. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Portafaix, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Martinez, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Guilhem, D.; Salami, M.; Loarer, T. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The heat flux generated by radiofrequency (RF) heating was calculated using Tore Supra's heating antennas. ► The highest heat flux value, generated by ions accelerated in RF-rectified sheath potentials, was 5 MW/m{sup 2}. ► The heat flux on the limiters of antennas was in the same order of magnitude as that on the toroidal pumping limiter. -- Abstract: Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are recognized as important auxiliary heating and current drive methods for present and next step fusion devices. However, these radio frequency (RF) systems generate a heat flux up to several MW/m{sup 2} on the RF antennas during plasma operation. This paper focuses on the determination of the heat flux deposited on the lateral protections of the RF antennas in Tore Supra. The heat flux was calculated by finite element method (FEM) using a model of the lateral protection. The FEM calculation was based on surface temperature measurements using infrared cameras monitoring the RF antennas. The heat flux related to the acceleration of electrons in front of the LHCD grills (LHCD active) and to the acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials (ICRH active) were calculated. Complementary results on the heat flux related to fast ions (ICRH active with a relatively low magnetic field) are also reported in this paper.

  3. Computer control and data acquisition system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating System (ICRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheshire, D.L.; Thomas, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) large Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will employ an Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) system for plasma startup. As the MFTF-B Industrial Participant, TRW has responsibility for the ICRH system, including development of the data acquisition and control system. During the MFTF-B Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS). For subsystem development and checkout at TRW, and for verification and acceptance testing at LLNL, the system will be run from a stand-alone computer system designed to simulate the functions of SCDS. The ''SCDS Simulator'' was developed originally for the MFTF-B ECRH System; descriptions of the hardware and software are updated in this paper. The computer control and data acquisition functions implemented for ICRH are described, including development status, and test schedule at TRW and at LLNL. The application software is written for the SCDS Simulator, but it is programmed in PASCAL and designed to facilitate conversion for use on the SCDS computers

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) start-up antenna for the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.M.; Romesser, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the ICRH start-up antenna on MFTF-B is to heat the plasma and control the ion distribution as the density increases during start-up. The antenna, consisting of two center fed half turn loops phased 180 0 apart, has been designed for 1 MW of input power, with a goal of coupling 400 kW into the ions. To vary the heating frequency relative to the local ion cyclotron frequency, the antenna is tunable over a range from 7.5 to 12.5 MHz. The thermal requirements common to low duty cycle ICRH antennas are especially severe for the MFTF-B antenna. The stress requirements are also unique, deriving from the possibility of seismic activity or JxB forces if the magnets unexpectedly quench. Considerable attention has been paid to contact control at high current bolt-up joints, and arranging geometries so as to minimize the possibility of voltage breakdown

  5. Parallel gradient effects on ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects on Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating of parallel nonuniformity in the magnetic field which arises from the poloidal field in a tokamak and the universal (major radius)/sup /minus/1/ scaling of the cyclotron frequency. The goal of the analysis is the macroscopic warm plasma current including temperature in the sense of the finite Larmor radius expansion and the quasilocal approximation of the parallel guiding center motion. A 1-D numerical application of the fully nonlocal integral dielectric is performed. Parallel gradient effects are studied for He-3 minority, 2nd harmonic deuterium, and hydrogen minority heating in tokamaks. The results show quite significant alteration of the toroidal wavenumber absorption spectrum, and a wealth of new behavior on the local propagation scale. 95 refs., 37 figs

  6. Initial TMX central-cell ICRH experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Coffield, F.E.; Falabella, S.; Griffin, D.; McVey, B.; Pickles, W.; P.

    1980-01-01

    Four topics are discussed in this report: the feasibility of applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the TMX central cell, some applications of heating, the results of preliminary experiments, and plans for further ICRH experiments

  7. Electron heating in JET by ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordey, J.G.; Christiansen, J.P.; Core, W.G.F.; Cotrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Kovanen, M.A.; Lomas, P.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A.; Tibone, F.

    1991-01-01

    Several ICRH experiments carried out on JET during the period 1988-90 have been directed specifically at raising the electron temperature to a high value by maximizing the total input power per particle (P tot /n). It has been found that the electron temperature saturates around 12-14 keV in sharp contrast to NBI ion heating experiments in which ion temperatures exceed 25 keV. Initial calculations suggested that this saturation was due to strongly enhanced transport in the central region. It is shown in this paper that the saturation is due to a lack of heating in the plasma center. The power input to electrons in an ICRF minority heating scheme is mainly via collisional transfer from the minority fast ions and a main problem is to maintain a peaked profile of fast ions. In the present experiments the highest fast ion energy content 4MJ has been achieved with a He 3 minority scheme, the equivalent fast ion toroidal β is 8%; electron temperatures in the range 11-14 keV are attained in these pulses. There are several possible physical effects that can give rise to the broadening of the fast ion radial profile: sawteeth, fishbones, fast ion finite orbit effects and Alfven or drift wave turbulence driven by the large gradients of fast ion pressure (discussed in section IV). The existence of such phenomena in many JET pulses means that the calculation of the power input profile by codes which contain purely classical collisional processes can be misleading. Hence an alternative approach is developed in section II; the measured fast ion energy is used directly to evaluate the power input to the central region; the scaling of the electron temperature with the actual power per particle can therefore be determined (section III). (author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  8. Use of ICRH for startup and initial heating of the TMX-U central cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Falabella, S.

    1982-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) was evaluated and it was found to be satisfactory for use in establishing the conditions necessary to form a thermal barrier in TMX-upgrade (TMX-U). We discuss the constraints that must be satisfied in order to maintain a plasma, and outline a complete startup scenario that ends with the plasma at design parameters. The detailed discussions in this report concentrate on those parts of startup where ICRH is necessary. The ability of ICRH to couple power into a plasma at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance, w/sub ci/, is determined from experiments with a half-turn loop antenna in the Phaedrus tandem mirror central cell. From these experiments, we get the empirical scaling that shows power deposited in the plasma is proportional to the plasma density

  9. The non-resonant decay of the fast magnetosonic wave during ICRH of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Core, W.G.; Hellsten, T.; Farrell, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The non-resonant decay of the fast magnetosonic wave into an Ion Bernstein wave and a quasi-mode is investigated from the point of view of assessing the importance of this process for the observed direct heating of the edge plasma during ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Starting from the Maxwell-Vlasov equations, expressions for the threshold electric field and the growth rates of the decay process are obtained. For JET like parameters, the thresholds for the decay are easily exceeded and the growth time for typical fast wave electric field strengths is of the order of a microsecond. The parametric dependence of the threshold on magnetic field, temperature, the density of the various ion species, and electron-ion collisions is studied. Finally the relevance of this process to the heating of plasma edge during ICRH is discussed. (author)

  10. Ion heating in minority ICRH experiments on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Start, D.F.H.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bures, M.

    1991-06-01

    Bulk ion heating by high power H-minority ICRH has been demonstrated in JET during both pellet enhanced performance H-mode experiments (PEP + H - mode) and in density limit studies. In the PEP + H - mode plasmas the electron and ion temperatures both reached 10 keV at an electron density of 7 x 10 19 /m 3 . According to Fokker-Planck calculations the power from the minority was transfered almost equally to the electrons and majority ions as a result of both the high electron density, n e , and the high minority density, n h , (n h /n e ≅ 0.15). For the first time with ICRH on JET a central ion temperature greater than the central electron temperature was achieved. In the density limit experiments which involved strong gas puffing into limiter discharges, there was strong evidence of a transfer from electron heating to ion heating as the electron density was ramped up to 8 x 10 19 /m 3 . (Author)

  11. Present status of two R.F. heating schemes: I.C.R.H. and L.H.R.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, T.

    1977-01-01

    Among the large number of wave-plasma interaction, Ion-Cyclotron Resonant Heating (I.C.R.H.) and Lower Hybrid Resonant Heating (L.H.R.H.), are two promising additional R.F. heating schemes for toroidal hot plasma. They both offer the advantage of using power generators which requires a moderate development for next generation machines. It seems important to try to state in the limits of this paper the present experimental situation of these two R.F. heating methods as it results from the vast literature published from the last European Conference

  12. Heating, current drive and confinement regimes with the JET ICRH and LHCD systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquinot, J.; Adams, J.M.; Altmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    by pellet injection. A value of n(d) tau-E T(i) = 7.8 x 10(20) m-3 s keV was obtained in this mode with T(e) approximately T(i) approximately 11 keV. In the L-mode regime, a regime, a record (140 kW) D-He-3 fusion power was generated with 10 - 14 MW of ICRH at the He-3 cyclotron frequency. Experiments were....... Paradoxically, LHCD induces central heating particularly in combination with ICRH. Finally we present the first observations of the synergistic acceleration of fast electrons by Transit Time Magnetic Pumping (TTMP) (from ICRH) and Electron Landau Damping (ELD) (from LHCD). The synergism generates TTMP current...

  13. A method to study electron heating during ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.; Hellsten, T.

    1989-01-01

    Collisionless absorption of ICRF waves occurs either by ion cyclotron absorption or by electron Landau (ELD) and transit damping (TTMP). Both ion cyclotron absorption, and direct electron absorption results in electron heating. Electron heating by minority ions occurs after a high energy tail of the resonating ions has been formed i.e. typically after 0.2-1s in present JET experiments. Electron heating through ELD, and TTMP, takes place on the timescale given by electron-electron collisions which is typically of the order of ms. This difference in the timescales can be used to separate the two damping mechanisms. This can be done by measuring the time derivatives of the electron temperature after sawtooth crashes during ramp-up and ramp-down of the RF-power. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  14. Non-thermal DT yield with (D)T ICRH heating in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotrell, G.A.; Bhatnagar, V.B.; Bures, M.; Hellsten, T.; Jacquinot, J.; Start, D.F.H.

    1989-01-01

    We present projections of the (D)T fusion yield expected during fundamental ICRH heating of D in JET plasmas. To obtain high Q, one needs to use a relatively high plasma density (n e > 5x10 19 m -3 ) and dipole antenna (k≅ 10%-30%), we have used ray-tracing and global wave ICRH codes to estimate cyclotron damping on deuterium (∼80%) and the rf power coupled directly to electrons (∼17%) via TTMP and Landau damping. With launched rf power P rf =12 MW deposited ∼0.3 m off-axis, we predict fusion powers P fus up to ∼8 MW for a range of JET plasmas with achieved plasma pressure n e o T e o = 6x10 20 keV m -3 and Z eff = 2. Projecting to P c = 20 MW, P fus increases to 17 MW with Z eff = 2. (author) 10 refs., 4 figs

  15. Ion cyclotron resonant heating 2 x 1700 loop antenna for the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksby, C.A.; Ferguson, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Barter, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanical design and improvements that have taken place on the loop type ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas that are located in the center cell region of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

  16. Towards predictive scenario simulations combining LH, ICRH and ECRH heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Artaud, J.F.; Becoulet, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Hoang, G.T.; Huysmans, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Litaudon, X.; Mazon, D.; Passeron, C.; Peysson, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable predictive simulations, combining current, heat and matter transport equation with a 2D equilibrium allowing diagnostic reconstruction such as Faraday angle and MSE angle are of a great interest for existing and future tokamak. The Cronos code with its various power deposition codes (Delphine, Rema, Pion) is a powerful tool to prepare such scenario in a reasonable CPU time (a few hours, for one minute plasma discharge). An example of such advanced scenario, with a negative seed of current at the center of the discharge is shown in this paper. It allows also testing new concept of feedback control, which will be directly implemented on the new real-time network of Tore-Supra. In this concept, the algorithm as to find itself the best and safe way to reach enhance performance (i.e. best plasma fusion power D-D) using different actuators (injected power,...). On this paper, we will focus on a simple example where the initial and final states are known and we will show why a steady state tokamak allowing long pulse operation is necessary for such control. (authors)

  17. Non-thermal DT yield with (D)T ICRH heating in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, G.A.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Bures, M.; Hellsten, T.; Jacquinot, J.; Start, D.F.H.

    1989-01-01

    Projections of the (D)T fusion yield expected during fundamental ICRH heating of D in JET tritium plasmas are presented. The highest fusion multiplication factor, Q (≡P fus /P r.f. ), is achieved for a relatively high plasma density (n e0 > 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) and minority concentration ratio n D /n T ≅ 20-40% with dipole antenna (k || ∼ 7 m -1 ). The latter reduces mode conversion and maximizes the r.f. power coupled to the minority ions. We have used ray-tracing and global wave ICRH codes to calculate power deposition profiles; 80% is cyclotron damped by deuterium and 17% is coupled directly to electrons via TTMP and Landau damping. With launched r.f. power P r.f. = 12 MW deposited ∼ 0.3 m off-axis, we predict fusion powers P fus up to ∼ 8 MW for a range of JET plasmas with achieved plasma pressure N e0 T e0 - 6 x 10 20 keV m -3 and Z eff = 2. Projecting to P r.f. = 25 MW, P fus increases to 17 MW with Z eff = 2. (author)

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of heavy impurity behaviour during ICRH with the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Hery 23 Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Bobkov, V.; Maggi, C.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coffey, I. H. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jacquet, P.; Lawson, K. D. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D. [Association EURATOM - Belgian State, ERM-KMS, TEC Partner (Belgium); Mayoral, M.-L. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK and EFDA Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    Magnetically confined plasmas, such as those produced in the tokamak JET, contain measurable amounts of impurity ions produced during plasma-wall interactions (PWI) from the plasma-facing components and recessed wall areas. The impurities, including high- and mid-Z elements such as tungsten (W) from first wall tiles and nickel (Ni) from Inconel structure material, need to be controlled within tolerable limits, to ensure they do not significantly affect the performance of the plasma. This contribution focuses on documenting W and Ni impurity behavior during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) operation with the new ITER-Like Wall (ILW). Ni- and W-concentration were derived from VUV spectroscopy and the impact of applied power level, relative phasing of the antenna straps, plasma separatrix - antenna strap distance, IC resonance position, edge density and different plasma configuration, on the impurity release during ICRH are presented. For the same ICRH power the Ni and W concentration was lower with dipole phasing than in the case of −π/2 phasing. The Ni concentration was found to increase with ICRH power and for the same NBI power level, ICRH-heated plasmas were characterized by two times higher Ni impurity content. Both W and Ni concentrations increased strongly with decreasing edge density which is equivalent to higher edge electron temperatures and more energetic ions responsible for the sputtering. In either case higher levels were found in ICRH than in NBI heated discharges. When the central plasma temperature was similar, ICRH on-axis heating resulted in higher core Ni impurity concentration in comparison to off-axis ICRH in L-mode. It was also found that the main core radiation during ICRH came from W.

  19. Self-consistent Study of Fast Particle Redistribution by Alfven Eigenmodes During Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergkvist, T.; Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) excited by fusion born α particles can degrade the heating efficiency of a burning plasma and throw out αs. To experimentally study the effects of excitation of AEs and the redistribution of the fast ions, ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is often used. The distribution function of thermonuclear αs in a reactor is expected to be isotropic and constantly renewed through DT reactions. The distribution function of cyclotron heated ions is strongly anisotropic, and the ICRH do not only renew the distribution function but also provide a strong decorrelation mechanism between the fast ions and the AE. Because of the sensitivity of the AE dynamics on the details of the distribution function, the location of the resonance surfaces in phase space and the extent of the overlapping resonant regions for different AEs, a self-consistent treatment of the AE excitation and the ICRH is necessary. Interactions of fast ions with AEs during ICRH has been implemented in the SELFO code. Simulations are in good agreement with the experimentally observer pitch-fork splitting and rapid damping of the AE as ICRH is turned off. The redistribution of fast ions have been studied in the presence of several driven AEs. (author)

  20. Non-resonant, diffusive interaction of superthermal ions with the sawtooth instability during ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaros, Avrilios

    2000-01-01

    A new interpretation is proposed for the well-known observation of sawteeth stabilization, during ICRH at JET and TFTR. It is shown that the radial fluxes of superthermal and thermal ions across the q=1 surface, exchange a finite amount of power with the m=1 internal kink mode (associated with the sawtooth instability) which is suppressed. The dominant contribution to this effect in the present theory is provided by the passing ions, which experience (due to the fluctuations) a much faster (than the trapped ions) radial diffusion. (author)

  1. Mechanical design features and challenges for the ITER ICRH antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthwick, A. [UKAEA/Euratom Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andy.borthwick@yahoo.co.uk; Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Davis, A. [UKAEA/Euratom Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F. [LPP-ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Fanthome, J.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hancock, A.D.; Lockley, D. [UKAEA/Euratom Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Mitteau, R. [Euratom-CEA Association, DSM/IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Nightingale, M. [UKAEA/Euratom Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sartori, R. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Vulliez, K. [Euratom-CEA Association, DSM/IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-06-15

    The ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) antenna provides plasma heating at a power of 20 MW. Operation in the ITER environment imposes significant thermal power handling capability, structural integrity, shielding and operations requirements. The design will require a step change over any predecessor in terms of power, scale and complexity. This paper reports the main mechanical design features that address the challenges and often conflicting requirements during the conceptual design phase.

  2. Double null X-point operation in JET with NBI and ICRH heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbing, B.; Bhatnagar, V.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we report on a selection of experiments on H-modes, in 3 and 3.5MA discharges, in the double null X-point configuration. The first experiment, section 2, is an attempt to couple ICRH power to H-modes. Here we also report on a rather unique H-mode with a smaller than usual distance between plasma and limiter. The second experiment, section 3, is on H-modes in the low density, hot ion regime. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  4. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A.; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  5. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  6. Investigation of operating parameters for ICRH antennas on TMX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A primary physics and engineering concern when the design of a fusion device is being investigated is the mechanism by which the plasma particles are to be heated. The method explored in this paper is ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH). The equipment consists of a conducting coil external to and surrounding the confined plasma. RF power is applied to the coil, creating electromagnetic fields which propagate through the plasma provided density and frequency conditions are satisfied. The main purpose of the work presented here is determination of optimal operating parameters for various ICRH antenna designs. The response of the electromagnetic fields and power deposition profiles to plasma densities and temperatures, excitation frequencies, etc., are determined using the McVey Antenna-Plasma Coupling Code

  7. Modeling of ICRH H-minorit driven n = 1 Resonant Modes in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Mantsinen, M.J.; Sharapov, S.E.; Cheng, C.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A nonperturbative code NOVA-KN (Kinetic Nonperturbative) has been developed to account for finite orbit width (FOW) effects in nonperturbative resonant modes such as the low-frequency MHD modes observed in the Joint European Torus (JET). The NOVA-KN code was used to show that the resonant modes with frequencies in the observed frequency range are ones having the characteristic toroidal precession frequency of H-minority ions. Results are similar to previous theoretical studies of fishbone instabilities, which were found to exist at characteristic precession frequencies of hot ions

  8. Design of an ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugo, J.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Vesey, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires 10-20 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to raise the plasma temperature to ignition. The initial ICRH system will provide 10 MW of power to the plasma, utilizing a total of six rf power units feeding six current straps in three ports. The systems may be expanded to 20 MW with additional rf power units, antennas, and ports. Plasma heating will be achieved through coupling to the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance of a 3 He minority species (also the second harmonic of tritium). The proposed antenna is a resonant double loop (RDL) structure with vacuum, shorted stubs at each end for tuning and impedance matching. The antennas are of modular, compact construction for installation and removal through the midplane port. Remote maintainability and the reactorlike operating environment have a major impact on the design of the launcher for this machine. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of JET deuterium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A V; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Yu A; Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Ongena, J; Bonheure, G; Biewer, T; Crombe, K; Ericsson, G; Giacomelli, L; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Esposito, B; Marocco, D; Jachmich, S; Kiptily, V; Leggate, H; Mailloux, J; Kallne, J

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency heating of majority ions is of prime importance for understanding the basic role of auxiliary heating in the activated D-T phase of ITER. Majority deuterium ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) experiments at the fundamental cyclotron frequency were performed in JET. In spite of the poor antenna coupling at 25 MHz, this heating scheme proved promising when adopted in combination with D neutral beam injection (NBI). The effect of fundamental ICRH of a D population was clearly demonstrated in these experiments: by adding ∼25% of heating power the fusion power was increased up to 30-50%, depending on the type of NBI adopted. At this power level, the ion and electron temperatures increased from T i ∼ 4.0 keV and T e ∼ 4.5 keV (NBI-only phase) to T i ∼ 5.5 keV and T e ∼ 5.2 keV (ICRH + NBI phase), respectively. The increase in the neutron yield was stronger when 80 keV rather than 130 keV deuterons were injected in the plasma. It is shown that the neutron rate, the diamagnetic energy and the electron as well as the ion temperature scale roughly linearly with the applied RF power. A synergistic effect of the combined use of ICRF and NBI heating was observed: (i) the number of neutron counts measured by the neutron camera during the combined ICRF + NBI phases of the discharges exceeded the sum of the individual counts of the NBI-only and ICRF-only phases; (ii) a substantial increase in the number of slowing-down beam ions was detected by the time of flight neutron spectrometer when ICRF power was switched on; (iii) a small D subpopulation with energies slightly above the NBI launch energy was detected by the neutral particle analyzer and γ-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Data collection on component malfunctions and failures of JET ICRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinna, T.; Cambi, G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the activity was to collect and analyse data coming out from operating experiences gained in the Joint European Torus (JET) for the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) system in order to enrich the data collection on failures of components used in fusion facilities. Alarms/Failures and malfunctions occurred in the years of operations from March 1996 to November 2005, including information on failure modes and, where possible, causes of the failures, have been identified. Beyond information on failures and alarms events, also data related to crowbar events have been collected. About 3400 events classified as alarms or failures related to specific components or sub-systems were identified by analysing the 25 hand-written logbooks made available by the ICRH operation staff. Information about the JET pulses in which the ICRH system was operated has been extracted from the tick sheets covering the whole considered time interval. 20 hand written tick sheets cover the period from March 1996 to middle May 2003, while tick sheets recorded as excel files cover the period from May 2003 to November 2005. By analysing the tick sheets it results that the ICRH was operated during about 12000 plasma pulses. Main statistical values, such as rates of alarms/failures and corresponding standard errors and confidence intervals, have been estimated. Failure rates of systems and components have been evaluated both with regard to the ICRH operation pulses and operating days (days in which at least one ICRH module was requested to operate). Failure probabilities on demand have been evaluated with regard to number of pulses operated. Some of the results are the following: - The highest number of alarms/failures (1243) appears to be related to Erratic /No-output of the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) apparatus, followed by faults (829) of the Tetrode circuits, by faults (466) of the High Voltage Power Supply system and by faults (428) of the Tuning elements. - The

  11. Effect of ICRH on the JET edge plasma with carbon and beryllium coated limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.; Erents, S.K.; Tagle, J.A.; Brinkschulte, H.; Bures, M.; De Kock, L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigation of the scrape-off Layer (SOL) at different poloidal positions has been carried out with Langmuir probes for limiter discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) at JET. A comparison of the effects of ICRH on the edge is presented for operation with all carbon limiters, and for operation with a beryllium layer evaporated on the walls and limiters of JET. The behaviour of the SOL parameters is similar for both cases, although edge temperatures tend to be lower in the Be case. Measurements with probes between the belt limiters and close to the ICRH antennas show that the edge parameters in this region are strongly influenced by the vicinity of an active antenna. (orig.)

  12. Simulation study of two-ion hybrid resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.

    1986-02-01

    A one-dimensional low-noise, low-frequency electromagnetic particle simulation code that is appropriate for investigation of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is developed. Retaining the hyperbolicity of the electromagnetic waves and exploiting nearly one-dimensional characteristics (perpendicular to the external magnetic field) of the ICRH, we use the guiding center electron approximation for the transverse electronic current calculation. We observe mode conversion of the incoming magnetosonic wave into the electrostatic ion-ion hybrid mode accompanied by strong ion-heating. The dependence of this heating on the different plasma parameters is examined through a series of simulations, focusing mainly on wave incidence from the high field side. Because K/sub parallel/ = 0 in our runs, the conventional Landau damping cannot explain the ion heating. Non-linear mechanisms for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy absorption during radio frequency heating in the ion cyclotron regime. 32 refs., 17 figs

  13. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10 12 cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). This analyzer indicates an increase in ion temperature from ∼20 eV before ICRH to ∼150 eV during ICRH, with ∼60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial integral of n i T i as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma potential is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat, as the plasma conditions varied over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U

  16. Self-consistent modelling of ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.; Hedin, J.; Johnson, T.; Laxaaback, M.; Tennfors, E.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of ICRH is often sensitive to the shape of the high energy part of the distribution functions of the resonating species. This requires self-consistent calculations of the distribution functions and the wave-field. In addition to the wave-particle interactions and Coulomb collisions the effects of the finite orbit width and the RF-induced spatial transport are found to be important. The inward drift dominates in general even for a symmetric toroidal wave spectrum in the centre of the plasma. An inward drift does not necessarily produce a more peaked heating profile. On the contrary, for low concentrations of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas it can even give rise to broader profiles. (author)

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas in tokamak and EBT configurations has been studied using 1-2/2 and 2-1/2 dimensional fully self-consistent electromagnetic particle codes. We have tested two major antenna configurations; we have also compared heating efficiencies for one and two ion species plasmas. We model a tokamak plasma with a uniform poloidal field and 1/R toroidal field on a particular q surface. Ion cyclotron waves are excited on the low field side by antennas parallel either to the poloidal direction or to the toroidal direction with different phase velocities. In 2D, minority ion heating (vsub(perpendicular)) and electron heating (vsub(parallel),vsub(perpendicular)) are observed. The exponential electron heating seems due to the decay instability. The minority heating is consistent with mode conversion of fast Alfven waves and heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron modes. Minority heating is stronger with a poloidal antenna. The strong electron heating is accompanied by toroidal current generation. In 1D, no thermal instability was observed and only strong minority heating resulted. For an EBT plasma we model it by a multiple mirror. We have tested heating efficiency with various minority concentrations, temperatures, mirror ratios, and phase velocities. In this geometry we have beach or inverse beach heating associated with the mode conversion layer perpendicular to the toroidal field. No appreciable electron heating is observed. Heating of ions is linear in time. For both tokamak and EBT slight majority heating above the collisional rate is observed due to the second harmonic heating. (author)

  18. Impact of ICRH on the measurement of fusion alphas by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bindslev, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed for measuring the phase space distributions of confined fast ion populations in ITER plasmas. This study determines the impact of fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the ability of CTS to diagnose fusion alphas......, corresponding to an off-axis resonance. The sensitivities of the results to the He-3 concentration (0.1-4%) and the heating power (20-40 MW) are considered. Fusion born alphas dominate the total CTS signal for large Doppler shifts of the scattered radiation. The tritons generate a negligible fraction...... perpendicular velocities, it may be difficult to draw conclusions about the physics of alpha particles alone by CTS. With this exception, the CTS diagnostic can reveal the physics of the fusion alphas in ITER even under the presence of fast ions due to ICRH....

  19. Fast wave absorption at the Alfven resonance during ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Hellsten, T.; Alava, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    For ICRH scenarii where the majority cyclotron resonance intersects the plasma core, mode conversion of the fast magnetosonic wave to an Alfven wave takes place at the plasma boundary on the high field side. Simple analytical estimates of the converted power for this mode conversion process are derived and compared with numerical calculations including finite electron inertia and kinetic effects. The converted power is found to depend on the local value of the wave field as well as on plasma parameters at the Alfven wave resonance. The interference with the reflected wave will therefore modify the mode conversion. If the conversion layer is localized near the wall, the conversion will be strongly reduced. The conversion coefficient is found to be strongest for small density gradients and high density and it is sensitive to the value of the parallel wave number. Whether it increases or decreases with the latter depends on the ion composition. Analysis of this problem for ICRH in JET predicts that a large fraction of the power is mode converted at the plasma boundary for first harmonic heating of tritium in a deuterium-tritium plasma. (author). 13 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  20. Generation of multiple analog pulses with different duty cycles within VME control system for ICRH Aditya system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ramesh; Singh, Manoj; Jadav, H M; Misra, Kishor; Kulkarni, S V, E-mail: rjoshi@ipr.res.i [Institute for plasma research, Bhat, Gandhinagar- 382428 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) is a promising heating method for a fusion device due to its localized power deposition profile, a direct ion heating at high density, and established technology for high RF power generation and transmission at low cost. Multiple analog pulse with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for steady state RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya to produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The control system software is based upon single digital pulse operation for RF source. It is planned to integrate multiple analog pulses with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya tokamak. The task of RF ICRH DAC is to control and acquisition of all ICRH system operation with all control loop and acquisition for post analysis of data with java based tool. For pre ionization startup as well as heating experiments using multiple RF Power of different powers and duration. The experiment based upon the idea of using single RF generator to energize antenna inside the tokamak to radiate power twice, out of which first analog pulse will produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The whole system is based on standard client server technology using tcp/ip protocol. DAC Software is based on linux operating system for highly reliable, secure and stable system operation in failsafe manner. Client system is based on tcl/tk like toolkit for user interface with c/c++ like environment which is reliable programming languages widely used on stand alone system operation with server as vxWorks real time operating system like environment. The paper is focused on the Data acquisition and monitoring system software on Aditya RF ICRH System with analog pulses in slave mode with digital pulse in

  1. Generation of multiple analog pulses with different duty cycles within VME control system for ICRH Aditya system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ramesh; Singh, Manoj; Jadav, H M; Misra, Kishor; Kulkarni, S V

    2010-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) is a promising heating method for a fusion device due to its localized power deposition profile, a direct ion heating at high density, and established technology for high RF power generation and transmission at low cost. Multiple analog pulse with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for steady state RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya to produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The control system software is based upon single digital pulse operation for RF source. It is planned to integrate multiple analog pulses with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya tokamak. The task of RF ICRH DAC is to control and acquisition of all ICRH system operation with all control loop and acquisition for post analysis of data with java based tool. For pre ionization startup as well as heating experiments using multiple RF Power of different powers and duration. The experiment based upon the idea of using single RF generator to energize antenna inside the tokamak to radiate power twice, out of which first analog pulse will produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The whole system is based on standard client server technology using tcp/ip protocol. DAC Software is based on linux operating system for highly reliable, secure and stable system operation in failsafe manner. Client system is based on tcl/tk like toolkit for user interface with c/c++ like environment which is reliable programming languages widely used on stand alone system operation with server as vxWorks real time operating system like environment. The paper is focused on the Data acquisition and monitoring system software on Aditya RF ICRH System with analog pulses in slave mode with digital pulse in

  2. Generation of multiple analog pulses with different duty cycles within VME control system for ICRH Aditya system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ramesh; Singh, Manoj; Jadav, H. M.; Misra, Kishor; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) is a promising heating method for a fusion device due to its localized power deposition profile, a direct ion heating at high density, and established technology for high RF power generation and transmission at low cost. Multiple analog pulse with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for steady state RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya to produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The control system software is based upon single digital pulse operation for RF source. It is planned to integrate multiple analog pulses with different duty cycle in master of digital pulse for Data acquisition and Control system for RF ICRH System(RF ICRH DAC) to be used for operating of RF Generator in Aditya tokamak. The task of RF ICRH DAC is to control and acquisition of all ICRH system operation with all control loop and acquisition for post analysis of data with java based tool. For pre ionization startup as well as heating experiments using multiple RF Power of different powers and duration. The experiment based upon the idea of using single RF generator to energize antenna inside the tokamak to radiate power twise, out of which first analog pulse will produce pre ionization and second analog pulse will produce heating. The whole system is based on standard client server technology using tcp/ip protocol. DAC Software is based on linux operating system for highly reliable, secure and stable system operation in failsafe manner. Client system is based on tcl/tk like toolkit for user interface with c/c++ like environment which is reliable programming languages widely used on stand alone system operation with server as vxWorks real time operating system like environment. The paper is focused on the Data acquisition and monitoring system software on Aditya RF ICRH System with analog pulses in slave mode with digital pulse in

  3. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-01-01

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation

  4. Investigation of energy confinement during ICRF heating on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qin, C. M.; Cheng, Y.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yang, H.; Yuan, S.; Wang, L.; Ju, S. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhang, J. H.; Wang, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Qian, J. P.; Zhang, T.; Li, J. G.; Song, Y. T.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R. J.; Wukitch, S.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.

    2017-09-01

    A summary is given on recent experiments in L-mode with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas on EAST. Experiments show a degradation of confinement with increasing power. Furthermore, the energy confinement time increases with plasma current and magnetic field, whereas it is insensitive to line averaged density. Minority heating has been found to be efficient, and parameters were optimized to maximize its efficiency. ICRH in lower hybrid waves heated plasma was also investigated.

  5. Turbulent transport stabilization by ICRH minority fast ions in low rotating JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Di Siena, A.; Delabie, E.; Giroud, C.; Johnson, T.; Lerche, E.; Menmuir, S.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    The first experimental demonstration that fast ion induced stabilization of thermal turbulent transport takes place also at low values of plasma toroidal rotation has been obtained in JET ILW (ITER-like wall) L-mode plasmas with high (3He)-D ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating) power. A reduction of the gyro-Bohm normalized ion heat flux and higher values of the normalized ion temperature gradient have been observed at high ICRH power and low NBI (neutral beam injection) power and plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic simulations indicate that ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence stabilization induced by the presence of high-energetic 3He ions is the key mechanism in order to explain the experimental observations. Two main mechanisms have been identified to be responsible for the turbulence stabilization: a linear electrostatic wave-fast particle resonance mechanism and a nonlinear electromagnetic mechanism. The dependence of the stabilization on the 3He distribution function has also been studied.

  6. Thermo-mechanical analysis of the ICRH antenna for the ignitor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvetti, M.F.; Berruti, T.; Gola, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the design of the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the ignitor machine. In addition, the paper presents relevant calculations and the design solutions adopted for the ICRH antenna straps. The thermal-mechanical analysis of the structure is illustrated. The displacements and stresses due to thermal loading and to dynamic loads induced during plasma vertical disruptions events (VDE) are calculated. The capability of carrying out both the assembly and maintenance of the antennas' components in full remote handling (RH) conditions is one of the specifications to which the design has to comply. A mechanical design that guarantees ease of operation is discussed. The proposed solution minimizes the variety of movements required for the manipulator

  7. Evidence of 9Be  +  p nuclear reactions during 2ω CH and hydrogen minority ICRH in JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Afanasyev, V. I.; Giroud, C.; Goloborodko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Popovichev, S. V.; Mironov, M. I.; contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    The intensity of 9Be  +  p nuclear fusion reactions was experimentally studied during second harmonic (2ω CH) ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and further analyzed during fundamental hydrogen minority ICRH of JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. In relatively low-density plasmas with a high ICRH power, a population of fast H+ ions was created and measured by neutral particle analyzers. Primary and secondary nuclear reaction products, due to 9Be  +  p interaction, were observed with fast ion loss detectors, γ-ray spectrometers and neutron flux monitors and spectrometers. The possibility of using 9Be(p, d)2α and 9Be(p, α)6Li nuclear reactions to create a population of fast alpha particles and study their behaviour in non-active stage of ITER operation is discussed in the paper.

  8. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Zucca, C.; Asunta, O.; Buttery, R. J.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T.; Igochine, V.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lennholm, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-06-01

    13 MW of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) power deposited inside the q = 1 surface is likely to reduce the sawtooth period in ITER baseline scenario below the level empirically predicted to trigger neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). However, since the ECCD control scheme is solely predicated upon changing the local magnetic shear, it is prudent to plan to use a complementary scheme which directly decreases the potential energy of the kink mode in order to reduce the sawtooth period. In the event that the natural sawtooth period is longer than expected, due to enhanced α particle stabilization for instance, this ancillary sawtooth control can be provided from >10MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power with a resonance just inside the q = 1 surface. Both ECCD and ICRH control schemes would benefit greatly from active feedback of the deposition with respect to the rational surface. If the q = 1 surface can be maintained closer to the magnetic axis, the efficacy of ECCD and ICRH schemes significantly increases, the negative effect on the fusion gain is reduced, and off-axis negative-ion neutral beam injection (NNBI) can also be considered for sawtooth control. Consequently, schemes to reduce the q = 1 radius are highly desirable, such as early heating to delay the current penetration and, of course, active sawtooth destabilization to mediate small frequent sawteeth and retain a small q = 1 radius. Finally, there remains a residual risk that the ECCD + ICRH control actuators cannot keep the sawtooth period below the threshold for triggering NTMs (since this is derived only from empirical scaling and the control modelling has numerous caveats). If this is the case, a secondary control scheme of sawtooth stabilization via ECCD + ICRH + NNBI, interspersed with deliberate triggering of a crash through auxiliary power reduction and simultaneous pre-emptive NTM control by off-axis ECCD has been considered, permitting long transient periods with high fusion

  9. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  10. ICRH studies in TJ-IU torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejon, F.; Longinov, A.V.; Rodriguez R, L.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary studies for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in the frequency range f=3-150 MHz are presented for TJ-IU torsatron. This wide range implies the use of two different theoretical models. The first valid for high frequency, where the WKB approximation is applicable, and the second one which solves the full wave equation in one dimension. The high frequency calculations have been made using a ray tracing code and taking into account the magnetic field and plasma 3-D inhomogeneity. The results obtained in this case are presented in the first paper of this report, being the most important the criterion to avoid Fast Wave (fw)-slow wave (SW) coupling at Lower Hybrid Resonance, near the plasma edge, and the existence of so called Localized Modes. for the low frequency range wave-length is of the size of the plasma radius, therefore, the WKB approximation cannot be used. In this case a 1-D model is used which disregards toroidal effects, to study the main available heating scenarios which are presented in the second work of this report. the studies are made for hydrogen, deuterium and mixed plasmas with and without He 3 minority. Finally, the antenna designs to reach these several scenarios are presented in the third paper. Two different antenna models are provided for SW excitation, one of the current type and the other one of potential type. A third antenna is designed to excite FW which is similar to the current type antenna for SW, but rotated 90 degree Celsius

  11. ICRH studies in TJ-IU torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejon, F.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary studies for ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in the frequency range f=3-150 MHz are presented for TJ-IU torsatron. This wide range implies the use of two different theoretical models. The first valid for high frequency, where the WKB approximation is applicable, and the second one which solves the full wave equation in one dimension. The high frequency calculations have been made using a ray tracing code and taking into account the magnetic field and plasma 3-D inhomogeneity. The results obtained in this case are presented in the first paper of this report, being the most important the criterion to avoid Fast Wave (FW)-Slow Wave (SW) coupling at Lower Hybrid Resonance, near the plasma edge, and the existence of so called Localized Modes. For the low frequency range wave-length is of the size of the plasma radius, there fore, the WKB approximation cannot be used. In this case a 1-D model is used which disregards toroidal effects, to study the main available heating scenarios which are presented in the second work of this report. The studies are made for hydrogen, deuterium and mixed plasmas with and without He3 majority. Finally, the antenna designs to reach these several scenarios are presented in the third paper. Two different antenna models are provided for SW excitation, one of the current type and the other one of potential type. A third antenna is designed to excite FW which is similar to the current type antenna for SW, but rotated 90 degree centigree. (Author)11 refs

  12. Generation of plasma rotation by ICRH in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Phillips, C.K.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Rice, J.; Greenwald, M.; Grassie, J.S. de

    2001-01-01

    A physical mechanism to generate plasma rotation by ICRH is presented in a tokamak geometry. By breaking the omnigenity of resonant ion orbits, ICRH can induce a non-ambipolar minor-radial flow of resonant ions. This induces a return current j p r in the plasma, which then drives plasma rotation through the j p r xB force. It is estimated that the fast-wave power in the present-day tokamak experiments can be strong enough to give a significant modification to plasma rotation. (author)

  13. On separation of heavy isotopes by means of selective ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.; Volosov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical study of the isotope separation by means of isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance plasma heating (ICRH). The special attention is devoted to the separation of gadolinium isotopes. The ions are supposed to pass through the device shown on Fig. 1 where they are heated by the full-turn-loop antenna that excites RF field with azimuthal number m = 0. They calculate the distribution function of ions in a plasma stream at the orifice of the device. A satisfactory separation is achieved for the following values of parameters. The length of heating zone ell = 200 cm, initial temperature of plasma stream T parallel = 5 eV, T perpendicular = 60 eV, the plasma radius a = 10 cm, plasma density n = 10 12 cm -3 , external magnetic field B = 30 kGs. The energy of resonance ions W = 100 divided-by 200 eV. The latter value is achieved if a current in the antenna loops is equal to 60A with full number of loops N = 150. With the specified parameters, the current in the plasma stream is equal to 15 divided-by 20A. Then the production rate equals to 100 kg of Gd 157 per year. Energy of Gd's ions after pass through the heating zone vs. their axial velocity

  14. Kinetic equilibrium reconstruction for the NBI- and ICRH-heated H-mode plasma on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, ZHENG; Nong, XIANG; Jiale, CHEN; Siye, DING; Hongfei, DU; Guoqiang, LI; Yifeng, WANG; Haiqing, LIU; Yingying, LI; Bo, LYU; Qing, ZANG

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium reconstruction is important to study the tokamak plasma physical processes. To analyze the contribution of fast ions to the equilibrium, the kinetic equilibria at two time-slices in a typical H-mode discharge with different auxiliary heatings are reconstructed by using magnetic diagnostics, kinetic diagnostics and TRANSP code. It is found that the fast-ion pressure might be up to one-third of the plasma pressure and the contribution is mainly in the core plasma due to the neutral beam injection power is primarily deposited in the core region. The fast-ion current contributes mainly in the core region while contributes little to the pedestal current. A steep pressure gradient in the pedestal is observed which gives rise to a strong edge current. It is proved that the fast ion effects cannot be ignored and should be considered in the future study of EAST.

  15. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-12-31

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) that is tuned to minority fuel ions can induce an energy diffusion of the heated species and create high energy tail temperatures of {approx} 1 MeV. The most energetic of these accelerated minority ions can undergo nuclear reactions with impurity Be and C that produces {gamma}-ray emission from the decay of the excited product nuclei. This RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission has been recorded using the JET neutron emission profile diagnostic which is capable of distinguishing neutrons and {gamma}-rays. Appropriate data processing has enabled the RF-induced {gamma}-ray emission signals to be isolated from the {gamma}-ray emission signals associated with neutron interactions in the material surrounding the profile monitor. The 2-d {gamma}-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Radio-frequency electrical design of the WEST long pulse and load-resilient ICRH launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helou, Walid, E-mail: walid.helou@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Colas, Laurent; Hillairet, Julien [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Milanesio, Daniele [Department of Electronics, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mollard, Patrick [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Argouarch, Arnaud [CEA DAM/DIF/DP2I, Bruyère le Chatel (France); Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Chen, Zhaoxi [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Delaplanche, Jean-Marc [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric [Laboratoire de physique des plasmas de l’ERM, Laboratorium voor plasmafysica van de KMS – (LPP-ERM/KMS), Ecole royale militaire–Koninklijke militaire school, BE-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jacquot, Jonathan [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Three new ion cyclotron resonance heating launchers designed for WEST. • Operation at 3 MW/launcher for 30 s and 1 MW/launcher for 1000 s on H-mode plasmas. • Unique combination of continuous-wave operation at high power and load tolerance. • International team led by the CEA/IRFM. • RF design performed using electromagnetic solvers and electric circuit calculations. - Abstract: Three new ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) launchers have been designed for the WEST project (W-Tungsten Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) in order to operate at 3 MW/launcher for 30 s and 1 MW/launcher for 1000 s on H-mode plasmas. These new launchers will be to date the first ICRH launchers to offer the unique combination of continuous-wave (CW) operation at high power and load tolerance capabilities for coupling on H-mode edge. The radio-frequency (RF) design optimization process has been carried out using full-wave electromagnetic solvers combined with electric circuit calculations. Cavity modes occurring between the launchers structures and the vacuum vessel ports have been evaluated and cleared out.

  17. Modeling of sawtooth destabilization during radio-frequency heating experiments in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClements, K.G.; Dendy, R.O.; Hastie, R.J.; Martin, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks have been stabilized using ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), but often reappear while ICRH continues. It is shown that the reappearance of sawteeth during one particular ICRH discharge in the Joint European Torus (JET) [Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2148 (1988)] was correlated with a change of sign in the energy δW associated with m=1 internal kink displacements. To compute δW, a new analytical model is used for the distribution function of heated minority ions, which is consistent with Fokker endash Planck simulations of ICRH. Minority ions have a stabilizing influence, arising from third adiabatic invariant conservation, but also contribute to a destabilizing shift of magnetic flux surfaces. As the minor radius of the q=1 surface rises, the stabilizing influence of minority ions diminishes, and the shape of the plasma cross section becomes increasingly important. It is shown that an increase in ICRH power can destabilize the kink mode: this is consistent with observations of sawteeth in JET discharges with varying levels of ICRH. It is suggested that the sawtooth-free period could be prolonged by minimizing the vertical extent of the ICRH power deposition profile.1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Comments on ICRH current drive in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, B.; Hellsten, T.; Moreau, D.

    1989-01-01

    To study current drive via the mode-converted slow wave during ICRH an assessment for which plasma compositions and wave number mode conversion from the magnetosonic wave to the slow wave can dominate is made. A simple slab model is used to investigate the competition between mode conversion and minority cyclotron absorption for a deuterium plasma with H + and 3 He 2+ minority species in JET. A 3 He 2+ minority should be more appropriate for mode conversion current drive than H + because the 3 He 2+ concentration can be chosen near its optimum for the ''Budden absorption'' without bringing the ion hybrid resonance and the cyclotron resonance so close that the minority absorption dominates. 3 He 2+ minority also allows operation at toroidal numbers which are characteristic of present JET antennae. (author)

  19. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  20. Comparison of collective Thomson scattering signals due to fast ions in ITER scenarios with fusion and auxiliary heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Asunta, O.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2009-01-01

    Auxiliary heating such as neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will accelerate ions in ITER up to energies in the MeV range, i.e. energies which are also typical for alpha particles. Fast ions of any of these populations will elevate the collective Thomson...... functions of fast ions generated by NBI and ICRH are calculated for a steady-state ITER burning plasma equilibrium with the ASCOT and PION codes, respectively. The parameters for the auxiliary heating systems correspond to the design currently foreseen for ITER. The geometry of the CTS system for ITER...... is chosen such that near perpendicular and near parallel velocity components are resolved. In the investigated ICRH scenario, waves at 50MHz resonate with tritium at the second harmonic off-axis on the low field side. Effects of a minority heating scheme with He-3 are also considered. CTS scattering...

  1. Transport analysis of pellet-enhanced ICRH plasma in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammett, G.W.; Colestock, P.L.; Granetz, R.S.; McCune, D.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Schmidt, G.L.; Smithe, D.N.; Kupschus, P.

    1989-01-01

    Performance of JET ICRH heated discharges has been significantly enhanced by using pellet fueling to produce a peaked density target for ICRH. The central T i is observed to increase by up to 80%, central T e by up to 40%, and the neutron rate by up to 400%, over their no-pellet values (which are already in the enhanced 'monster-sawtooth' regime). In this paper we describe the transport analysis of these discharges using the TRANSP code. These results indicate that the thermal diffusivities χ i and χ e are reduced by a factor of ∼2 near the plasma center where the pellets have increased the density gradient. The paper focuses on JET discharge 16211 which is documented more fully in a companion paper. (author) 6 refs., 8 figs

  2. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one...... the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures....

  3. On Resonant Heating Below the Cyclotron Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liu; Lin, Zhihong; White, R.

    2001-01-01

    Resonant heating of particles by an electrostatic wave propagating perpendicular to a confining uniform magnetic field is examined. It is shown that, with a sufficiently large wave amplitude, significant perpendicular stochastic heating can be obtained with wave frequency at a fraction of the cyclotron frequency

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillairet, Julien, E-mail: julien.hillairet@cea.fr; Mollard, Patrick; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Patterlini, Jean-Claude [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-12-10

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the V{sub r}/V{sub f} and SHAD systems.

  5. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  6. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number k z is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the k z spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B 0 , and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44 Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Three-dimensional modelling and numerical optimisation of the W7-X ICRH antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louche, F., E-mail: fabrice.louche@rma.ac.be [Laboratoire de physique des plasmas de l’ERM, Laboratorium voor plasmafysica van de KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels (Belgium); Křivská, A.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J. [Laboratoire de physique des plasmas de l’ERM, Laboratorium voor plasmafysica van de KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels (Belgium); Borsuk, V. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Durodié, F.; Schweer, B. [Laboratoire de physique des plasmas de l’ERM, Laboratorium voor plasmafysica van de KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A simplified version of the ICRF antenna for the stellarator W7-X has been modelled with the 3D electromagnetic software Microwave Studio. This antenna can be tuned between 25 and 38 MHz with the help of adjustable capacitors. • In previous modellings the front of the antenna was modelled with the help of 3D codes, while the capacitors were modelled as lumped elements with a given DC capacitance. As this approach does not take into account the effect of the internal inductance, a MWS model of these capacitors has been developed. • The initial geometry does not permit the operation at 38 MHz. By modifying some geometrical parameters of the front face, it was possible to increase the frequency band of the antenna, and to increase (up to 25%) the maximum coupled power accounting for the technical constraints on the capacitors. • The W7-X ICRH antenna must be operated at 25 and 38 MHz, and for various toroidal phasings of the strap RF currents. Due to the considered duty cycle it is shown that thanks to a special procedure based on minimisation techniques, it is possible to define a satisfactory optimum geometry in agreement with the specifications of the capacitors. • The various steps of the optimisation are validated with TOPICA simulations. For a given density profile the RF power coupling expectancy can be precisely computed. - Abstract: Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) is a promising heating and wall conditioning method considered for the W7-X stellarator and a dedicated ICRH antenna has been designed. This antenna must perform several tasks in a long term physics programme: fast particles generation, heating at high densities, current drive and ICRH physics studies. Various minority heating scenarios are considered and two frequency bands will be used. In the present work a design for the low frequency range (25–38 MHz) only is developed. The antenna is made of 2 straps with tap feeds and tuning capacitors with DC capacitance in

  8. Parametric dependencies of the experimental tungsten transport coefficients in ICRH and ECRH assisted ASDEX Upgrade H-modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli, M.; Angioni, C.; Odstrcil, T.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-11-01

    The profiles of the W transport coefficients have been experimentally calculated for a large database of identical ASDEX Upgrade H-mode discharges where only the radio-frequency (RF) power characteristics have been varied [Angioni et al., Nucl. Fusion 57, 056015 (2017)]. Central ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the minority heating scheme has been compared with central and off-axis electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), using both localized and broad heat deposition profiles. The transport coefficients have been calculated applying the gradient-flux relation to the evolution of the intrinsic W density in-between sawtooth cycles as measured using the soft X-ray diagnostic. For both ICRH and ECRH, the major player in reducing the central W density peaking is found to be the reduction of inward pinch and, in the case of ECRH, the rise of an outward convection. The impurity convection increases, from negative to positive, almost linearly with RF-power, while no appreciable changes are observed in the diffusion coefficient, which remains roughly at neoclassical levels independent of RF power or background plasma conditions. The ratio vW/DW is consistent with the equilibrium ∇ n W / n W prior to the sawtooth crash, corroborating the separate estimates of diffusion and convection. These experimental findings are slightly different from previous results obtained analysing the evolution of impurity injections over many sawtooth cycles. Modelling performed using the drift-kinetic code NEO and the gyro-kinetic code GKW (assuming axisymmetry) overestimates the diffusion coefficient and underestimates the experimental positive convection. This is a further indication that magneto-hydrodynamic/neoclassical models accounting for 3D effects may be needed to characterize impurity transport in sawtoothing tokamak plasmas.

  9. 1000 kW ICRH amplifiers for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boksberger, U.

    1986-01-01

    For the startup of the MFTF-B ICRH heating will be applied. Two commercial amplifiers derived from standard broadcast transmitters provide 1000 kW RF power each into a matching system for any VSWR as high as 1.5. Emphasis is put on the specific environment of magnetic fields and seismic loads as well as to the particular RF power control requirements and remote operation. Also addressed is the amplifier's performance into a typical load. The load variations due to the MFTF-B plasma coupling were calculated by TRW

  10. Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating 2 X 1700 loop antenna for the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksby, C.A.; Ferguson, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Barter, J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanical design and improvements that have taken place on the loop type ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas that are located in the center cell region of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). A computer code (JASON) was used to design getter-shielded antenna supports that will hold off very high voltages (83 kV, DC) over a small insulator distance (2.25 inches) in a vacuum of 10/sup -5/ Torr. The authors also added corona shields on the ceramic-to-metal joints of the matching network capacitors. The system now operates reliably with peak radio frequency (RF) voltages of 40 kV at 2-to-4- MHz frequency and power levels up to 200 kW. The authors have just installed a new loop antenna in the east part of the central cell where the slot antenna was located. This antenna uses two of the slot's internal coax lines and the external matching network. The feedthroughs designed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were replaced with two high-voltage RF feedthroughs designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

  11. Diffusion induced by cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.; Hatori, T.; Pfirsch, D.

    1985-09-01

    The wave induced particle transport during the ion cyclotron resonance heating is studied in collisionless toroidal plasmas. It is shown that the previously neglected non-conservation of the toroidal angular momentum IP/sub phi/ caused by the toroidal wave component E/sub phi/ is necessary to allow particle diffusion and yields the leading diffusive contribution. While the induced ion transport for the rf power in contemporary experiments is of the order of the neoclassical value, that of fast alpha particles is quite large if resonance is present

  12. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardal, Ali Ümit Cemal; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal......We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one...... the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures....

  13. Heated electron distributions from resonant absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroot, J.S.; Tull, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified model of resonant absorption of obliquely incident laser light has been developed. Using a 1.5 dimensional electrostatic simulation computer code, it is shown that the inclusion of ion motion is critically important in determining the heated electron distributions from resonant absorption. The electromagnetic wave drives up an electron plasma wave. For long density scale lengths (Lapprox. =10 3 lambda/subD//sube/), the phase velocity of this wave is very large (ω/kapproximately-greater-than10V/sub th/) so that if heating does occur, a suprathermal tail of very energetic electrons is produced. However, the pressure due to this wave steepens the density profile until the density gradient scale length near the critical density (where the local plasma frequency equals the laser frequency) is of order 20lambda/subD//sube/. The electrostatic wave is thus forced to have a much lower phase velocity (ω/kapprox. =2.5V/sub th/). In this case, more electrons are heated to much lower velocities. The heated electron distributions are exponential in velocity space. Using a simple theory it is shown that this property of profile steepening applies to most of a typical laser fusion pulse. This steepening raises the threshold for parametric instabilities near the critical surface. Thus, the extensive suprathermal electron distributions typically produced by these parametric instabilities can be drastically reduced

  14. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O N; Marcus, F B; Sadler, G; Van Belle, P [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J M; Bond, D S [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Matching of Tore Supra ICRH antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladurelle, L.; Beaumont, B.; Kuus, H.; Lombard, G.

    1994-01-01

    An automatic matching method is described for Tore Supra ICRH antennas based on impedance variations seen at their feed points. Error signals derived from directional voltage and phase measurements in the feeder allow to control the matching capacitors values for optimal power transmission. (author) 5 refs.; 9 figs

  17. Quantum heat engine with coupled superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Aslan, Nur; Wilson, C. M.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a quantum heat engine composed of two superconducting transmission line resonators interacting with each other via an optomechanical-like coupling. One resonator is periodically excited by a thermal pump. The incoherently driven resonator induces coherent oscillations in the other one due to the coupling. A limit cycle, indicating finite power output, emerges in the thermodynamical phase space. The system implements an all-electrical analog of a photonic piston. Instead of mechanical motion, the power output is obtained as a coherent electrical charging in our case. We explore the differences between the quantum and classical descriptions of our system by solving the quantum master equation and classical Langevin equations. Specifically, we calculate the mean number of excitations, second-order coherence, as well as the entropy, temperature, power, and mean energy to reveal the signatures of quantum behavior in the statistical and thermodynamic properties of the system. We find evidence of a quantum enhancement in the power output of the engine at low temperatures.

  18. Influence of impurities on the transition from minority to mode conversion heating in ({sup 3}He)-H)- plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Trilateral Euregio Cluster Partner, Brussels (Belgium); Fülöp, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Göteborg (Sweden); Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association ' EURATOM-Belgian State' , Trilateral Euregio Cluster Partner, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is one of the main auxiliary heating systems used in present-day tokamaks and is planned to be installed in ITER. In the initial full-field phase of ITER operating with hydrogen majority plasmas, fundamental resonance heating of helium-3 ions is one of a few ICRH schemes available. Past JET experiments with the carbon wall revealed a significant impact of impurities on the ICRH performance in ({sup 3}He)-H plasmas. A significant reduction of the helium-3 concentration, at which the transition from minority ion to mode conversion heating occurs, was found to be due to a high plasma contamination with carbon ions. In this paper we discuss the effect of Be and another impurity species present at JET after the installation of a new ITER-like wall on the transition helium-3 concentration in ({sup 3}He)-H plasmas. We suggest a potential method for controlling helium-3 level needed for a specific ICRH regime by puffing an extra helium-4 gas to the plasma.

  19. Efficient 3D/1D self-consistent integral-equation analysis of ICRH antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Lancellotti, V.; Kyrytsya, V.

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive account of the theory and implementation of a method for the self-consistent numerical analysis of plasma-facing ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna arrays. The method is based on the integral-equation formulation of the boundary-value problem, solved via a weighted-residual scheme. The antenna geometry (including Faraday shield bars and a recess box) is fairly general and three-dimensional (3D), and the plasma is in the one-dimensional (1D) 'slab' approximation; finite-Larmor radius effects, as well as plasma density and temperature gradients, are considered. Feeding via the voltages in the access coaxial lines is self consistently accounted throughout and the impedance or scattering matrix of the antenna array obtained therefrom. The problem is formulated in both the dual space (physical) and spectral (wavenumber) domains, which allows the extraction and simple handling of the terms that slow the convergence in the spectral domain usually employed. This paper includes validation tests of the developed code against measured data, both in vacuo and in the presence of plasma. An example of application to a complex geometry is also given. (author)

  20. The new JET phased ICRH array: first experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bures, M; Bhatnagar, V; Brown, T; Fechner, B; Gormezano, C; Kaye, A; Lennholm, M; Righi, E; Rimini, F; Sibley, A; Start, D; Wade, T [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Goulding, R [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lamalle, P [Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Nguyen, F [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1994-07-01

    New ICRH antennas on JET were designed to couple to the new JET divertor plasma configurations and to improve the Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) capabilities. The A2 antenna consists of 4 straps whose currents can be phased at arbitrary angles. The real time automatic tuning acts on frequency, line length (line phase shifters) and stub length. Provision is made for the coupling resistance/plasma position feedback to accommodate the fast changes in antenna loading. The first coupling, tuning and heating results are reported in 0{pi}0{pi}, 0000 and 00{pi}{pi} phasing. A new antenna model is described, which was developed to simulate the measured antenna loading in terms of plasma parameters and to provide a starting point for the real time automatic tuning. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Resonant double loop antenna development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Brown, R.A.; Bryan, W.E.; Fadnek, A.; Hoffman, D.J.; King, J.F.; Livesey, R.L.; McIlwain, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the development of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) systems for fusion research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built resonant double loop (RDL) antennas for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, US) and Tore Supra (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaire, Cadarache, France). Each antenna has been designed to deliver 4 MW of power. The electrical circuit and the mechanical philosophy employed are the same for both antennas, but different operating environments lead to substantial differences in the designs of specific components. A description and a comparison of the technologies developed in the two designs are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. ICRH experiments in a toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    A 100 kW, 144 μsec pulse of 1.4 MHz rf is used to heat plasmas with densities less than or equal to 3 x 10 12 cm -3 at the ion cyclotron frequency in a toroidal octupole. The rf is coupled to the plasma by a single turn, electrostatically shielded hoop coaxial to the four main hoops and located near the wall. Absorbed power is inferred from plasma loading of the hoop and measured directly with an electrostatic ion energy analyzer and compared to single particle resonance heating theory

  3. Minority Ions Acceleration by ICRH: a tool for investigating Burning Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinali, A.; Briguglio, S.; Calabro, G.; Crisanti, F.; Di Troia, C.; Fogaccia, G.; Marinucci, M.; Vlad, G.; Zonca, F.

    2008-01-01

    A thorough numerical analysis of the quasi-linear plasma-ICRH wave interaction has been made and will be presented in order to determine the characteristic fast-ion parameters that are necessary for addressing some of the main ITER burning plasma physics issues, e.g. fast ion transport due to collective mode excitations, cross-scale couplings of micro-turbulence with meso-scale fluctuations due to energetic particles, etc. These investigations refer to the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST), a conceptual tokamak design operating with deuterium plasmas in a dimensionless parameter range as close as possible to that of ITER and equipped with ICRH as a main heating scheme. The destabilization and saturation of fast ion driven Alfvenic modes below and above the EPM (Energetic Particle Modes) stability threshold are investigated by numerical simulations with the HMGC code, which assumes the anisotropic energetic particle distribution function accelerated by ICRH as input. The results of this study, obtained by integration of many numerical tools, are presented and discussed

  4. Tuning of JET transmission line/antenna system during ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeberg, J.

    1993-05-01

    The launched toroidal wave spectrum for ICRH and ICRH current drive is controlled by the phasing of the antenna currents. This causes imbalance in the transmission lines, which makes it more difficult to use the full power of the ICRH generators. Further, the generators are sensitive to the amount of reflected power. To reduce the amount of reflected power the transmission lines have to be constantly tuned. To study the tuning three models of the antenna are developed and compared with experimental results. A method is suggested which enables better usage of the generated power using a power correction unit to evenly distribute the power load between the generators. 4 refs, 24 figs

  5. Thermo-structural optimization of the ITER ICRH Four Port Junction and Straps against in-vessel design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuente, Antonio; Fursdon, Mike; Shannon, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Design optimization work has been conducted on the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) Four Port Junction (4PJ) and Straps – a sub-assembly of the antenna. The aim of the analysis is to evaluate ways of making the component compliant with SDC-IC rules while balancing the competing demands of different performance requirements. Of particular interest are the bends that connect the 316L(N) strap pipes to its housing, where previous work had shown that primary plus secondary stresses would result in a low predicted fatigue life. The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of reducing stresses in these bends. Coupled ANSYS CFX and structural models are used to calculate coolant and metal temperatures and resulting stresses due to incident and self-generated heat. Although all of the modifications explored resulted in primary plus secondary stresses exceeding the cyclic damage design criteria, some avenues are identified for future studies and a reduction in stress toward the target is obtained

  6. High power ICRH experiments on the Wisconsin levitated octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.; Fortgang, C.M.; Twichell, J.C.; Dexter, R.N.; Sprott, J.C.; Barter, J.D.

    1980-12-01

    Preliminary ICRH experiments have begun on the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. In order to study heating, energy confinement, and high β plasmas, a 1.8 to 3 MHz oscillator and antenna have been installed. The oscillator and antenna have been installed. The oscillator is capable of delivering 2 MW of RF power for 10 msec, and to date up to 0.5 MW has been coupled into the plasma. At a density of approx. 6 x 10 12 cm -3 , T/sub e/ reaches a maximum of 30 eV as measured by Langmuir probes and VUV spectroscopy. Charge exchange measurements of T/sub i/ show Maxwellian components at 95 and 190 eV, with an energy confinement time of approx. 1 msec. Electron energy confinement is limited by impurity radiation, and several methods of impurity control are being tested. Current experiments also include direct measurement of the RF electric field, antenna loading measurements, variation of the oscillator frequency, and ohmic heating of the electrons

  7. Progress in ICRH and lower hybrid launcher development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency methods of heating and non-inductive current drive have become well established and are likely to be part of any next-step Tokamak programme. The present state of development of antennae for ion cyclotron heating and recent developments to enhance the effectiveness of fast wave current drive systems are reviewed. The performance achieved by present systems enables the provision of an ICRH system for next step devices within the existing technology limits. The main Lower Hybrid current drive systems are also reviewed. Present operating limits suggest that the design power density at the grill in large multijunction launchers must be somewhat reduced due to peaking of the electric field. The resulting launcher for a next step machine based on present technology is a large and highly complex device. Development of recent proposals such as the rod array or the hyperguide, in parallel with necessary improvements in the current drive efficiency, would make Lower Hybrid a more attractive method of non-inductive current drive for next step machines. (Author)

  8. The experimental investigation on the properties of the plasma heated by waves in the mirror machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuyun, Duan; Shiqing, Cheng; Xuemeng, Chen; Qing, Pan; Zhigang, Yang [Southwest Inst. of Physics, Leshan, SC (China)

    1995-06-01

    The application of ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) in the MM-2U simple mirror plasma which is created and heated by ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) can result in the increase of plasma temperature and density. The confinement performance of plasma also can be improved. The ion and electron temperatures and the plasma density are measured in detail by using the ISP (Ion Sensitive Probe). The plasma floating potential profile are measured in both the radial and the axial direction. The experimental results show that ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Radio Field) can be used for stabilizing ECRH plasma and for improving the confinement performance of plasma.

  9. Design and development of PLC based offline impedance matching system for ICRH experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Ramesh; Jadav, H.M.; Mali, Aniruddh; Kulkarni, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) transmission line has two impedance matching networks, one for offline matching which has been employed before experimental shot. Another is online impedance matching which has been employed during experimental shot. Offline matching network consists of two static stubs, coarse tuner and coarse phase shifter identical in both transmission lines. There are motorized arrangement installed in each stubs and phase shifters. Both stubs are being used to vary transmission line length. Phase shifter is used to match the frequency of generated RF power. Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based automation and control technique has been designed and developed for the system. Offline matching should be operated below 1 kHz frequency in order to move stepper motors. Program generates required square pulses which employed to motor controller to move either in upward or downward direction. In existing system this operation has been carried out using VME. To reduce the load on VME, PLC based system has been designed and integrated with main DAC system. WinCC software has been used (as SCADA/HMI) to develop front end GUI which communicates with OPC server. Further, OPC communicates with PLC for control of motorized arrangement. This paper describes technical details,design and development of PLC based offline matching system using WinCC as user interface. The communication between WinCC application and hardware devices was realized by OPC technique. The developed system has friendly graphical user interface, high-level automation and comprehensive function such as experimental process control. The system was proved to be reliable and accurate in practical application. (author)

  10. Analysis of JET LCHD/ICRH synergy experiments in terms of relativistic current drive theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D F.H.; Baranov, Y; Brusati, M; Ekedahl, A; Froissard, P; Gormezano, C; Jacquinot, J; Paquin, L; Rimini, F G [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Cox, M; Gardner, C; O` Brien, M R [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom); Di Vita, A [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    1994-07-01

    The present analysis shows that the observed efficiency of current drive with synergy between LHCD and ICRH is in good agreement with the relativistic theory of Karney and Fisch for Landau damped waves. The predicted power absorption from the fast wave by the electron tail is within 30% of the measured value. In the presence of significant fast electron diffusion within a slowing down time it would be possible to produce central current drive using multiple ICRF resonances even when the LHCD deposition is at half radius, as in an ITER type device. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Analysis of JET LCHD/ICRH synergy experiments in terms of relativistic current drive theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Start, D.F.H.; Baranov, Y.; Brusati, M.; Ekedahl, A.; Froissard, P.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Paquin, L.; Rimini, F.G.; Di Vita, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present analysis shows that the observed efficiency of current drive with synergy between LHCD and ICRH is in good agreement with the relativistic theory of Karney and Fisch for Landau damped waves. The predicted power absorption from the fast wave by the electron tail is within 30% of the measured value. In the presence of significant fast electron diffusion within a slowing down time it would be possible to produce central current drive using multiple ICRF resonances even when the LHCD deposition is at half radius, as in an ITER type device. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs

  12. Broadening of ICRH produced fast ion profiles due to orbit effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.-G.; Porcelli, F.

    1991-01-01

    In the JET tokamak, minority ions accelerated by ICRH reach energies in the MeV range. Near the plasma magnetic axis, the standard trapped particle ''banana'' orbit is distorted into a ''potato'' or ''fat banana'' orbit. The zero banana width approximation which is used in most Fokker-Planck calculations of velocity distributions of resonating ions is often not valid in JET. The inclusion of finite banana width effects will, in general, lead to a lowering of the averaged tail energy and a broadening of pressure profiles, power transfer profiles etc. A model for calculating orbit broadened profiles is presented. (Author)

  13. Conceptual study of an ICRH traveling-wave antenna system for low-coupling conditions as expected in DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, R.; Messiaen, A.

    2016-07-01

    For the central heating of a fusion reactor ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRH) is the first choice method as it is able to couple RF power to the ions without density limit. The drawback of this heating method is the problem of excitation of the magneto-sonic wave through the plasma boundary layer from the antenna located along the wall, without exceeding its voltage standoff. The amount of coupling depends on the antenna excitation and the surface admittance at the antenna output due to the plasma profile. The paper deals with the optimization of the antenna excitation by the use of sections of traveling-wave antennas (TWAs) distributed all along the reactor wall between the blanket modules. They are mounted and fed in resonant ring system(s). First, the physics of the coupling of a strap array is studied by simple models and the coupling code ANTITER II. Then, after the study of the basic properties of a TWA section, its feeding problem is solved by hybrids driving them in resonant ring circuit(s). The complete modeling is obtained from the matrices of the TWA sections connected to one of the feeding hybrid(s). The solution is iterated with the coupling code to determine the loading for a reference low-coupling ITER plasma profile. The resulting wave pattern up to the plasma bulk is derived. The proposed system is totally load resilient and allows us to obtain a very selective exciting wave spectrum. A discussion of some practical implementation problems is added.

  14. Stochastic heating in the cyclotron resonance of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Hernandez A, O.

    1999-01-01

    The study of the different schemes of plasma heating by radiofrequency waves is a very actual problem related with the plasma heating in different machines and the particle acceleration mechanisms. In this work, it is obtained the expression for the temporal evolution of the energy absorbed in the cyclotron resonance of electrons where it is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. It is obtained the stochastic criteria in a magnetic configuration of an Ecr type plasma source. (Author)

  15. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating in a toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    rf power near the ion cyclotron-resonance frequency has been used to produce a hundredfold increase (from approximately-less-than1 to approx.100 eV) in the ion temperature in a toroidal octupole device. The heating produces no noticeable instabilities or other deleterious effects except for a high reflux of neutrals from the walls. The heating rate is consistent with theory and the limiting ion temperature is determined by charge-exchange losses

  16. Recent TMX-U central cell heating and fueling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Barter, J.; Dimonte, G.; Falabella, S.; Molvik, A.W.; Pincosy, P.; Turner, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments have begun to test new methods of heating and fueling of the TMX-U central cell plasma. Heating is with ICRH and 2kV neutral beams. Fueling is by the 2kV beams and by gas puffing. The ICRH system used for fundamental-frequency slow-wave heating consists of two double half-turn antennas, with one on each side of the central cell midplane at mirror ratios of 1:3 and 1:5. Gas fueling is between these two antennas to ensure that recently ionized particles pass through an ICRH resonance before entering the thermal barrier and cells. In recent gas-fed experiments with 100 to 200kW power on each antenna, the end loss temperature was measured to increase from 30eV to above 150eV with perpendicular (cc) temperatures of >500eV. The TMX-U central cell has been equipped with 10 low energy neutral-beam injectors (LENI). These beams are designed to operate at 2kV (net) accel-voltage and deliver 17 atom amperes each to the TMX-U plasma. This low energy was selected to improve trapping (relative to higher energy) on the initial ICRH heated plasma (2X10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/). At 2keV the beams are predicted to be capable of building up and fueling to 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ density, with ion-ion scattering providing a warm, isotropic ion component in the central cell

  17. ICRH coupling experiment in Big D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Owens, T.L.; Jaeger, E.F.; Bryan, W.E.; Hammonds, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A 10 MW, 40 to 80 MHz ICRH experiment has been proposed for Big D (at General Atomic). Compact loop antennas have been chosen to convey this power. In order to verify that the antenna will have sufficient loading, a prototype low-power antenna has been designed and will be installed in January 1986. The antenna is a cavity antenna that will operate from 30 to 80 MHz with a 50 Ohm match at R = 1 Ohm. The antenna can be moved from a position flush with the wall to flush with the limiter. By these means, we will establish the maximum acceptable gap from the coupler to the plasma. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal characteristics of this antenna system will be discussed. In addition to experimental exploration of coupling, we have investigated wave propagation and absorption in Big D by using a cold collisional plasma model in straight tokamak geometry with rotational transform. Although loading is dependent on the plasma position, both the reactive and real loads (10 to 20 and 1 to 2 Ohms) are comparable to other experiments. Loading and power deposition profiles as a function of frequency, density, and species mix will be presented. The report consists of viewgraphs of the presentation

  18. Ion cyclotron resonance heating in the Wisconsin supported toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Ion heating at the fundamental of the cyclotron resonance (1 MHz 12 cm -3 ) with no evidence of parametric decay or enhanced particle loss other than temperature dependent losses such as thermal flow to obstacles. Ion temperatures are limited by charge exchange on the large neutral reflux at the higher rf powers. (author)

  19. Electron-cyclotron-resonant-heated electron distribution functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Nevins, W.M.; Cohen, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Recent studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code indicate that the energetic electron tail formed by electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) at the second harmonic is not Maxwellian. We present the results of our bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code along with some simple analytic models of hot-electron distribution functions

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Castejon, F.

    1992-07-01

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron- cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. The general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D- III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave, damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (Author) 13 refs.

  1. Electron - cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidone, I.; Castejon, F.

    1992-01-01

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron- cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. The general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D- III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave, damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (Author) 13 refs

  2. EDITORIAL: Special section on recent progress on radio frequency heating and current drive studies in the JET tokamak Special section on recent progress on radio frequency heating and current drive studies in the JET tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, Jef; Mailloux, Joelle; Mayoral, Marie-Line

    2009-04-01

    This special cluster of papers summarizes the work accomplished during the last three years in the framework of the Task Force Heating at JET, whose mission it is to study the optimisation of heating systems for plasma heating and current drive, launching and deposition questions and the physics of plasma rotation. Good progress and new physics insights have been obtained with the three heating systems available at JET: lower hybrid (LH), ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI). Topics covered in the present issue are the use of edge gas puffing to improve the coupling of LH waves at large distances between the plasma separatrix and the LH launcher. Closely linked with this topic are detailed studies of the changes in LH coupling due to modifications in the scrape-off layer during gas puffing and simultaneous application of ICRH. We revisit the fundamental ICRH heating of D plasmas, include new physics results made possible by recently installed new diagnostic capabilities on JET and point out caveats for ITER when NBI is simultaneously applied. Other topics are the study of the anomalous behaviour of fast ions from NBI, and a study of toroidal rotation induced by ICRH, both again with possible implications for ITER. In finalizing this cluster of articles, thanks are due to all colleagues involved in preparing and executing the JET programme under EFDA in recent years. We want to thank the EFDA leadership for the special privilege of appointing us as Leaders or Deputies of Task Force Heating, a wonderful and hardworking group of colleagues. Thanks also to all other European and non-European scientists who contributed to the JET scientific programme, the Operations team of JET and the colleagues of the Close Support Unit (CSU). Thanks are also due to the Editors, Editorial Board and referees of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion together with the publishing staff of IOP Publishing who have supported and contributed substantially to

  3. The Ion Cyclotron, Lower Hybrid, and Alfven Wave Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.

    2004-01-01

    This lecture covers the practical features and experimental results of the three heating methods. The emphasis is on ion cyclotron heating. First, we briefly come back to the main non-collisional heating mechanisms and to the particular features of the quasilinear coefficient in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). The specific case of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is treated, as well as the polarisation issue and minority heating scheme. The various ICRF scenarios are reviewed. The experimental applications of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems are outlined. Then, the lower hybrid and Alfven wave heating and current drive experimental results are covered more briefly. Where applicable, the prospects for ITER are commented

  4. The effect of compressibility on the Alfven spatial resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of compressibility of magnetic field line on the damping rate of Alfven spatial resonance heating for a high beta plasma (Kinetic pressure/magnetic pressure) was analysed, using the ideal MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) model in cylindrical geometry for a diffuse θ-pinch with conducting wall. The dispersion relation was obtained solving the equation of motion in the plasma and vacuum regions together with boundary conditions. (Author) [pt

  5. Mode converter for electron cyclotron resonance heating of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motley, R.W.; Hsuan, H.; Glanz, J.

    1980-09-01

    A method is proposed for improving the efficiency of cyclotron resonance heating of a toroidal plasma by ordinary mode radiation from the outside of the torus. Radiation not absorbed in the first pass is reflected from the inside of the torus by a corrugated surface which rotates the polarization by 90 0 , so that a secondary source of extraordinary waves is created in the high field, accessible region of the plasma

  6. PLC based development of control, monitoring and interlock for 100 kW, 45.6 MHz ICRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadav, Hiralal; Joshi, Rameshkumar; Mali, Aniruddh K.; Kadia; Bhavesh; Parmar; Maganbhai, Kiritkumar; Kulkarni, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents details of PLC based system development for 100KW at the rate 45.6 MHz. Presently in ICRH RF DAC (Data acquisition and control) system existing based on real time VME and linux operating system. The ICRH system consists of 1.5 MW RF generator operating at 22- 40MHz which is used for second harmonic heating and pre-ionization experiments on SST-1 Tokamak at 1.5T and 3T magnetic field operation respectively. The task of PLC system in RF ICRH is to control, monitoring and interlocks HVDC power supply signal. Voltage and current signal of 2 kW, 20 kW, tetrode for 100 kW RF tube electrode like Filament, Control grid, Plate, Screen grid, signal monitor and voltage set raised by PLC analog IO module. Acknowledgement of the HVDC supply Filament, Control grid, Plate, Screen grid power supply is monitor and interlocks by PLC Digital IO module to interlocks stop the RF pulse and off HV power supply. The RF pulse(shot) to trigger signal generator (5mw) RF power output feed to LPA then chain of 2 KW, 20 KW, 100 KW at the rate 45.6 MHz. The programming logic controller (PLC) software is written in ladder language for AH500 Delta make using ISP Soft 2.04 and GUI is in the table form to control and monitor the parameters. Communication of PLC to PC by ethernet LAN network. (author)

  7. On efficiency and interpretation of sawteeth pacing with on-axis ICRH modulation in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Peluso, E.; Lerche, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    In metallic machines ICRH heating is playing an increasingly important role. One of its most recent applications on the Joint Europena Torus (JET) is sawtooth control by ICRH modulation, for avoiding triggering dangerous neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs) and counteracting impurity accumulation. Some of the main difficulties of these experiments are the assessment of the synchronization efficiency and the understanding of the main physical mechanisms at play. In this paper, three independent classes of statistical indicators are introduced to address these issues: Recurrence Plots, Convergent Cross Mapping and Transfer Entropy. The application to JET experiments with the ILW shows that the proposed indicators agree quite well among themselves and provide sound estimates of the efficiency of the synchronisation scheme investigated. They also support, with a shot to shot basis analysis and an estimate of the uncertainties, the interpretation that the fast ions play a fundamental role in the stabilization of the sawteeth, in both L and H mode. Proposals for experiments to be carried out in the future to consolidate the interpretation of the results are discussed.

  8. Development of Data Acquisition Card Driver for ICRH System on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daming; Luo, Jiarong; Zhao, Yanping; Qin, Chengming

    2008-04-01

    Presented in this paper is the development of the driver for the data acquisition card with a peripheral component interconnection (PCI) local bus on the ion cyclotron range of frequency heating (ICRH) system. The driver is mainly aimed at the embedded VxWorks system (real-time operating system) which is widely used in various fields of real-time systems. An efficient way is employed to develop this driver, which will advance the real-time control of the ICRH system on the experimental advanced superconductor tokamak (EAST). The driver is designed using the TORNADO integrated development environment (IDE), and implemented in C plus language. The details include the hardware configuration, analogue/digital (A/D) and digital/analogue (D/A) conversion, input and output (I/O) operation of the driver to support over five cards. The data acquisition card can be manipulated in a low-level program and meet the requirements of A/D conversion and D/A outputs.

  9. Plasma performance, boundary studies and first experiments with ICRH in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidmann, G.; Bay, H.L.; Bertschinger, G.

    1985-01-01

    The TEXTOR plasma serves as a test bed for plasma/wall interaction studies and ICRH experiments. Reproducible and long-lasting discharges with soft termination were generated in the internal disruptive mode. The operational regime for Ohmic heating is shown in a 1/q versus n-barsub(e)R/Bsub(T) diagram. A comparison of electrical conductivity derived from current density measurements with calculated values favours neoclassical theory. A pump limiter installed on TEXTOR demonstrated a particle removal rate of 6x10 20 particles per second out of the boundary layer. It could decrease the central electron density by 50%. The pump limiter was used to control fuelling and recycling characteristics of stable discharges. First experiments with additional ICRH showed a strong influence on the plasma boundary and scrape-off layer. The interaction of the radiofrequency with the boundary layer at present limits the power input to the plasma. Plasma boundary parameters have been measured by optical methods combined with neutral particle beams. (author)

  10. R&D activities on RF contacts for the ITER ion cyclotron resonance heating launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillairet, Julien, E-mail: julien.hillairet@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Argouarch, Arnaud [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bamber, Rob [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Beaumont, Bertrand [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bernard, Jean-Michel; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Durodié, Frédéric [Laboratory for Plasmas Physics, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Lamalle, Philippe [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lombard, Gilles [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Nicholls, Keith; Shannon, Mark [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vulliez, Karl [Maestral Laboratory, Technetics Group, Pierrelatte (France); Cantone, Vincent; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Larroque, Sébastien; Lebourg, Philippe; Martinez, André; Mollard, Patrick; Mouyon, David; Pagano, Marco [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CEA have developed a dedicated test-bed for testing RF contact in ITER relevant conditions (vacuum, temperature, RF current). • A prototype of RF contacts have been designed and manufactured, with copper lamellas brazed on a titanium holder. • This RF contact prototype failed at RF current larger than 1.8 kA. • Extensive R&D is foreseen with new RF contact designs. - Abstract: Embedded RF contacts are integrated within the ITER ICRH launcher to allow assembling, sliding and to lower the thermo-mechanical stress. They have to withstand a peak RF current up to 2.5 kA at 55 MHz in steady-state conditions, in the vacuum environment of the machine. The contacts have to sustain a temperature up to 250 °C during several days in baking operations and have to be reliable during the whole life of the launcher without degradation. The RF contacts are critical components for the launcher performance and intensive R&D is therefore required, since no RF contacts have so far been qualified at these specifications. In order to test and validate the anticipated RF contacts in operational conditions, CEA has prepared a test platform consisting of a steady-state vacuum pumped RF resonator. In collaboration with ITER Organization and the CYCLE consortium (CYclotron CLuster for Europe), an R&D program has been conducted to develop RF contacts that meet the ITER ICRH launcher specifications. A design proposed by CYCLE consortium, using brazed lamellas supported by a spring to improve thermal exchange efficiency while guaranteeing high contact force, was tested successfully in the T-resonator up to 1.7 kA during 1200 s, but failed for larger current values due to a degradation of the contacts. Details concerning the manufacturing of the brazed contacts on its titanium holder, the RF tests results performed on the resonator and the non-destructive tests analysis of the contacts are given in this paper.

  11. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  12. ICRH coupling in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Jaeger, E.F.; Owens, T.L.; Remsen, D.B.; Luxon, J.; Rawls, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A 9-MW ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) experiment has been proposed to heat the Doublet III-D (DIII-D) plasma. DIII-D is a 2.2-T, 3.5-MA tokamak at GA Technologies with a major radius of 1.67 m and minor radius of 67 cm (elongation approx.2). The device was recommissioned in early 1986. The initial experimental program includes ohmic plasma and neutral beam studies; high-power rf experiments will follow in later years. Compact loop antennas (which fit completely in a 35- by 50-cm port) have been chosen to convey this power because of their inherent ease of maintenance, high efficiency, and versatility. In order to verify that the antenna will have sufficient loading, a prototype low-power (2-MW) antenna has been designed and installed. Measurements will be made through September 1986. The antenna is a cavity antenna that will operate from approximately 30 to 80 MHz with a 50-Ω match for a load resistance of approx.1 Ω. It is surrounded by a fixed graphite-covered frame and can be extended from 3 cm behind this frame to 2 cm in front. This can be used to adjust coupling to the plasma. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal characteristics of this antenna system (and its extrapolation to ignited tokamaks) are discussed. In addition to experimental exploration of coupling, we have investigated wave propagation and absorption in DIII-D by using a cold collisional plasma model in straight tokamak geometry with rotation transform. Loading and power deposition profiles as a function of frequency, density, and species mix are presented

  13. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L. Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, D.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Poor definition of the heating profiles that occur during normal operation of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas has complicated the mechanical design of ICRF system components. This paper reports that at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Faraday shield analysis is being used in defining rf heating profiles. In recent numerical analyses of proposed hardware for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) and DIII-D, rf magnetic fields at Faraday shield surfaces were calculated, providing realistic predictions of the induced skin currents flowing on the shield elements and the resulting dissipated power profile. Detailed measurements on mock-ups of the Faraday shields for DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirmed the predicted magnetic field distributions. A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the DIII-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed

  14. Ion cyclotron heating of JET D-D and D-T optimised shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, G.; Baranov, Y.; Bartlett, D.

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses the unique roles played by Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in the preparation, formation and sustainment of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in high fusion performance JET optimised shear experiments using the Mk. H poloidal divertor. Together with Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), low power ICRH is applied during the early ramp-up phase of the plasma current, 'freezing in' a hollow or flat current density profile with q(0)>1. In combination with up to ∼ 20 MW of Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), the ICRH power is stepped up to ∼ 6 MW during the main low confinement (L-mode) heating phase. An ITB forms promptly after the power step, revealed by a region of reduced central energy transport and peaked profiles, with the ion thermal diffusivity falling to values close to the standard neo-classical level near the centre of both D-D and D-T plasmas. At the critical time of ITB formation, the plasma contains an energetic ICRF hydrogen minority ion population, contributing ∼ 50% to the total plasma pressure and heating mainly electrons. As both the NBI population and the thermal ion pressure develop, a substantial part of the ICRF power is damped resonantly on core ions (ω = 2 ω cD = 3 ω cT ) contributing to the ion heating. In NBI step-down experiments, high performance has been sustained by maintaining central ICRH heating; analysis shows the efficiency of central ICRH ion heating to be comparable with that of NBI. The highest D-D fusion neutron rates (R NT = 5.6 x 10 16 s -1 ) yet achieved in JET plasmas have been produced by combining a low magnetic shear core with a high confinement (H-mode) edge. In D-T, a fusion triple product n i T i τ E = (1.2 ± 0.2) x 10 21 m -3 keVs was achieved with 7.2 MW of fusion power obtained in the L-mode and up to 8.2 MW of fusion power in the H-mode phase. (author)

  15. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...... of the electron cyclotron frequency. These are injected obliquely from the outside of the tokamak near an optimal angle to the magnetic field lines. This method involves two mode conversions. The ordinary waves are converted into extraordinary waves near the plasma cut-off layer. The extraordinary waves...... are subsequently converted into electrostatic electron Bernstein waves at the upper hybrid resonance layer, and the Bernstein waves are completely absorbed close to the plasma centre. Results are presented from ray-tracinq calculations in full three-dimensional geometry using the dispersion function for a hot non...

  16. Resonant heating of a cluster plasma by intense laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, Thomas M. Jr.; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Gupta, Ayush; Palastro, John; Milchberg, Howard M.

    2005-01-01

    Gases of atomic clusters are interaction media for laser pulse propagation with properties useful for applications such as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray microscopy, harmonic generation, EUV lithography, and laser plasma acceleration. To understand cluster heating and expansion, a series of two- and three-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell simulations of the explosion of argon clusters of diameter in the range 20 nm-53 nm have been preformed. The studies show that heating is dominated by a nonlinear, resonant absorption process that gives rise to a size-dependent intensity threshold for strong absorption and that controls the dielectric properties of the cluster. Electrons are first accelerated out from the cluster and then driven back into it by the combined effects of the laser field and the electrostatic field produced by the laser-driven charge separation. Above the intensity threshold for strong heating there is a dramatic increase in the production of energetic particles and harmonic radiation. The dielectric properties of a gas of clusters are determined by the ensemble average cluster polarizability. Individual electrons contribute to the polarizability differently depending on whether they are in the core of the cluster or in the outer edge. Consequently, there can be large fluctuations in polarizability during the heating of a cluster

  17. ICRH programmes for antennas and for plasma dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Springmann, E.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the computer programmes used for designing the ICRH antennas at IPP. In the first part of the report the underlying physical principles are discussed on which the programmes are based. 2-D (two-dimensional) and 3-D (three-dimensional) models are used. In the second part the input and output of the programmes is described, and in the third part some results on ICRH antennas built for existing machines at IPP and antennas for machines which are in the design and construction phase are presented. In Appendix I the formulae for the 2-D model including plasma density profiles are described and an investigation of this 2-D model on folded dipol antennae is given. In Appendix II the main formulae for a computer program for the complete hot dispersion relation is given; the application of the program for an ASDEX plasma (dispersion for the fast wave and Bernstein wave) is shown. (orig.)

  18. Design and operations of a load-tolerant external conjugate-T matching system for the A2 ICRH antennas at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, I.; Graham, M.; Blackman, T.; Dowson, S.; Durodie, F.; Jacquet, P.; Lehmann, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nightingale, M.P.S.; Noble, C.; Sheikh, H.; Vrancken, M.; Walden, A.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.

    2013-01-01

    A load-tolerant external conjugate-T (ECT) impedance matching system for two A2 ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas was successfully put into operation at JET. The system allows continuous injection of the radio-frequency (RF) power into plasma in the presence of strong antenna loading perturbations caused by edge-localized modes (ELMs). Reliable ECT performance was demonstrated under a variety of antenna loading conditions including H-mode plasmas with radial outer gaps (ROGs) in the range 4–14 cm. The high resilience to ELMs predicted during the circuit simulations was fully confirmed experimentally. Dedicated arc-detection techniques and real-time matching algorithms were developed as a part of the ECT project. The new advanced wave amplitude comparison system has proven highly efficient in detection of arcs both between and during ELMs. The ECT system has allowed the delivery of up to 4 MW of RF power without trips into plasmas with type-I ELMs. Together with the 3 dB system and the ITER-like antenna, the ECT has brought the total RF power coupled to ELMy plasma to over 8 MW, considerably enhancing JET research capabilities. This paper provides an overview of the key design features of the ECT system and summarizes the main experimental results achieved so far. (paper)

  19. 2D and 3D modeling of wave propagation in cold magnetized plasma near the Tore Supra ICRH antenna relying on the perfecly matched layer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, J; Colas, L; Clairet, F; Goniche, M; Hillairet, J; Lombard, G; Heuraux, S; Milanesio, D

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to simulate ion cyclotron wave coupling in the edge of a tokamak plasma with the finite element technique is presented. It is applied in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics. Its main features include the perfectly matched layer (PML) technique to emulate radiating boundary conditions beyond a critical cutoff layer for the fast wave (FW), full-wave propagation across the inhomogeneous cold peripheral plasma and a detailed description of the wave launcher geometry. The PML technique, while widely used in numerical simulations of wave propagation, has scarcely been used for magnetized plasmas, due to specificities of this gyrotropic material. A versatile PML formulation, valid for full dielectric tensors, is summarized and interpreted as wave propagation in an artificial medium. The behavior of this technique has been checked for plane waves on homogeneous plasmas. Wave reflection has been quantified and compared to analytical predictions. An incompatibility issue for adapting the PML for forward (FW) and backward (slow wave (SW)) propagating waves simultaneously has been evidenced. In a tokamak plasma, this critical issue is overcome by taking advantage of the inhomogeneous density profile to reflect the SW before it reaches the PML. The simulated coupling properties of a Tore Supra ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna have been compared to experimental values in a situation of good single-pass absorption. The necessary antenna elements to include in the geometry to recover the coupling properties obtained experimentally are also discussed. (paper)

  20. Heating of Solar Wind Ions via Cyclotron Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R.; Moya, P. S.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Munoz, V.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Remote and in situ observations in the solar wind show that ion and electron velocity distributions persistently deviate from thermal equilibrium in the form of relative streaming between species components, temperature anisotropy, etc. These non-thermal features represent a source of free energy for the excitation of kinetic instabilities and fluctuations in the plasma. In this regard, it is believed that plasma particles can be heated, through a second order Fermi acceleration process, by multiple resonances with unstable counter-propagating field-aligned Ion-cyclotron waves. For multi-species plasmas, several collective wave modes participate in this process. In this work, we test this model by studying the percentage of ions that resonate with the waves modes described by the proper kinetic multi-species dispersion relation in a solar-wind-like plasma composed of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. Numerical results are compared with WIND spacecraft data to test its relevance for the existence of thresholds for the preferential perpendicular heating of He+2 ions as observed in the solar wind fast streams.

  1. Ion-cyclotron-resonance heating in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.; Sprott, J.C.; Strait, E.J.

    1983-06-01

    Ion-cyclotron-resonance heating has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, on the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. Heating of both ions and electrons has been observed. Typically, a two-component ion energy distribution is produced (300 eV and 50 eV) with 500 kW of rf power coupled into a 5 x 10 12 cm -3 plasma. Power is coupled to the plasma with an antenna that also serves as the inductor of an oscillator tank circuit. The oscillator is tunable from 1 to 3 MHz and can be applied for periods up to 10 msec. The experiments were performed with hydrogen, gun-injected plasmas. Most of the theortical work presented deals with a calculation that predicts the plasma loading. A slab model is used, and the questions of accessibility, polarization, and damping of the radio-frequency electromagnetic fields are addressed. It is found that cold-plasma theory cannot account for the heating and, therefore, hot-plasma theory is invoked to explain the results. The loading measurements and theoretical predictions are found to be in reasonable agreement

  2. Induction heating of liquids with an L-LC resonant tank

    OpenAIRE

    Quirós Jacobo, Francisco Javier; Martín Segura, Guillermo; Heredero Peris, Daniel; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Induction heating (IH) systems are used in many applications because they present many advantages compared other heating methods like quicker heating or faster start-up. This paper studies the application of IH systems for liquid heating using an L-LC resonant tank.

  3. The mechanical structure of the WEST Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliez, K., E-mail: karl.vulliez@cea.fr [Laboratoire d’étanchéité, CEA/DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 2 rue James Watt, 26700 Pierrelatte (France); Chen, Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Ferlay, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Winkler, K. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.; Mollard, P.; Patterlini, J.C.; Bernard, J.M.; Delaplanche, J.M.; Lombard, G.; Prou, M.; Volpe, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The design of a CW ICRH launcher for WEST was achieved. • Major upgrade were made on the launcher to improve performances and reliability. • 3 launchers are about to be built to be operated on WEST in 2015. • Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. • The compete RF and mechanical structure were analyzed by FEM. - Abstract: The WEST ICRH system has to deal with two challenging issues that no other ICRH system before ITER has faced simultaneously so far, i.e. ELMs resilience and Continuous Wave (CW) RF operation. The technical solution chosen to meet the requests imposed by the WEST scenarios is to build three new launchers based on the RF structure successfully tested in short pulses in 2007 on Tore Supra prototype launcher. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical structure of the CW ELMs resilient WEST ICRH launchers. The technical solutions chosen to drive the mechanical design are presented, in regard of the past experience on the 2007 TS prototype, together with the significant work carried out on the mechanical design to improve the launcher structure. The thermal and electro-mechanical analyses conducted and their impact on the launcher design are also presented. These three new CW ELMs resilient ICRH launchers are foreseen to be installed on WEST in 2016, and operational for the first plasmas.

  4. Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in heat stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wang, B.; Zou, Z.M.; Li, H.F.; Wang, P.Y.; Xia, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) in the detection of changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after heat stroke (HS). Materials and methods: The study group consisted of eight patients after HS, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3–9. The MR studies were performed with a 1.5 T system. MR spectra were recorded from a normal-appearing cerebellum region. Spectra from patients were compared with a control group including seven age-matched healthy volunteers recorded with the same techniques. Metabolites ratios including N-acetyl aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), N-acetyl aspartate/creatine2 (NAA/Cr2), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), choline/creatine2 (Cho/Cr2), and N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) were calculated and the differences between the two groups were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyse the relationship between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS. Results: In the cerebellum of the patients after HS, NAA/Cr ratios were found to be significantly decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.004) and Cho/Cr ratios were found to be decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.032). Significant positive correlation was found between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS (r = 0.748, p = 0.033). Conclusions: Metabolite abnormalities were seen in normal-appearing cerebellum structures in patients after HS. Proton MRS is a useful tool for evaluating major changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after HS and the severity of the disease can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios. - Highlights: • Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers important information in patients with heat stroke. • Significantly different NAA/Cr ratios were found between heat stroke and controls. • The severity of heat stroke can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios

  5. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap, E-mail: ranayadav97@gmail.com; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V. [Thapar University, Patiala, Punjab 147004, India and Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  6. Installation, testing and first results of TEXTOR's new ICRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durodie, F.; Delvigne, T.; Descamps, P.; Koch, R.; Ongena, J.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Nieuwenhove, R.; Van Oost, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Shen, X.M.; Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels; Messiaen, A.M.; Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels; Huetteman, P.; Kohlhaas, W.; Stickelman, C.; Cosler, A.

    1989-01-01

    The new ICRH system for TEXTOR, presented at the previous SOFT conference, has been tested and installed during spring and summer of 1987. Pulses of up to 2.8 MW have been achieved representing a power density at the antenna of about 3.1 MW/m 2 and over 90% of the installed RF power. Taking into account the already achieved volttages in the system one could extrapolate that a power density of 10 MW/m 2 with an transmission efficiency well over 90% would be technically feasible. First results, such as the interesting property that, in contrast with other experiments, the two antennae in each pair operate with zero and with π phase difference with nearly the same coupling efficiency, are discussed. The testing and conditioning procedures are described. RF-leak problems encounterd at the behinning of the experimental phase are discussed. Antenna and transmission line diagnostics as well as related tuning procedures are also described. During the installation of the neutral beam injectors, from beginning of April to about end of August 1988, several modifications to the whole of the ICRH system are being implemented. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Design of the ICRH antenna for TPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelman, C.H.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    A 6-MW ion cyclotron (IC) system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is in the preliminary design phase. In conjunction with the 3-MW Lower Hybrid system and the 8-MW neutral beam system, the IC system will provide heating and current-drive capabilities to explore advanced tokamak physics and long-pulse (1000 s) operation. The IC launcher consists of six nickel-plated current straps arranged toroidally in pairs behind three water-cooled Faraday shields. The Faraday shields can be independently mid remotely detached by cutting water lines at the back of the launcher and removing bolts at the front to free each shield. The antenna can be located at the +2 cm flux line and retracted 10 cm. Faraday shields are usually copper- or nickel-plated stainless steel or inconel. Titanium is the preferred material to minimize activation without greatly decreasing electrical resistivity and therefore increasing disruption loads. The IC antenna research and development programs have provided data that confirm the feasibility of B 4 C-coated nickel-plated titanium alloy in the TPX environment

  8. Temperature anisotropy in a cyclotron resonance heated tokamak plasma and the generation of poloidal electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Chang, C.S.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature anisotropy generated by cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas is calculated and the poloidal equilibrium electric field due to the anisotropy is studied. For the calculation of anisotropic temperatures, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function of heated particles is solved, assuming a moderate wave power and a constant quasilinear cyclotron resonance diffusion coefficient. The poloidal electrostatic potential variation is found to be proportional to the particle density and the degree of temperature anisotropy of warm species created by cyclotron resonance heating

  9. ECRH [electron-cyclotron resonance heating]-heated distributions in thermal-barrier tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; LoDestro, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution function is calculated for electrons subjected to strong electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) at the plug and barrier in a tandem-mirror thermal-barrier cell. When ECRH diffusion locally dominates over collisions and a boundary condition (associated with electrons passing to the center cell) imposes variations on the distribution function rapid compared to the variation of the ECRH and collisional diffusion coefficients, the kinetic equation can be reduced approximately to Laplace's equation. For the typical case where velocity space is divided into distinct regions in which plug and barrier ECRH dominate, the solution in each region can be expressed in terms of the plasma dispersion function or exponential integrals, according to whether the passing electrons are dominated by collisions or ECRH, respectively. The analytic results agree well with Fokker-Planck code results, in terms of both velocity-space structure and values of moments. 10 refs., 4 figs

  10. A novel circuit topology of modified switched boost hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Ananyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel circuit topology of modified switched boost high frequency hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment is presented in this paper for efficient induction heating. Recently, induction heating technique is becoming very popular for both domestic and industrial purposes because of its high energy efficiency and controllability. Generally in induction heating, a high frequency alternating magnetic field is required to induce the eddy currents in the work piece. High frequency resonant inverters are incorporated in induction heating equipment which produce a high frequency alternating magnetic field surrounding the coil. Previously this high frequency alternating magnetic field was produced by voltage source inverters. But VSIs have several demerits. So, in this paper, a new scheme of modified switched boost high frequency hybrid resonant inverter fitted induction heating equipment has been depicted which enhances the energy efficiency and controllability and the same is validated by PSIM.

  11. Current Monitoring System for ITER Like ICRH Antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argouarch, A.

    2006-01-01

    On TS antennas, the power transfer optimization from ICRH antenna to Plasma load is performed using feedback internal matching system. Experimental handling is required to mach the reactive impedance accordingly to the fluctuant plasma loading. As part of the development of the new ICRH prototype antenna, an additional measurement system based on Rogowski coils was developed to monitor the current distribution in antenna straps. The objective is to control module and phase of the antenna current straps with measurement provided by the coil system. Matching capacitors values, generators power and phase can also be controlled using the output of the devices, improving the real time matching control of the array. This paper details the new measurement layout, the Rogowski coil, and the whole system connected on each strap design for RF currents measurement between 40 MHz - 60 MHz for maximum amplitude of 1 kA. On the new ICRH prototype antenna, the measurement coils are coupled to the point where the strap currents are short circuited to the frame. The module and phase measurements are performed with the coils by direct magnetic induction in a vacuum and high temperature environment. Also, the Rogowski coils were characterized at low level power with vector network analyzer and the design adapted in order to obtain a controlled and reproducible gain in the desire bandwidth. The transconductive function is established with an experimental gain near -80 dB between primary circuit and inductive signal generated by the Rogowski coil. In a second step, the system with its associated electronic was qualified under high RF power. First results with high RF current (closed to 500 A at 57 MHz) match the desire Rogowski coil response. Compromises with electrical response at low power level and the coil under thermal/RF stresses were the most challenging part of the development. The overall response of the system and the current module/phase measurements are promising. A proper

  12. Coupling between particle and heat transport during power modulation experiments in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J.F.; Bouquey, F.; Bremond, S.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Eury, S.P.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Power modulations are a powerful tool often used to investigate heat transport processes in tokamaks. In some situations, this could also be an interesting method for the investigation of the particle transport due to the anomalous pinch. Low frequency (∼ 1 Hz) power modulation experiments, using both electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), have been performed in the Tore Supra tokamak. Strong coupling has been observed between the temperature and density modulations during the low frequency ECRH and ICRH modulation experiments. It has been shown that mechanisms as outgassing, Ware pinch effect, curvature driven pinch are not likely to be responsible for this density modulation. Because of its dependence on temperature or temperature gradient, the thermodiffusion is a serious candidate to be the driving source for this density modulation. This analysis shows that low frequency power modulation experiments have a great potential for the investigation of the anomalous particle pinch in tokamaks. Future plans will include the use of more precise density profile measurements using X-mode reflectometry

  13. Coupling between particle and heat transport during power modulation experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Artaud, J.F.; Bouquey, F.; Bremond, S.; Clary, J.; Darbos, C.; Eury, S.P.; Lennholm, M.; Magne, R.; Segui, J.L

    2004-07-01

    Power modulations are a powerful tool often used to investigate heat transport processes in tokamaks. In some situations, this could also be an interesting method for the investigation of the particle transport due to the anomalous pinch. Low frequency ({approx} 1 Hz) power modulation experiments, using both electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), have been performed in the Tore Supra tokamak. Strong coupling has been observed between the temperature and density modulations during the low frequency ECRH and ICRH modulation experiments. It has been shown that mechanisms as outgassing, Ware pinch effect, curvature driven pinch are not likely to be responsible for this density modulation. Because of its dependence on temperature or temperature gradient, the thermodiffusion is a serious candidate to be the driving source for this density modulation. This analysis shows that low frequency power modulation experiments have a great potential for the investigation of the anomalous particle pinch in tokamaks. Future plans will include the use of more precise density profile measurements using X-mode reflectometry.

  14. Composite Materials and Meta Materials for a New Approach to ITER ICRH Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Argouarch, A.; Vulliez, K.; Becoulet, A.; Litaudon, X.; Magne, R.; Champeaux, S.; Gouard, Ph.; Primout, M.; Le Gallou, J.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary laboratory testing of ICRH antennas is a very useful step before their commissioning. Traditionally, pure water, salt water or baking soda water loads are used. These 'water' loads are convenient but strongly limited in terms of performance testing. We have started two feasibility studies for advanced ICRH loads made of ferroelectric ceramics (passive loads) and meta materials (active loads). Preliminary results are very encouraging.

  15. Composite Materials and Meta Materials for a New Approach to ITER ICRH Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Argouarch, A.; Champeaux, S.; Gouard, Ph.; Le Gallou, J.-H.; Primout, M.; Vulliez, K.; Bécoulet, A.; Litaudon, X.; Magne, R.

    2009-11-01

    Preliminary laboratory testing of ICRH antennas is a very useful step before their commissioning. Traditionally, pure water, salt water or baking soda water loads are used. These "water" loads are convenient but strongly limited in terms of performance testing. We have started two feasibility studies for advanced ICRH loads made of ferroelectric ceramics (passive loads) and meta materials (active loads) [1]. Preliminary results are very encouraging.

  16. Resonance localization and poloidal electric field due to cyclo- tron wave heating in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, J.Y.; Chan, V.S.; Harvey, R.W.; Prater, R.; Wong, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    The perpendicular heating in cyclotron waves tends to pile up the resonant particles toward the low magnetic field side with their banana tips localized to the resonant surface. A poloidal electric field with an E x B drift comparable to the ion vertical drift in a toroidal magnetic field may result. With the assumption of anomalous electron and neoclassical ion transport, density variations due to wave heating are discussed

  17. Heat dissipation and information flow for delayed bistable Langevin systems near coherence resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiejun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, stochastic thermodynamics of delayed bistable Langevin systems near coherence resonance is discussed. We calculate the heat dissipation rate and the information flow of a delayed bistable Langevin system under various noise intensities. Both the heat dissipation rate and the information flow are found to be bell-shaped functions of the noise intensity, which implies that coherence resonance manifests itself in the thermodynamic properties.

  18. Effect of the minority concentration on ion cyclotron resonance heating in presence of the ITER-like wall in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Crombé, K.; Jachmich, S. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-Belgian State, TEC Partner, Brussels (Belgium); Jacquet, P.; Graham, M.; Kiptily, V.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mc Cormick, K.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R. [Euratom-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik Euratom Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Coenen, J. W. [IEK-4, EURATOM-FZJ, TEC Partner, Jülich (Germany); and others

    2014-02-12

    The most recent JET campaign has focused on characterizing operation with the 'ITER-like' wall. One of the questions that needed to be answered is whether the auxiliary heating methods do not lead to unacceptably high levels of impurity influx, preventing fusion-relevant operation. In view of its high single pass absorption, hydrogen minority fundamental cyclotron heating in a deuterium plasma was chosen as the reference wave heating scheme in the ion cyclotron domain of frequencies. The present paper discusses the plasma behavior as a function of the minority concentration X[H] in L-mode with up to 4MW of RF power. It was found that the tungsten concentration decreases by a factor of 4 when the minority concentration is increased from X[H] ≈ 5% to X[H] % 20% and that it remains at a similar level when X[H] is further increased to 30%; a monotonic decrease in Beryllium emission is simultaneously observed. The radiated power drops by a factor of 2 and reaches a minimum at X[H] ≈ 20%. It is discussed that poor single pass absorption at too high minority concentrations ultimately tailors the avoidance of the RF induced impurity influx. The edge density being different for different minority concentrations, it is argued that the impact ICRH has on the fate of heavy ions is not only a result of core (wave and transport) physics but also of edge dynamics and fueling.

  19. Heat Dissipation of Resonant Absorption in Metal Nanoparticle-Polymer Films Described at Particle Separation Near Resonant Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Dunklin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer films containing plasmonic nanostructures are of increasing interest for development of responsive energy, sensing, and therapeutic systems. The present work evaluates heat dissipated from power absorbed by resonant gold (Au nanoparticles (NP with negligible Rayleigh scattering cross sections randomly dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS films. Finite element analysis (FEA of heat transport was coordinated with characterization of resonant absorption by Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation (CDA. At AuNP particle separation greater than resonant wavelength, correspondence was observed between measured and CDA-predicted optical absorption and FEA-derived power dissipation. At AuNP particle separation less than resonant wavelength, measured extinction increased relative to predicted values, while FEA-derived power dissipation remained comparable to CDA-predicted power absorption before lagging observed extinguished power at higher AuNP content and resulting particle separation. Effects of isolated particles, for example, scattering, and particle-particle interactions, for example, multiple scattering, aggregation on observed optothermal activity were evaluated. These complementary approaches to distinguish contributions to resonant heat dissipation from isolated particle absorption and interparticle interactions support design and adaptive control of thermoplasmonic materials for a variety of implementations.

  20. Heating tokamaks via the ion-cyclotron and ion-ion hybrid resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1977-04-01

    For the ion-ion hybrid resonance it is shown that: (1) the energy absorption occurs via a sequence of mode conversions; (2) a poloidal field component normal to the ion-ion hybrid mode conversion surface strongly influences the mode conversion process so that roughly equal electron and ion heating occurs in the present proton-deuterium experiments, while solely electron heating is predicted to prevail in deuterium-tritium reactors; (3) the ion-ion hybrid resonance suppresses toroidal eigenmodes; and (4) wave absorption in minority fundamental ion-cyclotron heating experiments will be dominated by ion-ion hybrid mode conversion absorption for minority concentrations exceeding roughly 1 percent. For the ion-cyclotron resonance, it is shown that: (1) ion-cyclotron mode conversion leads to surface electron heating; and (2) ion-cyclotron mode conversion absorption dominates fundamental ion-cyclotron absorption thereby preventing efficient ion heating

  1. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated

  2. Tests on a mock-up of the feedback controlled matching options of the ITER ICRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grine, D.; Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2009-01-01

    Automatic control of the matching of the ITER ICRH antenna array on a reference load is presently developed and tested for optimization on a low-powered scaled (1:5) mock-up. Resilience to fast load variations is obtained either by 4 Conjugate-T (CT) or 4 quadrature hybrid circuits, the latter being the reference option. The main results are (i) for the CT option: successful implementation of the simultaneous feedback control of 11 actuators for the matching of the 4 CT and for the control of the array toroidal phasing; (ii) for the hybrid option: the matching and the array current control via feedback control of the decouplers and double stub tuners. This system is being progressively implemented and the simultaneous control of matching and antenna current has already been successfully tested on half of the array for heating and current drive phasings.

  3. Modeling of ICRH experiments in the Tara tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myer, R.C.; Golovato, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    The production and heating of the central cell plasma in Tara is provided by a slot antenna located on the midplane bump of the axial magnetic field profile. Slow ion cyclotron waves excited by the slot propagate down a magnetic beach to ion cyclotron resonance layers located on either side of the bump where the RF power is strongly damped by the ions. Two different theoretical models are being used to study the efficiency of coupling to slow waves in this configuration. Wave propagation models which are based on the infinite plasma dispersion relation for a cold plasma indicate that radially propagating left hand polarized slow waves are converted to right hand polarized fast waves at the Alfven resonance layer due to the radial density gradient. If this were to occur we would expect a lower coupling efficiency to the ions in the plasma core. On the other hand, a nonlocal kinetic model of RF wave propagation in a nonuniform plasma slab indicates that significant left hand component of the electric field extends beyond the Alfven resonance layer. Preliminary experimental measurements of the radial inductive field profile agree qualitatively with the predictions of the cold plasma model, however, there is insufficient data at this time time to establish that a density limit for slow wave accessibility to the plasma core exists

  4. Modeling of ICRH experiments in the Tara tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myer, R.C.; Golovato, S.N.

    1987-05-01

    The production and heating of the central cell plasma in Tara are provided by a slot antenna located on the midplane bump of the axial magnetic field profile. Slow ion cyclotron waves excited by the slot propagate down a magnetic beach to ion cyclotron resonance layers located on either side of the bump where the rf power is strongly damped by the ions. Two different theoretical models are being used to study the efficiency of coupling to slow waves in this configuration. Wave propagation models which are based on the infinite plasma dispersion relation for a cold plasma indicate that radially propagating left hand polarized slow waves are converted to right hand polarized fast waves at the Alfven resonance layer due to the radial density gradient. If this were to occur we would expect a lower coupling efficiency to the ions in the plasma core. On the other hand, a nonlocal kinetic model of rf wave propagation in a nonuniform plasma slab indicates that a significant left hand component of the electric field extends beyond the Alfven resonance layer. Preliminary experimental measurements of the radial inductive field profile agree qualitatively with the predictions of the cold plasma model, however, there is insufficient data at this time to establish that a density limit for slow wave accessibility to the plasma core exists

  5. Survey of European Community efforts in RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, T.

    1981-01-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the efforts made over the last 10 years, with particular emphasis on the period from 1978 to 1980. The RF heating experiments within EC are presented: low frequency heating; heating at medium frequencies (ICRH); RF heating at low hybrid frequency; heating at the ECR frequency. The plan of Tore-Supra is given

  6. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  7. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-07-11

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  8. The effects of electron cyclotron heating and current drive on toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Bobkov, B.; Classen, I. G. J.; Ferreira, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Fitzgerald, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Gallart, D.; Geiger, B.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Johnson, T.; Lauber, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Nabais, F.; Nikolaeva, V.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Schneider, P. A.; Snicker, A.; Vallejos, P.; the AUG Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    Dedicated studies performed for toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) in ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG) discharges with monotonic q-profiles have shown that electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) can make TAEs more unstable. In these AUG discharges, energetic ions driving TAEs were obtained by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). It was found that off-axis ECRH facilitated TAE instability, with TAEs appearing and disappearing on timescales of a few milliseconds when the ECRH power was switched on and off. On-axis ECRH had a much weaker effect on TAEs, and in AUG discharges performed with co- and counter-current electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the effects of ECCD were found to be similar to those of ECRH. Fast ion distributions produced by ICRH were computed with the PION and SELFO codes. A significant increase in T e caused by ECRH applied off-axis is found to increase the fast ion slowing-down time and fast ion pressure causing a significant increase in the TAE drive by ICRH-accelerated ions. TAE stability calculations show that the rise in T e causes also an increase in TAE radiative damping and thermal ion Landau damping, but to a lesser extent than the fast ion drive. As a result of the competition between larger drive and damping effects caused by ECRH, TAEs become more unstable. It is concluded, that although ECRH effects on AE stability in present-day experiments may be quite significant, they are determined by the changes in the plasma profiles and are not particularly ECRH specific.

  9. Edge Minority Heating Experiment in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Terry, J.L.; Bonoli, P.; Budny, R.; Chang, C.S.; Fiore, C.; Schilling, G.; Wukitch, S.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Perkins, R.; Porkolab, M.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2005-01-01

    An attempt was made to control global plasma confinement in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak by applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to the plasma edge in order to deliberately create a minority ion tail loss. In theory, an edge fast ion loss could modify the edge electric field and so stabilize the edge turbulence, which might then reduce the H-mode power threshold or improve the H-mode barrier. However, the experimental result was that edge minority heating resulted in no improvement in the edge plasma parameters or global stored energy, at least at power levels of P RF (le) 5.5 MW. A preliminary analysis of these results is presented and some ideas for improvement are discussed

  10. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    description of the rf system and experimental conditions can be found in [3]. In all the cases, the ion temperature equal to half of the electron temperature as generally observed in ohmically heated Aditya plasma [8] is considered. The parameters of the representa- tive shot # 20685 taken for the numerical simulation of fast ...

  11. Three-wave interaction during electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Hansen, Søren Kjer

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear wave-wave interactions in fusion plasmas, such as the parametric decay instability (PDI) of gyrotron radiation, can potentially hamper the use of microwave diagnostics. Here we report on anomalous scattering in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak during electron cyclotron resonance heating...... experiments. The observations can be linked to parametric decay of the gyrotron radiation at the second harmonic upper hybrid resonance layer....

  12. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupenko, I., E-mail: kupenko@esrf.fr; Strohm, C. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Glazyrin, K. [Photon Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G. [Laboratory of Crystallography, Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  13. Results of tests of the X2274 high power tetrode in a JT-60 110 to 130 MHz ICRH amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsen, D.B.; Loring, C.M.; McNees, S.G.; Moriyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Anno, K.; Fujii, T.; Terakado, M.; Kogure, S.; Nagashima, T.; Ohta, M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports the results of tests of the newly developed Varian EIMAC X2274 in the JAERI JT-60 ICRH system at pulse lengths up to 6 seconds at 131 MHz. It is our belief that these tests achieved the highest long pulse, or CW, power that has ever been delivered by a single power grid tube at frequencies above 100 MHz. Varian's EIMAC X2274, developed in conjunction with General Atomics and the US Department of Energy, uses an improved pyrolytic graphite grid configuration which provides significantly better vhf performance than the grids of the X2242 tetrode which was tested in this system in 1989. The EIMAC X2274 combines the improved grids with a new anode design which reduces the required water flow approximately 50% and increases the maximum anode dissipation 80%. All tests were performed at 131 MHz, the system's highest operating frequency. Tests of both prototype EIMAC X2274s produced essentially identical results. The basic objectives of these tests were: to demonstrate that the system with the EIMAC X2274 can reliably produce 1.5 MW at 130 MHz at 5 second pulse lengths for the JT-60U tokamak and to collect data for use in the design of future high power ICRH systems. In these tests the tube and system produced up to 1.7 MW at pulse lengths up to 5.4 seconds: i.e, the EIMAC X2274 in this system can easily meet Objective 1. The remainder of this paper shows that Objective 2 has been fulfilled. In addition to the high power tests, operational range tests were performed under variable VSWR conditions. Unlike the EIMAC X2242 tests were rf current heating of the screen grid limited output power, system parameters, rather than tube parameters, limited the output power in the high power tests. Operational range tests were conducted at output power levels chosen to be well within the system's anode cooling capability

  14. Resonant behavior in heat transfer across weak molecular interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklan, Sophia R. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Alex Greaney, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvalis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Grossman, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jcg@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study, in detail, the transfer of thermal (vibrational) energy between objects with discrete vibrational spectra to those with a semi-continuum of spectra. The transfer of energy is stochastic and strongly dependent on the instantaneous separation between the bodies. The insight from the MD simulations can be captured with a simple classical model that agrees well with quantum models. This model can be used to optimize systems for efficient frequency selective energy transfer, which can be used in designing a chemical sensor through nanomechanical resonance spectroscopy.

  15. Analysis and optimization with ecological objective function of irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Junle; Chen, Lingen; Ding, Zemin; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    Ecological performance of a single resonance ESE heat engine with heat leakage is conducted by applying finite time thermodynamics. By introducing Nielsen function and numerical calculations, expressions about power output, efficiency, entropy generation rate and ecological objective function are derived; relationships between ecological objective function and power output, between ecological objective function and efficiency as well as between power output and efficiency are demonstrated; influences of system parameters of heat leakage, boundary energy and resonance width on the optimal performances are investigated in detail; a specific range of boundary energy is given as a compromise to make ESE heat engine system work at optimal operation regions. Comparing performance characteristics with different optimization objective functions, the significance of selecting ecological objective function as the design objective is clarified specifically: when changing the design objective from maximum power output into maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of efficiency is 4.56%, while the power output drop is only 2.68%; when changing the design objective from maximum efficiency to maximum ecological objective function, the improvement of power output is 229.13%, and the efficiency drop is only 13.53%. - Highlights: • An irreversible single resonance energy selective electron heat engine is studied. • Heat leakage between two reservoirs is considered. • Power output, efficiency and ecological objective function are derived. • Optimal performance comparison for three objective functions is carried out.

  16. MeV ion loss during 3He minority heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Hammett, G.; Boivin, R.; Phillips, C.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    The loss of MeV ions during 3 He ICRH minority heating experiments has been measured using scintillator detectors near the wall of TFTR. The observed MeV ion losses to the bottom (90 degrees poloidal) detector are generally consistent with the expected first-orbit loss of D- 3 He alpha particle fusion products, with an inferred global reaction rate up to ∼10 16 reactions/sec. A qualitatively similar but unexpectedly large loss occurs 45 degrees poloidally below the outer midplane. This additional loss might be due to ICRH tail ions or to ICRH wave-induced loss of previously confined fusion products

  17. Design and Construction of Power System for Induction Heating (IH) Cooker Using Resonant Converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soe Thiri Thandar; Clement Saldanah; Win Khaing Moe

    2008-06-01

    Induction Heating (IH) systems using electromagnetic induction are developed in many industrial applications in Myanmar. Many industries have benefited from this new breakthrough by implementing induction heating for melting, hardening, and heating. Induction heating cooker is based on high frequency induction heating,electrical and electronic technologies. From the electronic point of view, induction heating cooker is composed of four parts.They are rectifier, filter, high frequency inverter, and resonant load. The purpose of this research is mainly objected to developed an induction heating cooker. The rectifier module is considered as full-bridge rectifier. The second protion of the system is a capacitive filter. The ripple components are minimized by this filter. The third is a high frequency converter to convert the constant DC to high frequency AC by switching the devices alternately. In this research, the Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) will be used as a power source, and can be driven by the pulse signals from the pulse transformer circuit. In the resonant load, the power consumption is about 500W. Construction and testing has been carried out. The merits of this research work is that IH cooker can be developed because of having less energy consumption, safe, efficient, quick heating, and having efficiency of 90% or more

  18. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, V P; Eriksson, L; Gormezano, C; Jacquinot, J; Kaye, A; Start, D F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  19. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H.

    1994-01-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs

  20. Plasma heating by radiofrequency in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da; Aihara, S.; Universidade Estadual de Campinas

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of the experimental set-up mounted in the Physical Institute of UFF (Brazil) to produce the gas ionization by radio-frequency are shown and its behaviour when confined by a mirror-geometry magnetic field is studied. The diagnostic is made by a langmuir probe and a prisme spectrogaph is used in order to verify the nature of the ionized helium gas and the degree of purity through its spectral lines. The argon ionization by R.f. is produced in the 'LISA' machine obtain a plasma column of approximatelly 60 cm length and with the Langmuir probe the study of the profile distribution of the plasma parameters such as: electron temperature and density and floating potencial in function of the magnetic field variation is made. The main focus is given to the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). A new expression on the ion saturation current (I sub(is)) produced by radiofrequency is developed. (L.C.) [pt

  1. Lower hybrid resonance heating of the JET plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.; Lallia, P.; Nguyen Trong, K.

    1975-10-01

    A preliminary proposition is presented to apply high power L.H.R. heating to the JET plasma, using a phased weveguide array (the Grill). The frequency is first choosen in order to locate the energy absorption region well within the plasma. The theory of the grill as a launching structure is then used to define the most appropriate Grill parameters compatible with the access available on the JET. Finally, a source and circuit realization capable of launching 10MW to the plasma is proposed [fr

  2. Adiabatic theory of nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotel'nikov, I.A.; Stupakov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma heating at electron frequency by an ordinary wave propagating at right angle to unidirectional magnetic field is treated. Injected microwave power is assumed to be so large that relativistic change of electron gyrofrequency during one flight thorugh the wave beam is much greater than inverse time of flight. The electron motion in the wave field is described using Hamiltonian formalism in adiabatic approximation. It is shown that energy coupling from the wave to electrons is due to a bifurcation of electron trajectory which results in a jumpm of the adiabatic invariant. The probability of bifurcational transition from one trajectory to another is calculated analytically and is used for the estimation of the beam power absorbed in plasma. 6 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Electron-cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filone, I.

    1992-01-01

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron-cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. the general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D-III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (author) 8 fig. 13 ref

  4. RF heating systems evolution for the WEST project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, R.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Argouarch, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J. M.; Bouquey, F.; Charabot, N.; Colas, L.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquot, J.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2014-02-12

    Tore Supra is dedicated to long pulse operation at high power, with a record in injected energy of 1 GJ (2.8 MW × 380 s) and an achieved capability of 12 MW injected power delivered by 3 RF systems: Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The new WEST project (W [tungsten] Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) aims at fitting Tore Supra with an actively cooled tungsten coated wall and a bulk tungsten divertor. This new device will offer to ITER a test bed for validating the relevant technologies for actively cooled metallic components, with D-shaped H-mode plasmas. For WEST operation, different scenarii able to reproduce ITER relevant conditions in terms of steady state heat loads have been identified, ranging from a high RF power scenario (15 MW, 30 s) to a high fluence scenario (10 MW, 1000 s). This paper will focus on the evolution of the RF systems required for WEST. For the ICRH system, the main issues are its ELM resilience and its CW compatibility, three new actively cooled antennas are being designed, with the aim of reducing their sensitivity to the load variations induced by ELMs. The LH system has been recently upgraded with new klystrons and the PAM antenna, the possible reshaping of the antenna mouths is presently studied for matching with the magnetic field line in the WEST configuration. For the ECRH system, the device for the poloidal movement of the mirrors of the antenna is being changed for higher accuracy and speed.

  5. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  6. Anisotropic distribution function of minority tail ions generated by strong ion-cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Colestock, P.

    1989-05-01

    The highly anisotropic particle distribution function of minority tail ions driven by ion-cyclotron resonance heating at the fundamental harmonic is calculated in a two-dimensional velocity space. It is assumed that the heating is strong enough to drive most of the resonant ions above the in-electron critical slowing-down energy. Simple analytic expressions for the tail distribution are obtained fro the case when the Doppler effect is sufficiently large to flatten the sharp pitch angle dependence in the bounce averaged qualilinear heating coefficient, D/sub b/, and for the case when D/sub b/ is assumed to be constant in pitch angle and energy. It is found that a simple constant-D/sub b/ solution can be used instead of the more complicated sharp-D/sub b/ solution for many analytic purposes. 4 refs., 4 figs

  7. Edge localized modes and edge pedestal in NBI and ICRF heated H, D and T-plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.; Lingertat, J.; Barnsley, R.

    1998-12-01

    Based on experiments carried out in JET in D:T mixtures varying from 100:0 to 5:95 and those carried out in hydrogen plasmas, the isotopic mass dependence of ELM parameters and the edge pedestal pressure in neutral beam (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance (ICRF) heated H-mode plasmas is presented. The ELM frequency is found to decrease with the atomic mass number both in ICRH and NBI discharges. However, the frequency in the case of ICRH is about 8 - 10 times higher than in the NBI case. Assuming that ELMs occur at a critical edge pressure gradient, limited by the ballooning instability, the scaling of the maximum edge pressure is most consistent with the assumption that the width of the transport barrier scales as the ion poloidal Larmor radius governed by the average energy of fast ions at the edge. The critical edge pressure in NBI heated discharges increases with the isotopic mass which. is consistent with the higher deduced width of the edge transport, barrier in tritium than in deuterium and hydrogen. The critical edge pressure in ICRH discharges is smaller, presumably, due to the smaller fast-ion contribution to the edge region. As a consequence of the edge pressure scaling with isotopic mass, the edge operational space in the n e - T e diagram increases with operation in tritium. If the evidence that the edge pedestal width is governed by the average energy of fast ions in the edge prevails, the pedestal in ITER would be controlled by the slowing down energy spectrum of α-particles in the edge. (author)

  8. Experimental study of the influence of different resonators on thermoacoustic conversion performance of a thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, E C; Ling, H; Dai, W; Yu, G Y

    2006-12-22

    In this paper, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator shape on the performance of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine is presented. Two different resonators were tested in the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat. One resonator is an iso-diameter one, and the other is a tapered one. To have a reasonable comparison reference, we keep the same traveling-wave loop, the same resonant frequency and the same operating pressure. The experiment showed that the resonator shape has significant influence on the global performance of the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine. The tapered resonator gives much better performance than the iso-diameter resonator. The tapered resonator system achieved a maximum pressure ratio of about 1.3, a maximum net acoustical power output of about 450 W and a highest thermoacoustic efficiency of about 25%.

  9. Tearing modes induced by perpendicular electron cyclotron resonance heating in the KSTAR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. H.; Lee, S. G.; Seol, J.; Aydemir, A. Y.; Bae, C.; Yoo, J. W.; Na, Y. S.; Kim, H. S.; Woo, M. H.; Kim, J.; Joung, M.; You, K. I.; Park, B. H.

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports on experimental evidence that shows perpendicular electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) can trigger classical tearing modes when deposited near a rational flux surface. The complex evolution of an m = 2 island is followed during current ramp-up in KSTAR plasmas, from its initial onset as the rational surface enters the ECRH resonance layer to its eventual lock on the wall after the rational surface leaves the layer. Stability analysis coupled to a transport calculation of the current profile with ECRH shows that the perpendicular ECRH may play a significant role in triggering and destabilizing classical m = 2 tearing modes, in agreement with our experimental observation.

  10. Design analysis of supplemental heating systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The first objective of the study was to formulate an R and D plan for tokamak supplemental heating based upon an evaluation and the potential of each heating technique. The second objective was to develop conceptual designs for reactor level heating systems. The two techniques selected for the second studies were icrh and negative beams

  11. Kalman Filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Kexin; Chen, Bingyao; Wei, Xing; Yang, Jiafei; Wang, Shi; Ying, Kui

    2017-01-01

    To develop a self-adaptive and fast thermometry method by combining the original hybrid magnetic resonance thermometry method and the bio heat transfer equation (BHTE) model. The proposed Kalman filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry, abbreviated as KalBHT hybrid method, introduced the BHTE model to synthesize a window on the regularization term of the hybrid algorithm, which leads to a self-adaptive regularization both spatially and temporally with change of temperature. Further, to decrease the sensitivity to accuracy of the BHTE model, Kalman filter is utilized to update the window at each iteration time. To investigate the effect of the proposed model, computer heating simulation, phantom microwave heating experiment and dynamic in-vivo model validation of liver and thoracic tumor were conducted in this study. The heating simulation indicates that the KalBHT hybrid algorithm achieves more accurate results without adjusting λ to a proper value in comparison to the hybrid algorithm. The results of the phantom heating experiment illustrate that the proposed model is able to follow temperature changes in the presence of motion and the temperature estimated also shows less noise in the background and surrounding the hot spot. The dynamic in-vivo model validation with heating simulation demonstrates that the proposed model has a higher convergence rate, more robustness to susceptibility problem surrounding the hot spot and more accuracy of temperature estimation. In the healthy liver experiment with heating simulation, the RMSE of the hot spot of the proposed model is reduced to about 50% compared to the RMSE of the original hybrid model and the convergence time becomes only about one fifth of the hybrid model. The proposed model is able to improve the accuracy of the original hybrid algorithm and accelerate the convergence rate of MR temperature estimation.

  12. Real time plasma control experiments using the JET auxiliary plasma heating systems as the actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zornig, N.H.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the Real Time Power Control system (RTPC) in the Joint European Torus (JET) is described in depth. The modes of operation are discussed in detail and a number of successful experiments are described. These experiments prove that RTPC can be used for a wide range of experiments, including: (1) Feedback control of plasma parameters in real time using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) or Neutral Beam Heating (NBH) as the actuator in various JET operating regimes. It is demonstrated that in a multi-parameter space it is not sufficient to control one global plasma parameter in order to avoid performance limiting events. (2) Restricting neutron production and subsequent machine activation resulting from high performance pulses. (3) The simulation of α-particle heating effects in a DT-plasma in a D-only plasma. The heating properties of α-particles are simulated using ICRH-power, which is adjusted in real time. The simulation of α-particle heating in JET allows the effects of a change in isotopic mass to be separated from α-particle heating. However, the change in isotopic mass of the plasma ions appears to affect not only the global energy confinement time (τ E ) but also other parameters such as the electron temperature at the plasma edge. This also affects τ E , making it difficult to make a conclusive statement about any isotopic effect. (4) For future JET experiments a scheme has been designed which simulates the behaviour of a fusion reactor experimentally. The design parameters of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are used. In the proposed scheme the most relevant dimensionless plasma parameters are similar in JET and ITER. It is also shown how the amount of heating may be simulated in real time by RTPC using the electron temperature and density as input parameters. The results of two demonstration experiments are presented. (author)

  13. Optimization of the dynamic and thermal performance of a resonant micro heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardaweel, H K; Richards, R F; Richards, C D; Anderson, M J

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a flexing membrane micro heat engine is presented. The micro heat engine consists of a cavity filled with a saturated, two-phase working fluid bounded on the top by a flexible expander membrane and on the bottom by a stiff evaporator membrane. A lumped parameter model is developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the micro heat engine. First, the model is validated against experimental data. Then, the model is used to investigate the effect of the duration of the heat addition process, the mass of the expander membrane and the thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity on the dynamic behavior of the micro engine. The results show the optimal duration for the heat addition process to be less than 10% of the engine cycle period. Increasing the mass of the flexible expander membrane is shown to reduce the resonant frequency of the engine to 130 Hz. Operating the engine at resonance leads to increased power output. The thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity is shown to have a strong effect on engine performance

  14. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities

  15. High-power ion-cyclotron-resonance heating in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    1983-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, on the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. Heating of both ions and electrons has been observed. Typically, a two component ion energy distribution is produced (300 eV and 50 eV) with the application of 500 kW of rf power into a 5 x 10 12 cm -3 density plasma. Power is coupled to the plasma with an antenna that also serves as the inductor of an oscillator tank circuit. The oscillator is tunable from 1 to 3 MHz and can be applied for periods up to 10 msec. The experiments were performed with hydrogen, gun injected plasmas

  16. Hollow density profile on electron cyclotron resonance heating JFT-2M plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ogawa, Toshihide; Kawakami, Tomohide; Shiina, Tomio; Ishige, Youichi

    1998-01-01

    The first hollow electron density profile in the central region on the JAERI Fusion Torus-2M (JFT-2M) is measured during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with a TV Thomson scattering system (TVTS). The peripheral region is not hollow but is accumulated due to pump-out from the central region. The hollowness increases with time but is saturated at ∼40 ms and maintains a constant hollow ratio. The hollowness is strongly related to the steep temperature gradient of the heated zone. (author)

  17. Electron spin resonance and its application to heat treated carbonaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, Francisco Guilherme

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the basic characteristics of the electron spin resonance technique, also called paramagnetic resonance, being discussed its application to heat treated carbonaceous materials. In the low heat treatment temperature (HTT) range (below 700 deg C) the organic free radical are the predominant unpaired spin center, which play a key role in the process of carbonization and meso phase formation. At higher temperatures, it is possible to make correlations between the low H T T range and the high HTT range (above 130 deg C), where the predominant unpaired spin center are the free charge carriers (free electrons) of the graphite like crystallites of the material, which are formed by the carbonization process. (author)

  18. Study on VCSEL laser heating chip in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Binquan; Wu, Wenfeng; Jia, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, atomic gyroscope has become an important direction of inertial navigation. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope has a stronger advantage in the miniaturization of the size. In atomic gyroscope, the lasers are indispensable devices which has an important effect on the improvement of the gyroscope performance. The frequency stability of the VCSEL lasers requires high precision control of temperature. However, the heating current of the laser will definitely bring in the magnetic field, and the sensitive device, alkali vapor cell, is very sensitive to the magnetic field, so that the metal pattern of the heating chip should be designed ingeniously to eliminate the magnetic field introduced by the heating current. In this paper, a heating chip was fabricated by MEMS process, i.e. depositing platinum on semiconductor substrates. Platinum has long been considered as a good resistance material used for measuring temperature The VCSEL laser chip is fixed in the center of the heating chip. The thermometer resistor measures the temperature of the heating chip, which can be considered as the same temperature of the VCSEL laser chip, by turning the temperature signal into voltage signal. The FPGA chip is used as a micro controller, and combined with PID control algorithm constitute a closed loop control circuit. The voltage applied to the heating resistor wire is modified to achieve the temperature control of the VCSEL laser. In this way, the laser frequency can be controlled stably and easily. Ultimately, the temperature stability can be achieved better than 100mK.

  19. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  20. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost......, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (He-3)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar...... rotation profiles are seen when heating at the second harmonic cyclotron frequency of He-3 and with mode conversion at high concentrations of He-3. The magnitude of the counter-rotation is found to decrease with an increasing plasma current. The correlation of the rotation with the electron temperature...

  1. Computer simulations of upper-hybrid and electron cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.C.

    1983-01-01

    A 2 1/2 -dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code is used to investigate the dynamic behavior of electron heating around the electron cyclotron and upper-hybrid layers when an extraordinary wave is obliquely launched from the high-field side into a magnetized plasma. With a large angle of incidence most of the radiation wave energy converts into electrostatic electron Bernstein waves at the upper-hybrid layer. These mode-converted waves propagate back to the cyclotron layer and deposit their energy in the electrons through resonant interactions dominated first by the Doppler broadening and later by the relativistic mass correction. The line shape for both mechanisms has been observed in the simulations. At a later stage, the relativistic resonance effects shift the peak of the temperature profile to the high-field side. The heating ultimately causes the extraordinary wave to be substantially absorbed by the high-energy electrons. The steep temperature gradient created by the electron cyclotron heating eventually reflects a substantial part of the incident wave energy. The diamagnetic effects due to the gradient of the mode-converted Bernstein wave pressure enhance the spreading of the electron heating from the original electron cyclotron layer

  2. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  3. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  4. Detailing Radio Frequency Heating Induced by Coronary Stents: A 7.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Davide; Winter, Lukas; Müller, Alexander; Vogt, Julia; Renz, Wolfgang; Özerdem, Celal; Grässl, Andreas; Tkachenko, Valeriy; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF) simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR) limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study. PMID:23185498

  5. Detailing radio frequency heating induced by coronary stents: a 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Santoro

    Full Text Available The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study.

  6. First plasma experiments in Tore Supra with a new generation of high heat flux limiters for RF antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarici, G.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Bucalossi, J.; Colas, L.; Durocher, A.; Gargiulo, L.; Ladurelle, L.; Lombard, G.; Martin, G.; Mollard, P.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1997 and 1998 Tore Supra shutdown, a first set of new antenna guard limiters was installed on one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas of Tore Supra. This limiter, which was one of the main technological studies of the 1998 campaign, was widely experimented in real plasma conditions, thus allowing the validation in situ, for the first time, of the technology of active metal casting (AMC) for plasma facing components. The huge improvement in the thermal response of the new limiter generation, compared to the old one, is shown on plasma pulses made identical in terms of antenna position and injected RF power profile. By using the infrared cameras installed inside Tore Supra and viewing the antennas front, the power density fluxes received by the carbon fibre composite (CFC) surface of the limiter were evaluated by correlation with the heat load tests made on the electrons beam facility of CEA/Framatome

  7. Laser heating of large noble gas clusters: from the resonant to the relativistic interaction regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumbrell, E T; Moore, A S; Clark, E L; Garbett, W J; Comley, A J; Edwards, R D; Eagleton, R E [Plasma Physics Division, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Lazarus, J A; Nilson, P M; Robinson, J S; Hohenberger, M; Symes, D R; Smith, R A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clarke, R J [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: edward.gumbrell@awe.co.uk, E-mail: r.a.smith@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-12-15

    Wide-ranging measurements of sub-picosecond laser interactions with large noble gas cluster targets have been conducted in order to help clarify the nature and extent of the underlying laser-plasma heating. Within the sub-relativistic vacuum irradiance range of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}, we find that electron temperatures measured with continuum x-ray spectroscopy exhibit a pronounced multi-keV enhancement. Analysis indicates this behaviour to be consistent with collisional or collisionless resonant heating mechanisms. We also present the first measurements of laser-to-cluster energy deposition at relativistic vacuum irradiances, our data demonstrating absorption fractions of 90% or more. Optical probing was used to resolve the onset of a supersonic ionization front resulting from this very high absorption, and shows that despite significant pre-focus heating, the greatest plasma energy densities can be generated about the vacuum focus position. Electron energy spectra measurements confirm that laser-plasma super-heating occurs, and together with ion data establish that relativistic laser-plasma coupling in atomic clusters can take place without significant MeV particle beam production. In conjunction with optical self-emission data, the optical probing also indicates laser pre-pulse effects at peak vacuum irradiance of 5 x 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}. Laser absorption, plasma heating and energy transport data are supported throughout with analytical and numerical modelling.

  8. Measurement of specific heat and specific absorption rate by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gultekin, David H., E-mail: david.gultekin@aya.yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Gore, John C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    We evaluate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method of calorimetry for the measurement of specific heat (c{sub p}) and specific absorption rate (SAR) in liquids. The feasibility of NMR calorimetry is demonstrated by experimental measurements of water, ethylene glycol and glycerol using any of three different NMR parameters (chemical shift, spin-spin relaxation rate and equilibrium nuclear magnetization). The method involves heating the sample using a continuous wave laser beam and measuring the temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter by non-invasive means. The temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter as a function of thermal power yields the ratio of the heat capacity to the respective nuclear thermal coefficient, from which the specific heat can be determined for the substance. The specific absorption rate is obtained by subjecting the liquid to heating by two types of radiation, radiofrequency (RF) and near-infrared (NIR), and by measuring the change in the nuclear spin phase shift by a gradient echo imaging sequence. These studies suggest NMR may be a useful tool for measurements of the thermal properties of liquids.

  9. Ion heating at the cyclotron resonance in plasmas magnetically confined in a toroidal octupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures as high as 600 eV have been produced using rf wave heating at the ion cyclotron resonance frequency in a toroidal octupole magnetic field. Rf is coupled to the plasma with an externally driven ''fifth'' hoop which forms the inductive leg of an oscillator tank circuit. Power levels up to 1 MW at 1 to 3 MHz have been applied for periods up to 2 msec. Plasmas produced either by ECRH or by gun injection are simulated with a computer program in which known particle and energy production and loss mechanisms are used to predict the spatially averaged time behaviour of the plasma in the presence of the applied ion heating. The program can be used to calculate the consequences of the heating model in the presence of many cooling mechanisms which may each have a separate dependence on instantaneous plasma parameters. Experimental quantities compared to computer predictions include density, ion temperature, and loading of the hoop by the plasma, both resistive and reactive, and neutral reflux from the wall by electron and ion impact. Wave penetration to the resonance zone is good up to the highest densities available (6 x 10 12 cm -3 by gun injection) in good agreement with theory. Neutral reflux from the walls and the large charge exchange cooling which results is the dominant loss mechanism at the higher hoop voltages

  10. Tearing modes induced by perpendicular electron cyclotron resonance heating in the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Lee, S.G.; Seol, J.; Aydemir, A.Y.; Bae, C.; Woo, M.H.; Kim, J.; Joung, M.; You, K.I.; Park, B.H.; Yoo, J.W.; Na, Y.S.; Kim, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental evidence that shows perpendicular electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) can trigger classical tearing modes when deposited near a rational flux surface. The complex evolution of an m = 2 island is followed during current ramp-up in KSTAR plasmas, from its initial onset as the rational surface enters the ECRH resonance layer to its eventual lock on the wall after the rational surface leaves the layer. Stability analysis coupled to a transport calculation of the current profile with ECRH shows that the perpendicular ECRH may play a significant role in triggering and destabilizing classical m = 2 tearing modes, in agreement with our experimental observation. (paper)

  11. Fast wave heating of two-ion plasmas in the Princeton large torus through minority cyclotron resonance damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Colestock, P.

    1979-07-01

    Strong minority proton heating is produced in PLT through ion cyclotron resonance damping of fast waves at moderate rf power levels. In addition to demonstrating good proton confinement, the proton energy distribution is consistent with Fokker--Planck theory which provides the prescription for extrapolation of this heating regime to higher rf power levels

  12. Enhancement of ohmic and stochastic heating by resonance effects in capacitive radio frequency discharges: a theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussenbrock, T; Brinkmann, R P; Lieberman, M A; Lichtenberg, A J; Kawamura, E

    2008-08-22

    In low-pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges, two mechanisms of electron heating are dominant: (i) Ohmic heating due to collisions of electrons with neutrals of the background gas and (ii) stochastic heating due to momentum transfer from the oscillating boundary sheath. In this work we show by means of a nonlinear global model that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance which arises in asymmetric capacitive discharges due to nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath significantly affects both Ohmic heating and stochastic heating. We observe that the series resonance effect increases the dissipation by factors of 2-5. We conclude that the nonlinear plasma dynamics should be taken into account in order to describe quantitatively correct electron heating in asymmetric capacitive radio frequency discharges.

  13. Circular waveguide systems for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive use of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) requires continuous development of components to improve efficiency, increase reliability, and deliver power to new locations with respect to the plasma. We have used rectangular waveguide components on the experiment and have developed, tested, and installed circular waveguide components. We replaced the rectangular with the circular components because of the greater transmission efficiency and power-handling capability of the circular ones. Design, fabrication, and testing of all components are complete for all systems. In this paper we describe the design criteria for the system

  14. Latest Results on 2-FGHP Tetrode To Fulfill ITER ICRH Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The requirements for the RF generation of ITER ICRH include several parameters that are not compatible for a tetrode to fulfill. High power, from 1.7 to 2.5 MW according to the ICRH design options, have to combined with, both, a cw operation (more than 1000 seconds of continuous running time) and a high VSWR (higher than 1:2.0), over the required frequency range of 40 to 56 MHz. The proposed paper will overview the existing tetrodes on the market used in similar type of operations, i.e. in fusion applications. This analysis shows clearly the limitations of the conventional tetrode technology that can only fulfill some of the ICRH requirements, but not all together. The first part of the paper will describe the latest results on conventional tetrodes, after years of operation at TORE SUPRA and JET, for which tetrodes such as TH 525 and TH 526 are used. The results clearly indicate that tetrodes are well suited for Fusion applications but not with the combination of parameters necessary for ITER ICRH. The second part will describe the extended performance tetrodes, based on a Double Folded Grid High Performance (2-FGHP) tetrode technology, used for scientific and TV broadcast applications for years. This 2-FGHP concept extends drastically the performance of tetrodes, either in terms of frequency, or power or pulse duration, allowing such tetrodes to be used in ITER. The third part shows results of operation in these scientific and broadcast areas of 2-FGHP tetrodes in order to demonstrate the advantages of this technology over conventional tetrodes. Real operation data allow to give performance together with duration of operation in full service, on a 24 hour per day basis. Finally the last part will be dedicated to present the latest results obtained in a Fusion type tests at Thales Electron Devices in 2006 of a 2-FGHP tetrode. These results show the possibilities of this technology to fulfill ITER ICRH requirements and its capabilities to allow some evolutions of

  15. Arc Security System Based on Harmonics Detection for the TS ICRH Transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-by, G.; Beaumont, B.; Lombard, G.; Millon, L.; Mollard, P.; Volpe, D.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1999 and with the help of I.P.P. (Institut fuer Plasmaphysik) Garching, we have tested in the Tore Supra (T.S.) ICRH transmitter, arcs security systems based on harmonics detection in a frequency band lower than the generator frequency. These systems have been designed for ASDEX in order to discriminate between the arcs and the ELMS mismatches during H-mode plasmas; they have been supplied to T.S. by a loan contract by I.P.P. The first tests done in T.S. were very successful and have permitted in 2000 to build a prototype matching T.S. technical requirements. These systems have some advantages in comparison with traditional securities which are based on use of a level on the V r /V f (Reflected to Forward voltage ratio) calculation . They do not use calculation, calibration with frequency or level. They can use RF signals from directional couplers or probes, so they are fully independent of the measurement systems. The detection bandwidth (4 MHz-35 MHz on TS) is independent of the antennae working frequencies. The detection principle is therefore insensitive to the crosstalk between the antennae and to the antennae coupling variations. The RF arc security box is installed in the generator hall which can be located far from the torus hall and the antennae (about 50 m on T.S.) a feature which is very relevant for the ITER transmitters. In 2001 we have built 3 systems based on our prototype in order to improve the protection of the 3 ICRH generators and antennae. These systems use industrial pass-band filters and a very sensitive linear detection (- 60 dBm) in order to facilitate the adjustment. Optical fibbers are used to transfer, with a very high immunity, the trip information to the generator electronic pilot. To guarantee safe operation, a checking test of the entire security chain is performed with a 10 MHz RF oscillator before each plasma start. The RF principle used on T.S. ICRH transmitter and its electronic interactions with the VME command control of

  16. Third harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating on TCV using top launch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porte, L.; Alberti, S.; Arnoux, G.; Martin, Y.; Hogge, J.P.; Goodman, T.P.; Henderson, M.A.; Nelson-Melby, E.; Pochelon, A.; Tran, M.Q.

    2003-01-01

    A third harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating system (X3) has been installed, commissioned and brought into service on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV). It comprises three 118 GHz, 0.5 MW gyrotrons designed to produce pulses up to 2 seconds long. In the present configuration, 1.0MW is launched vertically from the top of the vessel into the plasma and the remaining 0.5MW is launched horizontally from the low field side. X3 has been used to heat plasmas at density exceeding the 2 nd harmonic cut-off significantly extending the operational space of additionally heated TCV plasmas. Studies have been performed to determine the optimal plasma/launcher configuration for X3 absorption for various plasma conditions and to find methods for real time feedback control of the X3 launcher. First experiments have been performed aimed at heating H-mode plasmas on TCV. First results show that the ELMs in TCV ohmic H-mode plasmas exhibit all characteristics of Type III ELMs. If, at moderate X3 power ( 0.45MW) the Type III ELMs disappear and the H-mode discharge exhibits different MHD phenomena eventually disrupting. (author)

  17. Comparison between off-resonance and electron Bernstein waves heating regime in a microwave discharge ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G.; Di Giugno, R.; Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Lanaia, D.; Ciavola, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F. [Universita di Messina, Ctr. da Papardo-Sperone, 98100 Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); IET-Institute of Energy Technology, LEC-Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    A microwave discharge ion source (MDIS) operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania has been used to compare the traditional electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating with an innovative mechanisms of plasma ignition based on the electrostatic Bernstein waves (EBW). EBW are obtained via the inner plasma electromagnetic-to-electrostatic wave conversion and they are absorbed by the plasma at cyclotron resonance harmonics. The heating of plasma by means of EBW at particular frequencies enabled us to reach densities much larger than the cutoff ones. Evidences of EBW generation and absorption together with X-ray emissions due to high energy electrons will be shown. A characterization of the discharge heating process in MDISs as a generalization of the ECR heating mechanism by means of ray tracing will be shown in order to highlight the fundamental physical differences between ECR and EBW heating.

  18. Second harmonic ion cylotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave on the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave, and the propagation of the fast wave from the fundamental of the ion cyclotron frequency to its second harmonic was investigated in a hydrogen plasma on the PLT tokamak. The theory of fast magnetosonic wave propagation was extended to include the effects of density gradients, plasma current, and impurity ion species. The damping of the fast wave at the second harmonic is calculated, where the theory has been extended to include the full radial dependence of the fast wave fields. Power deposition profiles and eigenmode Q's are calculated using this theory. The effects of the interaction between the ion Bernstein wave and the fast magnetosonic wave are calculated, and enhanced fast wave damping is predicted. The antenna loading is calculated including the effects of overlap of the fast wave eigenmodes. During the second harmonic heating experiments, the antenna loading was characterized as a function of the plasma parameters, and efficient coupling of the RF power to the plasma at high density was observed. At very low densities, fast wave eigenmodes were identified on PLT, and their Q's are measured. Eigenmodes with different toroidal directions of propagation were observed to exhibit large splitting in density due to the plasma current. Efficient bulk heating, with centrally peaked profiles, is observed at the second harmonic, and a tail, which decreases monotonically with energy, is observed on the ion distribution

  19. Pulse Mask Controlled HFAC Resonant Converter for high efficiency Industrial Induction Heating with less harmonic distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Booma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about the fixed frequency pulse mask control based high frequency AC conversion circuit for industrial induction heating applications. Conventionally, for induction heating load, the output power control is achieved using the pulse with modulation based converters. The conventional converters do not guarantee the zero voltage switching condition required for the minimization of the switching losses. In this paper, pulse mask control scheme for the power control of induction heating load is proposed. This power control strategy allows the inverter to operate closer to the resonant frequency, to obtain zero voltage switching condition. The proposed high frequency AC power conversion circuit has lesser total harmonic distortion in the supply side. Modeling of the IH load, design of conversion circuit and principle of the control scheme and its implementation using low cost PIC controller are briefly discussed. Simulation results obtained using the Matlab environment are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the pulse mask scheme. The obtained results indicate the reduction in losses, improvement in the output power and lesser harmonic distortion in the supply side by the proposed converter. The hardware results are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  20. Resonant dissociation in N2 by electron impact: a source of heating in the thermosphere and auroras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.; Burrow, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    An electron impact resonant dissociation process, leading to superthermal atom production in molecular nitrogen is described. The maximum cross section for this process is found to be 2.5 x 10 -18 cm 2 at 10 eV. Measurements of scattered electrons indicate a value of -65 to -90 MeV for the electron affinity of N. The possible role of resonant dissociation as a source of heating in the thermosphere and in auroras is discussed

  1. ICRH antenna S-matrix measurements and plasma coupling characterisation at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhov, I.; Jacquet, P.; Blackman, T.; Bobkov, V.; Dumortier, P.; Helou, W.; Lerche, E.; Kirov, K.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Noble, C.; Contributors, JET

    2018-04-01

    The paper is dedicated to the characterisation of multi-strap ICRH antenna coupling to plasma. Relevance of traditional concept of coupling resistance to antennas with mutually coupled straps is revised and the importance of antenna port excitation consistency for application of the concept is highlighted. A method of antenna S-matrix measurement in presence of plasma is discussed allowing deeper insight into the problem of antenna-plasma coupling. The method is based entirely on the RF plant hardware and control facilities available at JET and it involves application of variable phasing between the antenna straps during the RF plant operations at  >100 kW. Unlike traditional techniques relying on low-power (~10 mW) network analysers, the applied antenna voltage amplitudes are relevant to practical conditions of ICRH operations; crucially, they are high enough to minimise possible effects of antenna loading non-linearity due to the RF sheath effects and other phenomena which could affect low-power measurements. The method has been successfully applied at JET to conventional 4-port ICRH antennas energised at frequencies of 33 MHz, 42 MHz and 51 MHz during L-mode plasma discharges while different gas injection modules (GIMs) were used to maintain comparable plasma densities during the pulses. The S-matrix assessment and its subsequent processing yielding ‘global’ antenna coupling resistances in conditions of equalised port maximum voltages allowed consistent description of antenna coupling to plasma at different strap phasing, operational frequencies and applied GIMs. Comprehensive experimental characterisation of mutually coupled antenna straps in presence of plasma also provided a unique opportunity for in-depth verification of TOPICA computer simulations.

  2. Electron cyclotron resonance heating on the W VII A-stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.; Erckmann, V.; Janzen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma build-up and heating of OH-current free plasmas by ECR-wave irradiation were investigated on the WENDELSTEIN VII-A stellarator using three kinds of wave launching: direct irradiation of the gyrotron modes from the low field side, or advanced wave launching in 0-mode polarization from the low field side, the nonabsorbed fraction being reflected back to the plasma from the high field side in X-mode polarization. An increase of the central electron temperature from 0.7 keV (TE 02 mode) to 1.2 keV (TE 11 , HE 11 mode) was observed which is explained by the narrow and well centred power deposition profiles for TE 11 , HE 11 modes. However, there is only a slight increase of the heating efficiency from 40% to 50%. The reflected X-mode fraction does not contribute to bulk plasma heating via Bernstein wave conversion and absorption as expected. The reason seems to be local absorption of the arising electron Bernstein waves due to a macroscopically turbulent structure around the upper hybrid resonance layer. Correlated with X-mode irradiation direct ion heating was observed (500 eV ion tail), possibly due to low frequency decay waves. In all ECRH experiments a toroidal plasma current was generated due to asymmetrically confined fast electrons. Optimum confinement in the shearless l=2 configuration was achieved at most irrational values of the rotational transform with small toroidal net current. It can be concluded from a numerical 1D-transport analysis that neoclassical electron confinement seems to be dominant in the hot central plasma core

  3. On ion-cyclotron-resonance heating of the corona and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concisely summarizes and critically reviews recent work by the authors on models of the heating of the solar corona by resonance of ions with high-frequency waves (up to the proton cyclotron frequency. The quasi-linear theory of pitch angle diffusion is presented in connection with relevant solar wind proton observations. Hybrid fluid-kinetic model equations, which include wave-particle interactions and collisions, are derived. Numerical solutions are discussed, representative of the inner corona and near-Sun solar wind. A semi-kinetic model for reduced velocity distributions is presented, yielding kinetic results for heavy ions in the solar corona. It is concluded that a self-consistent treatment of particle distributions and wave spectra is required, in order to adequately describe coronal physics and to obtain agreement with observations.

  4. Plasma heating in multiple-resonance excitation of a plasma in a mirror machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A; Siambis, J G [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1976-06-01

    By applying 1 kW of microwave power at 2.45 GHz and 1 kW of r.f. power in the frequency range of 4-25 MHz at one end of a mirror machine, where neutral hydrogen gas is injected in a pulsed mode, a plasma density of 2 x 10/sup 11/cm/sup -3/ with an electron temperature of 60 eV and ion temperature of 40 eV is generated. The ion heating mechanism, is, principally, collisional thermalization of the applied r.f. power, via coupling to and excitation of the low frequency resonances of the plasma column, in agreement with the theoretical prediction for the case of high total effective collision frequency for momentum transfer for the electrons.

  5. Operational upgrades to the DIII-D 60 GHz electron cyclotron resonant heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, T.E.; Cary, W.P.

    1993-10-01

    One of the primary components of the DIII-D radio frequency (rf) program over the past seven years has been the 60 GHz electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) system. The system now consists of eight units capable of operating and controlling eight Varian VGE-8006 60 GHz, 200 kW gyrotrons along with their associated waveguide components. This paper will discuss the operational upgrades and the overall system performance. Many modifications were instituted to enhance the system operation and performance. Modifications discussed in this paper include an improved gyrotron tube-fault response network, a computer controlled pulse-timing and sequencing system, and an improved high-voltage power supply control interface. The discussion on overall system performance will include operating techniques used to improve system operations and reliability. The techniques discussed apply to system start-up procedures, operating the system in a conditioning mode, and operating the system during DIII-D plasma operations

  6. Simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with electron cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the deposited power and deposited position of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) on Peeling-Ballooning (P-B) modes are simulated using BOUT++ code in this paper. The simulation results show that as the deposited position moves from the top to the bottom of the pedestal, the edge localized mode (ELM) size decreases first and then increases, finally decreases again. For ECRH with different deposited power, the effects on P-B modes are similar if they have the same peak value of the power deposition profile. These results show that the effects of ECRH on P-B modes are primarily determined by the change in pressure profile caused by ECRH. As long as ECRH can lead to large enough change in pressure profile, ECRH can efficiently affect the dynamics of P-B modes.

  7. Simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The effects of the deposited power and deposited position of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) on Peeling-Ballooning (P-B) modes are simulated using BOUT++ code in this paper. The simulation results show that as the deposited position moves from the top to the bottom of the pedestal, the edge localized mode (ELM) size decreases first and then increases, finally decreases again. For ECRH with different deposited power, the effects on P-B modes are similar if they have the same peak value of the power deposition profile. These results show that the effects of ECRH on P-B modes are primarily determined by the change in pressure profile caused by ECRH. As long as ECRH can lead to large enough change in pressure profile, ECRH can efficiently affect the dynamics of P-B modes.

  8. Electron cyclotron emission measurements during 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating in Wendelstein WVII-A stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfuss, H.J.; Gasparino, U.; Tutter, M.; Brakel, R.; Cattanei, G.; Dorst, D.; Elsner, A.; Engelhardt, K.; Erckmann, V.; Grieger, G.; Grigull, P.; Hacker, H.; Jaeckel, H.; Jaenicke, R.; Junker, J.; Kick, M.; Kroiss, H.; Kuehner, G.; Maassberg, H.; Mahn, C.; Mueller, G.; Ohlendorf, W.; Rau, F.; Renner, H.; Ringler, H.; Sardei, F.; Weller, A.; Wobig, H.; Wuersching, E.; Zippe, M.; Kasparek, W.; Mueller, G.A.; Raeuchle, E.; Schueller, P.G.; Schwoerer, K.; Thumm, M.

    1987-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission measurements have been carried out on electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas in the WENDELSTEIN VII-A Stellarator. Blackbody radiation from the thermalized plasma main body as well as radiation from a small amount of weakly relativistic suprathermal electrons has been detected. In addition sideband emission has been observed near the second harmonic of the heating line source. Harmonic generation and parametric wave decay at the upper hybrid layer may be a reasonable explanation. (orig.)

  9. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Inagaki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  10. Stochastic heating in the cyclotron resonance of electrons; Calentamiento estocastico en la resonancia ciclotronica de los electrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Hernandez A, O. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The study of the different schemes of plasma heating by radiofrequency waves is a very actual problem related with the plasma heating in different machines and the particle acceleration mechanisms. In this work, it is obtained the expression for the temporal evolution of the energy absorbed in the cyclotron resonance of electrons where it is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. It is obtained the stochastic criteria in a magnetic configuration of an Ecr type plasma source. (Author)

  11. Reconstruction of high temporal resolution Thomson scattering data during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating using conditional averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T., E-mail: kobayashi.tatsuya@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Yoshinuma, M.; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Moon, C.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Yasuhara, R.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Tsujimura, T. I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Inagaki, S. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a software application of the sampling scope concept for fusion research. The time evolution of Thomson scattering data is reconstructed with a high temporal resolution during a modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) phase. The amplitude profile and the delay time profile of the heat pulse propagation are obtained from the reconstructed signal for discharges having on-axis and off-axis MECH depositions. The results are found to be consistent with the MECH deposition.

  12. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterbeek, J.W.; Bürger, A.; Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) bea...

  13. New operational spaces for the electron cyclotron resonance heating at ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehnle, Hendrik Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, new electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) scenarios were developed for an extension of the operational space at the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade in view of ITER compatibility. In the last years, the first wall material at ASDEX Upgrade was changed from graphite to tungsten, and the ECRH is needed to control the tungsten concentration in the plasma core. But, in ITER-like plasma discharges at ASDEX Upgrade, the usage of the ECRH in the typically used second harmonic extraordinary polarised mode (X2 mode) is limited. In these ITER-scenarios a small safety factor should be achieved, which implements an increase of the plasma current at ASDEX Upgrade. A higher plasma current and a high confinement lead to a raised density and for the ITER scenario to an electron density above the cutoff of the X2 mode at ASDEX Upgrade. Therefore, the X2 mode is reflected at the cutoff layer and cannot be used for central heating and the control of the tungsten concentration. One possibility to overcome this problem is to apply the third harmonic mode at reduced magnetic field. Here the cutoff is increased by 33% due to the dependence on the magnetic field. However, at the reachable plasma parameters at the reduced field the absorption of the X3 mode is incomplete (60-70 %) and the shine-trough power can destroy microwave sensitive components in ASDEX Upgrade. To solve this problem the magnetic field has to be optimized. A slightly increased magnetic field from 1.7 T to 1.8 T moves the second harmonic resonance in the region of confined plasma with high temperatures and density, so that this resonance can act as beam dump. The deposition in the plasma core is still central enough for the tungsten control ability of the ECRH. The benefit of the beam dump was verified in experiments with two different magnetic fields (1.7 T and 1.8 T). In case of the higher magnetic field, the stray radiation was reduced; simultaneously the electron temperature was increased. In addition

  14. Coronal heating by the resonant absorption of Alfven waves - Importance of the global mode and scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinolfson, Richard S.; Davila, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the MHD equations for a fully compressible, low-beta, resistive plasma are used to study the resonance absorption process for the heating of coronal active region loops. Comparisons with more approximate analytic models show that the major predictions of the analytic theories are, to a large extent, confirmed by the numerical computations. The simulations demonstrate that the dissipation occurs primarily in a thin resonance layer. Some of the analytically predicted features verified by the simulations are (a) the position of the resonance layer within the initial inhomogeneity; (b) the importance of the global mode for a large range of loop densities; (c) the dependence of the resonance layer thickness and the steady-state heating rate on the dissipation coefficient; and (d) the time required for the resonance layer to form. In contrast with some previous analytic and simulation results, the time for the loop to reach a steady state is found to be the phase-mixing time rather than a dissipation time. This disagreement is shown to result from neglect of the existence of the global mode in some of the earlier analyses. The resonant absorption process is also shown to behave similar to a classical driven harmonic oscillator.

  15. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  16. Plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.

    1989-01-01

    Successful plasma heating is essential in present fusion experiments, for the demonstration of DpT burn in future devices and finally for the fusion reactor itself. This paper discusses the common heating systems with respect to their present performance and their applicability to future fusion devices. The comparative discussion is oriented to the various function of heating, which are: - plasma heating to fusion-relevant parameters and to ignition in future machines, -non-inductive, steady-pstate current drive, - plasma profile control, -neutral gas breakdown and plasma build-up. In view of these different functions, the potential of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the various schemes of wave heating (ECRH, LH, ICRH and Alven wave heating) is analyzed in more detail. The analysis includes assessments of the present physical and technical state of these heating methods, and makes suggestions for future developments and about outstanding problems. Specific attention is given to the still critical problem of efficient current drive, especially with respect to further extrapolation towards an economically operating tokamak reactor. Remarks on issues such as reliability, maintenance and economy conclude this comparative overview on plasma heating systems. (author). 43 refs.; 13 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. ICRF hydrogen minority heating in the boronized ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Braun, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Steuer, K.H.; Wesner, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the divertor of ASDEX has been modified (1986-87) the hydrogen concentration in deuterium plasmas could not be reduced below 10%, although the machine was operated for long periods of time with deuterium injection. This is probably due to desorption in the divertor as indicated by the increasing H-concentration during a deuterium injection pulse. As a consequence for H-minority heating in deuterium, the maximum power into ohmic plasmas without causing a disruption was limited to few hundred kW. A partial solution was ICRH in combination with deuterium injection which allowed us to apply up to 1.5 MW ICRH to the plasma. The beneficial role of the injection is attributed to an improved ICRH absorption and to the higher energy flux and temperature in the divertor. During the last ICRH campaign we operated mainly in helium plasmas for a lower hydrogen concentration and the vessel was boronised. The H-concentration is measured routinely by a mass spectrometer in the divertor chamber. This measurement does not give a fast response to eventual changes and also no absolute concentrations in the main plasma, but it gives a reliable estimate of the time evolution during one discharge or from shot to shot. The data from the mass spectrometer were often cross-checked with charge exchange measurements from the main plasma. In helium discharges the hydrogen concentration is around 2% in the ohmic phase but it increases up to 8% as ICRH is applied. Under these conditions the maximum available power (2.7 MW) could be applied to the plasma without causing a disruption. This is partly due to the low H-concentration in helium at the beginning of the ICRH pulse but also to the boronisation, as discussed in a later. (author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  18. Ray-tracing analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating in straight stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.

    1983-05-01

    A ray-tracing computer code is developed and implemented to simulate electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in stellarators. A straight stellarator model is developed to simulate the confinement geometry. Following a review of ECRH, a cold plasma model is used to define the dispersion relation. To calculate the wave power deposition, a finite temperature damping approximation is used. 3-D ray equations in cylindrical coordinates are derived and put into suitable forms for computation. The three computer codes, MAC, HERA, and GROUT, developed for this research, are described next. ECRH simulation is then carried out for three models including Heliotron E and Wendelstein VII A. Investigated aspects include launching position and mode scan, frequency detuning, helical effects, start-up, and toroidal effects. Results indicate: (1) an elliptical waveguide radiation pattern, with its long axis oriented half-way between the toroidal axis and the saddle point line, is more efficient than a circular one; and (2) mid-plane, high field side launch is favored for both O- and X-waves

  19. Response of a core coherent density oscillation on electron cyclotron resonance heating in Heliotron J plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Lu, X. X.; Kenmochi, N.; Ida, K.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Kado, S.; Kokubu, D.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Otani, Y.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2018-01-01

    We report properties of a coherent density oscillation observed in the core region and its response to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in Heliotron J plasma. The measurement was performed using a multi-channel beam emission spectroscopy system. The density oscillation is observed in a radial region between the core and the half radius. The poloidal mode number is found to be 1 (or 2). By modulating the ECH power with 100 Hz, repetition of formation and deformation of a strong electron temperature gradient, which is likely ascribed to be an electron internal transport barrier, is realized. Amplitude and rotation frequency of the coherent density oscillation sitting at the strong electron temperature gradient location are modulated by the ECH, while the poloidal mode structure remains almost unchanged. The change in the rotation velocity in the laboratory frame is derived. Assuming that the change of the rotation velocity is given by the background E × B velocity, a possible time evolution of the radial electric field was deduced.

  20. Analysis of resonant fast ion distributions during combined ICRF and NBI heating with transients using neutron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Mantsinen, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Kiptily, V. G.; Nabais, F.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    ICRF heating at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of a hydrogen minority ion species also gives rise to a partial power absorption by deuterium ions at their second harmonic resonance. This paper studies the deuterium distributions resulting from such 2nd harmonic heating at JET using neutron emission spectroscopy data from the time of flight spectrometer TOFOR. The fast deuterium distributions are obtained over the energy range 100 keV to 2 MeV. Specifically, we study how the fast deuterium distributions vary as ICRF heating is used alone as well as in combination with NBI heating. When comparing the different heating scenarios, we observed both a difference in the shapes of the distributions as well as in their absolute level. The differences are most pronounced below 0.5 MeV. Comparisons are made with corresponding distributions calculated with the code PION. We find a good agreement between the measured distributions and those calculated with PION, both in terms of their shapes as well as their amplitudes. However, we also identified a period with signs of an inverted fast ion distribution, which showed large disagreements between the modeled and measured results. Resonant interactions with tornado modes, i.e. core localized toroidal alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), are put forward as a possible explanation for the inverted distribution.

  1. INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHOI, M.; CHAN, V.S.; CHIU, S.C.; OMELCHENKO, Y.A.; SENTOKU, Y.; STJOH, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES. Existing tokamaks such as DIII-D and future experiments like ITER employ both NB injection (NBI) and ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) for auxiliary heating and current drive. The presence of energetic particles produced by NBI can result in absorption of the Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) power. ICRF can also interact with the energetic beam ions to alter the characteristics of NBI momentum deposition and resultant impact on current drive and plasma rotation. To study the synergism between NBI and ICRF, a simple physical model for the slowing-down of NB injected fast ions is implemented in a Monte-Carlo rf orbit code. This paper presents the first results. The velocity space distributions of energetic ions generated by ICRF and NBI are calculated and compared. The change in mechanical momentum of the beam and an estimate of its impact on the NB-driven current are presented and compared with ONETWO simulation results

  2. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  3. Neural basis of exertional fatigue in the heat: A review of magnetic resonance imaging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X R; Low, I C C; Stephenson, M C; Soong, T W; Lee, J K W

    2018-03-01

    The central nervous system, specifically the brain, is implicated in the development of exertional fatigue under a hot environment. Diverse neuroimaging techniques have been used to visualize the brain activity during or after exercise. Notably, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become prevalent due to its excellent spatial resolution and versatility. This review evaluates the significance and limitations of various brain MRI techniques in exercise studies-brain volumetric analysis, functional MRI, functional connectivity MRI, and arterial spin labeling. The review aims to provide a summary on the neural basis of exertional fatigue and proposes future directions for brain MRI studies. A systematic literature search was performed where a total of thirty-seven brain MRI studies associated with exercise, fatigue, or related physiological factors were reviewed. The findings suggest that with moderate dehydration, there is a decrease in total brain volume accompanied with expansion of ventricular volume. With exercise fatigue, there is increased activation of sensorimotor and cognitive brain areas, increased thalamo-insular activation and decreased interhemispheric connectivity in motor cortex. Under passive hyperthermia, there are regional changes in cerebral perfusion, a reduction in local connectivity in functional brain networks and an impairment to executive function. Current literature suggests that the brain structure and function are influenced by exercise, fatigue, and related physiological perturbations. However, there is still a dearth of knowledge and it is hoped that through understanding of MRI advantages and limitations, future studies will shed light on the central origin of exertional fatigue in the heat. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diffusive and convective transport modelling from analysis of ECRH-stimulated electron heat wave propagation. [ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    ECRH power modulation experiments in toroidal devices offer the chance to analyze the electron heat transport more conclusively: the electron heat wave propagation can be observed by ECE (or SX) leading to radial profiles of electron temperature modulation amplitude and time delay (phase shift). Taking also the stationary power balance into account, the local electron heat transport can be modelled by a combination of diffusive and convective transport terms. This method is applied to ECRH discharges in the W7-AS stellarator (B=2.5T, R=2m, a[<=]18 cm) where the ECRH power deposition is highly localized. In W7-AS, the T[sub e] modulation profiles measured by a high resolution ECE system are the basis for the local transport analysis. As experimental errors limit the separation of diffusive and convective terms in the electron heat transport for central power deposition, also ECRH power modulation experiments with off-axis deposition and inward heat wave propagation were performed (with 70 GHz o-mode as well as with 140 GHz x-mode for increased absorption). Because collisional electron-ion coupling and radiative losses are only small, low density ECRH discharges are best candidates for estimating the electron heat flux from power balance. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Tests of load resilient matching procedures for the ITER ICRH system on a mock-up and layout proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumortier, P.; Lamalle, P.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ICRH antenna of ITER consists of an array of 24 radiating straps and must radiate 20 MW with resilience to load variations due to the ELMs. Because of its compactness the mutual coupling effects between the straps are far from negligible. Moreover they considerably increase the difficulty of matching and lead to coupling between the generators. Different external matching system layouts are under consideration. A reduced scale (1/5) mock-up loaded by a movable water tank is used for their experimental investigation. A first layout using full passive power distribution among the straps and a single matching circuit with one '' Conjugate-T '' (CT) or one hybrid has already been successfully tested. Its drawbacks are the difficulty of changing the toroidal phasing and the use of a single 20 MW feeding line section. In this paper we describe the mock-up tests of a second layout based on two 10 MW CT circuits, and allowing switching between heating or current drive phasings without any hardware modification. Two decouplers are used to minimize the effect of mutual coupling on matching. A robust four-parameter CT matching procedure has been developed based on adjusting the two first parameters - the positions of the line stretchers in the CT branches - of each CT in vacuum conditions (this is done once for all for each frequency). High load resilience, i.e. a VSWR remaining < 1.5 for an 8-fold increase of antenna resistance, can be obtained for the 4 toroidal phasing configurations considered: (0π/2π3π/2), (0-π/2-π-3π/2), (00ππ) and (0ππ0). The change of phasing only requires the adjustment of the phase difference between the two power sources and of the two last parameters (stub and line stretcher in the common line) of each of the two CT circuits. These properties have first been derived from the experimental scattering matrix of the antenna array and are verified by reflection measurements on the mock-up. Feedback control of the phasing and the last two

  6. Operations of the External Conjugate-T Matching System for the A2 ICRH Antennas at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, I.; Graham, M.; Blackman, T.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nightingale, M.; Sheikh, H.; Whitehurst, A.

    2009-01-01

    The External Conjugate-T (ECT) matching system was successfully commissioned on two A2 ICRH antennas at JET in 2009. The system allows trip-free injection of RF power into ELMy H-mode plasmas in the 32-52 MHz band without antenna phasing restrictions. The ECT demonstrates robust and predictable performance and high load-tolerance during routine operations, injecting up to 4 MW average power into H-mode plasma with Type-I ELMs. The total power coupled to ELMy plasma by all the A2 antennas using the ECT and 3dB systems has been increased to 7 MW. Antenna arcing during ELMs has been identified as a new challenge to high-power ICRH operations in H-mode plasma. The implemented Advanced Wave Amplitude Comparison System (AWACS) has proven to be an efficient protection tool for the ECT scheme.

  7. Plasma heating in the TM-3 Tokamak at electron-cyclotron resonance with magnetic fields up to 25 ke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Bobrovskii, G.A.; Poznyak, V.I.; Razumova, K.A.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shmarin, A.A.

    Experiments were conducted in heating plasma at electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) with longitudinal magnetic fields up to 25 ke. It was shown by the aid of laser diagnosis that the temperature of the basic component of the electrons increases in accordance with the classical mechanism of heating at ECR in the process of electron-cyclotron heating (ECH). The distribution of the temperature of electrons with respect to radius was measured. The relationship of energetic lifetime in the Tokamak and electron temperature was obtained and the magnitude of energetic lifetime of accelerated electrons in the function of their energy was estimated. The value β/sub tau/ approximately equal to 2.2 was obtained by the aid of ECH in a regime with small discharge currents

  8. Modelling of radio frequency sheath and fast wave coupling on the realistic ion cyclotron resonant antenna surroundings and the outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Després, B.; Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E.; Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Křivská, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.

    2018-03-01

    In order to model the sheath rectification in a realistic geometry over the size of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) antennas, the self-consistent sheaths and waves for ICH (SSWICH) code couples self-consistently the RF wave propagation and the DC SOL biasing via nonlinear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions applied at plasma/wall interfaces. A first version of SSWICH had 2D (toroidal and radial) geometry, rectangular walls either normal or parallel to the confinement magnetic field B 0 and only included the evanescent slow wave (SW) excited parasitically by the ICRH antenna. The main wave for plasma heating, the fast wave (FW) plays no role on the sheath excitation in this version. A new version of the code, 2D SSWICH-full wave, was developed based on the COMSOL software, to accommodate full RF field polarization and shaped walls tilted with respect to B 0 . SSWICH-full wave simulations have shown the mode conversion of FW into SW occurring at the sharp corners where the boundary shape varies rapidly. It has also evidenced ‘far-field’ sheath oscillations appearing at the shaped walls with a relatively long magnetic connection length to the antenna, that are only accessible to the propagating FW. Joint simulation, conducted by SSWICH-full wave within a multi-2D approach excited using the 3D wave coupling code (RAPLICASOL), has recovered the double-hump poloidal structure measured in the experimental temperature and potential maps when only the SW is modelled. The FW contribution on the potential poloidal structure seems to be affected by the 3D effects, which was ignored in the current stage. Finally, SSWICH-full wave simulation revealed the left-right asymmetry that has been observed extensively in the unbalanced strap feeding experiments, suggesting that the spatial proximity effects in RF sheath excitation, studied for SW only previously, is still important in the vicinity of the wave launcher under full wave polarizations.

  9. Radial diffusion of a minority species in a tokamak due to ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacca, L.

    1993-01-01

    The author studies the transport of a minority species in a scenario where minority ions in a tokamak are heated by fast Alfven waves having a resonance layer in a tokamak. He does not assume the minority distribution function to be a Maxwellian at leading order, as transport theory generally assumes, but adopts a more realistic model where the strong anisotropy of the distribution function is accounted for. This anisotropy has been observed in experiments and is predicted by numerical calculations based on Fokker-Planck equation with quasilinear diffusion. By adopting a different ordering from that used in previous work on transport due to waves and taking moments of the kinetic equation which includes the rf driving term, he calculates the fluxes of the resonant minority species accounting for collisions of minority with bulk electrons and ion species. Finally he makes comparison of fluxes of rf-heated minority with standard neoclassical predictions (no rf source present) showing the enhancement in transport introduced by the presence of both a strongly anisotropic distribution function and an rf source

  10. ICRF hydrogen minority heating in the boronized ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Braun, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Steuer, K.H.; Wesner, F.

    1990-01-01

    Since the divertor of ASDEX has been modified (1986-87) the hydrogen concentration in deuterium plasmas could not be reduced below 10%, although the machine was operated for long periods of time with deuterium injection. This is probably due to desorption in the divertor as indicated by the increasing H-concentration during a deuterium injection pulse. As a consequence for H-minority heating in deuterium, the maximum power into ohmic plasmas without causing a disruption was limited to few hundred kW. A partial solution was ICRH in combination with deuterium injection which allowed us to apply up to 1.5 MW ICRH to the plasma. The beneficial role of the injection is attributed to an improved ICRH absorption and to the higher energy flux and temperature in the divertor. During the last ICRH campaign we operated mainly in helium plasmas for a lower hydrogen concentration and the vessel was boronised. The H-concentration is measured routinely by a mass spectrometer in the divertor chamber. (orig./AH)

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance heating assisted plasma startup in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucalossi, J.; Hertout, P.; Lennholm, M.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-04-01

    ECRH assisted plasma startup at fundamental resonance is investigated in Tore Supra in view of ITER operation. ECRH pre-ionisation is found to be very efficient allowing plasma initiation in a wide range of pre-fill pressure compared to ohmic startup. Reliable assisted startup has been achieved at the ITER reference toroidal electric field (0.3 V/m) with 160 kW of ECRH. Resonance location scan indicates that the plasma is initiated at the resonance location and that the plasma current channel position had to be real-time controlled since the very beginning of the discharge to obtain robust plasma startup. (authors)

  12. Modeling of divertor particle and heat loads during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields for ELM control in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, O., E-mail: o.schmitz@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Becoulet, M. [CEA/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Cahyna, P. [IPP AS CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Frerichs, H.; Kirschner, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Kukushkin, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laengner, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Lunt, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Reiser, D.; Reiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Saibene, G. [Fusion for Energy Joint Undertaking, Barcelona (Spain); Samm, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    First results from three-dimensional modeling of the divertor heat and particle flux pattern during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as ELM control scheme in ITER with the EMC3-Eirene fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code are discussed. The formation of a helical magnetic footprint breaks the toroidal symmetry of the heat and particle fluxes. Expansion of the flux pattern as far as 60 cm away from the unperturbed strike line is seen with vacuum RMP fields, resulting in a preferable heat flux spreading. Inclusion of plasma response reduces the radial extension of the heat and particle fluxes and results in a heat flux peaking closer to the unperturbed level. A strong reduction of the particle confinement is found. 3D flow channels are identified as a consistent reason due to direct parallel outflow from inside of the separatrix. Their radial inward expansion and hence the level of particle pump out is shown to be dependent on the perturbation level.

  13. Summary of experimental core turbulence characteristics in ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges in T-10 tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vershkov, V.A.; Shelukhin, D.A.; Soldatov, S.V.; Urazbaev, A.O.; Grashin, S.A.; Eliseev, L.G.; Melnikov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of experimental turbulence investigations carried out at T-10 for more than 10 years. The turbulence characteristics were investigated using correlation reflectometry, multipin Langmuir probe (MLP) and heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. The reflectometry capabilities were analysed using 2D full-wave simulations and verified by direct comparison using a MLP. The ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges show the distinct transition from the core turbulence, having complex spectral structure, to the unstructured one in the scrape-off layer. The core turbulence includes 'broad band, quasi-coherent' features, arising due to the excitation of rational surfaces with high poloidal m-numbers, with a low frequency near zero and specific oscillations at 15-30 kHz. All experimentally measured properties of low frequency and high frequency quasi-coherent oscillations are in good agreement with predictions of linear theory for the ion temperature gradient/dissipative trapped electron mode instabilities. Significant local changes in the turbulence characteristics were observed at the edge velocity shear layer and in the core near q = 1 radius after switching off the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The local decrease in the electron heat conductivity and decrease in the turbulence level could be evidence of the formation of an electron internal transport barrier. The dynamic behaviour of the core turbulence was also investigated for the case of fast edge cooling and the beginning phase of ECRH

  14. Resonant vibrations of self-interstitials in fcc metals with application to specific heat and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, P.N.; Dederichs, P.H.

    1981-07-01

    Some aspects of resonant vibrations of self-interstitials in the 100-dumbbell configuration in fcc-metals are discussed by extending previous calculations of Zeller et al. and Schober et al. Employing a simple defect model with nearest-neighbour interaction the local frequency spectrum of the defect is calculated showing several localized modes and low-frequency resonant modes. The change in the total density of states due to the defects is expressed as the derivative of a generalized phase shift which is used to calculate the change in the lattic specific heat due to single interstitials. Inelastic neutron scattering away from the one-phonon lines is proposed as a method to observe the resonant modes induced by self-interstitials. The model calculation in Cu shows that the well defined resonant modes due to dumbbell vibrations have appreciable intensity and could presumably be detected in neutron scattering measurements. The effect of di-interstitials on the phonon dispersion in Al is also discussed. (orig./GSCH)

  15. Electron heating via self-excited plasma series resonance in geometrically symmetric multi-frequency capacitive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüngel, E; Brandt, S; Schulze, J; Donkó, Z; Korolov, I; Derzsi, A

    2015-01-01

    The self-excitation of plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations plays an important role in the electron heating dynamics in capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) plasmas. In a combined approach of PIC/MCC simulations and a theoretical model based on an equivalent circuit, we investigate the self-excitation of PSR oscillations and their effect on the electron heating in geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas driven by multiple consecutive harmonics. The discharge symmetry is controlled via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), i.e. by varying the total number of harmonics and tuning the phase shifts between them. It is demonstrated that PSR oscillations will be self-excited under both symmetric and asymmetric conditions, if (i) the charge–voltage relation of the plasma sheaths deviates from a simple quadratic behavior and (ii) the inductance of the plasma bulk exhibits a temporal modulation. These two effects have been neglected up to now, but we show that they must be included in the model in order to properly describe the nonlinear series resonance circuit and reproduce the self-excitation of PSR oscillations, which are observed in the electron current density resulting from simulations of geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas. Furthermore, the effect of PSR self-excitation on the discharge current and the plasma properties, such as the potential profile, is illustrated by applying Fourier analysis. High-frequency oscillations in the entire spectrum between the applied frequencies and the local electron plasma frequency are observed. As a consequence, the electron heating is strongly enhanced by the presence of PSR oscillations. A complex electron heating dynamics is found during the expansion phase of the sheath, which is fully collapsed, when the PSR is initially self-excited. The nonlinear electron resonance heating (NERH) associated with the PSR oscillations causes a spatial asymmetry in the electron heating. By discussing the resulting ionization

  16. Review of recent advances in heating and current drive on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Eester, D. Van; Koch, R.

    1993-01-01

    Co-injection (D o →D + ) applied to TEXTOR leads to a hot ion mode regime with enhanced confinement. A synergistic increase of the beam effects is observed with the addition of ICRH at ω=2ω cD = ω cH (H minority heating scenario) resulting, beside other reviewed effects, in a significant increase of the ion temperature and of the beam driven current (respectively larger than 30% and 50% for the addition of an RF power comparable to the NBI one). The large ion heating efficiency of ICRH also remains when ICRH is added to balanced injection and the hot ion mode regime remains up to the maximum achieved β (=2/3 of the Troyon limit with more than 6MW of auxiliary heating). ICRH also leads to the formation of a more isotropic tail. These results are interpreted with the help of a Fokker-Planck code which computes the beam distribution function in presence of RF and of TRANSP simulations. The amount of RF absorption by the H minority, by the ion beam and the bulk plasma is theoretically evaluated. It is shown that a large part of the synergistic effects can be explained by the rise of the electron temperature due to the minority heating which increases the beam slowing down time and its critical energy. A smaller contribution to the effects is due to direct coupling of the RF power to the beam (less than 10% of the total RF absorbed power) and to the decrease of the plasma toroidal rotation induced by the RF. ICRH has also been added to co-injection at ω=3ω CD . In this case no minority heating is present and the RF energy coupling to the beam is one of the dominant effects. It leads to the formation of a very energetic tail of the ion beam with a strong increase of the beam-target neutron reactivity. (Author)

  17. Metabolic profiling of heat or anoxic stress in mouse C2C12 myotubes using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    to anaerobic metabolism due to inhibition of the aerobic pathway in the mitochondria. Conversely, lower levels of unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were apparent at increasing severity of stress, which indicate that lactate is released from the myotubes to the medium. In conclusion, the metabolites identified......In the present study, the metabolic effects of heat and anoxic stress in myotubes from the mouse cell line C2C12 were investigated by using a combination of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enrichment with [(13)C]-glucose. Both the (13)C and the (1)H NMR...... spectra showed reduced levels of the amino acids alanine, glutamate, and aspartate after heat or anoxic stress. The decreases were smallest at 42 degrees C, larger at 45 degrees C, and most pronounced after anoxic conditions. In addition, in both the (1)H and the (31)P NMR spectra, decreases in the high...

  18. Experimental proof of a load resilient external matching solution for the ITER ICRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Lamalle, P.

    2005-01-01

    A reliable load resilient external matching scheme for the ITER ICRH system has been successfully tested on the mock-up of the external matching system with variable plasma load simulation. To avoid the deleterious mutual coupling effects the power has been passively distributed among the upper half and the bottom half of the 24 radiating straps of the antenna plug. In this plug the straps are grouped in 8 triplets by 4-ports junctions. The 4 top and 4 bottom triplets are respectively put in parallel outside the antenna plug near a voltage anti-node by means of T junctions. The load resilient matching is then obtained by a 4 parameters single 'conjugate T' (CT) configuration. For an antenna loading variation of about 1 to 8 Ω/m the VSWR at the power source remains below 1.3. The maximum voltage along the line remains equal to the one in the antenna plug and there is a fair power share between the straps. A π0π0 toroidal phasing is easily obtained. The poloidal phasing between the top and bottom triplets is determined by the loading. A straightforward matching procedure is described. Good load resilience is also obtained by replacing the CT by one hybrid

  19. Performance test of a vertically-directed electric-field cavity resonator made for the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Atsushi.

    1996-06-01

    A cavity resonator with vertically-directed electric field was produced and attached to 'the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating' previously reported. Using the rapid gelation apparatus, drops of a simulated solution and of U-containing solutions for internal gelation were heated. The results indicated that the heating required for gelation of the U-containing solutions was possible. However, the electric field strength in the cavity resonator at that time was comparable to that causing the discharge due to the gaseous ammonia released from the heated drops. As a result, gel microspheres were not obtained in a stable state. The discussion suggests that the stable gelation would be realized by improving the cavity resonator shape and/or by modifying the power supply accompanied with using a power stabilizer. (author)

  20. Advantages of traveling wave resonant antennas for fast wave heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, D.A.; Callis, R.W.; Grassie, J.S. de

    1997-04-01

    The resilience of a maximally flat externally coupled traveling wave antenna (TWA) is contrasted with the sensitivity of a simple directly driven resonant loop array to vacuum and plasma conditions in DIII-D. We find a unique synergy between standing and traveling wave resonant TWA components. This synergy extends TWA operation to several passbands between 60 and 120 MHZ, provides 60 degrees- 120 degrees tunability between elements within a 1-2 MHZ bandwidth and permits efficient and continuous operation during ELMing H-mode

  1. RF tissue-heating near metallic implants during magnetic resonance examinations: an approach in the ac limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballweg, Verena; Eibofner, Frank; Graf, Hansjorg

    2011-10-01

    State of the art to access radiofrequency (RF) heating near implants is computer modeling of the devices and solving Maxwell's equations for the specific setup. For a set of input parameters, a fixed result is obtained. This work presents a theoretical approach in the alternating current (ac) limit, which can potentially render closed formulas for the basic behavior of tissue heating near metallic structures. Dedicated experiments were performed to support the theory. For the ac calculations, the implant was modeled as an RLC parallel circuit, with L being the secondary of a transformer and the RF transmission coil being its primary. Parameters influencing coupling, power matching, and specific absorption rate (SAR) were determined and formula relations were established. Experiments on a copper ring with a radial gap as capacitor for inductive coupling (at 1.5 T) and on needles for capacitive coupling (at 3 T) were carried out. The temperature rise in the embedding dielectric was observed as a function of its specific resistance using an infrared (IR) camera. Closed formulas containing the parameters of the setup were obtained for the frequency dependence of the transmitted power at fixed load resistance, for the calculation of the resistance for optimum power transfer, and for the calculation of the transmitted power in dependence of the load resistance. Good qualitative agreement was found between the course of the experimentally obtained heating curves and the theoretically determined power curves. Power matching revealed as critical parameter especially if the sample was resonant close to the Larmor frequency. The presented ac approach to RF heating near an implant, which mimics specific values for R, L, and C, allows for closed formulas to estimate the potential of RF energy transfer. A first reference point for worst-case determination in MR testing procedures can be obtained. Numerical approaches, necessary to determine spatially resolved heating maps, can

  2. Study of mutual coupling effects in the antenna array of the ICRH plug-in for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamalle, P.U.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Evrard, M.; Louche, F.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the ELM-tolerant 'conjugate T' (CT) matching schemes considered for the ITER ICRH antenna array has been found highly sensitive to the mutual resistances and reactances between antenna straps, which can produce large exchanges of active power between circuit branches. A general analysis is given of the effect of mutual coupling on the matching of a single CT and on the simultaneous matching of several coupled CT circuits. Circuit configurations optimizing the resilience of the system to realistic ELM-induced load variations are given in the case of a single CT. Problems arising from the interaction between several CTs and possible remedies are discussed

  3. Fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, T.D.

    1988-09-01

    Minority regime fast wave ICRF heating experiments have been conducted on the Alcator C tokamak at rf power levels sufficient to produce significant changes in plasma properties, and in particular to investigate the scaling to high density of the rf heating efficiency. Up to 450 kW of rf power at frequency f = 180 MHz, was injected into plasmas composed of deuterium majority and hydrogen minority ion species at magnetic field B 0 = 12 T, density 0.8 ≤ /bar n/sub e// ≤ 5 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , ion temperature T/sub D/(0) /approximately/ 1 keV, electron temperature T/sub e/(0) /approximately/ 1.5--2.5 keV, and minority concentration 0.25 /approx lt/ /eta/sub H// ≤ 8%. Deuterium heating ΔT/sub D/(0) = 400 eV was observed at /bar n/sub e// = 1 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , with smaller temperature increases at higher density. However, there was no significant change in electron temperature and the minority temperatures were insufficient to account for the launched rf power. Minority concentration scans indicated most efficient deuterium heating at the lowest possible concentration, in apparent contradiction with theory. Incremental heating /tau/sub inc// /equivalent to/ ΔW/ΔP up to 5 ms was independent of density, in spite of theoretical predictions of favorable density scaling of rf absorption and in stark contrast to Ohmic confinement times /tau/sub E// /equivalent to/ W/P. After accounting for mode conversion and minority losses due to toroidal field ripple, unconfined orbits, asymmetric drag, neoclassical and sawtooth transport, and charge-exchange, it was found that the losses as well as the net power deposition on deuterium do scale very favorably with density. Nevertheless, when the net rf and Ohmic powers deposited on deuterium are compared, they are found to be equally efficient at heating the deuterium. 139 refs

  4. Poloidal field effects on fundamental minority ion cyclotron resonance heating in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, S. C.; Imre, Kaya; Stevens, D. C.; Weitzner, Harold; Chang, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Minority ion fundamental cyclotron resonance is studied in a large tokamak in which the geometrical optics approximation applies off resonance and the minority average speed is less than the wave phase speeds. Poloidal equilibrium magnetic field effects are included, which lead to nontrivially nonlocal integrodifferential equations for the wave fields. Exact reciprocity relation is given as well as explicit analytic solutions for the transmission coefficients for both the high and low field side incidences. Numerical solutions are needed only for the high field side incident reflection coefficient. Numerical schemes are described and numerical results are presented together with a reliable error bound. Typically, energy absorption increases with poloidal field. The energy absorption increases with minority density at low values of minority density. However, it decreases at high minority density. Poloidal field effects weaken the dependence of energy absorption on the toroidal wave number. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  5. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here

  6. Effect of chopping time and heating on 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance and rheological behavior of meat batter matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fen; Dong, Hui; Shao, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Jun-Long; Liu, Deng-Yong

    2018-04-01

    The effect of chopping time and heating on physicochemical properties of meat batters was investigated by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance and rheology technology. Cooking loss and L* increased while texture profile analysis index decreased between chopping 5 and 6 min. The relaxation time T 21 (bound water) and its peak area ratio decreased, while the ratio of T 22 peak area (immobilized water) in raw meat batters gradually increased with the extension of chopping time. However, T 22 was opposite after being heated and a new component T 23 (free water) appeared (T 2i is the spin - spin relaxation time for the ith component.). The initial damping factor (Tan δ) gradually decreased and there were significant difference between 4 and 5 min of chopping time. There were significantly positive correlations between the ratio of peak area of T 22 and chopping time, the storage modulus (G'), cooking loss, and L*, respectively. Continued chopping time could improve the peak area proportion of T 22 in raw meat batters. Further, the higher the peak area proportion of T 22 in raw meat batters, the cooking loss of heated meat gel was higher. Also, the stronger the mobility of immobilized water in meat batter, the higher the L* of the fresh meat batters. Thus, it is revealed that the physicochemical properties of meat batter are significantly influenced by chopping time which further affects the water holding capacity and the texture of emulsification gel. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  8. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  9. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-01-05

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  10. Influence of RF heating and MHD instabilities on the fast-ion distribution in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Markus

    2016-06-07

    Fast, supra-thermal ions provide a powerful mechanism to heat fusion plasmas. Through Coulomb collisions with the thermal bulk plasma, they slow down and transfer their energy to the plasma. In present-day devices, fast ions are generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). In future fusion reactors, the dominant heating source, which allows the ignition of a burning plasma, will be fast a-particles resulting from fusion reactions. In addition to plasma heating, fast ions can be utilized to drive plasma currents and rotation. It is therefore crucial for the success of future fusion devices (such as ITER and DEMO) to understand the physics of fast ions and ensure their safe confinement. This thesis focuses both on modeling and experimental aspects. A model to calculate the NBI fast-ion distribution rapidly has been developed. It is based on a combination of existing codes and analytic solutions. Due to the comparably low numerical effort, it can be used to calculate the fast-ion distribution in a large set of discharges, which is used to e.g. improve plasma equilibrium reconstructions. Experimentally, the physics of fast ions is investigated at the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, using a FIDA (Fast-Ion D-Alpha) spectroscopy diagnostic. This diagnostic technique is based on charge-exchange reactions, that convert the ions into neutral atoms (keeping their momenta). The light emission from these neutral atoms can be collected by optics in the machine and analyzed with spectrometers. Here, the fast-ion contribution can be identified due to large Doppler shifts, and the shape of the spectrum yields information about the velocity distribution. The Doppler shift is given by a projection of the ion velocity vector onto the line of sight, such that observation from different viewing angles is needed to cover the entire velocity space. Therefore, the FIDA diagnostic has been upgraded from three viewing arrays to five, and the spectrometer has

  11. Influence of RF heating and MHD instabilities on the fast-ion distribution in ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Fast, supra-thermal ions provide a powerful mechanism to heat fusion plasmas. Through Coulomb collisions with the thermal bulk plasma, they slow down and transfer their energy to the plasma. In present-day devices, fast ions are generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). In future fusion reactors, the dominant heating source, which allows the ignition of a burning plasma, will be fast a-particles resulting from fusion reactions. In addition to plasma heating, fast ions can be utilized to drive plasma currents and rotation. It is therefore crucial for the success of future fusion devices (such as ITER and DEMO) to understand the physics of fast ions and ensure their safe confinement. This thesis focuses both on modeling and experimental aspects. A model to calculate the NBI fast-ion distribution rapidly has been developed. It is based on a combination of existing codes and analytic solutions. Due to the comparably low numerical effort, it can be used to calculate the fast-ion distribution in a large set of discharges, which is used to e.g. improve plasma equilibrium reconstructions. Experimentally, the physics of fast ions is investigated at the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, using a FIDA (Fast-Ion D-Alpha) spectroscopy diagnostic. This diagnostic technique is based on charge-exchange reactions, that convert the ions into neutral atoms (keeping their momenta). The light emission from these neutral atoms can be collected by optics in the machine and analyzed with spectrometers. Here, the fast-ion contribution can be identified due to large Doppler shifts, and the shape of the spectrum yields information about the velocity distribution. The Doppler shift is given by a projection of the ion velocity vector onto the line of sight, such that observation from different viewing angles is needed to cover the entire velocity space. Therefore, the FIDA diagnostic has been upgraded from three viewing arrays to five, and the spectrometer has

  12. FISIC - a full-wave code to model ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-08-01

    We present a user manual for the FISIC code which solves the integrodifferential wave equation in the finite Larmor radius approximation in fully toroidal geometry to simulate ICRF heating experiments. The code models the electromagnetic wave field as well as antenna coupling and power deposition profiles in axisymmetric plasmas. (orig.)

  13. Divertor Heat Flux Reduction by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the LHD-Type Helical DEMO Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, N.; Sagara, A.; Goto, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Miyazawa, J., E-mail: yanagi@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The conceptual design studies of the LHD-type helical fusion DEMO reactor, FFHR-d1, are progressing steadfastly. The LHD-type heliotron magnetic configuration equipped with the built- in helical divertors has a potential to realize low divertor heat flux in spatial average. However, the toroidal asymmetry may give more than a couple of times higher peak heat flux at some locations, as has been experimentally observed in LHD and confirmed by magnetic field-line tracing. By providing radiation dispersion accompanied with a plasma detachment, the heat flux may decrease significantly though the compatibility with a good core plasma confinement is an important issue to be explored. Whereas the engineering difficulties for developing materials to be used under the neutron environment require even further decrease of the heat flux (even though the heliotron is a unique configuration that divertor plates be largely shielded from the direct irradiation of neutrons by breeder blankets). In this respect, we proposed, in the last IAEA FEC, a new strike point sweeping scheme using a set of auxiliary helical coils, termed helical divertor (HD) coils. The HD coils carrying a few percent of the current amplitude of the main helical coils sweep the divertor strike points without altering the core plasma. Though this scheme is effective in dispersing the heat flux in the poloidal direction, the toroidal asymmetry still remains. The AC operation may also give unforeseen engineering difficulties. We here propose that the peak heat flux be mitigated using RMP fields in steady-state. The magnetic field-lines are numerically traced in the vacuum configuration and their footprints coming to the divertor regions are counted. Their fraction plotted as a function of the toroidal angle indicates that the peak heat flux be mitigated to {approx} 20 MW per square meters at 3 GW fusion power generation without having radiation dispersion when an RMP field is applied. We note that the

  14. Development of long-pulse heating & current drive actuators & operational techniques compatible with a high-Z divertor & first wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-01-09

    This was a collaboration between UCSD and MIT to study the effective application of ion-cyclotron heating (ICRH) on the EAST tokamak, located in China. The original goal was for UCSD to develop a diagnostic that would allow measurement of the steady state, or DC, convection pattern that develops on magnetic field lines that attach or connect to the ICRH antenna. This diagnostic would then be used to develop techniques and approaches that minimize or even eliminate such DC convection during application of strong ICRH heating. This was thought to then indicate reduction or elimination of parasitic losses of heating power, and thus be an indicator of effective RF heating. The original plan to use high speed digital gas-puff imaging (GPI) of the antenna-edge plasma region in EAST was ultimately unsuccessful due to limitations in machine and camera operations. We then decided to attempt the same experiment on the ALCATOR C-MOD tokamak at MIT which had a similar instrument already installed. This effort was ultimately successful, and demonstrated that the underlying idea of using GPI as a diagnostic for ICRH antenna physics would, in fact, work. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced E x B flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E-r were observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B and the ICRF power. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the probe measurements of poloidal phase velocity. The results suggest that effective ICRH heating with reduced impurity production is possible when the antenna/box system is designed so as to reduce the RF-induced image currents that flow in the grounded conducting antenna frame elements that surround the RF antenna current straps.

  15. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailloux, A.

    1997-01-01

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10 12 ions/cm 3 ) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O'ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author)

  16. Moment approach to neoclassical flows, currents and transport in auxiliary heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yil Bong.

    1988-02-01

    The moment approach is utilized to derive the full complement of neoclassical transport processes in auxiliary heated tokamaks. The effects of auxiliary heating [neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH)] considered arise from the collisional interaction between the background plasma species and the fast-ion-tail species. From a known fast ion distribution function we evaluate the parallel (to the magnetic field) momentum and heat flow inputs to the background plasma. Then, through the momentum and heat flow balance equations, we can determine the induced parallel flows (and current) and radial transpot fluxes in ''equilibrium'' (on the time scale much longer than the collisional relaxation time, i.e., t >> 1ν/sub ii/). In addition to the fast-ion-induced current, the total neoclassical current includes the boostap current, which is driven by the pressure and temperature gradients, the Pfirsch-Schlueter current which is required for charge neutrality, and the neoclassical (including trapped particle effects) Spitzer current due to the parallel electric field. The radial transport fluxes also include off-diagonal compnents in the transport matrix which correspond to the Ware (neoclassical) pinch due to the inductive applied electric field an the fast-ion-induced radial fluxes, in addition to the usual pressure- and temperature-gradient-driven fluxes (particle diffusion and heat conduction). Once the tranport coefficient are completely determined, the radial fluxes and the heat fluxes can be substituted into the density and energy evolution equations to provide a complete description of ''equilibrium'' (δδt << ν/sub ii/) neoclassical transport processes in a plasma. 47 refs., 14 figs

  17. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  18. Proceedings of eighth joint workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The theory of electron cyclotron resonance phenomena is highly developed. The main theoretical tools are well established, generally accepted and able to give a satisfactory description of the main results obtained in electron cyclotron emission, absorption and current drive experiments. In this workshop some advanced theoretical and numerical tools have been presented (e.g., 3-D Fokker-Planck codes, treatment of the r.f. beam as a whole, description of non-linear and finite-beam effects) together with the proposal for new scenarios for ECE and ECA measurements (e.g., for diagnosing suprathermal populations and their radial transport). (orig.)

  19. Structural characterization of heat treated pitch by solid state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfihi, H.; Tougne, P.; Legrand, A.P.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine structural parameters (aromaticity factor, fractions of protonated and non-protonated aromatic carbons) of some pitches, and to follow their evolution as a function of the heat treatment duration. For such a determination, /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H cross polarization combined with magic angle spinning and dipolar dephasing (CP/MAS/DD) NMR was used. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacquet, P.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Lerche, E.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Van-Eester, D.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Campergue, A.-L.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Graham, M.; Klepper, C.C.; Meigs, A.; Milanesio, D.; Mlynář, Jan; Pütterich, T.; Sirinelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2014), 061510-061510 ISSN 1070-664X. [Topical conference on radio frequency power in plasmas/20./. Sorrento, 25.06.2013-28.06.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : JET * ITER-like wall * ICRF heating * impurities * sawtooth * simulation * transport Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.142, year: 2014 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/21/6/10.1063/1.4884354

  1. Stack Parameters Effect on the Performance of Anharmonic Resonator Thermoacoustic Heat Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Nouh, Mostafa A.

    2014-01-01

    A thermoacoustic heat engine (TAHE) converts heat into acoustic power with no moving parts. It exhibits several advantages over traditional engines, such as simple design, stable functionality, and environment-friendly working gas. In order to further improve the performance of TAHE, stack parameters need to be optimized. Stack\\'s position, length and plate spacing are the three main parameters that have been investigated in this study. Stack\\'s position dictates both the efficiency and the maximum produced acoustic power of the heat engine. Positioning the stack closer to the pressure anti-node might ensure high efficiency on the expense of the maximum produced acoustic power. It is noticed that the TAHE efficiency can further be improved by spacing the plates of the stack at a value of 2.4 of the thermal penetration depth, δk . Changes in the stack length will not affect the efficiency much as long as the temperature gradient across the stack, as a ratio of the critical temperature gradient ψ is more than 1. Upon interpreting the effect of these variations, attempts are made towards reaching the engine\\'s most powerful operating point.

  2. Stack Parameters Effect on the Performance of Anharmonic Resonator Thermoacoustic Heat Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Nouh, Mostafa A.; Arafa, Nadim M.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab

    2014-01-01

    A thermoacoustic heat engine (TAHE) converts heat into acoustic power with no moving parts. It exhibits several advantages over traditional engines, such as simple design, stable functionality, and environment-friendly working gas. In order to further improve the performance of TAHE, stack parameters need to be optimized. Stack's position, length and plate spacing are the three main parameters that have been investigated in this study. Stack's position dictates both the efficiency and the maximum produced acoustic power of the heat engine. Positioning the stack closer to the pressure anti-node might ensure high efficiency on the expense of the maximum produced acoustic power. It is noticed that the TAHE efficiency can further be improved by spacing the plates of the stack at a value of 2.4 of the thermal penetration depth, δk . Changes in the stack length will not affect the efficiency much as long as the temperature gradient across the stack, as a ratio of the critical temperature gradient ψ is more than 1. Upon interpreting the effect of these variations, attempts are made towards reaching the engine's most powerful operating point.

  3. Laser surface modification of medical grade alloys for reduced heating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benafan, O., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu; Vaidyanathan, R., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Chen, S.-Y.; Kar, A. [Laser-Advanced Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL), College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Nanoscale surface modification of medical grade metallic alloys was conducted using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-based dopant diffusion technique. The objective of this approach was to minimize the induction heating by reducing the absorbed radio frequency field. Such an approach is advantageous in that the dopant is diffused into the alloy and is not susceptible to detachment or spallation as would an externally applied coating, and is expected to not deteriorate the mechanical and electrical properties of the base alloy or device. Experiments were conducted using a controlled environment laser system with the ability to control laser properties (i.e., laser power, spot size, and irradiation time) and dopant characteristics (i.e., temperature, concentration, and pressure). The reflective and transmissive properties of both the doped and untreated samples were measured in a radio frequency (63.86 MHz) magnetic field using a system comprising a high power signal generator, a localized magnetic field source and sensor, and a signal analyzer. The results indicate an increase in the reflectivity of the laser-treated samples compared to untreated samples. The effect of reflectivity on the heating of the alloys is investigated through a mathematical model incorporating Maxwell’s equations and heat conduction.

  4. Electron velocity-space diffusion in a micro-unstable ECRH [electron cyclotron resonance heated] mirror plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.A.

    1987-09-01

    An experimental study of the velocity-space diffusion of electrons in an electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) mirror plasma, in the presence of micro-unstable whistler rf emission, is presented. It is found that the dominant loss mechanism for hot electrons is endloss produced by rf diffusion into the mirror loss cone. In a standard case with 4.5 kW of ECRH power, this loss limits the stored energy to 120 J with an energy confinement time of 40 ms. The energy confinement time associated with collisional scattering is 350 ms in this case. Whistler microinstability rf produces up to 25% of the rf-induced loss. The hot electron temperature is not limited by loss of adiabaticity, but by rf-induced loss of high energy electrons, and decreases with increasing rf power in strong diffusion regimes. Collisional loss is in agreement with standard scattering theory. No super-adiabatic effects are clearly seen. Experiments in which the vacuum chamber walls are lined with microwave absorber reveal that single pass absorption is limited to less than 60%, whereas experiments with reflecting walls exhibit up to 90% absorption. Stronger diffusion is seen in the latter, with a hot electron heating rate which is twice that of the absorber experiments. This increase in diffusion can be produced by two distinct aspects of wall-reflected rf: the broader spatial rf profile, which enlarges the resonant region in velocity space, or a reduction in super-adiabatic effects due to randomization of the electron gyrophase. Since no other aspects of super-adiabaticity are observed, the first mechanism appears more likely. 39 refs., 54 figs

  5. Realisation of a test facility for the ITER ICRH antenna plug-in by means of a mock-up with salted water load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.; Koch, R.; Lamalle, P.; Louche, F.; Martini, J.L.; Vervier, M.

    2005-01-01

    By the use of a mock-up operated at higher frequency it is possible to measure with good accuracy the rf characteristics of an ICRH antenna, the plasma loading being simulated by a water tank in front of it. This concept has motivated the construction of the mock-up of the antenna array foreseen for ITER

  6. Simulation of the Plasma Density Evolution during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating at the T-10 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu. N.; Vershkov, V. A.; Danilov, A. V.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Zenin, V. N.; Lysenko, S. E.; Melnikov, A. V.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Subbotin, G. F.; Cherkasov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    In ohmically heated (OH) plasma with low recycling, an improved particle confinement (IPC) mode is established during gas puffing. However, after gas puffing is switched off, this mode is retained only for about 100 ms, after which an abrupt phase transition into the low particle confinement (LPC) mode occurs in the entire plasma cross section. During such a transition, energy transport due to heat conduction does not change. The phase transition in OH plasma is similar to the effect of density pump-out from the plasma core, which occurs after electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is switched on. Analysis of the measured plasma pressure profiles in the T-10 tokamak shows that, after gas puffing in the OH mode is switched off, the plasma pressure profile in the IPC stage becomes more peaked and, after the peakedness exceeds a certain critical value, the IPC-LPC transition occurs. Similar processes are also observed during ECH. If the pressure profile is insufficiently peaked during ECH, then the density pump-out effect comes into play only after the critical peakedness of the pressure profile is reached. In the plasma core, the density and pressure profiles are close to the corresponding canonical profiles. This allows one to derive an expression for the particle flux within the canonical profile model and formulate a criterion for the IPC-LPC transition. The time evolution of the plasma density profile during phase transitions was simulated for a number of T-10 shots with ECH and high recycling. The particle transport coefficients in the IPC and LPC phases, as well as the dependences of these coefficients on the ECH power, are determined.

  7. Commissioning activities and first results from the collective Thomson scattering diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meo, Fernando; Bindslev, Henrik; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2008-01-01

    of the system. First results in near perpendicular of scattered spectra in a neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) plasma (minority hydrogen) on ASDEX Upgrade have shown evidence of ICRH heating phase of hydrogen. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  8. Plasma potential in a magnetic mirror with electron-cyclotron-resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the ECRH plasma in the University of Wisconsin DE Machine magnetic mirror have been undertaken. Typical plasma parameters in these experiments were T/sub e/ - 10 to 30 eV, T/sub i/ - 4 eV, V/sub po/ (plasma potential at midplane) - 20 to 50 V, midplane plasma density n 0 - 10 16 m - 3 , B 0 (magnetic field strength on axis at midplane) - .005 to .01 T, mirror ratio R - 5 to 20. The principal experimental findings were the appearance of strong density peaks (approx. 2 x background) and notable V/sub f/ dips (approx. kT/sub e//e) in a narrow (approx. 1 cm) region near the axial positions of cyclotron resonance. The properties of these dips do not change greatly over the range of operating parameters, but are narrower at higher pressures

  9. Radio frequency plasma heating in large tokamak systems near the lower hybrid resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, A.; Hooke, W.M.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency range, power, efficiency, and pulse length of a high power rf system are discussed as they might be applied to the TFTR Tokamak facility as well as on a full scale reactor. Comparisons are made of the size, power output, and costs to obtain microwave power sufficient to satisfy the physics requirements. A new microwave feed concept is discussed which will improve the coupling of the microwave energy into the plasma. The unique advantages of waveguide feed systems is apparent when one considers the practical problems associated with coupling supplementary heating energy into a reactor

  10. Laser heating tunability by off-resonant irradiation of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormeño, Silvia; Gregorio-Godoy, Paula; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Juárez, Beatriz H; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2014-01-29

    Temperature changes in the vicinity of a single absorptive nanostructure caused by local heating have strong implications in technologies such as integrated electronics or biomedicine. Herein, the temperature changes in the vicinity of a single optically trapped spherical Au nanoparticle encapsulated in a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) shell (Au@pNIPAM) are studied in detail. Individual beads are trapped in a counter-propagating optical tweezers setup at various laser powers, which allows the overall particle size to be tuned through the phase transition of the thermo-responsive shell. The experimentally obtained sizes measured at different irradiation powers are compared with average size values obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) from an ensemble of beads at different temperatures. The size range and the tendency to shrink upon increasing the laser power in the optical trap or by increasing the temperature for DLS agree with reasonable accuracy for both approaches. Discrepancies are evaluated by means of simple models accounting for variations in the thermal conductivity of the polymer, the viscosity of the aqueous solution and the absorption cross section of the coated Au nanoparticle. These results show that these parameters must be taken into account when considering local laser heating experiments in aqueous solution at the nanoscale. Analysis of the stability of the Au@pNIPAM particles in the trap is also theoretically carried out for different particle sizes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Optical absorption and electron spin resonance in natural, irradiated and heated spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.S.; Isotani, S.

    1983-09-01

    Heat treatment and X and γ-Rays irradiation of lylac and colorless natural spodumene, LiAlSi 2 O 6 , have been studied. Irradiation produces a color change, from lylac or colorless to green. Irradiated samples heated at 200 0 C turn lylac and bleach at 400 0 C. Optical absorption spectra were decomposed into gaussian line shape bands and it is observed that green and lylac centers are simultaneously created by irradiation. These centers are independent from each other. Optical absorption, EPR and X-Ray fluorescence results show the spectra of impurities, responsible by the presence of the created centers and indicated Mn participation in the process of centers creation and destruction. Decay Kinetics of green and lylac centers have been studied and it is observed that simple Kinetic models do not apply to these cases. An empirical fit allowed the calculation of activation energies of the lylac and green centers decays. Discussions about the present results led us to propose a new model where the green and lylac centers are due to Mn 3+ ions in two different Al 3+ sites, whose absorption are intensified by the interaction with an electron trapped in a neighbour oxygen. (Author) [pt

  12. 3rd harmonic electron cyclotron resonant heating absorption enhancement by 2nd harmonic heating at the same frequency in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S; Coda, S; Goodman, T P; Decker, J; Peysson, Y; Mazon, D

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental mechanisms responsible for the interplay and synergy between the absorption dynamics of extraordinary-mode electron cyclotron waves at two different harmonic resonances (the 2nd and 3rd) are investigated in the TCV tokamak. An enhanced 3rd harmonic absorption in the presence of suprathermal electrons generated by 2nd harmonic heating is predicted by Fokker–Planck simulations, subject to complex alignment requirements in both physical space and momentum space. The experimental signature for the 2nd/3rd harmonic synergy is sought through the suprathermal bremsstrahlung emission in the hard x-ray range of photon energy. Using a synthetic diagnostic, the emission variation due to synergy is calculated as a function of the injected power and of the radial transport of suprathermal electrons. It is concluded that in the present experimental setup a synergy signature has not been unambiguously detected. The detectability of the synergy is then discussed with respect to variations and uncertainties in the plasma density and effective charge in view of future optimized experiments. (paper)

  13. Summary of EC-17: the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (Deurne, The Netherlands, 7-10 May 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Austin, M. E.; Kubo, S.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Plaum, B.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is given of the papers presented at the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The meeting covered all aspects of the research field ranging from theory to enabling technologies. From the workshop, advanced control by

  14. Application for EURATOM priority support of additional heating for ASDEX Upgrade, phase I and phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.; Blaumoser, M.; Ennen, K.; Gruber, J.; Gruber, O.; Jandl, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kollotzek, H.; Kotzlowski, H.; Lackner, E.; Lackner, K.; Larcher, T. von; Neuhauser, J.; Pillsticker, M.; Poehlchen, R.; Preis, H.; Schneider, H.; Seidel, U.; Sombach, B.; Streibl, B.; Werner, F.; Wieczorek, A.; Speth, E.; Pennigsfeld, F.P.; Feist, J.H.; Freudenberger, K.; Kolos, J.; Kunze, R.C.; Lohnert, H.; Melkus, W.; Ott, W.; Riedler, H.; Staebler, A.; Vollmer, O.; Wittenbecher, K.; Wulff, G.; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Wesner, F.; Baeumler, J.; Braun, F.; Fritsch, R.; Hofmeister, F.; Mark, E. von; Puri, S.; Soell, M.; Steinmetz, K.; Wedler, H.

    1985-04-01

    In order to reach the full performance plasma parameters of ASDEX Upgrade as provided by the machine technique a heating power of 12 to 15 MW is required. For the minimum required power the appropriate choice for the basic heating system are 6 MW ICRH and 6 MW neutral injection, both with a long pulse capability of up to 10 seconds. ICRH in a frequency range of 30 to 120 MHz shall cover He 3 minority, hydrogen fundamental and 2nd harmonic and deuterium 2nd harmonic heating. For neutral injection four JET sources with 60 keV H 0 and 80 A combined in one injection box were chosen. The averaged injection angle is 24 0 to perpendicular at Rsub(O) = 1.7 m. Both systems shall be installed during 1988. The costs are 57.4 MDM for both. (orig./GG)

  15. Custom-designed Laser-based Heating Apparatus for Triggered Release of Cisplatin from Thermosensitive Liposomes with Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yannan N; Weersink, Robert A; Foltz, Warren D; Zheng, Jinzi; Chaudary, Naz; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-13

    Liposomes have been employed as drug delivery systems to target solid tumors through exploitation of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect resulting in significant reductions in systemic toxicity. Nonetheless, insufficient release of encapsulated drug from liposomes has limited their clinical efficacy. Temperature-sensitive liposomes have been engineered to provide site-specific release of drug in order to overcome the problem of limited tumor drug bioavailability. Our lab has designed and developed a heat-activated thermosensitive liposome formulation of cisplatin (CDDP), known as HTLC, to provide triggered release of CDDP at solid tumors. Heat-activated delivery in vivo was achieved in murine models using a custom-built laser-based heating apparatus that provides a conformal heating pattern at the tumor site as confirmed by MR thermometry (MRT). A fiber optic temperature monitoring device was used to measure the temperature in real-time during the entire heating period with online adjustment of heat delivery by alternating the laser power. Drug delivery was optimized under magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance by co-encapsulation of an MR contrast agent (i.e., gadoteridol) along with CDDP into the thermosensitive liposomes as a means to validate the heating protocol and to assess tumor accumulation. The heating protocol consisted of a preheating period of 5 min prior to administration of HTLC and 20 min heating post-injection. This heating protocol resulted in effective release of the encapsulated agents with the highest MR signal change observed in the heated tumor in comparison to the unheated tumor and muscle. This study demonstrated the successful application of the laser-based heating apparatus for preclinical thermosensitive liposome development and the importance of MR-guided validation of the heating protocol for optimization of drug delivery.

  16. Extension of high T{sub e} regime with upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H., E-mail: takahashi.hiromi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Yamada, I.; Nakano, H.; Yokoyama, M.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); and others

    2014-06-15

    Enhancement of the output power per gyrotron has been planned in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Three 77-GHz gyrotrons with an output power of more than 1 MW have been operated. In addition, a high power gyrotron with the frequency of 154 GHz (1 MW/5 s, 0.5 MW/CW) was newly installed in 2012, and the total injection power of Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) reached 4.6 MW. The operational regime of ECRH plasma on the LHD has been extended due to the upgraded ECRH system such as the central electron temperature of 13.5 keV with the line-averaged electron density n{sub e-fir} = 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The electron thermal confinement clearly improved inside the electron internal transport barrier, and the electron thermal diffusivity reached neoclassical level. The global energy confinement time increased with increase of n{sub e-fir}. The plasma stored energy of 530 kJ with n{sub e-fir} = 3.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, which is 1.7 times larger than the previous record in the ECRH plasma in the LHD, has been successfully achieved.

  17. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs

  18. Characterization of free radicals by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in biochars from pyrolysis at high heating rates and at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    The concentration and type of free radicals from the decay (termination stage) of pyrolysis at slow and fast heating rates and at high temperatures (above 1000°C) in biomass char have been studied. A room temperature electron spin resonance spectroscopy study was conducted on original wood...... because the free radicals were trapped in a char consisting of a molten amorphous silica at heating rates of 103-104 K s-1. The experimental electron spin resonance spectroscopy spectra were analyzed by fitting to simulated data in order to identify radical types, based on g-values and line widths......, herbaceous biomass, holocelluloses, lignin and their chars, prepared at high temperatures in a wire mesh reactor, an entrained flow reactor, and a tubular reactor. The radical concentrations in the chars from the decay stage range up between 7·1016 and 1.5·1018 spins g -1. The results indicated...

  19. Electron spin resonance and its application to heat treated carbonaceous materials; A ressonancia de spin eletronico e sua aplicacao aos materiais carbonosos tratados termicamente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, Francisco Guilherme [Espirito Santo Univ., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Carbonosos e Plasma Termico

    1994-12-31

    This work presents the basic characteristics of the electron spin resonance technique, also called paramagnetic resonance, being discussed its application to heat treated carbonaceous materials. In the low heat treatment temperature (HTT) range (below 700 deg C) the organic free radical are the predominant unpaired spin center, which play a key role in the process of carbonization and meso phase formation. At higher temperatures, it is possible to make correlations between the low H T T range and the high HTT range (above 130 deg C), where the predominant unpaired spin center are the free charge carriers (free electrons) of the graphite like crystallites of the material, which are formed by the carbonization process. (author) 10 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Study of plasma start-up initiated by second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating on WEGA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Stange, T.; Aßmus, D.; Wauters, T.

    2014-01-01

    Although both 1st harmonic ordinary mode (O1) and 2nd harmonic extra-ordinary mode (X2) have been successfully used to initiate pre-ionization and breakdown in many devices, a complete theoretical model is still missing to explain the success of this method. Moreover, some experimental observations are not completely understood, such as what occurs during the delay time between the turn-on of ECRH power and first signals of density or light measurements. Since during this free period the ECRH power has to be absorbed by in-vessel components, it is of prime importance to know what governs this delay time. Recently, dedicated start-up experiments have been performed on WEGA, using a 28 GHz ECRH system in X2-mode. This machine has the interesting capability to be run also as a tokamak allowing comparative experiments between stellarator (ι/2π > 0) and tokamak (ι/2π = 0) configurations. Different scans in heating power, neutral gas pressure, and rotational transform (ι) show clearly that the start-up is a two step process. A first step following the turn-on of the ECRH power during which no measurable electron density (or just above the noise level in some cases), ECE and radiated power is detected. Its duration depends strongly on the level of injected power. The second step corresponds to the gas ionization and plasma expansion phase, with a velocity of density build-up and filling-up of the vessel volume depending mainly on pressure, gas and rotational transform. Moreover, an interesting scenario of ECRH pre-ionization without loop voltage in tokamak configuration by applying a small optimal vertical field is relevant for start-up assistance on future experiments like ITER. The results from this experimental parametric study are useful for the modeling of the start-up assisted by the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating. The aim of this work is to establish predictive scenarios for both ITER and W7-X operation

  1. Investigation of Parallel Radiofrequency Transmission for the Reduction of Heating in Long Conductive Leads in 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E McElcheran

    Full Text Available Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS is increasingly used to treat a variety of brain diseases by sending electrical impulses to deep brain nuclei through long, electrically conductive leads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of patients pre- and post-implantation is desirable to target and position the implant, to evaluate possible side-effects and to examine DBS patients who have other health conditions. Although MRI is the preferred modality for pre-operative planning, MRI post-implantation is limited due to the risk of high local power deposition, and therefore tissue heating, at the tip of the lead. The localized power deposition arises from currents induced in the leads caused by coupling with the radiofrequency (RF transmission field during imaging. In the present work, parallel RF transmission (pTx is used to tailor the RF electric field to suppress coupling effects. Electromagnetic simulations were performed for three pTx coil configurations with 2, 4, and 8-elements, respectively. Optimal input voltages to minimize coupling, while maintaining RF magnetic field homogeneity, were determined for all configurations using a Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm. Resulting electric and magnetic fields were compared to that of a 16-rung birdcage coil. Experimental validation was performed with a custom-built 4-element pTx coil. In simulation, 95-99% reduction of the electric field at the tip of the lead was observed between the various pTx coil configurations and the birdcage coil. Maximal reduction in E-field was obtained with the 8-element pTx coil. Magnetic field homogeneity was comparable to the birdcage coil for the 4- and 8-element pTx configurations. In experiment, a temperature increase of 2±0.15°C was observed at the tip of the wire using the birdcage coil, whereas negligible increase (0.2±0.15°C was observed with the optimized pTx system. Although further research is required, these initial results suggest that the concept of optimizing p

  2. Study of plasma start-up initiated by second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating on WEGA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Stange, T.; Aßmus, D. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Wauters, T. [Association Euratom-Belgian State, LPP-ERM/KMS, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12

    Although both 1st harmonic ordinary mode (O1) and 2nd harmonic extra-ordinary mode (X2) have been successfully used to initiate pre-ionization and breakdown in many devices, a complete theoretical model is still missing to explain the success of this method. Moreover, some experimental observations are not completely understood, such as what occurs during the delay time between the turn-on of ECRH power and first signals of density or light measurements. Since during this free period the ECRH power has to be absorbed by in-vessel components, it is of prime importance to know what governs this delay time. Recently, dedicated start-up experiments have been performed on WEGA, using a 28 GHz ECRH system in X2-mode. This machine has the interesting capability to be run also as a tokamak allowing comparative experiments between stellarator (ι/2π > 0) and tokamak (ι/2π = 0) configurations. Different scans in heating power, neutral gas pressure, and rotational transform (ι) show clearly that the start-up is a two step process. A first step following the turn-on of the ECRH power during which no measurable electron density (or just above the noise level in some cases), ECE and radiated power is detected. Its duration depends strongly on the level of injected power. The second step corresponds to the gas ionization and plasma expansion phase, with a velocity of density build-up and filling-up of the vessel volume depending mainly on pressure, gas and rotational transform. Moreover, an interesting scenario of ECRH pre-ionization without loop voltage in tokamak configuration by applying a small optimal vertical field is relevant for start-up assistance on future experiments like ITER. The results from this experimental parametric study are useful for the modeling of the start-up assisted by the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating. The aim of this work is to establish predictive scenarios for both ITER and W7-X operation.

  3. Investigation of Parallel Radiofrequency Transmission for the Reduction of Heating in Long Conductive Leads in 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElcheran, Clare E; Yang, Benson; Anderson, Kevan J T; Golenstani-Rad, Laleh; Graham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is increasingly used to treat a variety of brain diseases by sending electrical impulses to deep brain nuclei through long, electrically conductive leads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients pre- and post-implantation is desirable to target and position the implant, to evaluate possible side-effects and to examine DBS patients who have other health conditions. Although MRI is the preferred modality for pre-operative planning, MRI post-implantation is limited due to the risk of high local power deposition, and therefore tissue heating, at the tip of the lead. The localized power deposition arises from currents induced in the leads caused by coupling with the radiofrequency (RF) transmission field during imaging. In the present work, parallel RF transmission (pTx) is used to tailor the RF electric field to suppress coupling effects. Electromagnetic simulations were performed for three pTx coil configurations with 2, 4, and 8-elements, respectively. Optimal input voltages to minimize coupling, while maintaining RF magnetic field homogeneity, were determined for all configurations using a Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm. Resulting electric and magnetic fields were compared to that of a 16-rung birdcage coil. Experimental validation was performed with a custom-built 4-element pTx coil. In simulation, 95-99% reduction of the electric field at the tip of the lead was observed between the various pTx coil configurations and the birdcage coil. Maximal reduction in E-field was obtained with the 8-element pTx coil. Magnetic field homogeneity was comparable to the birdcage coil for the 4- and 8-element pTx configurations. In experiment, a temperature increase of 2±0.15°C was observed at the tip of the wire using the birdcage coil, whereas negligible increase (0.2±0.15°C) was observed with the optimized pTx system. Although further research is required, these initial results suggest that the concept of optimizing pTx to reduce DBS

  4. Electric Fields near RF Heating and Current Drive Antennas in Tore Supra Measured with Dynamic Stark Effect Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Martin, E. H.; Isler, R. C.; Colas, L.; Hillairet, J.; Marandet, Y.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Hillis, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Saoutic, B.

    2011-10-01

    Computational models of the interaction between RF waves and the scrape-off layer plasma near ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive launch antennas are continuously improving. These models mainly predict the RF electric fields produced in the SOL and, therefore, the best measurement for verification of these models would be a direct measurement of these electric fields. Both types of launch antennas are used on Tore Supra and are designed for high power (up to 4MW/antenna) and long pulse (> > 25s) operation. Direct, non-intrusive measurement of the RF electric fields in the vicinity of these structures is achieved by fitting spectral profiles of deuterium Balmer-alpha and Balmer-beta to a model that includes the dynamic, external-field Stark effect, as well as Zeeman splitting and Doppler broadening mechanisms. The measurements are compared to the mentioned, near-field region, RF antenna models. *Work supported in part by the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  5. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal magnetic field ripple of Tore Supra during ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Grisolia, C.; Hutter, T.; Mayaux, G.; Martin, G.; Saoutic, B.; Vartanian, S.

    1995-01-01

    Direct losses of ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra using two techniques were made. The first (DRIPPLE I) correlates the ion loss current measured by an electric probe with the ion loss power measured by a calorimeter. As the calorimeter integrates over all particle energies and time, it yields only the averaged lost ion energy. The second technique (DRIPPLE II), still under development, is a Faraday cup positioned and filtered so as to select ions by their Larmor radius. The currents measured are small (1-100 nA), and improvements in instrumentation are needed to take full advantage of the data, but the preliminary results are still useful. During ICRH (hydrogen minority regime, resonance on axis) a direct correlation between the lost ion mean energy and the density of hydrogen was seen. The energy increased when the hydrogen minority density decreased. Moreover, the line averaged density and the lower hybrid heating (LH) had also an effect on fast ion losses. (authors). 3 refs., 7 figs

  6. Analysis of the phase control of the ITER ICRH antenna array. Influence on the load resilience and radiated power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A., E-mail: a.messiaen@fz-juelich.de; Ongena, J.; Vervier, M. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Cycle, B1000-Brussels (Belgium); Swain, D. [US ITER Team, ORNL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    The paper analyses how the phasing of the ITER ICRH 24 strap array evolves from the power sources up to the strap currents of the antenna. The study of the phasing control and coherence through the feeding circuits with prematching and automatic matching and decoupling network is made by modeling starting from the TOPICA matrix of the antenna array for a low coupling plasma profile and for current drive phasing (worst case for mutual coupling effects). The main results of the analysis are: (i) the strap current amplitude is well controlled by the antinode V{sub max} amplitude of the feeding lines, (ii) the best toroidal phasing control is done by the adjustment of the mean phase of V{sub max} of each poloidal straps column, (iii) with well adjusted system the largest strap current phasing error is ±20°, (iv) the effect on load resilience remains well below the maximum affordable VSWR of the generators, (v) the effect on the radiated power spectrum versus k{sub //} computed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II remains small for the considered cases.

  7. Identification of minority ion cyclotron emission during radio frequency heating in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    First measurements and identification of Minority Ion Cyclotron Emission (MICE) during ICRF (H)D minority heating in the JET tokamak are presented. An inner wall radiofrequency (rf) probe shows the new single MICE spectral line, downshifted from the heating, frequency and appearing ∼ 400 ms after the ICRH switch-on. The line is narrow (Δω / ω) ∼ 0.04), characterised by the ion cyclotron frequency of minority protons in the outer edge mid-plane plasma and is observed irrespective of whether single or multi-frequency ICRH is applied. Threshold conditions for MICE are: coupled RF power to the plasma P rf ≥ 4.5 MW; total fast ion energy content W fast ≥ 0.6 MJ. At the time of the rapid switch-on of MICE, the measured power loss from the energetic minority ions is ∼ 0.1 ± 0.1 MW, constituting rf . The observations are consistent with the classical evolution and population of the plasma edge with ∼ 3 MeV ICRH protons on orbits near the outboard limiters. Particle loss and energy filtering contribute to a local non-Maxwellian energetic ion distribution which is susceptible to ion cyclotron instability

  8. Investigation of current drive possibilities with the present ICRH system in Wendelstein VII-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    With the double antenna configuration, designed for first heating tests on W VII-AS, a maximum driven current of 390 A/MW coupled can be expected when using a frequency of 75 MHz and a phasing of π/2. (orig.)

  9. Optimization of ICRH for core impurity control in JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lerche, E.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, P.; Van Eester, D.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Giroud, C.; Monakhov, I.; Casson, F.J.; Rimini, F.; Angioni, C.; Baruzzo, M.; Blackman, T.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Crombé, K.; Challis, C.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Fedorczak, N.; Graham, M.; Graves, J.P.; Gorini, G.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Johnson, T.; Kazakov, Y.; Kiptily, V.; Krivska, A.; Lennholm, M.; Lomas, P.; Maggi, C.; Mantica, P.; Mathews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meneses, L.; Mlynář, Jan; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M.F.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Nunes, I.; Ongena, J.; Petravich, G.; Petržílka, Václav; Pütterich, T.; Reich, M.; Santala, M.; Solano, E.R.; Shaw, A.; Sips, G.; Stamp, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Tsalas, M.; Valisa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2016), s. 036022 ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ICRF heating * tokamak * ITER-like wall * JET Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/3/036022

  10. Applications of the 3-dim ICRH global wave code FISIC and comparison with other models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.; Brambilla, M.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two ICRF heating experiments in ASDEX are presented, using the FISIC code to solve the integrodifferential wave equations in the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation model and of ray tracing. The different models show on the whole good agreement; we can however identify a few interesting toroidal effects, in particular on the efficiency of mode conversion and on the propagation of ion Bernstein waves. (author)

  11. A near infra-red video system as a protective diagnostic for electron cyclotron resonance heating operation in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Reintrog, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Corre, Y.; Moncada, V.; Travere, J.-M. [IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator is a large nuclear fusion device based at Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald in Germany. The main plasma heating system for steady state operation in W7-X is electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). During operation, part of plama facing components will be directly heated by the non-absorbed power of 1 MW rf beams of ECRH. In order to avoid damages of such components made of graphite tiles during the first operational phase, a near infra-red video system has been developed as a protective diagnostic for safe and secure ECRH operation. Both the mechanical design housing the camera and the optical system are very flexible and respect the requirements of steady state operation. The full system including data acquisition and control system has been successfully tested in the vacuum vessel, including on-line visualization and data storage of the four cameras equipping the ECRH equatorial launchers of W7-X.

  12. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO 2 + CO 2 collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO 2 lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 700 0 K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ΔJ up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 → 101) and hot-band (011 → 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu 3 -transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments

  13. Self-assembled Au nanoparticles on heated Corning glass by dc magnetron sputtering: size-dependent surface plasmon resonance tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammatikopoulos, S.; Pappas, S. D. [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece); Dracopoulos, V. [Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes, (FORTH/ICE-HT), Foundation for Research and Technology (Greece); Poulopoulos, P., E-mail: poulop@upatras.gr [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik (Germany); Velgakis, M. J.; Politis, C. [University of Patras, Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering (Greece)

    2013-02-15

    We report on the growth of Au nanoparticles on Corning glass by direct current magnetron sputtering and on the optical absorption of the films. The substrate temperature was kept to relatively high temperatures of 100 or 450 Degree-Sign C. This lead to the growth of Au nanoparticles instead of smooth Au films as the surface energy of Au is much larger than the one of glass. The size of the particles depended on the substrate temperature and deposition time and was shown to follow a logarithmic normal distribution function. Both, the surface plasmon resonance position and bandwidth, were found to depend upon the average particle size. The surface plasmon resonance position showed a 75 nm continuous blue shift from 14 nm down to 2.5 nm average particle size. Thus, we have shown how to tune the nanoparticle size and surface plasmon resonance of Au by varying the substrate temperature and deposition time. The experimental results are reproduced reasonably using a method which is based on the size- and wavelength-dependent complex dielectric function of Au within the framework of the Mie theory for the optical properties of metallic nanospheres.

  14. The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on the divertor heat and particle fluxes in MAST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thornton, A.J.; Kirk, A.; Cahyna, Pavel; Chapman, I.T.; Harrison, J.R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2014), 064011-064011 ISSN 0029-5515. [International Workshop on Stochasticity in Fusion Plasmas /6./. Jülich, 18.03.2013-20.03.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : divertor * edge localized mode * resonant magnetic perturbation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.062, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/54/6/064011/pdf/0029-5515_54_6_064011.pdf

  15. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on the 2nd Joint Grenoble-Varenna International Symposium on Heating in Toroidal Plasmas, held at Como, Italy, from the 3-12 September 1980. Important problems in relation to the different existing processes of heating. The plasma were identified and discussed. Among others, the main processes discussed were: a) neutral beam heating, b) ion-(electron)-cyclotron resonance heating, c) hybrid resonance and low frequency heating

  16. Microwave measurement test results of circular waveguide components for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.W.; Rubert, R.R.; Coffield, F.E.; Felker, B.; Stallard, B.W.; Taska, J.

    1983-01-01

    Development of high-power components for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) applications requires extensive testing. In this paper we describe the high-power testing of various circular waveguide components designed for application on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). These include a 2.5-in. vacuum valve, polarizing reflectors, directional couplers, mode converters, and flexible waveguides. All of these components were tested to 200 kW power level with 40-ms pulses. Cold tests were used to determine field distribution. The techniques used in these tests are illustrated. The new high-power test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described and test procedures are discussed. We discuss the following test results: efficiency at high power of mode converters, comparison of high power vs low power for waveguide components, and full power tests of the waveguide system. We also explain the reasons behind selection of these systems for use on TMX-U

  17. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zito, Pietro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  18. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.zito@enea.it; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  19. Impact of electro-magnetic stabilization, small- scale turbulence and multi-scale interactions on heat transport in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Heat transport experiments in JET, based on ICRH heat flux scans and temperature modulation, have confirmed the importance of two transport mechanisms that are often neglected in modeling experimental results, but are crucial to reach agreement between theory and experiment and may be significant in ITER. The first mechanism is the stabilizing effect of the total pressure gradient (including fast ions) on ITG driven ion heat transport. Such stabilization is found in non-linear gyro-kinetic electro-magnetic simulations using GENE and GYRO, and is the explanation for the observed loss of ion stiffness in the core of high NBI-power JET plasmas. The effect was recently observed also in JET plasmas with dominant ICRH heating and small rotation, due to ICRH fast ions, which is promising for ITER. Such mechanism dominates over ExB flow shear in the core and needs to be included in quasi-linear models to increase their ability to capture the relevant physics. The second mechanism is the capability of small- scale ETG instabilities to carry a significant fraction of electron heat. A decrease in Te peaking is observed when decreasing Zeff Te/Ti, which cannot be ascribed to TEMs but is in line with ETGs. Non-linear GENE single-scale simulations of ETGs and ITG/TEMs show that the ITG/TEM electron heat flux is not enough to match experiment. TEM stiffness is also much lower than measured. In the ETG single scale simulations the external flow shear is used to saturate the ETG streamers. Multi-scale simulations are ongoing, in which the ion zonal flows are the main saturating mechanism for ETGs. These costly simulations should provide the final answer on the importance of ETG-driven electron heat flux in JET. with JET contributors [F.Romanelli, Proc.25thIAEA FEC]. Supported by EUROfusion Grant 633053.

  20. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In Tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2-dimensional (2D) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r 0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In Tore-supra conditions near antenna corners, potential structures that are shorter than 1 centimeter are

  1. 2D potential structures induced by RF sheaths coupled with transverse currents in front of ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2004-01-01

    Sheaths are space charge regions at the plasma-wall. They are induced by the differential inertia between ions and electrons, and without external perturbation, they create a floating potential between the neutral plasma and the walls. In tokamaks, these sheaths are locally enhanced by the RF (radiofrequency) electric field generated by the ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) antennas used to heat magnetic fusion plasmas at very high temperature. RF sheaths are located at the connection points of magnetic field lines to the wall, or to the bumpers which protect the antenna or to any part of the antenna structure. The asymmetric behaviour of these oscillating sheaths rectifies RF potentials in the plasma in front of antenna, to finally create nonlinearly a DC potential which can be much higher than the floating potential. We study specifically how the space-time distribution of these RF and DC rectified potentials is modified when nearby flux tubes are allowed to exchange perpendicular polarization current. To simulate that, a 2D (2-dimensional) fluid code has been implemented to compute the 2D RF potential map in a plane perpendicular to magnetic lines, and within the flute approximation the whole 3-dimensional potential map is deduced. In simulation, we consider a homogeneous transverse conductivity and use a 'test' potential map having, in absence of transverse currents, a Gaussian shape characterized by its width r0 and its amplitude φ 0 . As a function of these 2 parameters (normalized respectively to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature), we can estimate the peaking and the smoothing of the potential structure in the presence of polarization current. So, we are able to determine, for typical plasmas, the amplitude of DC potential peaks, particularly on antenna's corners, where hot spots appear during a shot. In typical Tore Supra conditions near antenna corners potential structures less than centimetric are

  2. Epitaxial growth of Si1−xGex alloys and Ge on Si(100) by electron-cyclotron-resonance Ar plasma chemical vapor deposition without substrate heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Naofumi; Sakuraba, Masao; Murota, Junichi; Sato, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    By using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) Ar-plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) without substrate heating, the epitaxial growth process of Si 1−x Ge x alloy and Ge films deposited directly on dilute-HF-treated Si(100) was investigated. From the reflection high energy electron diffraction patterns of the deposited Si 1−x Ge x alloy (x = 0.50, 0.75) and Ge films on Si(100), it is confirmed that epitaxial growth can be realized without substrate heating, and that crystallinity degradation at larger film thickness is observed. The X-ray diffraction peak of the epitaxial films reveals the existence of large compressive strain, which is induced by lattice matching with the Si(100) substrate at smaller film thicknesses, as well as strain relaxation behavior at larger film thicknesses. The Ge fraction of Si 1−x Ge x thin film is in good agreement with the normalized GeH 4 partial pressure. The Si 1−x Ge x deposition rate increases with an increase of GeH 4 partial pressure. The GeH 4 partial pressure dependence of partial deposition rates [(Si or Ge fraction) × (Si 1−x Ge x thickness) / (deposition time)] shows that the Si partial deposition rate is slightly enhanced by the existence of Ge. From these results, it is proposed that the ECR-plasma CVD process can be utilized for Ge fraction control in highly-strained heterostructure formation of group IV semiconductors. - Highlights: • Si 1−x Ge x alloy and Ge were epitaxially grown on Si(100) without substrate heating. • Large strain and its relaxation behavior can be observed by X-ray diffraction. • Ge fraction of Si 1−x Ge x is equal to normalized GeH 4 partial pressure. • Si partial deposition rate is slightly enhanced by existence of Ge

  3. Investigation of the role of electron cyclotron resonance heating and magnetic configuration on the suprathermal ion population in the stellarator TJ-II using a luminescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Tribaldos, V.

    2018-02-01

    Numerous observation exist of a population of high energetic ions with energies well above the corresponding thermal values in plasmas generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator and in other magnetically confined plasmas devices. In this work we study the impact of ECR heating different conditions (positions and powers) on fast ions escaping from plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator. For this study, an ion luminescent probe operated in counting mode is used to measure the energy distribution of suprathermal ions, in the range from 1 to 30 keV. It is observed that some suprathermal ions characteristics (such as temperature, particle and energy fluxes) are related directly with the gyrotron power and focus position of the heating beam in the plasma. Moreover, it is found that suprathermal ion characteristics vary during a magnetic configuration scan (performed along a single discharge). By investigating the suprathermal ions escaping from plasmas generated using two gyrotrons, one with fixed power and the other modulated (on/off) at low frequency (10 Hz), the de-confinement time of the suprathermal ions can be measured, which is of the order of a few milliseconds (power balance is used to understand the de-confinement times in terms of the interaction of suprathermal ions and plasma components. This model also can be used to interpret experimental results of energy loss due to suprathermal ions. Finally, observations of increases (peaks) in the population of escaping suprathermal ions, which are well localized at discrete energies, is documented, these peaks being observed in the energy distributions along a discharge.

  4. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  5. Experimental observation of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the two plasmon decay instability and resonance absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in two experimental devices. In the first device an investigation was made of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the parametric decay of microwaves into electron plasma waves (Two Plasmon Decay instability, TPDI), modeling a process which can occur near the quarter critical surface in laser driven pellets. P-polarized microwave (f = 1.2 GHz, P 0 less than or equal to 12 kW) are applied to an essentially collisionless, inhomogeneous plasma, in an oversized waveguide, in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III device. The initial density scale length near the quarter critical surface is quite long (L/lambda/sub De/ approx. = 3000 or k 0 L approx. = 15). The observed threshold power for the TPDI is quite low (P/sub T/approx. = 0.1 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ approx. = 0.1). Near the threshold the decay waves only occur near the quarter critical surface. As the incident power is increased above threshold, the decay waves spread to lower densities, and for P 0 greater than or equal to lkW, (v/sub os//v/sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.3) suprathermal electron heating is strong for high powers (T/sub H/ less than or equal to 12 T/sub e/ for P 0 less than or equal to 8 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.9)

  6. Backscattering of gyrotron radiation and short-wavelength turbulence during electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating in the L-2M stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D., E-mail: tinborz@gmail.com; Kovrizhnykh, L. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15

    Backscattering of gyrotron radiation ({theta} = {pi}) by short-wavelength density fluctuations (k{sub Up-Tack} = 30 cm{sup -1}) in the plasma of the L-2M stellarator was studied under conditions of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma heating at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency (75 GHz). The scattering of the O-wave emerging due to the splitting of the linearly polarized gyrotron radiation into the X- and O-waves was analyzed. The signal obtained after homodyne detection of scattered radiation is a result of interference of the reference signal, the quasi-steady component, and the fast oscillating component. The coefficients of reflection of the quasi-steady component, R{sub =}{sup 2}(Y), and fast oscillating component, R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y), of scattered radiation are estimated. The growth of the R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y) coefficient from 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} to 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} with increasing ECR heating power from 190 to 430 kW is found to correlate with the decrease in the energy lifetime from 1.9 to 1.46 ms. The relative density of short-wavelength fluctuations is estimated to be Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub {approx}}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket / Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub e}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. It is shown that the frequencies of short-wavelength fluctuations are in the range 10-150 kHz. The recorded short-wavelength fluctuations can be interpreted as structural turbulence, the energy of which comprises {approx}10% of the total fluctuations energy. Simulations of transport processes show that neoclassical heat fluxes are much smaller than anomalous ones. It is suggested that short-wavelength turbulence plays a decisive role in the anomalous heat transport.

  7. A global solution of the ICRH problem based on the combined use of a planar coupling model and hot-plasma ray-tracing in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Messiaen, A.M.; Eester, D. van

    1986-01-01

    The global solution of the theoretical problem of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating in tokamak plasmas is obtained by a subdivision of the problem into two simpler ones by virtue of the ''single pass absorption'' hypothesis. The coupling problem is solved in planar geometry, allowing computation of both the antenna electrical properties and the Radio-Frequency (RF) field distribution in the plasma facing the antenna. Starting from this field distribution, the initial conditions for ray-tracing are derived and the propagation and absorption of waves in the plasma bulk is solved in the geometric optics limit taking into account the full tokamak geometry and the kinetic wave description. In the minority heating, redistribution of the minority absorbed power to the other species is carred out using standard quasilinear theory. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for the exploitation of bubble-enhanced heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound: a feasibility study in ex vivo liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbes, Delphine; Denost, Quentin; Robert, Benjamin; Köhler, Max O; Tanter, Mickaël; Bruno, Quesson

    2014-05-01

    Bubble-enhanced heating (BEH) may be exploited to improve the heating efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound in liver and to protect tissues located beyond the focal point. The objectives of this study, performed in ex vivo pig liver, were (i) to develop a method to determine the acoustic power threshold for induction of BEH from displacement images measured by magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI), and (ii) to compare temperature distribution with MR thermometry for HIFU protocols with and without BEH. The acoustic threshold for generation of BEH was determined in ex vivo pig liver from MR-ARFI calibration curves of local tissue displacement resulting from sonication at different powers. Temperature distributions (MR thermometry) resulting from "conventional" sonications (20 W, 30 s) were compared with those from "composite" sonications performed at identical parameters, but after a HIFU burst pulse (0.5 s, acoustic power over the threshold for induction of BEH). Displacement images (MR-ARFI) were acquired between sonications to measure potential modifications of local tissue displacement associated with modifications of tissue acoustic characteristics induced by the burst HIFU pulse. The acoustic threshold for induction of BEH corresponded to a displacement amplitude of approximately 50 μm in ex vivo liver. The displacement and temperature images of the composite group exhibited a nearly spherical pattern, shifted approximately 4 mm toward the transducer, in contrast to elliptical shapes centered on the natural focal position for the conventional group. The gains in maximum temperature and displacement values were 1.5 and 2, and the full widths at half-maximum of the displacement data were 1.7 and 2.2 times larger than in the conventional group in directions perpendicular to ultrasound propagation axes. Combination of MR-ARFI and MR thermometry for calibration and exploitation of BEH appears to increase the efficiency and safety

  9. ICRF experiments and synergy with LHCD on HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yin, F.X.; Wan, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    The successful ion cyclotron heating (ICRH) experiment with high power density of nearly 1MW/m 3 was carried out in HT-6M tokamak. The good heating efficiency was achieved by using different wall conditioning techniques, such as He GDC, Ti gettering and boronization. With 300kW injected RF power, the ion temperature reach about 750eV and Te increases from 700eV to about 1keV. Synergy effects between lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ICRH have some unique features. The current driven efficiency improved in full current drive case from 0.8x10 19 AW -1 M -2 (without ICRH) to 1.75x10 19 AW -1 M -2 (with ICRH). The reason for this high current driven efficiency may because the mode conversion at ion-ion hybrid resonance to an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) which is damped on the fast electron. (author)

  10. A finite element solution to conjugated heat transfer in tissue using magnetic resonance angiography to measure the in vitro velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Andrew William

    1993-12-01

    A combined numerical and experimental system for tissue heat transfer analysis was developed. The goal was to develop an integrated set of tools for studying the problem of providing accurate temperature estimation for use in hyperthermia treatment planning in a clinical environment. The completed system combines (1) Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) to non-destructively measure the velocity field in situ, (2) the Streamwise Upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element solution to the 3D steady state convective energy equation (CEE), (3) a medical image based automatic 3D mesh generator, and (4) a Gaussian type estimator to determine unknown thermal model parameters such as thermal conductivity, blood perfusion, and blood velocities from measured temperature data. The system was capable of using any combination of three thermal models (1) the Convective Energy Equation (CEE), (2) the Bioheat Transfer Equation (BHTE), and (3) the Effective Thermal Conductivity Equation (ETCE) Incorporation of the theoretically correct CEE was a significant theoretical advance over approximate models made possible by the use of MRA to directly measure the 3D velocity field in situ. Experiments were carried out in a perfused alcohol fixed canine liver with hyperthermia induced through scanned focused ultrasound Velocity fields were measured using Phase Contrast Angiography. The complete system was then used to (1) develop a 3D finite element model based upon user traced outlines over a series of MR images of the liver and (2) simulate temperatures at steady state using the CEE, BHTE, and ETCE thermal models in conjunction with the gauss estimator. Results of using the system on an in vitro liver preparation indicate the need for improved accuracy in the MRA scans and accurate spatial registration between the thermocouple junctions, the measured velocity field, and the scanned ultrasound power No individual thermal model was able to meet the desired accuracy of 0.5 deg C, the resolution

  11. Plasma heating - a comparative overview for future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, R.

    1989-01-01

    Successful plasma heating is essential in present fusion experiments, for the demonstration of D-T burn in future devices and finally for the fusion reactor itself. This paper discusses the common heating system with respect to their present performance and their applicability to future fusion devices. The comparative discussion is oriented to the various functions of heating, which are: Plasma heating to fusion-relevant parameters and to ignition in future machines, non-inductive, steady-state current drive, plasma profile control, neutral gas breakdown and plasma build-up. In view of these different functions, the potential of neutral beam injection (NBI) and the various schemes of wave heating (ECRH, LH, ICRH and Alfven wave heating) is analyzed in more detail. The analysis includes assessments of the present physical and technical state of these heating methods, and makes suggestions for future developments and about outstanding problems. Specific attention is given to the still critical problem of efficient current drive, especially with respect to further extrapolation towards an economically operating tokamak reactor. Remarks on issues such as reliability, maintenance and economy conclude this comparative overview on plasma heating systems. (orig.)

  12. Collision broadened resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1985-08-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The authors have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element. These data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. Collisions affect the absorption of rf energy by two quite distinct processes: In addition to the usual relaxation towards the Maxwellian distribution creating velocity gradients which drive quasilinear diffusion, collisions also affect the wave-particle resonance through the mechanism of gyro-phase diffusion. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field

  13. Hydrogenic Species Transport Assessments in Ceramic Aluminas Used in ITER ICRH H and CD and Diagnostic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, C.; Sedano, L. A.

    2007-09-27

    Ceramic insulators will be used in the ITER Heating and Current Drive and Diagnostics (H and CD/D) systems as opto-electronic vacuum windows or as feed-troughs. Their performance as materials could come modified by the intake of deuterium-tritium which amounts might be enhanced by ionising radiation effects. Such vacuum windows have a primary safety role as tritium confinement barriers. Tritium transport analyses have major implications on the design and safety assessments of ITER RF H and CD systems. As it is shown, refined tritium transport release-rate models together with detailed parametric studies can precise such assessments. In addition such modeling serves as conceptual framework to quantify precise impact of underlying phenomena (ex. radiation-enhanced diffusion or potential effects of radiation damage on tritium transport through the Vacuum Window) and its fi nal impact on main transport parameters of interest for VW design: permeation flux and D/T inventories. In the present work it has been shown how, for electric implantation of ionized D,T in the VW being the major source for isotopes intake, an hybrid recombination/radiation enhanced diffusion regime determine H-isotopes transport kinetics in the window. Precise values for permeation fluxes and inventories are provided from solution of mass transport equations. Near and medium term work planning is advanced. (Author) 16 refs.

  14. Hydrogenic Species Transport Assessments in Ceramic Aluminas Used in ITER ICRH H and CD and Diagnostic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, C.; Sedano, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic insulators will be used in the ITER Heating and Current Drive and Diagnostics (H and CD/D) systems as opto-electronic vacuum windows or as feed-troughs. Their performance as materials could come modified by the intake of deuterium-tritium which amounts might be enhanced by ionising radiation effects. Such vacuum windows have a primary safety role as tritium confinement barriers. Tritium transport analyses have major implications on the design and safety assessments of ITER RF H and CD systems. As it is shown, refined tritium transport release-rate models together with detailed parametric studies can precise such assessments. In addition such modeling serves as conceptual framework to quantify precise impact of underlying phenomena (ex. radiation-enhanced diffusion or potential effects of radiation damage on tritium transport through the Vacuum Window) and its fi nal impact on main transport parameters of interest for VW design: permeation flux and D/T inventories. In the present work it has been shown how, for electric implantation of ionized D,T in the VW being the major source for isotopes intake, an hybrid recombination/radiation enhanced diffusion regime determine H-isotopes transport kinetics in the window. Precise values for permeation fluxes and inventories are provided from solution of mass transport equations. Near and medium term work planning is advanced. (Author) 16 refs

  15. High Power ICRH scenarios in Tore-Supra: a potential route towards improved core confinement at high density?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimini, F.G.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Clairet, F.; Elbeze, D.; Gil, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Schunke, P.; Tsitrone, E. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hennequin, P.; Honore, C. [CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, LPTP, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2005-07-01

    As shown by many tokamak experiments, including Tore-Supra, an operational scenario based on tailoring the current profile via a combination of electron heating and fast plasma current ramp is particularly attractive for producing conditions favourable to internal transport barriers (ITBs) development. As we have reported in this paper, however, this is not a foolproof method for producing ITBs. In our case, reversed or flat shear conditions were indeed created, but only transiently and in a very narrow region in the plasma centre, {rho} < 0.3, and the KINEZERO code micro-stability analysis does not indicate that any significant stabilization of ITG (ion temperature gradient) or ETG (electron temperature gradient) modes is taking place. We have used the Cronos transport code to predict how we could redesign the experiment to maximize the probability to obtain more favourable conditions for triggering and sustaining high performance ITBs. Our modelling is done assuming that recycling can be moderated and edge density can be kept lower than in the actual experiments. In this case, with a substantial increase in LHCD power, from 2.5 MW to 8 MW, we could approach conditions of flat current profile over a wide region, extending to half radius, with a significant fraction of the total current, {approx} 70%, being non-inductively driven. The predictive Cronos transport model, which includes local reduction of transport according to magnetic shear, yields a long-lasting wide electron ITB located close to mid-radius.

  16. Alfven wave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, H.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of Alfven-wave heating is particularly sensitive to the character of the linear mode conversion which occurs at the Alfven resonance layer. Parameter changes can profoundly affect both the location within the plasma and the mechanism for the power absorption. Under optimal conditions the heating power may be absorbed by electron Landau damping and by electron transit-time magnetic pumping in the plasma interior, or by the same processes acting near the resonance layer on the mode-converted kinetic Alfven wave. The method is outlined for computing the coefficients for reflection, transmission and absorption at the resonance layer and some representative results are offered

  17. Metal impurity transport control in JET H-mode plasmas with central ion cyclotron radiofrequency power injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valisa, M.; Carraro, L.; Predebon, I.

    2011-01-01

    The scan of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) power has been used to systematically study the pump out effect of central electron heating on impurities such as Ni and Mo in H-mode low collisionality discharges in JET. The transport parameters of Ni and Mo have been measured by introducing...

  18. Resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The majority of these calculations neglect the fact that gyrocenters experience the inhomogeneity via their motion parallel to the magnetic field. The non-local effects of rotational transform and toroidicity can play a significant role in both the propagation and the absorption physics. In strongly driven systems, wave damping can distort the particle distribution function supporting the wave and this produces changes in the absorption. The most common approach is to use Maxwellian absorption rates. We have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element; these data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field

  19. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance; Fluorescence induite par laser sur des plasmas fortement magnetises, chauffes par resonnance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O`ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author) 62 refs.

  20. Selective heating and separation of isotopes in a metallic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffa, P.; Cheshire, D.; Flanders, B.; Myer, R.; Robinette, W.; Thompson, J.; Young, S.

    1983-01-01

    Several types of metallic plasmas have been produced at the Plasma Separation Process facility of TRW. Selective heating and separation of specific isotopes in these plasmas have been achieved. In this presentation the authors concentrate on the modeling of the selective heating and separation of the isotope Ni 58 . Two models are currently used to describe the excitation process. In both, the electromagnetic fields in the plasma produced by the ICRH antenna are calculated self-consistently using a kinetic description of the warm plasma dielectric. In the Process Model Code, both the production of the plasma and the heating are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach. Only the excitation process is treated in the second simplified model. Test particles that sample an initial parallel velocity distribution are launched into the heating region and the equations of motion including collisional damping are calculated. For both models, the perpendicular energy for a number of particles with different initial conditions and representing the different isotopes is calculated. This information is then input into a code that models the performance of our isotope separation collector. The motion of the ions of each isotope through the electrically biased collector is followed. An accounting of where each particle is deposited is kept and hence the isotope separation performance of the collector is predicted

  1. Understanding the magnetic behavior of heat treated CaO-P2O5-Na2O-Fe2O3-SiO2 bioactive glass using electron paramagnetic resonance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankhwar, Nisha; Kothiyal, G. P.; Srinivasan, A.

    2014-09-01

    Bioactive glass of composition 41CaO-44SiO2-4P2O5-8Fe2O3-3Na2O has been heat treated in the temperature (TA) range of 750-1150 °C for time periods (tA) ranging from 1 h to 3 h to yield magnetic bioactive glass ceramics (MBCs). X-ray diffraction studies indicate the presence of bone mineral (hydroxyapatite and wollastonite) and magnetic (magnetite and α-hematite) phases in nanocrystalline form in the MBCs. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study was carried out to understand the variation in saturation magnetization and coercivity of the MBCs with TA and tA. These studies reveal the nature and amount of iron ions present in the MBCs and their interaction in the glassy oxide matrix as a function of annealing parameters. The deterioration in the magnetic properties of the glass heat treated above 1050 °C is attributed to the crystallization of the non-magnetic α-hematite phase. These results are expected to be useful in the application of these MBCs as thermoseeds in hyperthermia treatment of cancer.

  2. Investigation of radio frequency heating of dental implants made of titanium in 1.5 tesla and 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance procedure. Measurement of the temperature by using tissue-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideta, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Masaru; Kudou, Sadahiro; Higashida, Mitsuji; Nakazawa, Masami; Mori, Shintarou; Kaneda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants are increasingly being used for dental parts. There is no problem with the attraction of a static magnetic field for Ti in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), since Ti is paramagnetic. However, there is a risk of radio frequency (RF) heat generation within Ti. 3.0 T-MRI scanners are becoming increasingly common. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3.0 T-MRI is quadruple that of SAR compared with 1.5 T-MRI due to its being proportional to the square of the strength of a static magnetic field. The effect of heat generation in 3.0 T-MRI can thus be greater than in 1.5 T-MRI. So, using 1.5 T and 3.0 T-MRI scanners, we measured the temperature of several Ti implants using the same scanning parameters during MRI scanning. Our measurements showed the rise in temperature of the Ti implants to be a maximum of 0.4degC. In this study, however, Ti in a human mouth was not directly measured, so we need to attempt to perform MRI carefully on patients with Ti implants. (author)

  3. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  4. Power deposition profiles and Poynting vector distribution of phased antenna arrays in the ion-cyclotron resonance heating of a NET/INTOR-type tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Koch, R.

    1986-01-01

    The heating produced by magnetosonic waves launched from phased antenna arrays in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies is studied for a large tokamak with NET/INTOR-like parameters. The model used combines a 3-D planar, cold-plasma, antenna-plasma coupling code and a 3-D non-circular, toroidal, hot-plasma/ray-tracing code. First, the fractional power absorption of a ray during a single transit through the absorption layer is studied in a D-T plasma indicating total absorption in all INTOR cases except during the initial state characterized by low plasma temperature and density. However, in this case the single-pass wave absorption can be increased considerably by adding a few per cent of hydrogen. Further, complete power deposition profiles and Poynting vector distributions are presented for 'symmetric' and 'antisymmetric' 2x2 antenna array configurations with ksub(parallel)-shaping. Excitation of coaxial modes has, for the first time, been demonstrated explicitly by analysis of the Poynting vector distribution in real space. An antenna configuration with a π-phasing in the z-direction (such that the radiated power spectrum peaks at ksub(parallel) approx.= 5 m -1 ) and the choice of 3lambda/4 long antenna elements with 'symmetric' excitation in the y-direction, are found to produce central RF power deposition profiles in the second-harmonic and minority heating of INTOR. Finally, from a comparison of results for circular and non-circular NET/INTOR plasmas with elongation kappa=1.6, it is found that in the latter wave focusing is greatly reduced and that the power density figures are lower by approximately a factor of 1.9 for the case treated. (author)

  5. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  6. Do heat and moisture exchangers in the anaesthesia breathing circuit preserve body temperature in dogs undergoing anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenissi, Latifa; Covey-Crump, Gwen; Knowles, Toby G; Murrell, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether the use of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) preserves body temperature in dogs weighing dogs. Dogs were assigned randomly to a treatment group [HME (n = 16) or no HME (n = 15)]. Dogs were pseudorandomised according to the premedication they were administered, either dexmedetomidine or no dexmedetomidine. Induction agents were not standardised. General anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane vaporised in 100% oxygen delivered using a T-piece and a fresh gas flow of 600 mL kg -1 minute -1 . Rectal temperature was measured before premedication (T1), after induction (T2), before moving to the MRI unit (T3) and at the end of the MRI scan (T4). Ambient temperatures were measured in the induction room, outside and inside the MRI unit. Data were analysed using a general linear model with T4 as the outcome variable. Linear correlations were performed between T1, T2, T3 and T4, and variables that predicted T4 were investigated. Sex, age and body mass were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences in rectal temperature between groups at any time point (group with HME at the end of MRI = 36.3 ± 1.1 °C; group with no HME at the end of MRI = 36.2 ± 1.4 °C) but at the end of the MRI, dogs administered dexmedetomidine (36.6 ± 0.7 °C) had a higher rectal temperature compared with dogs not administered dexmedetomidine (35.9 ± 1.6 °C) for premedication. Rectal temperature varied directly with ambient temperature in MRI scanning room and inversely with anaesthetic duration. Using an HME did not alter body temperature in dogs weighing temperature during anaesthesia. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  8. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  9. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system has been designed, fabricated indigenously and commissioned on Tokamak Aditya. The system has been commissioned to operate between 20·0 and 47·0 MHz at a maximum power of 200 kW continuous wave (CW). Duration of 500 ms is sufficient for operation on Aditya, ...

  10. Heat pumps: heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pielke, R

    1976-01-01

    The author firstly explains in a general manner the functioning of the heat pump. Following a brief look at the future heat demand and the possibilities of covering it, the various methods of obtaining energy (making use of solar energy, ground heat, and others) and the practical applications (office heating, swimming pool heating etc.) are explained. The author still sees considerable difficulties in using the heat pump at present on a large scale. Firstly there is not enough maintenance personnel available, secondly the electricity supply undertakings cannot provide the necessary electricity on a wide basis without considerable investments. Other possibilities to save energy or to use waste energy are at present easier and more economical to realize. Recuperative and regenerative systems are described.

  11. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  12. Review on resonance cone fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1980-02-01

    Resonance cone fields and lower hybrid heating are reviewed in this report. The resonance cone fields were reported by Fisher and Gould, and they proposed the use of the measurement of resonance cones and structure as a diagnostic tool to determine the plasma density and electron temperature in magnetoplasma. After the resonance cone, a wave-like disturbance persists. Ohnuma et al. have measured bending, reflection and ducting of resonance cones in detail. The thermal modes in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma were seen. The reflection of thermal mode near an electron plasma frequency layer and an insulating plate has been observed. The non-linear effects of resonance cones is reported. Monochromatic electron beam produces the noise of broad band whistler mode. Lower hybrid waves have been the subject of propagation from the edge of plasma to the lower hybrid layer. Linear lower hybrid waves were studied. The lower hybrid and ion acoustic waves radiated from a point source were observed. The parametric decay of finite-extent, cold electron plasma waves was studied. The lower hybrid cone radiated from a point source going along magnetic field lines was observed. Several experimental data on the lower hybrid heating in tokamak devices have been reported. The theories on resonance cones and lower hybrid waves are introduced in this report. (Kato, T.)

  13. Heat pipe heat storage performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A; Pasquetti, R [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (FR). Inst. Universitaire des Systemes; Grakovich, L P; Vasiliev, L L [A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst. of the BSSR, Academy of Sciences, Minsk (BY)

    1989-01-01

    Heat storage offers essential thermal energy saving for heating. A ground heat store equipped with heat pipes connecting it with a heat source and to the user is considered in this paper. It has been shown that such a heat exchanging system along with a batch energy source meets, to a considerable extent, house heating requirements. (author).

  14. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  15. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  16. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  17. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  18. Isotope separation in plasma by ion-cyclotron resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinov, A.E.; Kornilova, I.Yu.; Selemir, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    Contemporary state of investigation on isotope separation in plasma using selective ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating is considered. The main attention is paid to necessary conditions of heating selectivity, plasma creation methods in isotope ICR-separation facilities, selection of antenna systems for heating, and principles of more-heated component selection. Experimental results obtained at different isotope mixtures separation are presented [ru

  19. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on Aditya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    basis by means of thermometers incorporated in the soda water circuit and the soda water flowmeter. ..... Baking at 100. ◦. C of the interface components is possible as vacuum seals can withstand such temper- ature. Ten pulses that comprise 100 ms ON time and 50 ms OFF time, are usually used for conditioning of Aditya ...

  20. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on Aditya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    basis by means of thermometers incorporated in the soda water circuit and the ... the enclosure are brazed/welded to avoid RF leakage and the front side of ..... Detector output is scaled down to 0 to 1 V level and connected to a Knick amplifier.

  1. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heefner, J.W.; Williams, C.W.; Lauze, R.R.; Karsner, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The ECRH Control System was installed on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) in 1980. The system provides approximately 1 MW of 28 GHz microwave power to the TMX-U plasma. The subsystems of ECRH that must be controlled include high-voltage charging supplies, series pass tubes, and magnet supplies. In addition to the devices that must be controlled, many interlocks must be continuously monitored. The previous control system used relay logic and analog controls to operate the system. This approach has many drawbacks such as lack of system flexibility and maintainability. In order to address these problems, it was decided to go with a CAMAC and Modicon based system that uses a Hewlett-Packard 9836C personal computer to replace the previous analog controls. 2 figs

  2. Heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E L; Eisenmann, G; Hahne, E [Stuttgart Univ. (TH) (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1976-04-01

    A survey is presented on publications on design, heat transfer, form factors, free convection, evaporation processes, cooling towers, condensation, annular gap, cross-flowed cylinders, axial flow through a bundle of tubes, roughnesses, convective heat transfer, loss of pressure, radiative heat transfer, finned surfaces, spiral heat exchangers, curved pipes, regeneraters, heat pipes, heat carriers, scaling, heat recovery systems, materials selection, strength calculation, control, instabilities, automation of circuits, operational problems and optimization.

  3. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple “shark fins” and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  4. Temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iervolino, E.; Riccio, M.; Van Herwaarden, A.W.; Irace, A.; Breglio, G.; Van der Vlist, W.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric (TG) devices for tip heating over the temperature range of View the MathML source 25–600?C. The resonance frequency of a fabricated TG device shows to be temperature independent for tip heating up to

  5. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  6. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  7. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  8. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  9. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  10. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  11. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. These resonances occur when the betatron oscillation wave numbers ν/sub x/ or ν/sub y/ and the synchrotron wave number ν/sub s/ satisfy the relation (ν/sub x,y/ - mν/sub s/) = 5, with m an integer denoting the m/sup th/ satellite. The main difference between SPEAR II and SPEAR I is the value of ν/sub s/, which in SPEAR II is approximately 0.04, an order of magnitude larger than in SPEAR I. An ad hoc meeting was held at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, where details of the SPEAR II results were presented and various possible mechanisms for producing these resonances were discussed. Later, experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  12. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  13. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir OSHA-NIOSH ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  14. Nonlinear phenomena at cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, D.; Uma, R.

    1986-01-01

    Finite amplitude electromagnetic waves in a magnetoplasma which typically occur in situations as in present day wave heating, current drives and other schemes in magnetically confined fusion systems, can show qualitatively different absorption and emission characteristics around resonant frequencies of the plasma because of anharmonicity. Linear wave plasma coupling as well as weak nonlinear effects such as parametric instabilities generally overlook this important effect even though the thresholds for the two phenomena as shown here are comparable. Though the effects described here are relevant to a host of nonlinear resonance effects in fusion plasmas, the authors mainly limit themselves to ECRH

  15. Cyclotron heating rate in a parabolic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    Cyclotron resonance heating rates are found for a parabolic magnetic mirror. The equation of motion for perpendicular velocity is solved, including the radial magnetic field terms neglected in earlier papers. The expression for heating rate involves an infinite series of Anger's and Weber's functions, compared with a single term of the unrevised expression. The new results show an increase of heating rate compared with previous results. A simple expression is given for the ratio of the heating rates. (author)

  16. Supplementary plasma heating studies in the Atomic Energy Commission France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, T.

    1976-01-01

    The research on supplementary heating of toroidal plasma made in France at the Atomic Energy Commission and in the European Community are described (with special reference to the J.E.T. project) in the frame of the national programs. A non exhaustive description of the world effort in this topic is also presented: (neutral injection heating, TTMP (transit time magnetic pumping) heating, electron and ion cyclotron resonance, and lower hybrid resonance heating)

  17. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...

  18. Gravitoelectromagnetic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between gravitational and electromagnetic radiation has a rather long research history. It is well known, in particular, that gravity-wave distortions can drive propagating electromagnetic signals. Since forced oscillations provide the natural stage for resonances to occur, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances have been investigated as a means of more efficient gravity-wave detection methods. In this report, we consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields on a Minkowski background, which also applies to astrophysical environments where gravity is weak, at the second perturbative level. We use covariant methods that describe gravitational waves via the transverse component of the shear, instead of pure-tensor metric perturbations. The aim is to calculate the properties of the electromagnetic signal, which emerges from the interaction of its linear counterpart with an incoming gravitational wave. Our analysis shows how the wavelength and the amplitude of the gravitationally driven electromagnetic wave vary with the initial conditions. More specifically, for certain initial data, the amplitude of the induced electromagnetic signal is found to diverge. Analogous, diverging, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances were also reported in cosmology. Given that, we extend our Minkowski space study to cosmology and discuss analogies and differences in the physics and in the phenomenology of the Weyl-Maxwell coupling between the aforementioned two physical environments.

  19. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  20. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  1. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  2. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  3. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  4. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  5. Investigation of auxiliary heating in tandem mirrors and tokamaks and barrier cell pumping. Annual progress report, October 1, 1980 to December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Scharer, J.

    1981-06-01

    The research has focussed on physics questions concerned with ECRH heating in tandem mirror plugs, pumping of tandem mirror thermal barriers by drift orbits, ICRH heating in tokamaks, and bundle divertors. We have concluded that drift-orbit pumping of thermal barriers is not feasible because the azimuthal E Vector X B Vector drift limits the excursion of trapped ions from a flux surface. We have developed a three-dimensional weakly relativistic (T/sub e/ less than or equal to 50 keV) ray tracing and absorption code for electron cyclotron heating in tandem mirror plugs and barriers. Cases run for TMX, MFTF-B and reactors at T/sub e/ > 10 keV show that strong absorption per pass is present and a careful choice of wave frequency and launch angle is required to ensure wave penetration and absorption in the plasma core. In the area of ion cyclotron frequency range heating in tokamaks, a three-dimensional hot plasma ray tracing theory and code has been developed to handle rays launched from any poloidal angle in the tokamak cross section. Wave heating in the central strong absorption zones is currently being investigated using a full wave solution for the various heating regimes

  6. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  7. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  8. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  9. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  10. Ion heat transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P; Angioni, C; Baiocchi, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of ion heat transport have been carried out in JET exploiting the upgrade of active charge exchange spectroscopy and the availability of multi-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating with 3He minority. The determination of ion temperature gradient (ITG) threshold a...

  11. Heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triggs, G.W.; Lightowlers, R.J.; Robinson, D.; Rice, G.

    1986-01-01

    A heat pipe for use in stabilising a specimen container for irradiation of specimens at substantially constant temperature within a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, comprises an evaporator section, a condenser section, an adiabatic section therebetween, and a gas reservoir, and contains a vapourisable substance such as sodium. The heat pipe further includes a three layer wick structure comprising an outer relatively fine mesh layer, a coarse intermediate layer and a fine mesh inner layer for promoting unimpeded return of condensate to the evaporation section of the heat pipe while enhancing heat transfer with the heat pipe wall and reducing entrainment of the condensate by the upwardly rising vapour. (author)

  12. Confinement and heating in modular and continuous coil stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.T.; Anderson, F.S.B.; Bonomo, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Major efforts on the Proto-Cleo stellarator have focused on ICRH of a net current-free plasma, measurements of plasma secondary currents, RF heating by externally induced magnetic reconnection through the formation and destruction of an internal separatrix, and RF current drive experiments. Efforts on the Proto-Cleo torsatron have focused on electron heat conduction. A modular stellarator has been designed and is under fabrication at the University of Wisconsin. The Interchangeable Module Stellarator (IMS) is designed to approximate closely the magnetic properties of the existing Proto-Cleo stellarator as much as possible. Monte-Carlo transport calculations have been made in flux coordinates using model fields patterned after magnetic fields in Proto-Cleo and IMS. Plasma simulation techniques using a 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell method have been utilized in a numerical search for the bootstrap current. A current is found which is proportional to temperature and density gradients but is independent of poloidal field. The behaviour of charged particles moving in a stellarator under the influence of a steady magnetic field is analysed in terms of the Hamiltonian of the moving particle and the technique of repeated canonical transformations to identify possible adiabatic invariants and drift motions. An improved theory of collisionless particle motion in stellarators has been developed for a family of stellarator configurations. The broad range of configurations encompassed by this family permits an understanding of the differences in numerically observed transport coefficients. Two procedures have been developed to calculate the bootstrap current in non-axisymmetric stellarators. In fully toroidal stellarators the flows and consequent bootstrap current are reduced from their axisymmetric values by a factor of order l slash-l/m in the Pfirsch-Schlueter regime. (author)

  13. Resonant-cantilever bio/chemical sensors with an integrated heater for both resonance exciting optimization and sensing repeatability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haitao; Li Xinxin; Gan Xiaohua; Liu Yongjing; Liu Xiang; Xu Pengcheng; Li Jungang; Liu Min

    2009-01-01

    With an integrated resonance exciting heater and a self-sensing piezoresistor, resonant micro-cantilever bio/chemical sensors are optimally designed and fabricated by micromachining techniques. This study is emphasized on the optimization of the integrated heating resistor. Previous research has put the heater at either the cantilever clamp end, the midpoint or the free end. Aiming at sufficiently high and stable resonant amplitude, our research indicates that the optimized location of the thermal-electric exciting resistor is the clamp end instead of other positions. By both theoretical analysis and resonance experiments where three heating resistors are placed at the three locations of the fabricated cantilever, it is clarified that the clamp end heating provides the most efficient resonance excitation in terms of resonant amplitude, Q-factor and resonance stability. Besides, the optimized combination of dc bias and ac voltage is determined by both analysis and experimental verification. With the optimized heating excitation, the resonant cantilever is used for biotin–avidin-specific detection, resulting in a ±0.1 Hz ultra-low noise floor of the frequency signal and a 130 fg mass resolution. In addition to resonance excitation, the heater is used to heat up the cantilever for speed-up desorption after detection that helps rapid and repeated sensing to chemical vapor. The clamp end is determined (by simulation) as the optimal heating location for uniform temperature distribution on the cantilever. Using the resonant cantilever, a rapid and repeated sensing experiment on dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor shows that a short-period heating at the detection interval significantly quickens the signal recovery and enhances the sensing repeatability

  14. Narrow dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdalov, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on np interactions indicating to existence of narrow resonances in pp-system are discussed. Possible theoretical interpretations of these resonances are given. Experimental characteristics of the dibaryon resonances with isospin I=2 are considered

  15. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  16. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  17. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  18. Alfvenic resonant cavities in the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollweg, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of Alfven waves in a simple medium consisting of three uniform layers; each layer is characterized by a different value for the Alfven speed, νsub(A). We show how the central layer can act as a resonant cavity under quite general conditions. If the cavity is driven externally, by an incident wave in one of the outer layers, there result resonant transmission peaks, which allow large energy fluxes to enter the cavity from outside. The transmission peaks result from the destructive interference between a wave which leaks out of the cavity, and a directly reflected wave. We show that there are two types of resonances. The first type occurs when the cavity has the largest (or smallest) of the three Alfven speeds; this situation occurs on coronal loops. The second type occurs when the cavity Alfven speed is intermediate between the other two values of νsub(A); this situation may occur on solar spicules. Significant heating of the cavity can occur if the waves are damped. We show that if the energy lost to heat greatly exceeds the energy lost by leakage out of the cavity, then the cavity heating can be independent of the damping rate. This conclusion is shown to apply to coronal resonances and to the spicule resonances. This conclusion agrees with a point made by Ionson in connection with the coronal resonances. Except for a numerical factor of order unity, we recover Ionson's expression for the coronal heating rate. However, Ionson's qualities are much too large. For solar parameters, the maximum quality is of the order of 100, but the heating is independent of the damping rate only when dissipation reduces the quality to less than about 10. (WB)

  19. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  20. Tidally Heated Terrestrial Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Wade Garrett

    This work models the surface and internal temperatures for hypothetical terrestrial planets in situations involving extreme tidal heating. The feasibility of such planets is evaluated in terms of the orbital perturbations that may give rise to them, their required proximity to a hoststar, and the potential for the input tidal heating to cause significant partial melting of the mantle. Trapping terrestrial planets into 2:1 resonances with migrating Hot Jupiters is considered as a reasonable way for Earth-like worlds to both maintain high eccentricities and to move to short enough orbital periods (1-20 days) for extreme tidal heating to occur. Secular resonance and secular orbital perturbations may support moderate tidal heating at a low equilibrium eccentricity. At orbital periods below 10-30 days, with eccentricities from 0.01 to 0.1, tidal heat may greatly exceed radiogenic heat production. It is unlikely to exceed insolation, except when orbiting very low luminosity hosts, and thus will have limited surface temperature expression. Observations of such bodies many not be able to detect tidal surface enhancements given a few percent uncertainty in albedo, except on the nightside of spin synchronous airless objects. Otherwise detection may occur via spectral detection of hotspots or high volcanic gas concentrations including sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The most extreme cases may be able to produce magma oceans, or magma slush mantles with up to 40-60% melt fractions. Tides may alter the habitable zones for smaller red dwarf stars, but are generally detrimental. Multiple viscoelastic models, including the Maxwell, Voigt-Kelvin, Standard Anelastic Solid, and Burgers rheologies are explored and applied to objects such as Io and the super-Earth planet GJ 876d. The complex valued Love number for the Burgers rheology is derived and found to be a useful improvement when modeling the low temperature behavior of tidal bodies, particularly during low eccentricity

  1. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Ramandeep S Johal. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 22 Issue 12 December 2017 pp 1193-1203 General Article. Pythagorean Means and Carnot Machines: When Music Meets Heat · Ramandeep S Johal · More Details ...

  2. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 12. Pythagorean Means and Carnot Machines: When Music Meets Heat. Ramandeep S Johal.

  3. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    The arrangement described relates particularly to heat exchangers for use in fast reactor power plants, in which heat is extracted from the reactor core by primary liquid metal coolant and is then transferred to secondary liquid metal coolant by means of intermediate heat exchangers. One of the main requirements of such a system, if used in a pool type fast reactor, is that the pressure drop on the primary coolant side must be kept to a minimum consistent with the maintenance of a limited dynamic head in the pool vessel. The intermediate heat exchanger must also be compact enough to be accommodated in the reactor vessel, and the heat exchanger tubes must be available for inspection and the detection and plugging of leaks. If, however, the heat exchanger is located outside the reactor vessel, as in the case of a loop system reactor, a higher pressure drop on the primary coolant side is acceptable, and space restriction is less severe. An object of the arrangement described is to provide a method of heat exchange and a heat exchanger to meet these problems. A further object is to provide a method that ensures that excessive temperature variations are not imposed on welded tube joints by sudden changes in the primary coolant flow path. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  4. Direct Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1990-01-01

    Potential resources and applications of earth heat in the form of geothermal energy are large. United States direct uses amount to 2,100 MWt thermal and worldwide 8,850 MWt above a reference temperature of 35 degrees Celsius. Space and district heating are the major direct uses of geothermal energy. Equipment employed in direct use projects is of standard manufacture and includes downhole and circulation pumps, transmission and distribution pipelines, heat exchangers and convectors, heat pumps and chillers. Direct uses of earth heat discussed are space and district heating, greenhouse heating and fish farming, process and industrial applications. The economic feasibility of direct use projects is governed by site specific factors such as location of user and resource, resource quality, system load factor and load density, as well as financing. Examples are presented of district heating in Klamath Falls, and Elko. Further developments of direct uses of geothermal energy will depend on matching user needs to the resource, and improving load factors and load density.

  5. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat......Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...

  6. Topics on the formation and stability of magnetic-mirror-confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated two methods of creating a magnetic mirror confined plasma. The first method used the direct cross-field injection of a potassium plasma into a magnetic mirror, and the second applied ion-cyclotron-resonance heating (ICRH) to a barium Q-machine plasma in a simple axisymmetric mirror field. The latter procedure provided a plasma which was particularly suitable for the investigation of MHD stability and kinetic microstability

  7. Theory of the JET ICRH antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theilhaber, K.

    1984-01-01

    The JET antenna has been conceived as a 'limiter antenna', completely recessed in a lateral frame which has the dual purpose of protecting the conductors and limiting the plasma radius. The coupling of this antenna is calculated in slab geometry, using a variational formulation which finds the self-consistent currents in the antenna elements. Full account is taken of the modes excited inside the limiter frame and of their coupling to waves in the inhomogeneous plasma. This yields the antenna impedance as a function of frequency and the field structure inside the plasma, including power fluxes and dispersion, as a function of penetration. (author)

  8. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1994-01-01

    It is approximately 10 years since the Third Edition of Heat Pipes was published and the text is now established as the standard work on the subject. This new edition has been extensively updated, with revisions to most chapters. The introduction of new working fluids and extended life test data have been taken into account in chapter 3. A number of new types of heat pipes have become popular, and others have proved less effective. This is reflected in the contents of chapter 5. Heat pipes are employed in a wide range of applications, including electronics cooling, diecasting and injection mo

  9. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  10. Resonant Self-Trapping and Absorption of Intense Bessel Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report the observation of resonant self-trapping and enhanced laser-plasma heating resulting from propagation of high intensity Bessel beams in neutral gas. The enhancement in absorption and plasma heating is directly correlated to the spatial trapping of laser radiation. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. District heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental risks and uncertainties of a high-energy future are disturbing and give rise to several reservations concerning the use of fossil fuels. A number of technologies will help to reduce atmospheric pollution. In Denmark special importance is attached to the following: Energy conservation. Efficient energy conversion. Renewable energy sources. District heating, combined production of heat and power. Many agree that district heating (DH), produced by the traditional heat-only plant, and combined heat and power (CHP) have enormous potential when considering thermal efficiency and lowered environmental impacts: The basic technology of each is proven, it would be relatively simple to satisfy a substantial part of the energy demand, and their high efficiencies mean reduced pollution including greenhouse gas emissions. This is especially important in high population density areas - the obviously preferred sites for such energy generation. Compared with individual heating DH can provide a community with an operationally efficient and most often also an economically competitive heat supply. This is particularly true under the circumstances where the DH system is supplied from CHP plants. Their use results in very substantial improvements in overall efficiency. Further environmental improvements arise from the reduced air pollution obtainable in reasonably large CHP plants equipped with flue gas cleaning to remove particles, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen acids. As a consequence of these considerations, DH plays an important role in fulfilling the space and water heating demand in many countries. This is especially the case in Denmark where this technology is utilised to a very great extent. Indeed, DH is one of the reasons why Denmark has relatively good air quality in the cities. (au)

  12. Determination of electromagnetic modes in oversized corrugated waveguides on the electron cyclotron resonance heating installation at the tokamak Tore Supra; Determination de modes electromagnetiques de guides d'ondes corrugues surdimensionnes sur l'installation de chauffage des electrons de tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, L

    2001-03-09

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in the Tore Supra tokamak constitutes an important step in the research aimed at obtaining thermonuclear fusion reactions. Electron heating is achieved by transmitting an electromagnetic wave from the oscillators (gyrotrons) to the plasma via the fundamental mode, propagating in oversized corrugated waveguides. Maximizing the proportion of the gyrotron power coupled to the fundamental waveguide mode is essential for the good functioning of the transmission line and for maximizing the effect on the plasma. This thesis gives all necessary tools for finding the proportion of the fundamental mode and all other modes present in passive components and at the output of the gyrotron as installed in the Tore Supra ECRH plant. This characterisation is based on obtaining amplitude and phase diagrams of the electric field on a plane transverse to the propagation axis. The most difficult part of obtaining these diagrams is measuring the phase which, despite the very short wavelength, is measured directly at low power levels. At high power levels the phase is numerically reconstructed from amplitude measurements for gyrotron characterisation. A complete theoretical study of the phase reconstruction code is given including its validation with theoretical diagrams. This study allows the realisation of a modal characterisation unit electromagnetic for measurement of radiated beams and usable in each part of the ECRH installation. At the end, the complete modal characterisation is given at low level for a mode converter and also at high level for the first series gyrotron installed at TORE SUPRA. (author)

  13. Stimulated resonant scattering at stressed fused silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, Philippe; Reymermier, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The radiative emission in CO 2 laser heated stressed fused silica is radically modified when gold microspheres are on the surface. At high heating rates, the emission dynamics changes from thermoluminescence to stimulated resonant scattering with an emission rate that is increased tenfold and the near infrared (NIR) spectrum is red-shifted. We show that the dynamic tensile stress that rises in heated silica is coupled with a fluctuating electromagnetic field that enables electromagnetic friction between moving OH emitters from silica bulk and NIR resonant scatterers at the silica surface. (paper)

  14. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  15. RF heating of currentless plasma in Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Sato, M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF) experiments performed with a current-free plasma in Heliotron E are described. Parametric studies of ECRH are in progress. For both fundamental and second-harmonic resonances, optimum heating is observed when the plasma density is near the cutoff density (for the ordinary wave, in the case of fundamental resonance and for the extraordinary wave, in the case of second-harmonic resonance) and when a resonance zone exists on the magnetic axis. The maximum heating efficiencies for the fundamental and second-harmonic resonances are 6.5 eV.kW -1 per 10 19 m -3 and 2.4 eV.kW -1 per 10 19 m -3 , respectively. The ray-tracing analysis agrees qualitatively well with the experimental results. The power dependences of the plasma parameters are also investigated. - The first ICRF experiment with fast-wave heating of a current-free plasma has been performed. The ICRF wave power and pulse length are 550 kW and 15 ms, respectively. The frequency is 26.7 MHz. Ions and electrons are heated effectively. The increase in ion temperature is only slightly changed by varying the hydrogen ratio of the gas puff. On the other hand, the electron temperature increase has a definite peak for a high proton ratio (approx. 15%). This agrees qualitatively with the mode conversion picture of minority heating. (author)

  16. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  17. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state

  18. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  19. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  20. Review: heat pipe heat exchangers at IROST

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2012-01-01

    The use of the heat pipe as a component in a heat recovery device has gained worldwide acceptance. Heat pipes are passive, highly reliable and offer high heat transfer rates. This study summarizes the investigation of different types of heat pipe heat recovery systems (HPHRSs). The studies are classified on the basis of the type of the HPHRS. This research is based on 30 years of experience on heat pipe and heat recovery systems that are presented in this study. Copyright , Oxford University ...

  1. Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers for heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, L L; Grakovich, L P; Kiselev, V G; Kurustalev, D K; Matveev, Yu

    1984-01-01

    Heat pipes and heat pipe exchangers are of great importance in power engineering as a means of recovering waste heat of industrial enterprises, solar energy, geothermal waters and deep soil. Heat pipes are highly effective heat transfer units for transferring thermal energy over large distance (tens of meters) with low temperature drops. Their heat transfer characteristics and reliable working for more than 10-15 yr permit the design of new systems with higher heat engineering parameters.

  2. Resonances in a periodically driven bosonic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelle, Anton; Smith, Cristiane Morais

    2017-11-01

    Periodically driven systems are a common topic in modern physics. In optical lattices specifically, driving is at the origin of many interesting phenomena. However, energy is not conserved in driven systems, and under periodic driving, heating of a system is a real concern. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, the heating of single-band systems has been studied, with a focus on disorder- and interaction-induced effects, such as many-body localization. Nevertheless, driven systems occur in a much wider context than this, leaving room for further research. Here, we fill this gap by studying a noninteracting model, characterized by discrete, periodically spaced energy levels that are unbounded from above. We couple these energy levels resonantly through a periodic drive, and discuss the heating dynamics of this system as a function of the driving protocol. In this way, we show that a combination of stimulated emission and absorption causes the presence of resonant stable states. This will serve to elucidate the conditions under which resonant driving causes heating in quantum systems.

  3. Resonances in a periodically driven bosonic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelle, Anton; Smith, Cristiane Morais

    2017-11-01

    Periodically driven systems are a common topic in modern physics. In optical lattices specifically, driving is at the origin of many interesting phenomena. However, energy is not conserved in driven systems, and under periodic driving, heating of a system is a real concern. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, the heating of single-band systems has been studied, with a focus on disorder- and interaction-induced effects, such as many-body localization. Nevertheless, driven systems occur in a much wider context than this, leaving room for further research. Here, we fill this gap by studying a noninteracting model, characterized by discrete, periodically spaced energy levels that are unbounded from above. We couple these energy levels resonantly through a periodic drive, and discuss the heating dynamics of this system as a function of the driving protocol. In this way, we show that a combination of stimulated emission and absorption causes the presence of resonant stable states. This will serve to elucidate the conditions under which resonant driving causes heating in quantum systems.

  4. Unwanted heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka, M.

    2006-01-01

    The number of small heating plants using biomass is growing. According to TREND's information, Hrinovska energeticka, is the only one that controls the whole supplier chain in cooperation with its parent company in Bratislava. Starting with the collection and processing of wood chips by burning, heat production and heat distribution to the end user. This gives the company better control over costs and consequently its own prices. Last year, the engineering company, Hrinovske storjarne, decided to focus only on its core business and sold its heating plant, Hrinovske tepelne hospodarstvo, to Intech Slovakia and changed the company name to Hrinovska energeticka. Local companies and inhabitants were concerned that the new owner would increase prices. But the company publicly declared and kept promises that the heat price for households would remain at 500 Slovak crowns/gigajoule (13.33 EUR/gigajoule ), one of the lowest prices in Slovakia. This year the prices increased slightly to 570 Slovak crowns (15.2 EUR). 'We needed - even at the cost of lower profit - to satisfy our customers so that we would not lose them. We used this time for transition to biomass. This will allow us to freeze our prices in the coming years,' explained the statutory representative of the company, Ivan Dudak. (authors)

  5. Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than 57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was 28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  6. Optimal trajectory control of a series-resonant inverter with a non-linear resonant inductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Baskurt, F.; Bouloukos, A; Baars, N.H.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    ies-Resonant (SR) converters have been used as building blocks for DC-AC and DC-DC power converters for at least half a century. Applications were first found in induction heating [1], where generating a substantial AC current at moderately high frequency was required by the application. Later, the

  7. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  8. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  9. Monopole heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Upper bounds on the flux of monopoles incident on the Earth with velocity -5 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ) and on the flux of monopoles incident on Jupiter with velocity -3 c(10 16 GeV m -1 ), are derived. Monopoles moving this slowly lose sufficient energy to be stopped, and then catalyse nucleon decay, releasing heat. The limits are obtained by requiring the rate of energy release from nucleon decay to be less than the measured amount of heat flowing out from the surface of the planet. (U.K.)

  10. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections

  11. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  12. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  13. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  14. Heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  15. Heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The tubes of a heat exchanger tube bank have a portion thereof formed in the shape of a helix, of effective radius equal to the tube radius and the space between two adjacent tubes, to tangentially contact the straight sections of the tubes immediately adjacent thereto and thereby provide support, maintain the spacing and account for differential thermal expansion thereof

  16. Heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, F; Yanagida, T; Fujie, K; Futawatari, H

    1975-04-30

    The purpose of this construction is the improvement of heat transfer in finned tube heat exchangers, and therefore the improvement of its efficiency or its output per unit volume. This is achieved by preventing the formation of flow boundary layers in gaseous fluid. This effect always occurs on flow of smooth adjacent laminae, and especially if these have pipes carrying liquid passing through them; it worsens the heat transfer of such a boundary layer considerably compared to that in the turbulent range. The fins, which have several rows of heat exchange tubes passing through them, are fixed at a small spacing on theses tubes. The fins have slots cut in them by pressing or punching, where the pressed-out material remains as a web, which runs parallel to the level of the fin and at a small distance from it. These webs and slots are arranged radially around every tube hole, e.g. 6 in number. For a suitable small tube spacing, two adjacent tubes opposite each other have one common slot. Many variants of such slot arrangements are illustrated.

  17. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1976-01-01

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type is described in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration

  18. Three-dimensional calculation analysis of ICRF heating in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tetsuo; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Mutoh, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is one of the heating methods for the fusion plasma experiments and also effective for the helical plasmas. For the purpose of analysis of the ICRF heating in the helical plasmas, the three-dimensional full-wave code has been developed. The feature of the helical system compared with the tokamak device is the strong coupling of the toroidal harmonic modes. They cannot be treated independently. Dependence of the power absorption on the position of the ion cyclotron resonance layer is calculated including all toroidal modes. Strong power absorption was obtained when the position of the resonance layer is slightly different from the experimental results. Difference of the position of the resonance layer in different toroidal angle is thought to be important to achieve the good heating efficiency in the ICRF heating for the helical plasmas. (author)

  19. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  20. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  1. Thermal and non-thermal particle interaction with the LHCD launchers in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Balorin, C.; Basiuk, V.; Bibet, Ph.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Delpech, L.; Desgranges, C.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Joffrin, E.; Kazarian, F.; Lowry, C.; Moreau, Ph.; Petrzilka, V.; Portafaix, C.; Prou, M.; Roche, H.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) launchers and the plasma has been studied during long pulse, high power operation in the Tore Supra tokamak. The main diagnostics used for characterising the plasma-launcher interaction are calorimetry of the energy extracted by the launchers and infrared (IR) imaging of the launchers and their side limiters. The calorimetry has allowed to identify three different heat sources on the LHCD launchers, namely the RF losses in the waveguides, a fraction (∼0.8%) of the total injected energy and, finally, fast ion losses during ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), accounting for ∼1% of the injected ICRH energy. The interaction by fast ions is identified by infrared imaging of the LHCD launchers as a localised hotspot on the ion drift side, below or at the mid-plane

  2. Resonant island divertor experiments on text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Evans, T.E.; Jackson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    The first experimental tests of the resonant island divertor (RID) concept have been carried out on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). Modular perturbation coils produce static resonant magnetic fields at the tokamak boundary. The resulting magnetic islands are used to guide heat and particle fluxes around a small scoop limiter head. An enhancement in the limiter collection efficiency over the nonisland operation, as evidenced by enhanced neutral density within the limiter head, of up to a factor of 4 is obtained. This enhancement is larger than one would expect given the measured magnitude of the cross-field particle transport in TEXT. It is proposed that electrostatic perturbations occur which enhance the ion convection rate around the islands. Preliminary experiments utilizing electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in conjunction with RID operation have also have been performed. 6 refs., 3 figs

  3. Heat pipe heat exchangers in heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stulc, P; Vasiliev, L L; Kiseljev, V G; Matvejev, Ju N

    1985-01-01

    The results of combined research and development activities of the National Research Institute for Machine Design, Prague, C.S.S.R. and the Institute for Heat and Mass Transfer, Minsk, U.S.S.R. concerning intensification heat pipes used in heat pipe heat exchangers are presented. This sort of research has been occasioned by increased interest in heat power economy trying to utilise waste heat produced by various technological processes. The developed heat pipes are deployed in construction of air-air, gas-air or gas-gas heat recovery exchangers in the field of air-engineering and air-conditioning. (author).

  4. Mode Coupling and Nonlinear Resonances of MEMS Arch Resonators for Bandpass Filters

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-01-30

    We experimentally demonstrate an exploitation of the nonlinear softening, hardening, and veering phenomena (near crossing), where the frequencies of two vibration modes get close to each other, to realize a bandpass filter of sharp roll off from the passband to the stopband. The concept is demonstrated based on an electrothermally tuned and electrostatically driven MEMS arch resonator operated in air. The in-plane resonator is fabricated from a silicon-on-insulator wafer with a deliberate curvature to form an arch shape. A DC current is applied through the resonator to induce heat and modulate its stiffness, and hence its resonance frequencies. We show that the first resonance frequency increases up to twice of the initial value while the third resonance frequency decreases until getting very close to the first resonance frequency. This leads to the phenomenon of veering, where both modes get coupled and exchange energy. We demonstrate that by driving both modes nonlinearly and electrostatically near the veering regime, such that the first and third modes exhibit softening and hardening behavior, respectively, sharp roll off from the passband to the stopband is achievable. We show a flat, wide, and tunable bandwidth and center frequency by controlling the electrothermal actuation voltage.

  5. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A heat exchanger such as forms, for example, part of a power steam boiler is made up of a number of tubes that may be arranged in many different ways, and it is necessary that the tubes be properly supported. The means by which the tubes are secured must be as simple as possible so as to facilitate construction and must be able to continue to function effectively under the varying operating conditions to which the heat exchanger is subject. The arrangement described is designed to meet these requirements, in an improved way. The tubes are secured to a member extending past several tubes and abutment means are provided. At least some of the abutment means comprise two abutment pieces and a wedge secured to the supporting member, that acts on these pieces to maintain the engagement. (U.K.)

  6. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holly, D.J.; Prager, S.C.; Shepard, D.A.; Sprott, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed

  7. Gold nanoparticles as nanosources of heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffou, Guillaume

    2018-04-01

    Under illumination at their plasmonic resonance wavelength, gold nanoparticles can absorb incident light and turn into efficient nanosources of heat remotely controllable by light. This fundamental scheme is at the basis of an active field of research coined thermoplasmonics and encompasses numerous applications in physics, chemistry and biology at the micro and nano scales. Warning, no authors found for 2018Phot........48.

  8. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  9. Acoustic Levitator With Furnace And Laser Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Stoneburner, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus incorporates electrical-resistance furnace for uniform heating up to temperature of about 1,000 degrees C. Additional local heating by pair of laser beams raise temperature of sample to more than 1,500 degrees C. High temperature single-mode acoustic levitator generates cylindrical-mode accoustic resonance levitating sample. Levitation chamber enclosed in electrical-resistance furnace. Infrared beams from Nd:YAG laser provide additional local heating of sample. Designed for use in containerless processing of materials in microgravity or in normal Earth gravity.

  10. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  11. Investigation of radiofrequency heating for a closed conducting loop formed in a part of the patient's body in 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 3.0 tesla MR imaging. Measurement of temperature by use of human body-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Masaru; Higashida, Mitsuji; Kudo, Sadahiro; Ideta, Takahiro; Nakazawa, Masami

    2012-01-01

    Thermal injuries have been sometimes reported due to a closed conducting loop formed in a part of the patient's body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In recent years, 3.0 T-MRI scanner has been widely used. However, it is considered that the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3.0 T-MRI can affect the heat of the loop because its own SAR becomes approximately 4 times as much as that of the 1.5 T-MRI scanner. With this, the change in temperature was measured with human body-equivalent loop phantom in both 1.5 T-MRI and 3.0 T-MRI. In the two scanners, the temperature during 20 min of scanning time was measured with three types of sequences such as field echo (FE), spin echo (SE), and turbo SE (TSE) set up with the same scanning condition. It was found from the result that rise in temperature depended on SAR of the scanning condition irrespective of static magnetic field intensity and any pulse sequences. Furthermore, the increase of SAR and rise in temperature were not only in proportion to each other but also were indicated to have good correlation. However, even low SAR can occasionally induce serious thermal injuries. It was found from result that we had to attempt not to form a closed conducting loop with in a part of the patient's body during MRI. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  14. Ramifide resonators for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The resonators with the conductors ramified form for cyclotrons are systematized and separated into the self-contained class - the ramified resonators for cyclotrons (Carr). The ramified resonators are compared with the quarter-wave and half-wave nonramified resonators, accomplished from the transmitting lines fragments. The CRR are classified into two types: ones with the additional structural element, switched in parallel and in series. The CRR may include several additional structural elements. The CRR calculations may be concluded by analytical methods - the method of matrix calculation or the method of telegraph equations and numerical methods - by means of the ISFEL3D, MAFIA and other programs [ru

  15. Theoretical approach for plasma series resonance effect in geometrically symmetric dual radio frequency plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma series resonance (PSR) effect is well known in geometrically asymmetric capacitively couple radio frequency plasma. However, plasma series resonance effect in geometrically symmetric plasma has not been properly investigated. In this work, a theoretical approach is made to investigate the plasma series resonance effect and its influence on Ohmic and stochastic heating in geometrically symmetric discharge. Electrical asymmetry effect by means of dual frequency voltage waveform is applied to excite the plasma series resonance. The results show considerable variation in heating with phase difference between the voltage waveforms, which may be applicable in controlling the plasma parameters in such plasma.

  16. Spectroscopy and Biosensing with Optically Resonant Dielectric Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnok, Alex; Caldarola, Martin; Bonod, Nicolas; Alú, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Resonant dielectric nanoparticles (RDNs) made of materials with large positive dielectric permittivity, such as Si, GaP, GaAs, have become a powerful platform for modern light science, enabling various fascinating applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. In addition to light localization at the nanoscale, dielectric nanostructures provide electric and magnetic resonant responses throughout the visible and infrared spectrum, low dissipative losses and optical heating, low doping effec...

  17. An experimental study of Alfven wave heating using electrostatically shielded antennas in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, G.G.; Joye, B.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of electrostatic screens in ICRH for the protection of the plasma from the near fields of rf antennas, it has always been considered that low voltages at low frequency have made such screens unnecessary in Alfven wave heating (AWH). Despite this, AWH performs rather poorly as a heating method; the results being confused by a density rise up to 300 % of the target density. It is known that the density increase arises neither from impurity injection nor from a change in recycling. In addition, an extensive range of phenomena have been observed in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). During AWH, the SOL density is observed to decrease, the SOL floating potential is perturbed in a way that reflects the Alfven wave spectrum, the antennas charge negatively and draw a large current from the plasma and harmonics have been observed on the edge wave fields. The cause and correlation of these effects with each other and their impression on the bulk plasma response was not known. Experimental results from the TORTUS tokamak have indicated that the density increase might be eliminated by electrostatic screens. In their case, two AWH experiments were performed. In the first, an unshielded OFHC copper loop antenna was excited at a given power and, in the second, the same antenna was excited at the same power after installation of an aluminium, TiN coated, slotted screen. The density increase in the first case was shown to be completely eliminated in the second, although spectroscopic measurements revealed a difference in the plasma O(II) and Cu(I) content for each case. (author) 2 refs., 3 figs

  18. Heating networks and domestic central heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamler, W; Wasilewski, W

    1976-08-01

    This is a comprehensive survey of the 26 contributions from 8 European countries submitted to the 3rd International District Heating Conference in Warsaw held on the subject 'Heating Networks and Domestic Central Heating Systems'. The contributions are grouped according to 8 groups of subjects: (1) heat carriers and their parameters; (2) system of heating networks; (3) calculation and optimization of heating networks; (4) construction of heating networks; (5) operation control and automation; (6) operational problems; (7) corrosion problems; and (8) methods of heat accounting.

  19. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  20. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  1. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of the theory, design and manufacture of heat pipes and their applications. This latest edition has been thoroughly revised, up-dated and expanded to give an in-depth coverage of the new developments in the field. Significant new material has been added to all the chapters and the applications section has been totally rewritten to ensure that topical and important applications are appropriately emphasised. The bibliography has been considerably enlarged to incorporate much valuable new information. Thus readers of the previous edition, which has established

  2. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostatni, A.W.; Dostatni, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    In the main patent, a description was given of a heat exchanger with an exchange surface in preformed sheet metal designed for the high pressure and temperature service particularly encountered in nuclear pressurized water reactors and which is characterised by the fact that it is composed of at least one exchanger bundle sealed in a containment, the said bundle or bundles being composed of numerous juxtaposed individual compartments whose exchange faces are built of preformed sheet metal. The present addendun certificate concerns shapes of bundles and their positioning methods in the exchanger containment enabling its compactness to be increased [fr

  3. ICRF heating analysis on ASDEX plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Kimitaka; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Morishita, Takayuki; Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    1988-01-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) waves heating in an ASDEX tokamak are analyzed. The excitation, propagation and absorption are studied by using a global wave code. This analysis is combined with a Fokker-Planck code. The waveform in the plasma, the loading resistance and the reactance of the antenna are calculated for both the minority ion heating and the second harmonic resonance heating. Attention is given to the change of the antenna loading associated with the L/H transition. Optimum conditions for the loading are discussed. In the minority heating case, the tail generation and thermalization are analyzed. Spatial profiles of the tail-ion temperature and the power transferred to the bulk electrons and ions are obtained. Central as well as off-central heating cases are investigated. The effect of the reactive electric field is discussed in connection with rf losses and impurity production. (author)

  4. Tunneling of heat: Beyond linear response regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Kamil; Saroka, David

    2018-02-01

    We examine nanoscale processes of heat (energy) transfer as carried by electrons tunneling via potential barriers and molecular interconnects between two heat reservoirs (thermal baths). For that purpose, we use Landauer-type formulas to calculate thermal conductance and quadratic correction to heat flux flowing via quantum systems. As an input, we implement analytical expressions for transmission functions related to simple potential barriers and atomic bridges. Our results are discussed with respect to energy of tunneling electrons, temperature, the presence of resonant states, and specific parameters characterizing potential barriers as well as heat carriers. The simplicity of semi-analytical models developed by us allows to fit experimental data and extract crucial information about the values of model parameters. Further investigations are expected for more realistic transmission functions, while time-dependent aspects of nanoscale heat transfer may be addressed by using the concept of wave packets scattered on potential barriers and point-like defects within regular (periodic) nanostructures.

  5. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  6. Low temperature nuclear heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, J.; Tarjanne, R. [comps.

    1977-08-01

    The meeting was concerned with the use of low grade nuclear heat for district heating, desalination, process heat, and agriculture and aquaculture. The sessions covered applications and demand, heat sources, and economics.

  7. Radiofrequency plasma heating: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The conference proceedings include sessions on Alfven Wave Heating, ICRF Heating and Current Drive, Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive, and ECRF Heating. Questions of confinement, diagnostics, instabilities and technology are considered. Individual papers are cataloged separately

  8. Impact of wave phase jumps on stochastic heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasenko, V.I.; Zagorodny, A.G.; Cherniak, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of charged particles with fields of random waves brings about known effects of stochastic acceleration and heating. Jumps of wave phases can increase the intensity of these processes substantially. Numerical simulation of particle heating and acceleration by waves with regular phases, waves with jumping phase and stochastic electric field impulses is performed. Comparison of the results shows that to some extent an impact of phase jumps is similar to the action of separate field impulses. Jumps of phase not only increase the intensity of resonant particle heating but involves in this process non-resonant particles from a wide range of initial velocities

  9. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    the authors review the conditions for the onset of parametric resonance, and propose a nonlinear control strategy in order to both induce the resonant oscillations and to stabilize the unstable motion. Lagrange’s theory is used to derive the dynamics of the system and input–output feedback linearization...

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Electromagnetic resonance waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaba, J.M.; Manjon, F.J.; Guirao, A.; Andres, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    We describe in this paper a set of experiments designed to make qualitative and quantitative measurements on electromagnetic resonances of several simple systems. The experiments are designed for the undergraduate laboratory of Electricity and Magnetism in Physics. These experiments can help the students understanding the concept of resonance, which appears in different fields of Physics. (Author) 8 refs

  12. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  13. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  17. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  18. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  19. Recent results on confinement in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The JET device is the world's largest tokamak and has been utilized in plasma heating experiments at total powers of up to 35MW using both neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). At the highest performance, JET plasmas have achieved conditions equivalent to energy ''breakeven''. A principal aim of the JET experiment is the investigation of plasma heating and confinement in plasma regimes relevant to thermonuclear ignition. The central issues in confinement physics involved in these advances are briefly reviewed and the most recent investigations of transport in high performance plasmas are summarized. (Author)

  20. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor–atom interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M. A., E-mail: mabeck2@wisc.edu; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R. [Department of Physics, University Of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor–atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 10{sup 4} can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  1. Split heat pipe heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical analysis of a split heat pipe heat recovery system. The analysis is based on an Effectiveness-NTU approach to deduce its heat transfer characteristics. In this study the variation of overall effectiveness of heat recovery with the number of transfer units are presented. Copyright , Manchester University Press.

  2. TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.

  3. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  4. Dual source heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Multiple photon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, C.J.; Feldman, B.J.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the interaction of intense near-resonant monochromatic radiation with an N-level anharmonic oscillator. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple photon resonance, the process by which an N-level system resonantly absorbs two or more photons simultaneously, is investigated. Starting from the Schroedinger equation, diagrammatic techniques are developed that allow the resonant process to be analyzed quantitatively, in analogy with well-known two-level coherent phenomena. In addition, multiple photon Stark shifts of the resonances, shifts absent in two-level theory, are obtained from the diagrams. Insights into the nature of multiple photon resonances are gained by comparing the quantum mechanical system with classical coupled pendulums whose equations of motion possess identical eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In certain limiting cases, including that of the resonantly excited N-level harmonic oscillator and that of the equally spaced N-level system with equal matrix elements, analytic results are derived. The influence of population relaxation and phase-disrupting collisions on the multiple photon process are also analyzed, the latter by extension of the diagrammatic technique to the density matrix equations of motion. 11 figures

  7. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. Heat pipes in modern heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Leonard L.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are very flexible systems with regard to effective thermal control. They can easily be implemented as heat exchangers inside sorption and vapour-compression heat pumps, refrigerators and other types of heat transfer devices. Their heat transfer coefficient in the evaporator and condenser zones is 10 3 -10 5 W/m 2 K, heat pipe thermal resistance is 0.01-0.03 K/W, therefore leading to smaller area and mass of heat exchangers. Miniature and micro heat pipes are welcomed for electronic components cooling and space two-phase thermal control systems. Loop heat pipes, pulsating heat pipes and sorption heat pipes are the novelty for modern heat exchangers. Heat pipe air preheaters are used in thermal power plants to preheat the secondary-primary air required for combustion of fuel in the boiler using the energy available in exhaust gases. Heat pipe solar collectors are promising for domestic use. This paper reviews mainly heat pipe developments in the Former Soviet Union Countries. Some new results obtained in USA and Europe are also included

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  10. A scalable pressure sensor based on an electrothermally and electrostatically operated resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Alcheikh, Nouha; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Ilyas, Saad; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on the convective cooling of the air surrounding an electrothermally heated resonant bridge. Unlike conventional pressure sensors that rely on diaphragm deformation in response to pressure, the sensor does

  11. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  12. Excitation of Nucleon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss developments in the area of nucleon resonance excitation, both necessary and feasible, that would put our understanding of nucleon structure in the regime of strong QCD on a qualitatively new level. They involve the collection of high quality data in various channels, a more rigorous approach in the search for ''missing'' resonances, an effort to compute some critical quantities in nucleon resonance excitations from first principles, i.e. QCD, and a proposal focused to obtain an understanding of a fundamental quantity in nucleon structure

  13. Dihadronic and dileptonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Simple phenomenological rules are suggested for calculation of dihadron and dilepton resonance masses. A general interpretation is given for different exotic resonances in nuclear physics: Darmstadt-effect, dibaryon, dipion and other resonances. Information about the inner structure of e ± , proton, neutron, pions and so on can be obtained from the usual reactions of the type e + + e - =>γγ, e ± +γ=>e ± γ, e ± μ ± , e ± N... at low, intermediate and high energies using existing experimental devices

  14. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  15. Resonant halide perovskite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiguntseva, Ekaterina Y.; Ishteev, Arthur R.; Komissarenko, Filipp E.; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Ushakova, Elena V.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Makarov, Sergey V.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid halide perovskites is a prospective material for fabrication of cost-effective optical devices. Unique perovskites properties are used for solar cells and different photonic applications. Recently, perovskite-based nanophotonics has emerged. Here, we consider perovskite like a high-refractive index dielectric material, which can be considered to be a basis for nanoparticles fabrication with Mie resonances. As a result, we fabricate and study resonant perovskite nanoparticles with different sizes. We reveal, that spherical nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescence signal. The achieved results lay a cornerstone in the field of novel types of organic-inorganic nanophotonics devices with optical properties improved by Mie resonances.

  16. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  17. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  18. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity (ω/k perpendicular ∼ V Ti much-lt V α ) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion α-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k perpendicular ρ i ∼ 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research

  19. Heat pipe heat exchanger for heat recovery in air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Baky, Mostafa A.; Mohamed, Mousa M. [Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Minufiya University, Shebin El-Kom (Egypt)

    2007-03-15

    The heat pipe heat exchangers are used in heat recovery applications to cool the incoming fresh air in air conditioning applications. Two streams of fresh and return air have been connected with heat pipe heat exchanger to investigate the thermal performance and effectiveness of heat recovery system. Ratios of mass flow rate between return and fresh air of 1, 1.5 and 2.3 have been adapted to validate the heat transfer and the temperature change of fresh air. Fresh air inlet temperature of 32-40{sup o}C has been controlled, while the inlet return air temperature is kept constant at about 26{sup o}C. The results showed that the temperature changes of fresh and return air are increased with the increase of inlet temperature of fresh air. The effectiveness and heat transfer for both evaporator and condenser sections are also increased to about 48%, when the inlet fresh air temperature is increased to 40{sup o}C. The effect of mass flow rate ratio on effectiveness is positive for evaporator side and negative for condenser side. The enthalpy ratio between the heat recovery and conventional air mixing is increased to about 85% with increasing fresh air inlet temperature. The optimum effectiveness of heat pipe heat exchanger is estimated and compared with the present experimental data. The results showed that the effectiveness is close to the optimum effectiveness at fresh air inlet temperature near the fluid operating temperature of heat pipes. (author)

  20. Nonazeotropic Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealker, David H.; Deming, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    Heat pump collects heat from water circulating in heat-rejection loop, raises temperature of collected heat, and transfers collected heat to water in separate pipe. Includes sealed motor/compressor with cooling coils, evaporator, and condenser, all mounted in outer housing. Gradients of temperature in evaporator and condenser increase heat-transfer efficiency of vapor-compression cycle. Intended to recover relatively-low-temperature waste heat and use it to make hot water.

  1. Heat transfer: Pittsburgh 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: Process Heat Transfer; Thermal Hydraulics and Phase Change Phenomena; Analysis of Multicomponent Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer in Advanced Reactors; General Heat Transfer in Solar Energy; Numerical Simulation of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; High Temperature Heat Transfer; Heat Transfer Aspects of Severe Reactor Accidents; Hazardous Waste On-Site Disposal; and General Papers

  2. Industrial waste heat for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitner, K.L.; Brooks, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    Presents 2 bounding evaluations of industrial waste heat availability. Surveys waste heat from 29 major industry groups at the 2-digit level in Standard Industrial Codes (SIC). Explains that waste heat availability in each industry was related to regional product sales, in order to estimate regional waste heat availability. Evaluates 4 selected industries at the 4-digit SIC level. Finds that industrial waste heat represents a significant energy resource in several urban areas, including Chicago and Los Angeles, where it could supply all of these areas residential heating and cooling load. Points out that there is a strong need to evaluate the available waste heat for more industries at the 4-digit level. Urges further studies to identify other useful industrial waste heat sources as well as potential waste heat users

  3. An unusually strong resonant phonon scattering by 3-d impurities in II-VI semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonchakov, A.T.; Sokolov, V.I.; Gruzdev, N.B. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, S. Kovalevskaya Str. 18, 620219 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-11-01

    Low temperature phonon heat conductivity was measured for ZnSe and ZnS crystals, doped with 3-d impurities. A strong resonance-like phonon scattering by 3-d ions with orbitally degenerate ground state was observed. The Jahn-Teller effect is proposed as the reason of the strong resonance-like behaviour of heat conductivity. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  5. Quantum Proximity Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that at long wavelengths λ an s-wave scatterer can have a scattering cross section σ on the order of λ 2 , much larger than its physical size, as measured by the range of its potential. Very interesting phenomena can arise when two or more identical scatterers are placed close together, well within one wavelength. We show that, for a pair of identical scatterers, an extremely narrow p-wave open-quote open-quote proximity close-quote close-quote resonance develops from a broader s-wave resonance of the individual scatterers. A new s-wave resonance of the pair also appears. The relation of these proximity resonances (so called because they appear when the scatterers are close together) to the Thomas and Efimov effects is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F.M., E-mail: m.lutz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Lange, Jens Sören, E-mail: Soeren.Lange@exp2.physik.uni-giessen.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Pennington, Michael, E-mail: michaelp@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bettoni, Diego [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Brambilla, Nora [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Crede, Volker [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Eidelman, Simon [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Budker Istitute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gillitzer, Albrecht [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gradl, Wolfgang [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Lang, Christian B. [Institut für Physik, Universität Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Metag, Volker [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Nakano, Takashi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting ‘Resonances in QCD’, which took place at GSI October 12–14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: • What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? • Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? • What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy–light and heavy–heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  7. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  8. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  9. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  10. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  11. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  12. Accidental degeneracy of resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.; Mondragon, A.; Jauregui, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: It will be shown that a degeneracy of resonances is associated with a second rank pole in the scattering matrix and a Jordan cycle of generalized eigenfunctions of the radial Schrodinger equation. The generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions are basis elements of an expansion in complex resonance energy eigenfunctions. In this orthonormal basis, the Hamiltonian is represented by a non-diagonal complex matrix with a Jordan block of rank two. Some general properties of the degeneracy of resonances will be exhibited and discussed in an explicit example of degeneracy of resonant states and double poles in the scattering matrix of a double barrier potential. The cross section, scattering wave functions and Jordan-Gamow eigenfunctions are computed at degeneracy and their properties as functions of the control parameters of the system are discussed. (Author)

  13. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  15. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  18. Comment on resonant absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerling, P.

    1977-01-01

    An average over angles of incidence of the usual resonant absorption function is presented. This form is appropriate under experimental conditions where the angles of incidence vary greatly and in an unknown manner. For comparison a lens-ellipsoidal mirror illumination system with a known longitudinal aberration is considered. In the latter example the angles of incidence are readily obtained and the resulting resonance absorption function evaluated. The associated fields are calculated in a similar fashion. (author)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  20. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    1 Microwave Resonators and Filters Daniel E. Oates MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244 Wood St. Lexington, MA 02478 USA Email: oates@ll.mit.edu...explained in other chapters, the surface resistance of superconductors at microwave frequencies can be as much as three orders of magnitude lower than the...resonators and filters in the first edition of this handbook (Z.-Y. Shen 2003) discussed the then state of the art of microwave frequency applications