WorldWideScience

Sample records for resonant cavity radiator

  1. Ultra-wide-band accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation in a resonating cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Seo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavity accumulation of coherent undulator synchrotron radiation emitted by a train of periodic electron bunches is investigated. Phase-matching conditions for accumulation of radiation emitted by successive bunches are analyzed and numerically confirmed. While the coherent emission of a single bunch is optimal at grazing resonance, the accumulated radiation targeted at the upper resonant frequency of the waveguide mode is found to have much broader bandwidth and higher efficiency as the resonance steps away from the grazing condition. Numerical results confirm that stimulated superradiance is responsible for the accumulated radiation.

  2. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Avino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable.

  3. Intrinsic line shape of electromagnetic radiation from a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions synchronized by an internal cavity resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, Alexei

    2013-03-01

    Stacks of intrinsic Josephson-junctions are realized in mesas fabricated out of layered superconducting single crystals, such as Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (BSCCO). Synchronization of phase oscillations in different junctions can be facilitated by the coupling to the internal cavity mode leading to powerful and coherent electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz frequency range. An important characteristic of this radiation is the shape of the emission line. A finite line width appears due to different noise sources leading to phase diffusion. We investigated the intrinsic line shape caused by the thermal noise for a mesa fabricated on the top of a BSCCO single crystal. In the ideal case of fully synchronized stack the finite line width is coming from two main contributions, the quasiparticle-current noise inside the mesa and the fluctuating radiation in the base crystal. We compute both contributions and conclude that for realistic mesa's parameters the second mechanism typically dominates. The role of the cavity quality factor in the emission line spectrum is clarified. Analytical results were verified by numerical simulations. In real mesa structures part of the stack may not be synchronized and chaotic dynamics of unsynchronized junctions may determine the real line width. Work supported by UChicago Argonne, LLC, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Radiation-pressure-mediated control of an optomechanical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Jonathan; Aggarwal, Nancy; Singh, Robinjeet; Lanza, Robert; Libson, Adam; Yap, Min Jet; Cole, Garrett D.; McClelland, David E.; Mavalvala, Nergis; Corbitt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a method to control a detuned movable-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity using radiation pressure in the presence of a strong optical spring. At frequencies below the optical spring resonance, self-locking of the cavity is achieved intrinsically by the optomechanical (OM) interaction between the cavity field and the movable end mirror. The OM interaction results in a high rigidity and reduced susceptibility of the mirror to external forces. However, due to a finite delay time in the cavity, this enhanced rigidity is accompanied by an antidamping force, which destabilizes the cavity. The cavity is stabilized by applying external feedback in a frequency band around the optical spring resonance. The error signal is sensed in the amplitude quadrature of the transmitted beam with a photodetector. An amplitude modulator in the input path to the cavity modulates the light intensity to provide the stabilizing radiation pressure force.

  5. Alfvenic resonant cavities in the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollweg, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of Alfven waves in a simple medium consisting of three uniform layers; each layer is characterized by a different value for the Alfven speed, νsub(A). We show how the central layer can act as a resonant cavity under quite general conditions. If the cavity is driven externally, by an incident wave in one of the outer layers, there result resonant transmission peaks, which allow large energy fluxes to enter the cavity from outside. The transmission peaks result from the destructive interference between a wave which leaks out of the cavity, and a directly reflected wave. We show that there are two types of resonances. The first type occurs when the cavity has the largest (or smallest) of the three Alfven speeds; this situation occurs on coronal loops. The second type occurs when the cavity Alfven speed is intermediate between the other two values of νsub(A); this situation may occur on solar spicules. Significant heating of the cavity can occur if the waves are damped. We show that if the energy lost to heat greatly exceeds the energy lost by leakage out of the cavity, then the cavity heating can be independent of the damping rate. This conclusion is shown to apply to coronal resonances and to the spicule resonances. This conclusion agrees with a point made by Ionson in connection with the coronal resonances. Except for a numerical factor of order unity, we recover Ionson's expression for the coronal heating rate. However, Ionson's qualities are much too large. For solar parameters, the maximum quality is of the order of 100, but the heating is independent of the damping rate only when dissipation reduces the quality to less than about 10. (WB)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  7. The CEBAF separator cavity resonance control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wissmann; C. Hovater; A. Guerra; T. Plawski

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade will increase the maximum beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three halls. The resulting increase in RF separator cavity gradient and subsequent increase in RF power needed for these higher energies will require the cavities to have active resonance control. Currently, at the present 4 to 6 GeV energies, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW) which is maintained at a constant temperature of 95 Fahrenheit. This approach is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system that controls both water temperature and flow has been designed and built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to regulate water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately, closed loop control will be maintained by monitoring each cavity's reflected power. This paper describes this system

  8. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  9. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  10. Shear Layer Dynamics in Resonating Cavity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    .... The PIV data was also combined with the surface pressure measurements through the application of the Quadratic Stochastic Estimation procedure to provide time resolved snapshots of the flow field. Examination of these results indicate the strong pumping action of the cavity regardless of whether resonance existed and was used to visualize the large scale structures interacting with the aft wall.

  11. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  12. Resonant cavity enhanced multi-analyte sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstein, David Alan

    Biological research and medicine increasingly depend on interrogating binding interactions among small segments of DNA, RNA, protein, and bio-specific small molecules. Microarray technology, which senses the affinity for target molecules in solution for a multiplicity of capturing agents fixed to a surface, has been used in biological research for gene expression profiling and in medicine for molecular biomarker detection. Label-free affinity sensing is preferable as it avoids fluorescent labeling of the target molecules, reducing test cost and variability. The Resonant Cavity Imaging Biosensor (RCIB) is a label-free optical inference based technique introduced that scales readily to high throughput and employs an optical resonant cavity to enhance sensitivity by a factor of 100 or more. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a cavity constructed from Si/SiO2 Bragg reflectors, one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept 5 nm, an Indium-Gallium-Arsenide digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel with resolution 128 x 128. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity, one can control the sensitivity of the measurement to the presence of bound molecules thereby enhancing or suppressing sensitivity where appropriate. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations are recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup was constructed. A sample was fabricated with 25, 100 mum wide square regions, each with a different density of 1 mum square depressions etched 12 nm into the S1O 2 surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm RMS precision when the sample remains loaded in the setup and 0.3 nm RMS precision when the sample is removed and replaced. Selective binding of the protein

  13. Radiation injuries of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galantseva, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    The review is given of factors which cause the beginning of radiation injuries of oral cavity in oncologic patients following radiotherapy: dose rate absorbed with tumor and surrounding healthy tissues; irradiation procedures; size of irradiated volume. Pathogenesis and clinical picture are considered as well as prophylaxis and tactics of treatments of patients with radiation injuries of oral cavity

  14. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  15. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)˜ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3-2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  16. Plasmonic-cavity model for radiating nano-rod antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the analytical solution of nano-rod antennas utilizing a cylindrical harmonics expansion. By treating the metallic nano-rods as plasmonic cavities, we derive closed-form expressions for both the internal and the radiated fields, as well as the resonant condition and the ......In this paper, we propose the analytical solution of nano-rod antennas utilizing a cylindrical harmonics expansion. By treating the metallic nano-rods as plasmonic cavities, we derive closed-form expressions for both the internal and the radiated fields, as well as the resonant condition...... and the radiation efficiency. With our theoretical model, we show that besides the plasmonic resonances, efficient radiation takes advantage of (a) rendering a large value of the rods' radius and (b) a central-fed profile, through which the radiation efficiency can reach up to 70% and even higher in a wide...... frequency band. Our theoretical expressions and conclusions are general and pave the way for engineering and further optimization of optical antenna systems and their radiation patterns....

  17. A study of nasal cavity volume by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, Yasuyoshi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-04-01

    The nasal cavity volume in 69 healthy volunteers from 8 to 23 years old (17 males and 52 females) was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Merits of MRI such as no radiation exposure, less artifact due to bone and air and measurement of intravascular blood flow; and demerits such as contraindication in users of heart pace-makers or magnetic clips, contraindication in people with claustrophobia and influence of environmental magnetic fields must be considered. A Magunetom M10 (Siemens), a superconduction device with 1.0 Tesla magnetic flux density was used. Enhanced patterns of T[sub 1], and pulse lines were photographed at 600 msec TR (repetition time) and 19 msec TE (echo time) using SE (spin echo) and short SE (spin echo), and 3 or 4 mm slices. Photographs were made of the piriform aperture, choana, superior-middle-inferior concha including the nasal meatus, the frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, cribriform plate, and upper surface of the palate. The line connecting the maximum depression point in the nasal root and the pontomedullary junction was selected by sagittal median section, because this corresponds well with the CM (canthomeatal) line which is useful in CT (computed tomography). The transverse section of the nasal cavity volume was traced by display console with an accessory MRI device and calculated by integration of the slice width. The increase of height and body weight neared a plateau at almost 16 years, whereas increase of nasal cavity volume continued until about 20 years. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and regression line were significant. There were no significant differences in these parameters between male and female groups. Comparatively strong correlation between nasal cavity volume, and age, height and body weight was statistically evident. (author).

  18. Hybrid III-V/SOI Resonant Cavity Photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity photo detector has been demonstrated, which comprises an InP grating reflectorand a Si grating reflector. It can selectively detects an incident light with 1.54-µm wavelength and TM polarization.......A hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity photo detector has been demonstrated, which comprises an InP grating reflectorand a Si grating reflector. It can selectively detects an incident light with 1.54-µm wavelength and TM polarization....

  19. Tunneling effect in cavity-resonator-coupled arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hua; Xu Zhuo; Qu Shao-Bo; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Wang Jia-Fu; Liang Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The quantum tunneling effect (QTE) in a cavity-resonator-coupled (CRC) array was analytically and numerically investigated. The underlying mechanism was interpreted by treating electromagnetic waves as photons, and then was generalized to acoustic waves and matter waves. It is indicated that for the three kinds of waves, the QTE can be excited by cavity resonance in a CRC array, resulting in sub-wavelength transparency through the narrow splits between cavities. This opens up opportunities for designing new types of crystals based on CRC arrays, which may find potential applications such as quantum devices, micro-optic transmission, and acoustic manipulation. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  1. Photoproduction of axions in a resonant electromagnetic cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Van Soa; Hoang Ngoc Long; Ha Huy Bang; Nguyen Mai Hung

    2000-09-01

    Photon-axion conversions in a resonant electromagnetic cavity with frequency equal to the axion mass are considered in detail by the Feynman diagram methods. The differential cross sections are presented and numerical evaluations are given. It is shown that there is a resonant conversion for the considered process. From our results, some estimates for experimental conditions are given. (author)

  2. Entangling a nanomechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.; Woolley, M. J.; Doherty, A. C.; Milburn, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme able to entangle at the steady state a nanomechanical resonator with a microwave cavity mode of a driven superconducting coplanar waveguide. The nanomechanical resonator is capacitively coupled with the central conductor of the waveguide and stationary entanglement is achievable up to temperatures of tens of milliKelvin

  3. Wireless overhead line temperature sensor based on RF cavity resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafourian, Maryam; Nezhad, Abolghasem Zeidaabadi; Bridges, Greg E; Thomson, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of maximizing power transfer through overhead transmission lines necessitates the use of dynamic power control to keep transmission line temperatures within acceptable limits. Excessive conductor operating temperatures lead to an increased sag of the transmission line conductor and may reduce their expected life. In this paper, a passive wireless sensor based on a resonant radio frequency (RF) cavity is presented which can be used to measure overhead transmission line temperature. The temperature sensor does not require a power supply and can be easily clamped to the power line with an antenna attached. Changing temperature causes a change of cavity dimensions and a shift in resonant frequency. The resonant frequency of the cavity can be interrogated wirelessly. This temperature sensor has a resolution of 0.07 °C and can be interrogated from distances greater than 4.5 m. The sensor has a deviation from linearity of less than 2 °C. (paper)

  4. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A [Nuclear Science Center, New Delhi (India)

    1992-11-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs.

  5. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.

    1992-01-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs

  6. Hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity enhanced photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid III–V/SOI resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure comprising a high-contrast grating (HCG) reflector, a hybrid grating (HG) reflector, and an air cavity between them, has been proposed and investigated. In the proposed structure, a light absorbing material is integrated...... as part of the HG reflector, enabling a very compact vertical cavity. Numerical investigations show that a quantum efficiency close to 100 % and a detection linewidth of about 1 nm can be achieved, which are desirable for wavelength division multiplexing applications. Based on these results, a hybrid RCE...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of syrinx cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Nemoto, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    Syrinx cavity may result from a number of intramedullary tumors or non-neoplastic conditions such as Chiari malformation, trauma and meningitis. The surgical procedure to repair the syrinx is quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, it is important to determine whether syrinx is associated with tumor or not before surgery. We reviewed MR images of 26 cases with syrinx cavity; 20 of which were not associated with tumor (12 Chiari malformation, 5 trauma, 1 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus, 1 idiopathic) and 6 of which were associated with intramedullary tumor (3 ependymoma, 2 astrocytoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma). The syrinx showed low signal in all 26 cases on T1 weighted images (SE 600/40). All 6 cases with syrinx associated with intramedullary tumor showed high intensity on T2 weighted images (SE 2000/120). On the other hand, the syrinx of 19 of 20 cases with no tumor condition showed reduced intensity on T2 weighted images. Only one post-traumatic small syrinx showed high signal. This was quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, when the syrinx cavity shows high signal on T2 weighted images, an intramedullary tumor is strongly suggested. (author)

  8. Radiation measurements during cavities conditioning on APS RF test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzien, D.M.; Kustom, R.L.; Moe, H.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the shielding structure around the Advanced Photon Source (APS) synchrotron and storage ring RF stations, the X-ray radiation has been measured in the near field and far field regions of the RF cavities during the normal conditioning process. Two cavity types, a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity, are used on the APS and are conditioned in the RF test stand. Vacuum measurements are also taken on a prototype 352-MHz single-cell cavity and a 352-MHz five-cell cavity. The data will be compared with data on the five-cell cavities from CERN

  9. Shunt impedance of spiral loaded resonant rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peebles, P.Z. Jr.; Parvarandeh, M.

    1975-01-01

    Based upon a treatment of the spiral loaded resonant radio frequency cavity as a shorted quarter-wave transmission line, a model for shunt impedance is developed. The model is applicable to loosely wound spirals in large diameter containers. Theoretical shunt impedance is given for spirals wound from tubing of circular or rectangular cross section. The former produces higher shunt impedance. Measurements made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on 17 copper cavities are described which support the theoretical results. Theoretical results are also compared to data from twenty-three additional cavities measured at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It is shown that the theoretical function forms a useful means of interpreting the quality of constructed cavities. (author)

  10. Low index contrast heterostructure photonic crystal cavities with high quality factors and vertical radiation coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochen; Minkov, Momchil; Fan, Shanhui; Li, Xiuling; Zhou, Weidong

    2018-04-01

    We report here design and experimental demonstration of heterostructure photonic crystal cavities resonating near the Γ point with simultaneous strong lateral confinement and highly directional vertical radiation patterns. The lateral confinement is provided by a mode gap originating from a gradual modulation of the hole radii. High quality factor resonance is realized with a low index contrast between silicon nitride and quartz. The near surface-normal directional emission is preserved when the size of the core region is scaled down. The influence of the cavity size parameters on the resonant modes is also investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  11. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10 4 A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found

  12. Lead salt resonant cavity enhanced detector with MEMS mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, F.; Fill, M.; Rahim, M.; Zogg, H.; Quack, N.; Blunier, S.; Dual, J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a tunable resonant cavity enhanced detector (RCED) for the mid-infrared employing narrow gap lead-chalcogenide (IV-VI) layers on a Si substrate. The device consists of an epitaxial Bragg reflector layer, a thin p-n+ heterojunction with PbSrTe as detecting layer and a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) micromirror as second mirror. Despite the thin absorber layer the sensitivity is even higher than for a conventional detector. Tunability is achieved by changing the cavity length with a vertically movable MEMS mirror. The device may be used as miniature infrared spectrometer to cover the spectral range from 30 μm.

  13. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J; Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  14. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Chabalko

    Full Text Available Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR, which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power.

  15. Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmohammadi, Mohsen; Sample, Alanson P.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power delivery has the potential to seamlessly power our electrical devices as easily as data is transmitted through the air. However, existing solutions are limited to near contact distances and do not provide the geometric freedom to enable automatic and un-aided charging. We introduce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), which can enable purpose-built structures, such as cabinets, rooms, and warehouses, to generate quasistatic magnetic fields that safely deliver kilowatts of power to mobile receivers contained nearly anywhere within. A theoretical model of a quasistatic cavity resonator is derived, and field distributions along with power transfer efficiency are validated against measured results. An experimental demonstration shows that a 54 m3 QSCR room can deliver power to small coil receivers in nearly any position with 40% to 95% efficiency. Finally, a detailed safety analysis shows that up to 1900 watts can be transmitted to a coil receiver enabling safe and ubiquitous wireless power. PMID:28199321

  16. Mid-Infrared Tunable Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Zogg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-infrared detectors that are sensitive only in a tunable narrow spectral band are presented. They are based on the Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detector (RCED principle and employing a thin active region using IV-VI narrow gap semiconductor layers. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by two mirrors. The active layer is grown onto one mirror, while the second mirror can be displaced. This changes the cavity length thus shifting the resonances where the detector is sensitive. Using electrostatically actuated MEMS micromirrors, a very compact tunable detector system has been fabricated. Mirror movements of more than 3 μm at 30V are obtained. With these mirrors, detectors with a wavelength tuning range of about 0.7 μm have been realized. Single detectors can be used in mid-infrared micro spectrometers, while a detector arrangement in an array makes it possible to realize Adaptive Focal Plane Arrays (AFPA.

  17. Regularized quasinormal modes for plasmonic resonators and open cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandar Dezfouli, Mohsen; Hughes, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Optical mode theory and analysis of open cavities and plasmonic particles is an essential component of optical resonator physics, offering considerable insight and efficiency for connecting to classical and quantum optical properties such as the Purcell effect. However, obtaining the dissipative modes in normalized form for arbitrarily shaped open-cavity systems is notoriously difficult, often involving complex spatial integrations, even after performing the necessary full space solutions to Maxwell's equations. The formal solutions are termed quasinormal modes, which are known to diverge in space, and additional techniques are frequently required to obtain more accurate field representations in the far field. In this work, we introduce a finite-difference time-domain technique that can be used to obtain normalized quasinormal modes using a simple dipole-excitation source, and an inverse Green function technique, in real frequency space, without having to perform any spatial integrations. Moreover, we show how these modes are naturally regularized to ensure the correct field decay behavior in the far field, and thus can be used at any position within and outside the resonator. We term these modes "regularized quasinormal modes" and show the reliability and generality of the theory by studying the generalized Purcell factor of dipole emitters near metallic nanoresonators, hybrid devices with metal nanoparticles coupled to dielectric waveguides, as well as coupled cavity-waveguides in photonic crystals slabs. We also directly compare our results with full-dipole simulations of Maxwell's equations without any approximations, and show excellent agreement.

  18. Resonance detection of Moessbauer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The resonance detection method as compared with the usual method of registering Moessbauer spectra has a number of advantages, one of which is the increase of resolution of the Moessbauer spectrum. The method is based on the modulation of a secondary radiation of a converter tuned in the resonance with the Moessbauer gamma-quantum source. The resonance detection method with account of supression, secondary radiation outgoing from the converter is investigated. The converter represents a substrate enriched by the Moessbauer isotope placed either inside the gas counter, or coupled with any other detecting device. Analytical expressions for Moessbauer spectrum parameters: effect, area and width of the spectral line are derived. It is shown that the joint application of usual and resonance detection methods for registering the Moessbauer spectrum allows one to determine parameters of the source, converter and the investigated absorber

  19. On the stability of radiation-pressure-dominated cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, R.; Klahr, H.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.

    2012-01-01

    Context. When massive stars exert a radiation pressure onto their environment that is higher than their gravitational attraction (super-Eddington condition), they launch a radiation-pressure-driven outflow, which creates cleared cavities. These cavities should prevent any further accretion onto the star from the direction of the bubble, although it has been claimed that a radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instability should lead to the collapse of the outflow cavity and foster the growth of massive stars. Aims: We investigate the stability of idealized radiation-pressure-dominated cavities, focusing on its dependence on the radiation transport approach used in numerical simulations for the stellar radiation feedback. Methods: We compare two different methods for stellar radiation feedback: gray flux-limited diffusion (FLD) and ray-tracing (RT). Both methods are implemented in our self-gravity radiation hydrodynamics simulations for various initial density structures of the collapsing clouds, eventually forming massive stars. We also derive simple analytical models to support our findings. Results: Both methods lead to the launch of a radiation-pressure-dominated outflow cavity. However, only the FLD cases lead to prominent instability in the cavity shell. The RT cases do not show such instability; once the outflow has started, it precedes continuously. The FLD cases display extended epochs of marginal Eddington equilibrium in the cavity shell, making them prone to the radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the RT cases, the radiation pressure exceeds gravity by 1-2 orders of magnitude. The radiative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is then consequently suppressed. It is a fundamental property of the gray FLD method to neglect the stellar radiation temperature at the location of absorption and thus to underestimate the opacity at the location of the cavity shell. Conclusions: Treating the stellar irradiation in the gray FLD approximation underestimates the radiative forces

  20. Longitudinal and transverse electric field measurements in resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Dechun; Chen Linfeng; Zheng Xiaoyue

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a measuring technique for the electric field distribution of high order modes in resonant cavities. A perturbing bead-like cage made with metallic wires are developed for S-band field measurements, which can be used to detect a small electric field component in the presence of other strong electric or magnetic field components (That means high sensitivity and high directivity). In order to avoid orientation error for the cage with very high directivity, two parallel threads were used for supporting the perturbing cage. A simple mechanical set-up is described. The cage can be driven into the cavity on-axis or off-axis in any azimuth for the longitudinal and transverse electric field measurements

  1. Resonant spin wave excitations in a magnonic crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Prabhakar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Spin polarized electric current, injected into permalloy (Py) through a nano contact, exerts a torque on the magnetization. The spin waves (SWs) thus excited propagate radially outward. We propose an antidot magnonic crystal (MC) with a three-hole defect (L3) around the nano contact, designed so that the frequency of the excited SWs, lies in the band gap of the MC. L3 thus acts as a resonant SW cavity. The energy in this magnonic crystal cavity can be tapped by an adjacent MC waveguide (MCW). An analysis of the simulated micromagnetic power spectrum, at the output port of the MCW reveals stable SW oscillations. The quality factor of the device, calculated using the decay method, was estimated as Q > 105 for an injected spin current density of 7 ×1012 A/m2.

  2. Resonant cavity operation of a virtual cathode oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Hoeberling, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Gigawatt level virtual cathode sources have been proposed for several applications. These include microwave weapons and drivers for high-energy particle accelerators. Both of these require a microwave source with very high power output that is controllable in frequency and phase. A conventional virtual cathode oscillator will not meet these requirements. The addition of a resonant cavity surrounding the oscillating virtual cathode either alone or pumped with a low-power injection signal, causing it to operate as an amplifier, could greatly influence the performance of this type of source making it more practical for accelerator and weapon applications. The progress on an experiment to test these concepts will be discussed

  3. Quality measurements of resonance cavities in behalf of investigation of microwave properties of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekkers, G.; Ridder, M. de.

    1988-01-01

    A method for investigating conducting properties at microwave frequencies of superconducting materials by means of quality measurements of a resonance cavity is described. The method is based on the direct relationship of the quality factor of a resonance circuit, in this case a resonance cavity, with the losses in the circuit. In a resonance cavity these losses are caused by the material properties of the resonance cavity. Therefore quality measurements yield, essentially, a possibility for investigation of conducting properties of materials. The underlying theory of the subject, the design of a special resonance cavity, the measuring methods and the accuracy in the relation of the measured quality factor and the specific conductivity of the material is presented. refs.; figs.; tabs

  4. The numerical simulation of plasma flow in cylindrical resonant cavity of microwave plasma thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.-L.; He, H.-Q; Mao, G.-W.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Thruster (MPT) is an electro-thermal propulsive device. MPT consists of microwave generator, gas storing and supplying system, resonant cavity and accelerative nozzle. It generates free-floating plasma brought by the microwave discharge breakdown gas in the resonant cavity, and the plasma exhausted from nozzle produces thrust. MPT has prospective application in spacecraft because of its advantages of high thrust, moderate specific impulse and high efficiency. In this paper, the numerical simulation of the coupling flow field of microwave plasma in resonant cavity under different frequencies will be discussed. The results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) When the resonant model TM 011 was used, the higher the microwave frequency was, the smaller the size of MPT. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in small cavity, however, remain unchanged. 2) When the resonant model was used, the distribution of the temperature, the pressure and the electronic density in the resonant cavity remained unchanged under different resonant frequencies. 3) When the resonant frequency was increased with a fixed pressure distribution in a small cavity, compare to the MPT with lower frequency, the gas flow rate, the microwave power and the nozzle throat diameter of MPT all decreased. 4) The electromagnetic field in the cylindrical resonant cavity for all MPT with different frequencies was disturbed by the plasma formation. The strong disturbance happened in the region close to the plasma. (author)

  5. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB.

  6. Sound Radiation of Aerodynamically Excited Flat Plates into Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Osterziel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibrations and the sound radiation of flexible plate structures of different thickness mounted in a rigid plate are experimentally investigated. Therefore, flow properties and turbulent boundary layer parameters are determined through measurements with a hot-wire anemometer in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel. Furthermore, the excitation of the vibrating plate is examined by laser scanning vibrometry. To describe the sound radiation and the sound transmission of the flexible aluminium plates into cavities, a cuboid-shaped room with adjustable volume and 34 flush-mounted microphones is installed at the non flow-excited side of the aluminium plates. Results showed that the sound field inside the cavity is on the one hand dependent on the flow parameters and the plate thickness and on the other hand on the cavity volume which indirectly influences the level and the distribution of the sound pressure behind the flexible plate through different excited modes.

  7. Natural convection and wall radiation in tall cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, C [Regional Engineering College, Tiruchirapalli (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Venkateshan, S P [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The problem of combined natural convection and wall radiation in tall cavities has been taken up for a detailed numerical investigation. The governing equations for fluid flow have been solved by a finite volume method and the radiation has been treated by the radiosity-irradiation method. The analysis has been specifically made for the case where the emissivity of the hot left wall is different from that of the cold right wall. For this case it was found that decoupling radiation from free convection can lead to considerable error. Correlations have been suggested for predicting both the convective as well as the radiative heat transfer rates across the cavity. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Natural convection and wall radiation in tall cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, C.; Venkateshan, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of combined natural convection and wall radiation in tall cavities has been taken up for a detailed numerical investigation. The governing equations for fluid flow have been solved by a finite volume method and the radiation has been treated by the radiosity-irradiation method. The analysis has been specifically made for the case where the emissivity of the hot left wall is different from that of the cold right wall. For this case it was found that decoupling radiation from free convection can lead to considerable error. Correlations have been suggested for predicting both the convective as well as the radiative heat transfer rates across the cavity. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Analysis of reactor cavity radiation streaming: some practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a cost effective analysis procedure for use in the prediction of radiation environments in the cavity and containment building of a nuclear power reactor. Comments are offered on potential problems in certification of analysis procedures and the availability of benchmarkable data sets, both measurements and calculations

  10. Efficient second harmonic generation of a diode-laser-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser using monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 external resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, William J.; Nabors, C. D.; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    56-percent efficient external-cavity-resonant second-harmonic generation of a diode-laser pumped, CW single-axial-mode Nd:YAG laser is reported. A theory of external doubling with a resonant fundamental is presented and compared to experimental results for three monolithic cavities of nonlinear MgO:LiNbO3. The best conversion efficiency was obtained with a 12.5-mm-long monolithic ring cavity doubler, which produced 29.7 mW of CW, single-axial model 532-nm radiation from an input of 52.5 mW.

  11. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry–Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-03-06

    In experiments with Fabry–Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect. - Highlights: • A method to measure an angular antispring effect on a suspended mirror was proposed. • Remote excitation on the mirror with radiation pressure of resonant light is used. • This method provides better measurement accuracy compared with the previous method.

  12. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  13. Resonant-bar gravitational radiation antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of gravitational radiation, and describes the worldwide research programme for the development of high-sensitivity resonant-bar antennas which are aimed at detecting gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources. (author)

  14. Radiation Characteristics of the Cavity Backed Antenna in Conducting Cone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A technique using finite element and boundary integral method (FE-BI) and reciprocity theorem is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of cavity backed antenna mounted on a conducting cone. The electric fields inside the cavity and on the aperture are obtained using finite element and boundary integral method. The far-field characteristic of the antenna is computed using reciprocity theorem. The paper begins with a general description of the method. An application of this method is given and the numerical result is compared with the experimental result.

  15. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Mendes; Nesrallah, Ana Cristina Aló; Parahyba, Cláudia Joffily; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present a literature review on the effects of the ionizing radiation from radiotherapy treatment on dental tissues. Among the effects of increasing global life expectancy and longevity of the teeth in the oral cavity, increasing rates of neoplastic diseases have been observed. One of the important treatment modalities for head and neck neoplastic diseases is radiotherapy, which uses ionizing radiation as the main mechanism of action. Therefore, it is essential for dentists to be aware of the changes in oral and dental tissues caused by ionizing radiation, and to develop treatment and prevention strategies. In general, there is still controversy about the effects of ionizing radiation on dental structures. However, qualitative and quantitative changes in saliva and oral microbiota, presence of oral mucositis and radiation-related caries are expected, as they represent the well-known side effects of treatment with ionizing radiation. Points that still remain unclear are the effects of radiotherapy on enamel and dentin, and on their mechanisms of bonding to contemporary adhesive materials. Ionizing radiation has shown important interaction with organic tissues, since more deleterious effects have been shown on the oral mucosa, salivary glands and dentin, than on enamel. With the increasing number of patients with cancer seeking dental treatment before and after head and neck radiotherapy, it is important for dentists to be aware of the effects of ionizing radiation on the oral cavity.

  16. Radiation-induced formation of cavities in amorphous germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Prethinned polycrystalline Ge TEM samples were irradiated with 1.5 MeV Kr + ions at room temperature while structural and morphological changes were observed in situ in the Argonne High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem Facility. After a Kr + dose of 1.2x10 14 ions/cm 2 , the irradiated Ge was completely amorphized. A high density of small void-like cavities was observed after a Kr + dose of 7x10 14 ions/cm 2 . With increasing Kr + ion dose, these cavities grew into large holes transforming the irradiated Ge into a sponge-like porous material after 8.5x10 15 ions/cm 2 . The radiation-induced nucleation of void-like cavities in amorphous material is astonishing, and the final structure of the irradiated Ge with enormous surface area may have potential applications

  17. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popović, S.; Upadhyay, J.; Nikolić, M.; Vušković, L.; Mammosser, J.

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal

  18. Mid infrared resonant cavity detectors and lasers with epitaxial lead-chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogg, H.; Rahim, M.; Khiar, A.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Quack, N.

    2010-09-01

    Wavelength tunable emitters and detectors in the mid-IR wavelength region allow applications including thermal imaging and gas spectroscopy. One way to realize such tunable devices is by using a resonant cavity. By mechanically changing the cavity length with MEMS mirror techniques, the wavelengths may be tuned over a considerable range. Resonant cavity enhanced detectors (RCED) are sensitive at the cavity resonance only. They may be applied for low resolution spectroscopy, and, when arrays of such detectors are realized, as multicolour IR-FPA or "IR-AFPA", adaptive focal plane arrays. We report the first room temperature mid-IR VECSEL (vertical external cavity surface emitting laser) with a wavelength above 3 μm. The active region is just 850 nm PbSe, followed by a 2.5 pair Bragg mirror. Output power is > 10 mW at RT.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  20. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: Modeling and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Zullo, R.; Gaglio, G.; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), 015205 ISSN 0957-0233 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical resonators * optical sensors * cavity ring-down spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  1. Cavity Resonator Wireless Power Transfer System for Freely Moving Animal Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Henry; Thackston, Kyle A; Bercich, Rebecca A; Jefferys, John G R; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to create a large wireless powering arena for powering small devices implanted in freely behaving rodents. We design a cavity resonator based wireless power transfer (WPT) system and utilize our previously developed optimal impedance matching methodology to achieve effective WPT performance for operating sophisticated implantable devices, made with miniature receive coils (powering fidelity of 93.53% over nine recording sessions across nine weeks, indicating nearly continuous device operation for a freely behaving rat within the large cavity resonator space. We have developed and demonstrated a cavity resonator based WPT system for long term experiments involving freely behaving small animals. This cavity resonator based WPT system offers an effective and simple method for wirelessly powering miniaturized devices implanted in freely moving small animals within the largest space.

  2. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances ...

  3. Resonator modes and mode dynamics for an external cavity-coupled laser array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Niketh; Bochove, Erik J.; Aceves, Alejandro B.; Zunoubi, Mohammad R.; Braiman, Yehuda

    2015-03-01

    Employing a Fox-Li approach, we derived the cold-cavity mode structure and a coupled mode theory for a phased array of N single-transverse-mode active waveguides with feedback from an external cavity. We applied the analysis to a system with arbitrary laser lengths, external cavity design and coupling strengths to the external cavity. The entire system was treated as a single resonator. The effect of the external cavity was modeled by a set of boundary conditions expressed by an N-by-N frequency-dependent matrix relation between incident and reflected fields at the interface with the external cavity. The coupled mode theory can be adapted to various types of gain media and internal and external cavity designs.

  4. Bistable output from a coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A. J.; Choquette, K. D.; Chow, W. W.; Allerman, A. A.; Geib, K.

    2000-01-01

    We report a monolithic coupled-resonator vertical-cavity laser with an ion-implanted top cavity and a selectively oxidized bottom cavity which exhibits bistable behavior in the light output versus injection current. Large bistability regions over current ranges as wide as 18 mA have been observed with on/off contrast ratios of greater than 20 dB. The position and width of the bistability region can be varied by changing the bias to the top cavity. Switching between on and off states can be accomplished with changes as small as 250 μW to the electrical power applied to the top cavity. The bistable behavior is the response of the nonlinear susceptibility in the top cavity to the changes in the bottom intracavity laser intensity as the bottom cavity reaches the thermal rollover point

  5. The use of microperforated plates to attenuate cavity resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenech, Benjamin; Keith, Graeme; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The use of microperforated plates to introduce damping in a closed cavity is examined. By placing a microperforated plate well inside the cavity instead of near a wall as traditionally done in room acoustics, high attenuation can be obtained for specific acoustic modes, compared with the lower...... attenuation that can be obtained in a broad frequency range with the conventional position of the plate. An analytical method for predicting the attenuation is presented. The method involves finding complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the modified cavity and makes it possible to predict Green......'s functions. The results, which are validated experimentally, show that a microperforated plate can provide substantial attenuation of modes in a cavity. One possible application of these findings is the treatment of boiler tones in heat-exchanger cavities....

  6. Resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-01-01

    We report on a resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) technique that uses mechanical resonant frequency to characterize and identify tissues of different types. The linear dependency of the resonant frequency on the square root of Young's modulus was validated on silicone phantoms. Both the frequency response spectrum and the 3D imaging results from the agar phantoms with hard inclusions confirmed the feasibility of deploying the resonant frequency as a mec...

  7. Determination of calibration constants for perturbing objects of cavity resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.A.R.; Serrao, V.A.; Fuhrmann, C.

    1989-05-01

    Using the Slater theorem, the calibrating constants for objects utilized in the tecnique of perturbing measurements of cavities electric and magnetic fields have been determined. Such perturbing objects are utilized in the measurements of the shunt impedance and electric field relative intensity ocurring in linac accelerating structures. To determine the calibrating constants of the perturbing objects, a cylindrical cavity of well know field pattern has been utilized. The cavity was excited in two differente modes of oscillation and the experimental results are in good aggrement with the theoretical values. (author) [pt

  8. Study on the dependence of the resonance frequency of accelerators on the cavities internal diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrao, V.A.; Franco, M.A.R.; Fuhrmann, C.

    1988-05-01

    The resonance frequencies of individual cavities and of a six cell disk-loaded prototype of an accelerating structure were measured as a function of cavity inner diameter. A linear relationship between the indidual cavity frequency and the six cell stack 2Π/3 mode frequency was obtained that will be very useful during the final tuning of the accelerating strutures of the IEAV linac. The dispersion diagrams were also obtained for various internal cavity diameters; these diagrams were utilized to estimate the group velocity and the RF filling time of the accelerating structure. (author) [pt

  9. Challenges in resonant cavity biosensor design: collection efficiency and specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armani, Andrea M.; Mehrabani, Simin; Sun, Victoria; McBirney, Samantha; Hawk, Rasheeda M.; Gungor, Eda; Lee, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Optical cavities have successfully demonstrated the ability to detect a wide range of analytes with exquisite sensitivity. However, optimizing other parameters of the system, such as collection efficiency and specificity, have remained elusive. This presentation will discuss some of the recent work in this area, including 3D COMSOL Multiphysics models including mass transfer and binding kinetics of different cavity geometries and covalent attachment methods for a wide range of biological and synthetic moieties. A few representative experimental demonstrations will also be presented.

  10. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, P., E-mail: hahnp@ethz.ch; Dual, J. [Institute of Mechanical Systems (IMES), Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  11. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  12. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  13. Ultrasonic transducers with resonant cavities as emitters for air-borne applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montero De Espinosa Freijo, F.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work a new proposal to improve the emission efficiency of air-borne ultrasonic transducers is introduced. A theoretical ultrasonic transducer design is studied using a piezoelectric membrane and a Helmholtz resonator with two acoustic ports. The resonator provides radiation in the acoustic ports in phase with that of the membrane. Several finite element simulations and experimental results are used to study the device. The finite element models were used to compare its behaviour with that of conventional vacuum-cavity transducers. These results show an improvement in the bandwidth reaching a quality factor value of 19. Furthermore, the experimental measurements were used to study the effects of the resonant cavity in the response. Several measurements for different cavity depths were performed. The results show an improvement of 25 dB in the emitted pressure through tuning the transducer.

    En este trabajo se presenta una nueva propuesta para mejorar la eficiencia de transductores ultrasónicos acoplados a aire. Para este estudio se ha empleado un diseño teórico de transductor ultrasónico que utiliza una membrana piezoeléctrica y un resonador de Helmholtz con dos puertos acústicos. El resonador hace que la radiación en los puertos acústicos se encuentre en fase con la producida por la membrana. Para estudiar el dispositivo se utilizaron resultados obtenidos mediante programas de elementos finitos y resultados experimentales. Por un lado, los modelos de elementos finitos se utilizaron para comparar el comportamiento del dispositivo con el de transductores convencionales con cavidades al vacío. Estos resultados indican una mejora en el ancho de banda alcanzando valores de factor de calidad de 19. Por otro lado, los resultados experimentales se emplearon para identificar los efectos de la cavidad resonante en el funcionamiento del dispositivo. Para ello se realizaron varias medidas utilizando ciertas profundidades de cavidad

  14. Novel dielectric photonic-band-gap resonant cavity loaded in a gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoan; Liu Gaofeng; Tang Changjian

    2010-01-01

    A novel resonant cavity composed of a periodic, multilayer, dielectric photonic crystal is proposed. Using the transfer matrix method and the Bloch theorem for periodic systems, an analysis on the band-gap property of such a structure is made, and the basic electromagnetic property of the photonic-band-gap resonant cavity (PBGC) is preliminarily exhibited. The theoretical studies and the cold cavity simulation results obtained from a high-frequency structure simulator are presented. On the basis of the present research, such a PBGC is quite similar to the two-dimensional PBGC made of triangular lattices of metal rods with a defect at its centre, in which a frequency selectivity is similarly demonstrated. Because of its unique electromagnetic property, the cavity has many promising applications in active and passive devices operating in the millimetre, sub-millimetre, and even THz wave range. As a specific application, the feasibility of substituting the traditional cylindrical resonant cavity loaded in a gyrotron for a dielectric PBGC to achieve a transverse high-order operation is discussed under the consideration of the electromagnetic features of the cavity. The study shows the great potential value of such a cavity for gyrotron devices.

  15. Review of meson resonance radiative decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    The radiative decays of meson resonances can be studied by three different approaches, it is noted. These are the meson-exchange, Primakoff effect, and the production of the desired resonance and subsequent observation of its decay. These approaches are criticized and examples of them are reviewed. Mass distributions are shown and branching ratios discussed. 21 references

  16. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  17. Micromechanical Resonator Driven by Radiation Pressure Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boales, Joseph A; Mateen, Farrukh; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2017-11-22

    Radiation pressure exerted by light on any surface is the pressure generated by the momentum of impinging photons. The associated force - fundamentally, a quantum mechanical aspect of light - is usually too small to be useful, except in large-scale problems in astronomy and astrodynamics. In atomic and molecular optics, radiation pressure can be used to trap or cool atoms and ions. Use of radiation pressure on larger objects such as micromechanical resonators has been so far limited to its coupling to an acoustic mode, sideband cooling, or levitation of microscopic objects. In this Letter, we demonstrate direct actuation of a radio-frequency micromechanical plate-type resonator by the radiation pressure force generated by a standard laser diode at room temperature. Using two independent methods, the magnitude of the resonator's response to forcing by radiation pressure is found to be proportional to the intensity of the incident light.

  18. Synthesis of coupled resonator optical waveguides by cavity aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Pascual; Doménech, José David; Capmany, José

    2010-01-18

    In this paper, the layer aggregation method is applied to coupled resonator optical waveguides. Starting from the frequency transfer function, the method yields the coupling constants between the resonators. The convergence of the algorithm developed is examined and the related parameters discussed.

  19. Teleportation of two-atom entangled state in resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao

    2007-01-01

    An alternative scheme is presented for teleportation of a two-atom entangled state in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is based on the resonant atom-cavity field interaction. In the scheme, only one cavity is involved, and the number of the atoms needed to be detected is decreased compared with the previous scheme. Since the resonant atom-cavity field interaction greatly reduces the interaction time, the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed during the teleportation process. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed. The scheme can easily be generalized to the teleportation of N-atom Greeninger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states. The number of atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in the GHZ state increases.

  20. Compact 400-Mhz Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for the LHC Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zenghai

    2010-01-01

    Crab cavities are proposed for the LHC upgrade to improve the luminosity. There are two possible crab cavity installations for the LHC upgrade: the global scheme at Interaction Region (IR) 4 where the beam-beam separation is about 420-mm, and the local scheme at the IR5 where the beam-beam separation is only 194-mm. One of the design requirements as the result of a recent LHC-Crab cavity workshop is to develop a 400-MHz cavity design that can be utilized for either the global or local schemes at IR4 or IR5. Such a design would offer more flexibility for the final upgrade installation, as the final crabbing scheme is yet to be determined, and save R and D cost. The cavity size of such a design, however, is limited by the beam-beam separation at IR5 which can only accommodate a cavity with a horizontal size of about 145-mm, which is a design challenge for a 400-MHz cavity. To meet the new design requirements, we have developed a compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) crab cavity that can fit into the tight spaces available at either IR4 or IR5. In this paper, we present the optimization of the HWSR cavity shape and the design of HOM, LOM, and SOM couplers for wakefield damping.

  1. Demonstration of acoustic resonances in a cylindrical cavity applying the photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, N. L.; Vallespi, A. S.; Zajarevich, N. M.; Peuriot, A. L.; Slezak, V. B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present some experiments which can be performed in college or on the first courses of university to acquire knowledge about resonant acoustical phenomena in closed cavities in a tangible way, through experiments based on the photoacoustic effect in gases. This phenomenon consists in the generation of acoustic waves after optical excitation of an absorbing gas and further local heating of the non-absorbing surrounding gas by energy exchange through collisions between molecules of both species. Simple experiments, performed with daily live elements, can be very useful for teachers and students to get in touch with the phenomenon of acoustic resonances with the addition of concepts about light-matter interaction. The setups consist of the resonant cavity, the illumination source and the signal detection-acquisition scheme. In this paper a closed glass test tube is used as the resonant cavity and is filled with a mixture of nitrogen dioxide and air. The illumination is performed by a pulsed power LED modulated at different resonant frequencies of the cavity. A microphone inside the tube is connected to an oscilloscope which displays the photoacoustic signal. The LED is moved along the tube showing how different resonant modes can be excited.

  2. Rotational cooling of polar molecules by Stark-tuned cavity resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2003-01-01

    A general scheme for rotational cooling of diatomic heteronuclear molecules is proposed. It uses a superconducting microwave cavity to enhance the spontaneous decay via Purcell effect. Rotational cooling can be induced by sequentially tuning each rotational transition to cavity resonance, starting from the highest transition level to the lowest one using an electric field. Electrostatic multipoles can be used to provide large confinement volume with essentially homogeneous background electric field

  3. Entangling optical and microwave cavity modes by means of a nanomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzanjeh, Sh. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Jerib, 81746-73441 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino, Macerata (Italy); Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P. [School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino, Macerata (Italy); Milburn, G. J. [Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We propose a scheme that is able to generate stationary continuous-variable entanglement between an optical and a microwave cavity mode by means of their common interaction with a nanomechanical resonator. We show that when both cavities are intensely driven, one can generate bipartite entanglement between any pair of the tripartite system, and that, due to entanglement sharing, optical-microwave entanglement is efficiently generated at the expense of microwave-mechanical and optomechanical entanglement.

  4. Entangling optical and microwave cavity modes by means of a nanomechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.; Milburn, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme that is able to generate stationary continuous-variable entanglement between an optical and a microwave cavity mode by means of their common interaction with a nanomechanical resonator. We show that when both cavities are intensely driven, one can generate bipartite entanglement between any pair of the tripartite system, and that, due to entanglement sharing, optical-microwave entanglement is efficiently generated at the expense of microwave-mechanical and optomechanical entanglement.

  5. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: modeling and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgini, A; Avino, S; Malara, P; Zullo, R; Gagliardi, G; Homola, J; De Natale, P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of a surface-plasmon-resonance refractive-index (RI) sensor based on an optical resonator. The resonator transforms RI changes of liquid samples, interacting with the surface plasmon excited by near-infrared light, into a variation of the intra-cavity optical loss. Cavity ring-down measurements are provided as a proof of concept of RI sensing on calibrated mixtures. A characterization of the overall sensor response and noise features as well as a discussion on possible improvements is carried out. A reproducibility analysis shows that a resolution of 10 −7 –10 −8  RIU is within reach over observation times of 1–30 s. The ultimate resolution is set only by intrinsic noise features of the cavity-based method, pointing to a potential limit below 10 −10  RIU/√Hz. (paper)

  6. Improved method for measuring the electric fields in microwave cavity resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, J.C.; Herrmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field distribution in microwave cavities is commonly measured by frequency perturbation techniques. For many cavity modes which are important in accelerator applications, the standard bead-pulling technique cannot provide adequate discrimination between fields parallel and perpendicular to the particle trajectory, leading to inaccurate and ambiguous results. A method is described which substantially increases the directivity of the measurements. The method has been successfully used to determine the accelerator-related cavity parameters at frequencies up to three times the fundamental resonant frequency

  7. Wavelength-controlled external-cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal resonant reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, A. A.; Liles, Alexandros A.; Persheyev, Saydulla; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an alternative design of external-cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with fiber reflector and a Photonic Crystal (PhC) based resonant reflector on SOI. The Silicon reflector comprises a polymer (SU8) bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and sidemode suppression ratio of more than 25 dB.

  8. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‿loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‿loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  9. Coupled modes, frequencies and fields of a dielectric resonator and a cavity using coupled mode theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y.; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M.

    2014-01-01

    Probes consisting of a dielectric resonator (DR) inserted in a cavity are important integral components of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers because of their high signal-to-noise ratio. This article studies the behavior of this system, based on the coupling between its dielectric and cavity modes. Coupled-mode theory (CMT) is used to determine the frequencies and electromagnetic fields of this coupled system. General expressions for the frequencies and field distributions are derived for both the resulting symmetric and anti-symmetric modes. These expressions are applicable to a wide range of frequencies (from MHz to THz). The coupling of cavities and DRs of various sizes and their resonant frequencies are studied in detail. Since the DR is situated within the cavity then the coupling between them is strong. In some cases the coupling coefficient, κ, is found to be as high as 0.4 even though the frequency difference between the uncoupled modes is large. This is directly attributed to the strong overlap between the fields of the uncoupled DR and cavity modes. In most cases, this improves the signal to noise ratio of the spectrometer. When the DR and the cavity have the same frequency, the coupled electromagnetic fields are found to contain equal contributions from the fields of the two uncoupled modes. This situation is ideal for the excitation of the probe through an iris on the cavity wall. To verify and validate the results, finite element simulations are carried out. This is achieved by simulating the coupling between a cylindrical cavity's TE011 and the dielectric insert's TE01δ modes. Coupling between the modes of higher order is also investigated and discussed. Based on CMT, closed form expressions for the fields of the coupled system are proposed. These expressions are crucial in the analysis of the probe's performance.

  10. Evaluation of RF seals for resonant cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Spalek, G.; Bolme, G.O.; Bultman, N.; Klapetkzy, A.; Kemp, E.L.; Stovall, J.E.; Rose, J.

    1991-01-01

    In radio-frequency quadrupoles (RFQ) and drift-tube linacs (DTL), electrical seals are required at mechanical interfaces to preserve the cavity quality factor (Q). Studies determined the response of copper-plated C-seals to continuous wave (cw), highfield operating conditions. In addition, low-power evaluations of machined-surface, knife-edge, indium wire, C-type, and multilam seals were done at room temperature and cryogenic (25 K) temperatures. For the high-field tests, the Q as well as seal temperature, was measured with power. For the low power test, the Q was measured as a function of temperature

  11. Surface plasmon resonance optical cavity enhanced refractive index sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Gagliardi, G.; Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; Iodice, M.; Adam, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 11 (2013), s. 1951-1953 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Resonators * Surface plasmons * Optical sensing and sensors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  12. Bright cavity solitons in metamaterials with internal resonances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yulin, A.V.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír; Eyderman, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2015), s. 063820 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14028 Grant - others: COST (XE) MP1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Plasmons * Dissipative solitons * Resonators Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2014

  13. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  14. Efficient 525 nm laser generation in single or double resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shilong; Han, Zhenhai; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yinhai; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Shi, Baosen

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study into highly efficient sum frequency generation from 792 and 1556 nm wavelength light to 525 nm wavelength light using either a single or double resonant ring cavity based on a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). By optimizing the cavity's parameters, the maximum power achieved for the resultant 525 nm laser was 263 and 373 mW for the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The corresponding quantum conversion efficiencies were 8 and 77% for converting 1556 nm photons to 525 nm photons with the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The measured intra-cavity single pass conversion efficiency for both configurations was about 5%. The performances of the sum frequency generation in these two configurations was studied and compared in detail. This work will provide guidelines for optimizing the generation of sum frequency generated laser light for a variety of configurations. The high conversion efficiency achieved in this work will help pave the way for frequency up-conversion of non-classical quantum states, such as the squeezed vacuum and single photon states. The proposed green laser source will be used in our future experiments, which includes a plan to generate two-color entangled photon pairs and achieve the frequency down-conversion of single photons carrying orbital angular momentum.

  15. IV-VI mid-IR tunable lasers and detectors with external resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogg, H.; Rahim, M.; Khiar, A.; Fill, M.; Felder, F.; Quack, N.; Blunier, S.; Dual, J.

    2009-08-01

    Wavelength tunable emitters and detectors in the mid-IR wavelength region allow applications including thermal imaging and spectroscopy. Such devices may be realized using a resonant cavity. By mechanically changing the cavity length with MEMS mirror techniques, the wavelengths may be tuned over a considerable range. Vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSEL) may be applied for gas spectroscopy. Resonant cavity enhanced detectors (RCED) are sensitive at the cavity resonance only. They may be applied for low resolution spectroscopy, and, when arrays of such detectors are realized, as multicolor IR-FPA or IR-AFPA (IR-adaptive focal plane arrays). We review mid-infrared RCEDs and VECSELs using narrow gap IV-VI (lead chalcogenide) materials like PbTe and PbSe as the active medium. IV-VIs are fault tolerant and allow easy wavelength tuning. The VECSELs operate up to above room temperature and emit in the 4 - 5 μm range with a PbSe active layer. RCEDs with PbTe absorbing layers above 200 K operating temperature have higher sensitivities than the theoretical limit for a similar broad-band detector coupled with a passive tunable band-filter.

  16. Radiative widths of resonances (experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-07-01

    After a hiatus of several years, this conference brings us considerable new data on resonance production in photon photon interactions. I will first discuss the contributions concerning the tensor, pseudoscalar and scalar mesons, then review the current status of the (c/ovr string/c /eta//sub c/) and finally summarize the exciting new results concerning the spin 1 mesons. 40 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint

  18. The imaging anatomical consideration of the resonance of the cranial cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Myoung

    2000-01-01

    Because vocal technique is the basis of singing a song beautifully, so this study was undertaken to use the scientific and correct technique in order to get much better musical expressions. Shimadzu X-ray remote control TV system was used for checking the supporting state of diaphragmatic respiration after 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 sec during phonation in the state of full inhalation between professional singer and non-professional singer. Shimadzu Magnet nex-α(SMT-50CX/H) was used for examining the scattering state from the resonance of nasal caity to that of cranial cavity on the basis of diaphragmatic respiration. The results obtained were summerized as follows: 1. The resonance of cranial cavity must be scattered by the energy of diaphragmatic respiration after gathering the foci of the fundamental 5 vowels. 2. While raising the epiglottis, the resonance of nasal cavity must be clearly in order to maintain the resonance of cranial cavity beautifully. 3. We can get musical expressions by maintaining the elasticity of diaphragmatic respiration.=20

  19. Exact results for emission from one and two atoms in an ideal cavity at multiphoton resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fam Le Kien; Shumovskij, A.S.; Tran Quang.

    1987-01-01

    The emission from the system of one or two two-level atoms in an ideal cavity with one mode at mutiphoton resonance is examined. Exact results for the two-time dipole correlation function and the time-dependent spectra of multiphoton-induced fluorescence are presented

  20. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  1. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  2. Noise reduction in double-panel structures by cavity and panel resonance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.-H.; Berkhoff, A.P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  3. Resonant cavity light-emitting diodes based on dielectric passive cavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kropp, J.-R.; Zschiedrich, L.; Schmidt, F.; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    A novel design for high brightness planar technology light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and LED on-wafer arrays on absorbing substrates is proposed. The design integrates features of passive dielectric cavity deposited on top of an oxide- semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), the p-n junction with a light emitting region is introduced into the top semiconductor λ/4 DBR period. A multilayer dielectric structure containing a cavity layer and dielectric DBRs is further processed by etching into a micrometer-scale pattern. An oxide-confined aperture is further amended for current and light confinement. We study the impact of the placement of the active region into the maximum or minimum of the optical field intensity and study an impact of the active region positioning on light extraction efficiency. We also study an etching profile composed of symmetric rings in the etched passive cavity over the light emitting area. The bottom semiconductor is an AlGaAs-AlAs multilayer DBR selectively oxidized with the conversion of the AlAs layers into AlOx to increase the stopband width preventing the light from entering the semiconductor substrate. The approach allows to achieve very high light extraction efficiency in a narrow vertical angle keeping the reasonable thermal and current conductivity properties. As an example, a micro-LED structure has been modeled with AlGaAs-AlAs or AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs and an active region based on InGaAlP quantum well(s) emitting in the orange spectral range at 610 nm. A passive dielectric SiO2 cavity is confined by dielectric Ta2O5/SiO2 and AlGaAs-AlOx DBRs. Cylindrically-symmetric structures with multiple ring patterns are modeled. It is demonstrated that the extraction coefficient of light to the air can be increased from 1.3% up to above 90% in a narrow vertical angle (full width at half maximum (FWHM) below 20°). For very small oxide-confined apertures 100nm the narrowing of the FWHM for light extraction can be reduced down to 5

  4. Effect of a gravitational wave on electromagnetic radiation confined in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourrenc, P.

    1978-01-01

    Gravitational radiation is considered within the first-order approximation. A pattern of an electromagnetic cavity is studied: Gravitational waves give rise to a deformation of the planes limiting the cavity. This deformation alters the electromagnetic radiation. Several cases are studied and orders of magnitude are put forward. (author)

  5. Waveguide Cavity Resonator as a Source of Optical Squeezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefszky, M.; Ricken, R.; Eigner, C.; Quiring, V.; Herrmann, H.; Silberhorn, C.

    2017-04-01

    We present the generation of continuous-wave optical squeezing from a titanium-in-diffused lithium niobate waveguide resonator. We directly measure 2.9 ±0.1 dB of single-mode squeezing, which equates to a produced level of 4.9 ±0.1 dB after accounting for detection losses. This device showcases the current capabilities of this waveguide architecture and precipitates more complicated integrated continuous-wave quantum devices in the continuous-variable regime.

  6. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-10-18

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM) value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators.

  7. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators.

  8. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samour, C.

    1969-01-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. 195 Pt + n and 183 W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of γ i > with E γ . The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in 195 Pt + n, 197 Au + n and 59 Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [fr

  9. Results on the interaction of an intense bunched electron beam with resonant cavities at 35 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Gardelle, J; Rullier, J L; Vermare, C; Wuensch, Walter; Lidia, S M; Westenskow, G A; Donohue, J T; Meurdesoif, Y; Lekston, J M; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA) concept is currently being investigated both at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and at CERN. As part of this program, a 7 MeV, 1-kA electron beam produced by the PIVAIR accelerator at CESTA has been used to power a free electron laser (FEL) amplifier at 35 GHz. At the FEL exit, the bunched electron beam is transported and focused into a resonant cavity built by the CLIC group at CERN. The power and frequency of the microwave output generated when the bunched beam traverses two different cavities are measured. (7 refs).

  10. Resonant cavity enhanced light harvesting in flexible thin-film organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2013-04-24

    Dielectric/metal/dielectric (DMD) electrodes have the potential to significantly increase the absorption efficiency and photocurrent in flexible organic solar cells. We demonstrate that this enhancement is attributed to a broadband cavity resonance. Silver-based semitransparent DMD electrodes with sheet resistances below 10 ohm/sq. are fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates in a high-throughput roll-to-roll sputtering tool. We carefully study the effect of the semitransparent DMD electrode (here composed of ZnxSnyOz/Ag/InxSn yOz) on the optical device performance of a copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) bilayer cell and illustrate that a resonant cavity enhanced light trapping effect dominates the optical behavior of the device. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  11. All-dielectric resonant cavity-enabled metals with broadband optical transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengqi; Zhang, Houjiao; Liu, Xiaoshan; Pan, Pingping; Liu, Yi; Tang, Li; Liu, Guiqiang

    2017-06-01

    Metal films with broadband optical transparency are desirable in many optoelectronic devices, such as displays, smart windows, light-emitting diodes and infrared detectors. As bare metal is opaque to light, this issue of transparency attracts great scientific interest. In this work, we proposed and demonstrated a feasible and universal approach for achieving broadband optical transparent (BOT) metals by utilizing all-dielectric resonant cavities. Resonant dielectrics provide optical cavity modes and couple strongly with the surface plasmons of the metal film, and therefore produce a broadband near-unity optical transparent window. The relative enhancement factor (EF) of light transmission exceeds 3400% in comparison with that of pure metal film. Moreover, the transparent metal motif can be realized by other common metals including gold (Au), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu). These optical features together with the fully retained electric and mechanical properties of a natural metal suggest that it will have wide applications in optoelectronic devices.

  12. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers.

  13. Explanation of the quantum phenomenon of off-resonant cavity-mode emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri-Arteaga, Santiago; Vinck-Posada, Herbert; Gómez, Edgar A.

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the unexpected occurrence of an extra emission peak that has been experimentally observed in off-resonant studies of cavity QED systems. Our results within the Markovian master equation approach successfully explain why the central peak arises, and how it reveals that the system is suffering a dynamical phase transition induced by the phonon-mediated coupling. Our findings are in qualitative agreement with previous reported experimental results, and the fundamental physics behind this quantum phenomenon is understood.

  14. Bistable laser device with multiple coupled active vertical-cavity resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-08-19

    A new class of bistable coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor laser devices has been developed. These bistable laser devices can be switched, either electrically or optically, between lasing and non-lasing states. A switching signal with a power of a fraction of a milliwatt can change the laser output of such a device by a factor of a hundred, thereby enabling a range of optical switching and data encoding applications.

  15. Pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity: usual and unusual manifestations and pitfalls on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Yoshida, Shusaku; Nishitani, Hiromu [University of Tokushima, Department of Radiology, Tokushima (Japan); Uehara, Hisanori [University of Tokushima, Department of Molecular and Environmental Pathology, Tokushima (Japan); Shimazu, Hideki [Oe Kyoudo Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The endometrial cavity may demonstrate various imaging manifestations such as normal, reactive, inflammatory, and benign and malignant neoplasms. We evaluated usual and unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the uterine endometrial cavity, and described the diagnostic clues to differential diagnoses. Surgically proven pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity were evaluated retrospectively with pathologic correlation. The pathologies included benign endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial hyperplasia and polyp, malignant endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial carcinoma and carcinosarcoma, endometrial-myometrial neoplasm such as endometrial stromal sarcoma, pregnancy-related lesions in the endometrial cavity such as gestational trophoblastic diseases (hydatidiform mole, invasive mole and choriocarcinoma) and placental polyp, myometrial lesions simulating endometrial lesions such as submucosal leiomyoma and some adenomyosis, endometrial neoplasms simulating myometrial lesions such as adenomyomatous polyp and endometrial lesions arising in the hemicavity of a septate/bicornate uterus, and fluid collections in the uterine cavity (hydro/hemato/pyometra). It is important to recognize various imaging findings in these diseases, in order to make a correct preoperative diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Malignant tumors of the nasal cavity: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Gonzalez, Fabio Mota; Cordeiro, Flamarion de Barros; Yamashiro, Ilka; Lenh, Carlos Neutzling; Rapoport, Abrao

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of deep tissue extension of malignant tumors of the nasal cavity. Twelve patients diagnosed with malignant tumors of the nasal cavity were retrospectively evaluated at the Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Head and Neck Surgery of the 'Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, Brazil, between 1990 and 2000. All cases were confirmed by histopathologic examination. The results were: extension to the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses was identified in six patients, extension to contralateral nasal cavity, orbit and lamina cribosa in five patients, extension to nasal pharynx and masticator space in two patients, extension to cavernous sinus, anterior/middle cranial fossa, pterygomaxillary fossa, inferior/superior orbital fissure, frontal sinus, contralateral ethmoid sinus, contralateral lamina cribosa, hard palate and pterygopalatine fossa in one patient. Conclusion: It is important to precisely assess the local extension and spread of tumor by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in order to plan the approach to treatment, which will influence the prognosis. (author)

  17. Resonant atom-field interaction in large-size coupled-cavity arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We consider an array of coupled cavities with staggered intercavity couplings, where each cavity mode interacts with an atom. In contrast to large-size arrays with uniform hopping rates where the atomic dynamics is known to be frozen in the strong-hopping regime, we show that resonant atom-field dynamics with significant energy exchange can occur in the case of staggered hopping rates even in the thermodynamic limit. This effect arises from the joint emergence of an energy gap in the free photonic dispersion relation and a discrete frequency at the gap's center. The latter corresponds to a bound normal mode stemming solely from the finiteness of the array length. Depending on which cavity is excited, either the atomic dynamics is frozen or a Jaynes-Cummings-like energy exchange is triggered between the bound photonic mode and its atomic analog. As these phenomena are effective with any number of cavities, they are prone to be experimentally observed even in small-size arrays.

  18. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kenichi

    1996-01-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  19. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kenichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance biophysical radiation dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rao F.H.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the advancements made in the field of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for biophysical dosimetry with tooth enamel for accident, emergency, and retrospective radiation dose reconstruction. A methodology has been developed to measure retrospective radiation exposures in human tooth enamel. This entails novel sample preparation procedures with minimum mechanical treatment to reduce the preparation induced uncertainties, establish optimum measurement conditions inside the EPR cavity, post-process the measured spectrum with functional simulation of dosimetric and other interfering signals, and reconstruct dose. By using this technique, retrospective gamma exposures as low as 80±30 mGy have been successfully deciphered. The notion of dose modifier was introduced in EPR biodosimetry for low dose measurements. It has been demonstrated that by using the modified zero added dose (MZAD) technique for low radiation exposures, doses in 100 mGy ranges can be easily reconstructed in teeth that were previously thought useless for EPR dosimetry. Also, the use of a dose modifier makes robust dose reconstruction possible for higher radiation exposures. The EPR dosimetry technique was also developed for tooth samples extracted from rodents, which represent small tooth sizing. EPR doses in the molars, extracted from the mice irradiated with whole body exposures, were reassessed and shown to be correct within the experimental uncertainty. The sensitivity of human tooth enamel for neutron irradiation, obtained from the 3 MV McMaster K.N. Van de Graaff accelerator, was also studied. For the first time this work has shown that the neutron sensitivity of the tooth enamel is approximately 1/10th of the equivalent gamma sensitivity. Parametric studies for neutron dose rate and neutron energy within the available range of the accelerator, showed no impact on the sensitivity of the tooth enamel. Therefore, tooth enamel can be used as a dosimeter for both neutrons

  1. Investigation of Fano resonances induced by higher order plasmon modes on a circular nano-disk with an elongated cavity

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad Ruhul

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, a planar metallic nanostructure design, which supports two distinct Fano resonances in its extinction cross-section spectrum under normally incident and linearly polarized electromagnetic field, is proposed. The proposed design involves a circular disk embedding an elongated cavity; shifting and rotating the cavity break the symmetry of the structure with respect to the incident field and induce higher order plasmon modes. As a result, Fano resonances are generated in the visible spectrum due to the destructive interference between the sub-radiant higher order modes and super-radiant the dipolar mode. The Fano resonances can be tuned by varying the cavity\\'s width and the rotation angle. An RLC circuit, which is mathematically equivalent to a mass-spring oscillator, is proposed to model the optical response of the nanostructure design.

  2. Misalignment sensitivity in an intra-cavity coherently combined crossed-Porro resonator configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperovich, Z.; Buchinsky, O.; Greenstein, S.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the misalignment sensitivity in a crossed-Porro resonator configuration when coherently combining two pulsed multimode Nd:YAG laser channels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported study of this configuration. The configuration is based on a passive intra-cavity interferometric combiner that promotes self-phase locking and coherent combining. Detailed misalignment sensitivity measurements are presented, examining both translation and angular deviations of the end prisms and combiner, and are compared to the results for standard flat end-mirror configurations. The results show that the most sensitive parameter in the crossed-Porro resonator configuration is the angular tuning of the intra-cavity interferometric combiner, which is ~±54 µrad. In comparison, with the flat end mirror configuration, the most sensitive parameter in the resonator is the angular tuning of the output coupler, which is ~±11 µrad. Thus, with the crossed-Porro configuration, we obtain significantly reduced sensitivity. This ability to reduce the misalignment sensitivity in coherently combined solid-state configurations may be beneficial in paving their way into practical use in a variety of demanding applications.

  3. Investigations of a voltage-biased microwave cavity for quantum measurements of nanomechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxinol, Francisco; Hao, Hugo; Lahaye, Matt

    2015-03-01

    Quantum electromechanical systems incorporating superconducting qubits have received extensive interest in recent years due to their promising prospects for studying fundamental topics of quantum mechanics such as quantum measurement, entanglement and decoherence in new macroscopic limits, also for their potential as elements in technological applications in quantum information network and weak force detector, to name a few. In this presentation we will discuss ours efforts toward to devise an electromechanical circuit to strongly couple a nanomechanical resonator to a superconductor qubit, where a high voltage dc-bias is required, to study quantum behavior of a mechanical resonator. Preliminary results of our latest generation of devices integrating a superconductor qubit into a high-Q voltage biased microwave cavities are presented. Developments in the circuit design to couple a mechanical resonator to a qubit in the high-Q voltage bias CPW cavity is discussed as well prospects of achieving single-phonon measurement resolution. National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1056423 and Grant No. DMR-1312421.

  4. Daily Tracking of Glioblastoma Resection Cavity, Cerebral Edema, and Tumor Volume with MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shahil; Gajjar, Shefali R; Padgett, Kyle R; Asher, David; Stoyanova, Radka; Ford, John C; Mellon, Eric A

    2018-03-19

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays a critical role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Studies of brain imaging during RT for glioblastoma have demonstrated changes in the brain during RT. However, frequent or daily utilization of standalone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during RT have limited feasibility. The recent release of the tri-cobalt-60 MRI-guided RT (MR-IGRT) device (ViewRay MRIdian, Cleveland, OH) allows for daily brain MRI for the RT setup. Daily MRI of three postoperative patients undergoing RT and temozolomide for glioblastoma over a six-week course allowed for the identification of changes to the cavity, edema, and visible tumor on a daily basis. The volumes and dimensions of the resection cavities, edema, and T2-hyperintense tumor were measured. A general trend of daily decreases in cavity measurements was observed in all patients. For the one patient with edema, a trend of daily increases followed by a trend of daily decreases were observed. These results suggest that daily MRI could be used for onboard resimulation and adaptive RT for future fluctuations in the sizes of brain tumors, cavities, or cystic components. This could improve tumor targeting and reduce RT of healthy brain tissue.

  5. Design of Transparent Anodes for Resonant Cavity Enhanced Light Harvesting in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-03

    The use of an ITO-free MoO 3/Ag/MoO 3 anode to control the photon harvesting in PCDTBT:PC 70BM solar cells is proposed. At first sight, the fact that these anodes possess reduced far-field transmission compared to ITO may seem to be a disadvantage. But, despite this, we show that by carefully tuning the resonant optical cavity we can enhance the external quantum efficiency close to the band edge of PCDTBT, resulting in high photocurrent and power conversion efficiency on par with ITO. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High-repetition intra-cavity source of Compton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Agustsson, R; Campese, T; Murokh, A; Ovodenko, A; Shaftan, T

    2014-01-01

    We report our progress in developing a high-power Compton source for a diversity of applications ranging from university-scale compact x-ray light sources and metrology tools for EUV lithography, to high-brilliance gamma-sources for nuclear analysis. Our conceptual approach lies in multiplying the source’s repetition rate and increasing its average brightness by placing the Compton interaction point inside the optical cavity of an active laser. We discuss considerations in its design, our simulations, and tests of the laser’s cavity that confirm the feasibility of the proposed concept. (paper)

  7. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels.

  8. Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerk, A A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Marquardt, F [Department of Physics, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Jacobs, K [Department of Physics, University of Massachussets at Boston, Boston, MA 02125 (United States)], E-mail: aashish.clerk@mcgill.ca, E-mail: florian.marquardt@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: kjacobs@cs.umb.edu

    2008-09-15

    We study the quantum measurement of a cantilever using a parametrically coupled electromagnetic cavity which is driven at the two sidebands corresponding to the mechanical motion. This scheme, originally due to Braginsky et al (Braginsky V, Vorontsov Y I and Thorne K P 1980 Science 209 547), allows a back-action free measurement of one quadrature of the cantilever's motion, and hence the possibility of generating a squeezed state. We present a complete quantum theory of this system, and derive simple conditions on when the quantum limit on the added noise can be surpassed. We also study the conditional dynamics of the measurement, and discuss how such a scheme (when coupled with feedback) can be used to generate and detect squeezed states of the oscillator. Our results are relevant to experiments in optomechanics, and to experiments in quantum electromechanics employing stripline resonators coupled to mechanical resonators.

  9. Numerical investigation of the electric field distribution and the power deposition in the resonant cavity of a microwave electrothermal thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Serhan Yildiz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Microwave electrothermal thruster (MET, an in-space propulsion concept, uses an electromagnetic resonant cavity as a heating chamber. In a MET system, electromagnetic energy is converted to thermal energy via a free floating plasma inside a resonant cavity. To optimize the power deposition inside the cavity, the factors that affect the electric field distribution and the resonance conditions must be accounted for. For MET thrusters, the length of the cavity, the dielectric plate that separates the plasma zone from the antenna, the antenna length and the formation of a free floating plasma have direct effects on the electromagnetic wave transmission and thus the power deposition. MET systems can be tuned by adjusting the lengths of the cavity or the antenna. This study presents the results of a 2-D axis symmetric model for the investigation of the effects of cavity length, antenna length, separation plate thickness, as well as the presence of free floating plasma on the power absorption. Specifically, electric field distribution inside the resonant cavity is calculated for a prototype MET system developed at the Bogazici University Space Technologies Laboratory. Simulations are conducted for a cavity fed with a constant power input of 1 kW at 2.45 GHz using COMSOL Multiphysics commercial software. Calculations are performed for maximum plasma electron densities ranging from 1019 to 1021 #/m3. It is determined that the optimum antenna length changes with changing plasma density. The calculations show that over 95% of the delivered power can be deposited to the plasma when the system is tuned by adjusting the cavity length.

  10. Normal mode splitting and ground state cooling in a Fabry—Perot optical cavity and transmission line resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hua-Jun; Mi Xian-Wu

    2011-01-01

    Optomechanical dynamics in two systems which are a transmission line resonator and Fabrya—Perot optical cavity via radiation—pressure are investigated by linearized quantum Langevin equation. We work in the resolved sideband regime where the oscillator resonance frequency exceeds the cavity linewidth. Normal mode splittings of the mechanical resonator as a pure result of the coupling interaction in the two optomechanical systems is studied, and we make a comparison of normal mode splitting of mechanical resonator between the two systems. In the optical cavity, the normal mode splitting of the movable mirror approaches the latest experiment very well. In addition, an approximation scheme is introduced to demonstrate the ground state cooling, and we make a comparison of cooling between the two systems dominated by two key factors, which are the initial bath temperature and the mechanical quality factor. Since both the normal mode splitting and cooling require working in the resolved sideband regime, whether the normal mode splitting influences the cooling of the mirror is considered. Considering the size of the mechanical resonator and precooling the system, the mechanical resonator in the transmission line resonator system is easier to achieve the ground state cooling than in optical cavity. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  12. Tunable Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced Photodetector with Double High-Index-Contrast Grating Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists....... Furthermore, the fact that it can be fabricated on a silicon platform offers us a possibility of integration with electronics.......In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists...... of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs...

  13. Tunable Fano resonance in MDM stub waveguide coupled with a U-shaped cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xingchun; Tian, Jinping; Yang, Rongcao

    2018-04-01

    A new compact metal-dielectric-metal waveguide system consisting of a stub coupled with a U-cavity is proposed to produce sharp and asymmetric Fano resonance. The transmission properties of the proposed structure are numerically studied by the finite element method and verified by the coupled mode theory. Simulation results reveal that the spectral profile can be easily tuned by adjusting the geometric parameters of the structure. One of the potential application of the proposed structure as a highly efficient plasmonic refractive index nanosensor was investigated with its sensitivity of more than 1000 nm/RIU and a figure of merit of up to 5500. Another application is integrated slow-light device whose group index can be greater than 6. In addition, multiple Fano resonances will occur in the broadband transmission spectrum by adding another U-cavity or (and) stub. The characteristics of the proposed structure are very promising for the highly performance filters, on-chip nanosensors, and slow-light devices.

  14. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Zhao; G. Ciovati; T. R. Bieler

    2010-01-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical micro...

  15. Comparison of four computational methods for computing Q factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We benchmark four state-of-the-art computational methods by computing quality factors and resonance wavelengths in photonic crystal membrane L5 and L9 line defect cavities.The convergence of the methods with respect to resolution, degrees of freedom and number ofmodes is investigated. Special att...... attention is paid to the influence of the size of the computational domain. Convergence is not obtained for some of the methods, indicating that some are moresuitable than others for analyzing line defect cavities....

  16. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons; Capture radiative partielle des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samour, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. {sup 195}Pt + n and {sup 183}W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > with E{sub {gamma}}. The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n and {sup 59}Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [French] La capture radiative des neutrons de resonance a ete etudiee pres de l'accelerateur lineaire de Saclay entre 0,5 et 700 eV a l'aide de la methode du temps-de-vol et d'un detecteur Ge(Li). Les noyaux {sup 195}Pt + n et {sup 183}W + n permettent l'analyse de la distribution de resonance en resonance des largeurs radiatives partielles {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} et de leur eventuelle correlation, ainsi que l'etude de la variation de < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > en fonction de E{sub {gamma}}. Les intensites moyennes des transitions Ml et El sont comparees pour quelques isotopes de l'etain. Des effets d'interference, soit entre resonances, soit entre capture directe et capture resonnante sont mis en evidence dans {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n et {sup 59}Co + n. Enfin les schemas des etats excites d'un grand nombre de noyaux sont obtenus et compares avec les predictions theoriques. Cette etude a ete completee par une analyse des spectres thermiques. (auteur)

  17. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons; Capture radiative partielle des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samour, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. {sup 195}Pt + n and {sup 183}W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > with E{sub {gamma}}. The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n and {sup 59}Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [French] La capture radiative des neutrons de resonance a ete etudiee pres de l'accelerateur lineaire de Saclay entre 0,5 et 700 eV a l'aide de la methode du temps-de-vol et d'un detecteur Ge(Li). Les noyaux {sup 195}Pt + n et {sup 183}W + n permettent l'analyse de la distribution de resonance en resonance des largeurs radiatives partielles {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} et de leur eventuelle correlation, ainsi que l'etude de la variation de < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > en fonction de E{sub {gamma}}. Les intensites moyennes des transitions Ml et El sont comparees pour quelques isotopes de l'etain. Des effets d'interference, soit entre resonances, soit entre capture directe et capture resonnante sont mis en evidence dans {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n et {sup 59}Co + n. Enfin les schemas des etats excites d'un grand nombre de noyaux sont obtenus et compares avec les predictions theoriques. Cette etude a ete completee par une analyse des spectres thermiques. (auteur)

  18. Computation of coupled surface radiation and natural convection in an inclined form cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amraqui, Samir; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Abid, Cherifa

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with computation of the radiation-natural convection interactions in an inclined form cavity. The cavity contains two symmetrically identical isothermal blocks and is vented by two opening located in a vertical median axis at the top and the bottom parts of the cavity. Calculations are made by using a finite volume method and an efficient numerical procedure is introduced for calculating the view factors, with shadow effects included. Effects of Rayleigh number Ra and inclination angle φ are investigated for Pr = 0.71 in presence and in absence of the radiation exchange. Results are reported in terms of isotherms, streamlines, local and average Nusselt numbers and mass flow rate. In light of the obtained results, we can conclude that the heat transfer decreases with increasing φ. In addition, the increase of Ra and the taking into account of the radiation exchange produce a considerable increase in the heat transfer.

  19. Intra-oral cone radiation therapy for selected carcinomas of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.; Doppke, K.P.; Biggs, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 101 patients with early carcinomas of the oral cavity, T1 and T2, treated by external cobalt 60 beam and/or intra-oral cone (IOC) radiation therapy between 1964 through 1980 was made. The two year disease-free survival rate, including surgical salvage, was 88% and the local control rate was 85%. The incidence of radiation complications, i.e., soft tissue ulceration and/or osteoradionecrosis, was 14% and varied with various tumor sites and radiation doses delivered. The present review shows that local control and radiation complications are closely related to radiation doses and varies with different tumor sites of the oral cavity. Radiation therapy dosages expressed in terms of TDF values for these lesions are herein recommended. With proper selections of lesions arising from the oral cavity, combined external beam and IOC radiation therapy has been found extremely efficacious in achieving good local tumor control and high survival rates with excellent cosmetic and functional results and minimum radiation sequalae

  20. Design of a Novel Polarized Beam Splitter Based on a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Resonator Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuan; Chen Shu-Wen; Liao Qing-Hua; Yu Tian-Bao; Liu Nian-Hua; Huang Yong-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze a novel ultra-compact polarization beam splitter based on a resonator cavity in a two-dimensional photonic crystal. The two polarizations can be separated efficiently by the strong coupling between the microcavities and the waveguides occurring around the resonant frequency of the cavities. The transmittance of two polarized light around 1.55 μm can be more than 98.6%, and the size of the device is less than 15 μm×13 μm, so these features will play an important role in future integrated optical circuits. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  1. Determination of Activated Carbon Residual Life using a Microwave Cavity Resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, A; Wylie, S; Shaw, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Thomas, A; Keele, H

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the continuation of work conducted jointly between Dstl and LJMU. This unique body of work has been, largely, concerned with detecting the residual life of high performance filter materials using electromagnetic (EM) waves within a resonant cavity. Past work has considered both HEPA [1] and ASZM-TEDA[2] activated carbon filter materials. This paper continues the later work, considering the response of ASZM-TEDA activated carbon through the co-ageing of two distinct batches of the material. The paper briefly introduces activated carbon, discusses theory relevant to the work and the methodology used for investigation. A comprehensive set of results is included which seek to validate this technique for determining the residual lifespan of activated carbon.

  2. Photoluminescence of PMMA doped with fluorescein and carbosilane dendrimer and lasing in PBG resonance cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunfang; Jin Feng; Dong Xianzi; Chen Weiqiang; Duan Xuanming

    2007-01-01

    Carbosilane dendrimers with terminal allyl groups were synthesized and used to encapsulate the allyl derivative of fluorescein (allyl-FL) doped in PMMA. The optical property of this system was investigated and the results showed that the concentration of allyl-FL in PMMA could be increased to 4.5 wt% without decrease of the luminescence efficiency by adding the dendrimer into the system. The allyl-FL/dendrimer/PMMA film was embedded into a resonance cavity composed of two pieces of photonic band gap (PBG) materials to form a new-type solid-state laser. A laser emission at 589 nm was obtained when excited with a third harmonic generation (THG) of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) and its full-width at half-maximum of the spectrum was 1.7 nm

  3. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  4. Cavity resonance absorption in ultra-high bandwidth CRT deflection structure by a resistive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.E.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-05-11

    An improved ultra-high bandwidth helical coil deflection structure for a cathode ray tube is described comprising a first metal member having a bore therein, the metal walls of which form a first ground plane; a second metal member coaxially mounted in the bore of the first metal member and forming a second ground plane; a helical deflection coil coaxially mounted within the bore between the two ground planes; and a resistive load disposed in one end of the bore and electrically connected to the first and second ground planes, the resistive load having an impedance substantially equal to the characteristic impedance of the coaxial line formed by the two coaxial ground planes to inhibit cavity resonance in the structure within the ultra-high bandwidth of operation. Preferably, the resistive load comprises a carbon film on a surface of an end plug in one end of the bore.

  5. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  6. Radiation therapy of tumors of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Both operation and irradiation can cure a high percentage of patients with oral cavity carcinomas. The decision as to which modality is best (or whether to combine both modalities or offer only palliative treatment) in a particular patient is frequently complex and involves consideration of a number of factors before rational therapy can be planned. 1. Tumor location and distribution. 2. Tumor volume. 3. Tumor differentiation. 4. Known patterns of spread. 5. Functional, rehabilitative, and cosmetic aspects and their impact on the patient's life style and occupation. 6. The wishes of the patient and family. 7. Availability of a given treatment in the patient's geographic area. 8. Experience of the patient's physicians. 9. Anticipated cure rates with the various modes of therapy. 10. Expense. 11. The patient's age. 12. Tobacco and alcohol consumption. 13. Presence of other serious medical problems

  7. Low-Cost Resonant Cavity Raman Gas Probe for Multi-Gas Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, J.; Haugholt, K. H.; Ferber, A.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Tschudi, J.

    2014-12-01

    Raman based gas sensing can be attractive in several industrial applications, due to its multi-gas sensing capabilities and its ability to detect O_2 and N_2. In this article, we have built a Raman gas probe, based on low-cost components, which has shown an estimated detection limit of 0.5 % for 30 second measurements of N_2 and O_2. While this detection limit is higher than that of commercially available equipment, our estimated component cost is approximately one tenth of the price of commercially available equipment. The use of a resonant Fabry-Pérot cavity increases the scattered signal, and hence the sensitivity, by a factor of 50. The cavity is kept in resonance using a piezo-actuated mirror and a photodiode in a feedback loop. The system described in this article was made with minimum-cost components to demonstrate the low-cost principle. However, it is possible to decrease the detection limit using a higher-powered (but still low-cost) laser and improving the collection optics. By applying these improvements, the detection limit and estimated measurement precision will be sufficient for e.g. the monitoring of input gases in combustion processes, such as e.g. (bio-)gas power plants. In these processes, knowledge about gas compositions with 0.1 % (absolute) precision can help regulate and optimize process conditions. The system has the potential to provide a low-cost, industrial Raman sensor that is optimized for specific gas-detection applications.

  8. Metal cutting by radiation from a CO2 laser with a self-filtering cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malikov, A G; Orishich, Anatolii M; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of quality cutting by radiation from a CO 2 laser with an unstable self-filtering cavity (SFC) is experimentally investigated. The SFC provides the product of the divergence angle by the beam radius close to that for lower modes in a stable cavity (SC), however, at a higher radiation power, which favours faster cutting. In the far-field zone, the SFC beam has a diffraction structure with side maxima, which is usually considered as a negative factor in laser cutting. 25-mm-thick steel slabs have been cut. The comparison of the obtained results with known data on SC lasers shows that the principal characteristics of the cut (the width, edge roughness, specific expenditure of energy) are close in these lasers. A conclusion is made that at the chosen cavity parameters, the specific spatial structure of the SFC laser beam has no significant effect on the cut characteristics. (laser technologies)

  9. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeem,; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Nik-Ghazali, N.

    2016-01-01

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature T_w and concentration C_w whereas the right surface is maintained at T_c and C_c such that T_w>T_c and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  10. Influence of radiation on double conjugate diffusion in a porous cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeem,; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna [Dept. of Computer System & Technology, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Khan, T. M. Yunus, E-mail: yunus.tatagar@gmail.com [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 (Malaysia); Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, BVB College of Engineering & Technology, Hubli (India); Badruddin, Irfan Anjum, E-mail: irfan-magami@Rediffmail.com; Nik-Ghazali, N. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 (Malaysia)

    2016-05-06

    The current work highlights the effect of radiation on the conjugate heat and mass transfer in a square porous cavity having a solid wall. The solid wall is placed at the center of cavity. The left surface of cavity is maintained at higher temperature T{sub w} and concentration C{sub w} whereas the right surface is maintained at T{sub c} and C{sub c} such that T{sub w}>T{sub c} and Cw>Cc. The top and bottom surfaces are adiabatic. The governing equations are solved with the help of finite element method by making use of triangular elements. The results are discussed with respect to two different heights of solid wall inside the porous medium along with the radiation parameter.

  11. Program system for calculating streaming neutron radiation field in reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhongliang; Zhao Shu.

    1986-01-01

    The A23 neutron albedo data base based on Monte Carlo method well agrees with SAIL albedo data base. RSCAM program system, using Monte Carlo method with albedo approach, is used to calculate streaming neutron radiation field in reactor cavity and containment operating hall. The dose rate distributions calculated with RSCAM in square concrete duct well agree with experiments

  12. An acoustic radiator with integrated cavity and active control of surface vibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur; Tajdari, Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method to realize an acoustic source for low frequencies with relatively small thickness. A honeycomb plate structure which is open on one side combines the radiating surface and the major part of the air cavity. The vibration of the plate is controlled with a decentralized

  13. Three-dimensional FDTD Modeling of Earth-ionosphere Cavity Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Pasko, V. P.

    2003-12-01

    Resonance properties of the earth-ionosphere cavity were first predicted by W. O. Schumann in 1952 [Schumann, Z. Naturforsch. A, 7, 149, 1952]. Since then observations of extremely low frequency (ELF) signals in the frequency range 1-500 Hz have become a powerful tool for monitoring of global lightning activity and planetary scale variability of the lower ionosphere, as well as, in recent years, for location and remote sensing of sprites, jets and elves and associated lightning discharges [e.g., Sato et al., JASTP, 65, 607, 2003; Su et al., Nature, 423, 974, 2003; and references cited therein]. The simplicity and flexibility of finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique for finding first principles solutions of electromagnetic problems in a medium with arbitrary inhomogeneities and ever-increasing computer power make FDTD an excellent candidate to be the technique of the future in development of realistic numerical models of VLF/ELF propagation in Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Cummer, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat., 48, 1420, 2000], and several reports about successful application of the FDTD technique for solution of related problems have recently appeared in the literature [e.g., Thevenot et al., Ann. Telecommun., 54, 297, 1999; Cummer, 2000; Berenger, Ann. Telecommun., 57, 1059, 2002, Simpson and Taflove, IEEE Antennas Wireless Propagat. Lett., 1, 53, 2002]. In this talk we will present results from a new three-dimensional spherical FDTD model, which is designed for studies of ELF electromagnetic signals under 100 Hz in the earth-ionosphere cavity. The model accounts for a realistic latitudinal and longitudinal variation of ground conductivity (i.e., for the boundaries between oceans and continents) by employing a broadband surface impedance technique proposed in [Breggs et al., IEEE Trans. Antenna Propagat., 41, 118, 1993]. The realistic distributions of atmospheric/lower ionospheric conductivity are derived from the international reference ionosphere model

  14. Radiation dosimetry using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A new dosimetry system for 3D dose distribution measurements based on the Fricke dosimeter and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed. The dosimeter consists of a ferrous sulphate solution incorporated in an agarose gel, which together constitute the dosimeter gel. The absorbed dose to the gel is measured by means of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1 in an MR scanner. The dose distribution to an arbitrary slice within a dosimeter gel phantom can thus be determined. The chemical yield of the dosimeter gel is significantly higher than that of the for Fricke solution, and is strongly dependent of the initial ferrous sulphate concentration, assuming that the gel is bubbled with oxygen during preparation. A gel of 1.5 mM [Fe 2+ ] and 50 mM [H 2 SO 4 ] has a sensitivity of 0.108 s -1 Gy -1 and is linear up to 50 Gy. The dosimeter gel has uniform dose response over large volumes. Above 50 mM[H 2 SO 4 ] the yield increases only slightly, but the gel strength decreases and results in gel phantoms with non-uniform dose response. Below 50 mM[H 2 SO 4 ] the sensitivity of the dosimeter falls rapidly due to the decreased relaxivity of the ferric ions. The high chemical yield can be explained by a chain reaction and a reaction scheme is accordingly proposed. The dosimeter gel shows no dependence on dose rate or radiation quality and can be regarded as water-equivalent with respect to the interaction of the radiation. The diffusion coefficient of the ferric ions in the agarose gel is 1.19x10 -2 cm 2 /h. The diffusion blurs the dosimeteric image, but poses only a minor problem if the MR measurements are completed within the first two hours after irradiation. Dose distribution data from external radiation therapy units have been determined using the dosimeter gel and MRI with good accuracy, but the precision is poor, about 5-10%. (au) (84 refs.)

  15. A high-resolution EPR-CT microscope using cavity-resonators equipped with small field gradient coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, T.; Murata, T.; Kumai, H.; Yamashiro, A.

    1996-01-01

    Cylindrical cavity resonators equipped with field gradient coils were developed for two-dimensional EPR-CT microscope systems. The field gradient coils lie in four (or six) thin metal tubes placed along the direction of the microwave magnetic field in the cavity to minimize impact on the resonator's quality factor. Two pairs of the tubes carry a 100 kHz current for magnetic field modulation. This cavity has high spin-detection sensitivity and can provide EPR images with submillimeter resolution. In order to reconstruct better images from fewer projections, we used an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for the two-dimensional image reconstruction. The ART method may be suitable for not only spectral-spatial two-dimensional EPR imaging, but also spatio-temporal EPR imaging in dynamic spin systems. (author)

  16. A study on utility of magnetic resonance imaging for female pelvic cavity using enteral MRI contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ham Gyum

    1997-01-01

    For radiological test in soft tissue or neighboring part with same signal intensity, proper test method and equipment shall be selected as needed. In case of female pelvic cavity, ultrasonography or computed tomography alternatively used, but MRI can be more usefully applied to design treatment method or operation plan by improving the diagnostic accuracy and careful observation of lesion characteristics. Magnetic Resonance Imaging using recently developed Enteral MRI contrast media can acquire more diagnostic information than using only intravenous contrast media. Thus this study attempted to examine the utility of anatomic structure and diagnostic acquisition by imaging the female pelvic cavity using Enteral MRI contrast media. As a result of analyzing magnetic resonance imaging after administering Enteral MRI contrast media to pelvic cavity suspect patients, more diagnostic information media could be acquired than only using intravenous contrast. Especially, in the diagnosis of lesion position, shape, distinction from neighboring tissues it is thought that external Enteral MRI contrast media should be used

  17. Mitigation of radiation-pressure-induced angular instability of a Fabry–Perot cavity consisting of suspended mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [KAGRA Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    To observe radiation pressure noise in optical cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, high laser power is necessary. However, because the radiation pressure on the mirrors could cause an angular anti-spring effect, the high laser power could induce angular instability to the cavity. An angular control system using radiation pressure as an actuator, which was previously invented to reduce the anti-spring effect for the low power case, was applied to the higher power case where the angular instability would occur. As a result the angular instability was mitigated. It was also demonstrated that the cavity was unstable without this control system. - Highlights: • High laser power could cause angular instability to a suspended Fabry–Perot cavity. • To mitigate the instability, the control system using radiation pressure is applied. • Mitigating the radiation-pressure-induced angular instability is demonstrated. • It is also confirmed that the cavity would be unstable without the control system.

  18. Variability Among Breast Radiation Oncologists in Delineation of the Postsurgical Lumpectomy Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, Daniel M.; Luo Weixiu; Song Jun; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Gelman, Rebecca; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Results: Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS ≥3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter ≥5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Conclusions: Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined

  19. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  20. Absorption of resonant electromagnetic radiation in electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, T.U.; Pazdzerskii, V.A.; Usachenko, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Nonrelativistic quantum theory is used to study the possibility of amplification of electromagnetic radiation in forced braking scattering of an electron beam on atoms. The interaction of the atom with the electromagnetic field is considered in the resonant approximation. Cases of large and small detuning from resonance are considered. It is shown that for any orientation of the electron beam relative to the field polarization vector, absorption of radiation occurs, with the major contribution being produced by atomic electrons

  1. Development of a Cryogenic Radiation Detector for Mapping Radio Frequency Superconducting Cavity Field Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Dotson, Danny W

    2005-01-01

    There is a relationship between field emissions in a Super Conducting RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-rays). External (room temperature) detectors are shielded from the onset of low energy X-rays by the vacuum and cryogenic stainless steel module walls. An internal measuring system for mapping field emissions would assist scientists and engineers in perfecting surface deposition and acid washing module surfaces. Two measurement systems are undergoing cryogenic testing at JLab. One is an active CsI photodiode array and the second is an X-ray film camera. The CsI array has operated sucessfully in a cavity in liquid Helium but saturated at higher power due to scattering in the cavity. A shield with an aperature similar to the X-ray film detector is being designed for the next series of tests which will be completed before PAC-05.

  2. Two-photon cavity solitons in a laser: radiative profiles, interaction and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrat, C [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); Torrent, M C [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); Vilaseca, R [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); GarcIa-Ojalvo, J [Center for Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Brambilla, M [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Politecnico di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2004-05-01

    We study the properties of two-photon cavity solitons that appear in a broad-area cascade laser. These vectorial solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission emerging over a background of single-photon emission. Analysis of their structural properties reveals singular features such as their short distance radiation of outgoing waves, which can be interpreted in terms of the soliton frequency profile. However, the phase of these solitons is not determined by any external factor, which influences the way in which the structures can be written and erased. We also examine ways of controlling the cavity-soliton position, and analyse the interaction between neighbouring cavity solitons. Finally, investigation of the parameter dependence of these structures shows a route from soliton-dominated to defect-mediated turbulence.

  3. Calculation of the resonance frequency change for a cavity charged by a plasma with or without a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, G.

    1967-03-01

    In the mere case of a cold plasma with or without static magnetic field, are given two methods of calculation of resonance frequency shift and absorption in a cylindrical cavity crossed by a plasma column: 1. A perturbation method, already known and used for electronic density measurements is restated and its application is used for several high frequency cavity modes. 2. An exact method employing Maxwell's equations, which however necessitates a computer, is compared with the first one; it permits a determination of the validity limits of the perturbation method and to draw conclusions, [fr

  4. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of a Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. W. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated and analyzed a resonant-cavity-enhancedd InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot n-i-n photodiode using Crosslight Apsys package. The resonant cavity has a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR at one side. Comparing with the conventional photodetectors, the resonant-cavity-enhanced photodiode (RCE-PD showed higher detection efficiency, faster response speed, and better wavelength selectivity and spatial orientation selectivity. Our simulation results also showed that when an AlAs layer is inserted into the device structure as a blocking layer, ultralow dark current can be achieved, with dark current densities 0.0034 A/cm at 0 V and 0.026 A/cm at a reverse bias of 2 V. We discussed the mechanism producing the photocurrent at various reverse bias. A high quantum efficiency of 87.9% was achieved at resonant wavelength of 1030 nm with a FWHM of about 3 nm. We also simulated InAs QD RCE-PD to compare with InGaAs QD. At last, the photocapacitance characteristic of the model has been discussed under different frequencies.

  6. Closure of laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shenhong; Su, Zhengzhong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Min; Li, Tianying

    2006-09-01

    Closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy is especially suitable for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or damage of cranial nerve after radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). To investigate the clinical value, technique, indications and contraindications of closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy (REP) or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of NPC. Thirty patients, suffering from intractable aspiration secondary to radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, were treated with closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy and were observed for at least 1 year. Intractable aspiration and dyspnea were completely eradicated in all patients. The quality of their life was greatly improved.

  7. Absorption of continuum radiation in a resonant expanding gaseous sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaparev, N Y

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with absorption of external continuum radiation in a self-similarly expanding gaseous sphere. Frequency probability and integral probability of radiation absorption in the resonance frequency range are determined depending on the expansion velocity gradient and thickness of the optical medium. It is shown that expansion results in a reduced optical thickness of the medium and enhanced integral absorption. (paper)

  8. Resonance in the restricted problem caused by solar radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, K.B.; Gupta, B.

    1977-01-01

    Resonance is discussed in the motion of an artificial Earth satellite caused by solar radiation pressure. The Hamiltonian and the generating functions occurring in the problem are expanded in the power series of small parameter β, which depends on solar radiation pressure. Also the perturbations in the osculating elements are obtained up to O(βsup(1/2)). (author)

  9. Tuner and radiation shield for planar electron paramagnetic resonance microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkowicz, Ryszard; Suter, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Planar microresonators provide a large boost of sensitivity for small samples. They can be manufactured lithographically to a wide range of target parameters. The coupler between the resonator and the microwave feedline can be integrated into this design. To optimize the coupling and to compensate manufacturing tolerances, it is sometimes desirable to have a tuning element available that can be adjusted when the resonator is connected to the spectrometer. This paper presents a simple design that allows one to bring undercoupled resonators into the condition for critical coupling. In addition, it also reduces radiation losses and thereby increases the quality factor and the sensitivity of the resonator

  10. AZO/Ag/AZO anode for resonant cavity red, blue, and yellow organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentle, A. R., E-mail: angus.gentle@uts.edu.au; Smith, G. B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Institute of Nanoscale Technology, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia); Yambem, S. D.; Burn, P. L.; Meredith, P. [Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences and School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2016-06-28

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the transparent electrode of choice for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Replacing ITO for cost and performance reasons is a major drive across optoelectronics. In this work, we show that changing the transparent electrode on red, blue, and yellow OLEDs from ITO to a multilayer buffered aluminium zinc oxide/silver/aluminium zinc oxide (AZO/Ag/AZO) substantially enhances total output intensity, with better control of colour, its constancy, and intensity over the full exit hemisphere. The thin Ag containing layer induces a resonant cavity optical response of the complete device. This is tuned to the emission spectra of the emissive material while minimizing internally trapped light. A complete set of spectral intensity data is presented across the full exit hemisphere for each electrode type and each OLED colour. Emission zone modelling of output spectra at a wide range of exit angles to the normal was in excellent agreement with the experimental data and hence could, in principle, be used to check and adjust production settings. These multilayer transparent electrodes show significant potential for both eliminating indium from OLEDs and spectrally shaping the emission.

  11. Radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of those neoplasms, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Sci-Sat AM: Radiation Dosimetry and Practical Therapy Solutions - 05: Not all geometries are equivalent for magnetic field Fano cavity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, Victor N.; Rogers, David W.O. [Carleton University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    The coupling of MRI and radiation treatment systems for the application of magnetic resonance guided radiation therapy necessitates a reliable magnetic field capable Monte Carlo (MC) code. In addition to the influence of the magnetic field on dose distributions, the question of proper calibration has arisen due to the several percent variation of ion chamber and solid state detector responses in magnetic fields when compared to the 0 T case (Reynolds et al., Med Phys, 2013). In the absence of a magnetic field, EGSnrc has been shown to pass the Fano cavity test (a rigorous benchmarking tool of MC codes) at the 0.1 % level (Kawrakow, Med.Phys, 2000), and similar results should be required of magnetic field capable MC algorithms. To properly test such developing MC codes, the Fano cavity theorem has been adapted to function in a magnetic field (Bouchard et al., PMB, 2015). In this work, the Fano cavity test is applied in a slab and ion-chamber-like geometries to test the transport options of an implemented magnetic field algorithm in EGSnrc. Results show that the deviation of the MC dose from the expected Fano cavity theory value is highly sensitive to the choice of geometry, and the ion chamber geometry appears to pass the test more easily than larger slab geometries. As magnetic field MC codes begin to be used for dose simulations and correction factor calculations, care must be taken to apply the most rigorous Fano test geometries to ensure reliability of such algorithms.

  13. Manipulating the wavelength-drift of a Tm laser for resonance enhancement in an intra-cavity pumped Ho laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haizhou; Huang, Jianhong; Liu, Huagang; Li, Jinhui; Lin, Zixiong; Ge, Yan; Dai, Shutao; Deng, Jing; Lin, Wenxiong

    2018-03-05

    We demonstrate an enhancement mechanism and thermal model for intra-cavity pumped lasers, where resonance enhancement in intra-cavity pumped Ho laser was achieved by manipulating the wavelength-drift nature of the Tm laser for the first time. Optical conversion efficiency of 37.5% from an absorbed 785 nm diode laser to a Ho laser was obtained with a maximum output power of 7.51 W at 2122 nm, which is comparable to the conversion efficiency in 1.9 μm LD pumped Ho lasers. Meanwhile, more severe thermal effects in the Ho-doped gain medium than the Tm-doped one at high power operation were verified based on the built thermal model. This work benefits the design or evaluation of intra-cavity pumped lasers, and the resonance enhancement originated from the difference in reabsorption loss between stark levels at the lasing manifolds of quasi-three-level rare-earth ions has great interest to improve the existing intra-cavity pumped lasers or explore novel lasers.

  14. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  15. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Victor W; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A; Atwater, Harry A

    2015-05-07

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emission from graphene plasmonic resonators on a silicon nitride substrate. It is shown that the graphene resonators produce antenna-coupled blackbody radiation, which manifests as narrow spectral emission peaks in the mid-infrared. By continuously varying the nanoresonator carrier density, the frequency and intensity of these spectral features can be modulated via an electrostatic gate. This work opens the door for future devices that may control blackbody radiation at timescales beyond the limits of conventional thermo-optic modulation.

  16. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of nasal cavity hemangiomas according to histological type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sun Won; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Yeo Ju; Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Tae Young [Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Hye [Dept. of Radiology, nha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision.

  17. Form factors and radiation widths of the giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Simple analytic relations for the form factors of inelastic electron scattering in the Born approximation and radiation widths of the isovector and isoscalar giant multipole resonances are derived. The dynamic relationship between the volume and surface density vibrations were taken into account in this calculation. The form factors in the Born approximation were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data in the region of small transferred momenta. The radiation widths of isoscalar multipole resonances increase when the number of nucleons increase as A 1/3 , and for isovector resonances this dependence has the form f(A)A 1/3 , where f(A) is a slowly increasing function of A. Radiation widths well fit the experimental data

  18. Synchrotron radiation resonance Raman spectroscopy (SR3S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of normal Raman spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy to study the structure of molecular species and the nature of their chemical bonds is discussed. The availability of a fully tunable radiation source (the Synchrotron Radiation Source) extending into the ultraviolet raises the possibility of using synchrotron radiation resonance Raman spectroscopy as a sensitive and specific analytical probe. The pulsed nature of the SRS beam may be exploited for time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy and its high degree of polarization could be very helpful in the interpretation of spectra. The possibilities are considered under the headings: intensity requirements and comparison with other sources; some applications (e.g. structure of proteins; study of iron-porphyrin unit; study of chlorophylls). (U.K.)

  19. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  20. Electromagnetic scattering and radiation from microstrip patch antennas and spirals residing in a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volakis, J. L.; Gong, J.; Alexanian, A.; Woo, A.

    1992-01-01

    A new hybrid method is presented for the analysis of the scattering and radiation by conformal antennas and arrays comprised of circular or rectangular elements. In addition, calculations for cavity-backed spiral antennas are given. The method employs a finite element formulation within the cavity and the boundary integral (exact boundary condition) for terminating the mesh. By virtue of the finite element discretization, the method has no restrictions on the geometry and composition of the cavity or its termination. Furthermore, because of the convolutional nature of the boundary integral and the inherent sparseness of the finite element matrix, the storage requirement is kept very low at O(n). These unique features of the method have already been exploited in other scattering applications and have permitted the analysis of large-size structures with remarkable efficiency. In this report, we describe the method's formulation and implementation for circular and rectangular patch antennas in different superstrate and substrate configurations which may also include the presence of lumped loads and resistive sheets/cards. Also, various modelling approaches are investigated and implemented for characterizing a variety of feed structures to permit the computation of the input impedance and radiation pattern. Many computational examples for rectangular and circular patch configurations are presented which demonstrate the method's versatility, modeling capability and accuracy.

  1. Dynamics of the cavity radiation of a correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, Sintayehu, E-mail: sint_tesfa@yahoo.com [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Dilla University, PO Box 419, Dilla (Ethiopia)

    2011-10-15

    A detailed analysis of the time evolution of the two-mode squeezing, entanglement and intensity of the cavity radiation of a two-photon correlated emission laser initially seeded with a thermal light is presented. The dependences of the degree of two-mode squeezing and entanglement on the intensity of the thermal light and time are found to have a more or less similar nature, although the actual values differ, especially in the early stages of the process and when the atoms are initially prepared with nearly 50:50 probability to be in the upper and lower energy levels. Seeding the cavity degrades the nonclassical features significantly, particularly in the vicinity of t=0. It is also shown that the mean photon number in a wider time span has a dip when mode b is seeded but a peak when mode a is seeded. Moreover, it turns out that the effect of the seed light on the nonclassical features and intensity of the cavity radiation decreases significantly with time, an outcome essentially attributed to the pertinent emission-absorption mechanism. This can be taken as an encouraging aspect in the practical utilization of this model as a source of a bright entangled light.

  2. Radiative effects on turbulent buoyancy-driven air flow in open square cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, B.; Kaiser, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the radiative effects and the air variable properties (density, viscosity and thermal conductivity) on the buoyancy-driven flows established in open square cavities are investigated. Two-dimensional, laminar, transitional and turbulent simulations are obtained, considering both uniform wall temperature and uniform heat flux heating conditions. In transitional and turbulent cases, the low- Reynolds k-ω turbulence model is employed. The average Nusselt number and the dimensionless mass-flow rate have been obtained for a wide range of the Rayleigh number varying from 10 3 to 10 16 . The results obtained taking into account the variable thermophysical properties of air are compared to those calculated assuming constant properties and the Boussinesq approximation. In addition, the influence of considering surface radiative effects on the differences reached for the Nusselt number and the mass flow rate obtained with several intensities of heating is studied; specifically, the effects of thermal radiation on the appearance of the burnout phenomenon is analyzed. The changes produced in the flow patterns into the cavity when the radiative heat transfer and the effects of variation of properties are relevant, are also shown. (authors)

  3. On the equilibrium of a black hole in a radiation-filled cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.

    1979-01-01

    By using the horizon entropy, Hawking showed that a stable black hole will form inside a radiation cavity of finite energy E and small enough volume, V 10 years is negligible. Second, any such hole should not be in equilibrium, let alone stable; it should evaporate away again because the radiation, with typical wavelength approximately 16 times larger than the hole, can hardly be accreted. Study of the combined accretion and evaporation resolves the difficulty. It confirms the prediction of stability and it does so without appeal to the concept of horizon entropy. A state of pure radiation is actually favored over one including a hole when 1 >= V/Vsub(h) > 0.2556, but the reverse holds for smaller cavity volumes. The horizon entropy of a black hole plays a natural role; it helps determine the system's evolution and equilibria through the condition that the total entropy of hole plus radiation always tends to increase. Using the known temperature of the hole and the fact (deduced from the accretion formula) that energy flows from the hot body to the cold, one easily inverts the reasoning to derive a unique value for the black-hole entropy. (author)

  4. Active Radiative Thermal Switching with Graphene Plasmon Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Ognjen; Thomas, Nathan H; Christensen, Thomas; Sherrott, Michelle C; Soljačić, Marin; Minnich, Austin J; Miller, Owen D; Atwater, Harry A

    2018-03-27

    We theoretically demonstrate a near-field radiative thermal switch based on thermally excited surface plasmons in graphene resonators. The high tunability of graphene enables substantial modulation of near-field radiative heat transfer, which, when combined with the use of resonant structures, overcomes the intrinsically broadband nature of thermal radiation. In canonical geometries, we use nonlinear optimization to show that stacked graphene sheets offer improved heat conductance contrast between "ON" and "OFF" switching states and that a >10× higher modulation is achieved between isolated graphene resonators than for parallel graphene sheets. In all cases, we find that carrier mobility is a crucial parameter for the performance of a radiative thermal switch. Furthermore, we derive shape-agnostic analytical approximations for the resonant heat transfer that provide general scaling laws and allow for direct comparison between different resonator geometries dominated by a single mode. The presented scheme is relevant for active thermal management and energy harvesting as well as probing excited-state dynamics at the nanoscale.

  5. Giant resonance effects in radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of capture reaction studies of giant resonance properties is described, and a number of examples are given. Most of the recent work of interest has been in proton capture, in part because of the great utility (and availability) of polarized beams; most of the discussion concerns this reaction. Alpha capture, which has been a useful tool for exploring isoscalar E2 strength, and neutron capture are, however, also treated. 46 references, 14 figures

  6. Radiative decays of resonances on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Andria; Bernard, Véronique; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a generalization of the Lüscher approach to the calculation of the matrix elements of the unstable states. A theoretical framework for the lattice extraction of the ΔNγ* transition form factors is formulated. The procedure to measure the form factors at the resonance pole is given. The current theoretical progress on the B → K*γ* decays is briefly summarized

  7. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Arturo O; Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-11-01

    An investigation on the resonance frequency shift for a plane-wave mode in a cylindrical cavity produced by a rigid sphere is reported in this paper. This change of the resonance frequency has been previously considered as a cause of oscillational instabilities in single-mode acoustic levitation devices. It is shown that the use of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance allows the derivation of an expression for the resonance frequency shift in a simpler and more direct way than a method based on a Green's function reported in literature. The position of the sphere can be any point along the axis of the cavity. Obtained predictions of the resonance frequency shift with the deduced equation agree quite well with numerical simulations based on the boundary element method. The results are also confirmed by experiments. The equation derived from the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle appears to be more general, and for large spheres, it gives a better approximation than the equation previously reported.

  8. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  9. Study of Nb-Cu 1.3 GHz SRF cavity resonators for future particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Amelin, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Niobium-coated superconducting radio-frequency cavities have a number of advantages over cavities made from bulk niobium. Cavities coated with high-power impulse magnetron sputtering are tested at CERN in order to optimize the coating and study the Q-slope that limits the performance. To accurately measure the quality factor as a function of accelerating field, it is important to have good matching between an input antenna and a cavity impedance. To improve the matching, a variable coupler that changes the length of the antenna can be used. We have shown that the Q-factor of the input antenna can be changed between $10^7-10^{11}$ by moving the antenna, which should allow to achieve critical coupling with a cavity. This technology could be used in future measurements, so that reflections are always minimized.

  10. Calibrated high-precision 17O-excess measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Steig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-precision analysis of the 17O / 16O isotope ratio in water and water vapor is of interest in hydrological, paleoclimate, and atmospheric science applications. Of specific interest is the parameter 17O excess (Δ17O, a measure of the deviation from a~linear relationship between 17O / 16O and 18O / 16O ratios. Conventional analyses of Δ17O of water are obtained by fluorination of H2O to O2 that is analyzed by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. We describe a new laser spectroscopy instrument for high-precision Δ17O measurements. The new instrument uses cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance to achieve reduced measurement drift compared with previous-generation instruments. Liquid water and water-vapor samples can be analyzed with a better than 8 per meg precision for Δ17O using integration times of less than 30 min. Calibration with respect to accepted water standards demonstrates that both the precision and the accuracy of Δ17O are competitive with conventional IRMS methods. The new instrument also achieves simultaneous analysis of δ18O, Δ17O and δD with precision of < 0.03‰, < 0.02 and < 0.2‰, respectively, based on repeated calibrated measurements.

  11. Efficiency of different methods of extra-cavity second harmonic generation of continuous wave single-frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Radnatarov, Daba

    2016-01-20

    This work presents for the first time to the best of our knowledge a comparative efficiency analysis among various techniques of extra-cavity second harmonic generation (SHG) of continuous-wave single-frequency radiation in nonperiodically poled nonlinear crystals within a broad range of power levels. Efficiency of nonlinear radiation transformation at powers from 1 W to 10 kW was studied in three different configurations: with an external power-enhancement cavity and without the cavity in the case of single and double radiation pass through a nonlinear crystal. It is demonstrated that at power levels exceeding 1 kW, the efficiencies of methods with and without external power-enhancement cavities become comparable, whereas at even higher powers, SHG by a single or double pass through a nonlinear crystal becomes preferable because of the relatively high efficiency of nonlinear transformation and fairly simple implementation.

  12. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  13. Studies of metronidazole radiosensitizing effect in radiation treatment of patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, P.Yu.; Daryalova, S.L.; Pelevina, I.I.; Karakulov, R.K.; Zel'vin, B.M.; Kiseleva, E.S.; Kvasov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical observations of 26 patients with tongue, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer receiving telegammatherapy by dynamic dose fractionation scheme in combination with metronidazole (MZ), and of 38 patients from the control group treated using the identical schedule without MZ suggest that MZ favors increasing radiation damage in tumors in those sites without changing the character or intensifying early radiation reactions. After oral administration of MZ in single doses of 5-6 g/m 2 it reached its maximum in the blood serum within 2-4 h. When the total dose of 30-60 g of MZ was used, a marked toxic effect manifest in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed in 33.3% of patients. MZ has a negative effect on liver functions; however, changes in biochemical tests were reversible and within normal values. Simultaneous studies of biopsy material from 22 patients (11 from each group) in terms of proliferation activity showed that oral cavity tumors contain a significant portion of proliferating cells which notably decrease in the course of radiation therapy. The decrease is marked to a greater extent after irradiation in combination with MZ. (author)

  14. Measurement and Analysis of the Temperature Gradient of Blackbody Cavities, for Use in Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucas, Javier; Segovia, José Juan

    2018-05-01

    Blackbody cavities are the standard radiation sources widely used in the fields of radiometry and radiation thermometry. Its effective emissivity and uncertainty depend to a large extent on the temperature gradient. An experimental procedure based on the radiometric method for measuring the gradient is followed. Results are applied to particular blackbody configurations where gradients can be thermometrically estimated by contact thermometers and where the relationship between both basic methods can be established. The proposed procedure may be applied to commercial blackbodies if they are modified allowing secondary contact temperature measurement. In addition, the established systematic may be incorporated as part of the actions for quality assurance in routine calibrations of radiation thermometers, by using the secondary contact temperature measurement for detecting departures from the real radiometrically obtained gradient and the effect on the uncertainty. On the other hand, a theoretical model is proposed to evaluate the effect of temperature variations on effective emissivity and associated uncertainty. This model is based on a gradient sample chosen following plausible criteria. The model is consistent with the Monte Carlo method for calculating the uncertainty of effective emissivity and complements others published in the literature where uncertainty is calculated taking into account only geometrical variables and intrinsic emissivity. The mathematical model and experimental procedure are applied and validated using a commercial type three-zone furnace, with a blackbody cavity modified to enable a secondary contact temperature measurement, in the range between 400 °C and 1000 °C.

  15. Radiation therapy of the oral cavity: sequelae and management, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beumer, J.; Curtis, T.; Harrison, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    This is the concluding portion of a two-part series dealing with the effects and manifestations in the oral cavity of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors. Preradiation and postradiation extractions in dentulous patients, as well as dental maintenance of such patients (including fluoride treatments follow-up, and restorative care), are discussed. Guidelines for the dental management of edentulous patients are also presented at length (this section covers risk of bone necrosis, soft liners, timing of denture placement, dentures and preexisting bone necrosis, soft-tissue necrosis and dentures, morbidity, and prosthodontic procedures). The article concludes with a brief discussion of osteoradionecrosis and soft-tissue necrosis

  16. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and......Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p......-nitrobenzylchloride and subsequent formation of the p-nitrobenzyl radical and the reaction of p-nitrotoluene with O– are studied by resonance Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy....

  17. Efficient continuous-wave eye-safe region signal output from intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bin; Ding Xin; Sheng Quan; Yin Su-Jia; Shi Chun-Peng; Li Xue; Wen Wu-Qi; Yao Jian-Quan; Yu Xuan-Yi

    2012-01-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) tunable intra-cavity singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on the multi-period periodically poled lithium niobate and using a laser diode (LD) end-pumped CW 1064 nm Nd:YVO 4 laser as the pump source. A highly efficiency CW operation is realized through a careful cavity design for mode matching and thermal stability. The signal tuning range is 1401–1500 nm obtained by varying the domain period. The maximum output power of 2.2 W at 1500 nm is obtained with a 17.1 W 808 nm LD power and the corresponding conversion efficiency is 12.9%. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Determination of the quasi-TE mode (in-plane) graphene linear absorption coefficient via integration with silicon-on-insulator racetrack cavity resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Iain F; Clark, Nicholas; Hussein, Siham; Towlson, Brian; Whittaker, Eric; Milosevic, Milan M; Gardes, Frederic Y; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Halsall, Matthew P; Vijayaraghaven, Aravind

    2014-07-28

    We examine the near-IR light-matter interaction for graphene integrated cavity ring resonators based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) race-track waveguides. Fitting of the cavity resonances from quasi-TE mode transmission spectra reveal the real part of the effective refractive index for graphene, n(eff) = 2.23 ± 0.02 and linear absorption coefficient, α(gTE) = 0.11 ± 0.01dBμm(-1). The evanescent nature of the guided mode coupling to graphene at resonance depends strongly on the height of the graphene above the cavity, which places limits on the cavity length for optical sensing applications.

  19. Computer program for calculating the resonant frequency, shunt impedance and quality factor of a pill-box cavity in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguero, V.M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1983-10-01

    Keil and Zotter have analyzed the electromagnetic fields excited by the longitudinal density fluctuations of an unbunched relativistic particle beam drifting in a corrugated vacuum chamber of circular cross section. At higher frequencies, these corrugations become resonant cavities. Zotter has written a computer program known as KN7C to compute the resonant frequencies. However, in the actual use of KN7C, some difficulties are encountered. To surmount these difficulties, the program known as CAVITY was written to analyze this pill-box shaped resonant cavity. Although there are many input variables to this program, only two are essential and need to be specified. They are BD = b/d = the ratio of the circular beampipe radius to that of the pill-box cavity and GD = g/d where g is the length of the cavity. When they are specified, CAVITY will print out the dimensionless normalized fundamental resonant frequency FD, shunt impedance Z and figure of merit Q. From these, the actual resonant frequency, shunt impedance and figure of merit can be deduced. The program is described and a listing is provided

  20. Radiative resonance couplings in γ π →π π

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian; Zanke, Marvin

    2017-12-01

    Studies of the reaction γ π →π π , in the context of the ongoing Primakoff program of the COMPASS experiment at CERN, give access to the radiative couplings of the ρ (770 ) and ρ3(1690 ) resonances. We provide a vector-meson-dominance estimate of the respective radiative width of the ρ3, Γρ3→πγ=48 (18 ) keV , as well as its impact on the F -wave in γ π →π π . For the ρ (770 ), we establish the formalism necessary to extract its radiative coupling directly from the residue of the resonance pole by analytic continuation of the γ π →π π amplitude to the second Riemann sheet, without any reference to the vector-meson-dominance hypothesis.

  1. Maintenance of the resonance in a cavity filled with a variable density plasma; Entretien de la resonance d'une cavite chargee par un plasma de densite variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A study has been made of the possibility of keeping in resonance a cavity filled with a plasma of variable density; only the low HF power zone has been examined (less than a few dozen W). A calculation is first made, for the chosen experimental conditions, of the slipping of the resonance frequency of a cavity as a function of the plasma parameters (density, temperature), with a view to obtaining an idea of its importance. A description is then given of the experimental set-up: the S band cavity (3000 Mc/sec) is supplied by a carcinotron type generator; use is made of the plasma of a positive column whose density ({approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) can easily be controlled so as to obtain slipping of the cavity frequency ({delta}F{sub max} {approx} 50 Mc/s). The zone of automatic agreement thus obtained for the S band is 3 per cent continuously ({approx}100 Mc/s) and 1 per cent ({approx}30 Mc/s) with a response time of 10 {mu}s (sudden changes in density, {delta}n {approx} 5.10{sup 10} cm{sup 3}). These characteristics already compare very favorably with existing systems, and can easily be improved. (author) [French] On etudie une possibilite de maintenir a la resonance une cavite chargee par un plasma dont la densite varie; on se limite au domaine des puissances HF faibles (< quelques dizaines de W). On calcule tout d'abord, pour les conditions experimentales choisies, le glissement de la frequence de resonance d'une cavite en fonction des parametres du plasma, densite, temperature, pour en evaluer les ordres de grandeur. On decrit ensuite la realisation experimentale: la cavite bande S (3000 Mc/s) est alimentee par un generateur du type carcinotron; on utilise le plasma d'une colonne positive, dont on controle facilement la densite ({approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) pour faire glisser en frequence la cavite ({delta}F{sub max} {approx} 50 Mc/s). La zone d'accord automatique obtenue ainsi pour la bande S est de 3 pour cent en continu ({approx}100 Mc/s), de 1 pour cent

  2. Radiation and scattering by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Conformal arrays are popular antennas for aircraft and missile platforms due to their inherent low weight and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to scattering and radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. In particular, the formulation specifics such as weight functions, dyadic Green's function, implementation details, and particular difficulties inherent to cylindrical structures are discussed. Special care is taken to ensure that the resulting computer program has low memory demand and minimal computational requirements. Both scattering and radiation parameters are computed and validated as much as possible.

  3. The role of bleomycin combination in radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to improve tumor control by radiation therapy, a treatment regimen consisting of concurrent combination of bleomycin (90 mg/3 weeks) and radiation (30 Gy/3 weeks) was applied. Between 1972 and 1981, 287 patients with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity were subjected to this bleomycin-radiation combination regimen. All except 4 patients experienced marked response after treatment using the bleomycin-radiation combination alone. One hundred thirty-four patients (47 %) obtained CR and 149 (53 %) PR. Higher CR rates were obtained in patients with carcinoma of the lower gum (62 %), of the upper gum (68 %), and of the cheek mucosa (43 %), compared to patients with carcinoma of the floor of the mouth (21 %), and of the tongue (15 %). In each of the tumor sites, small lesions (T1, T2) obtained higher CR rates, compared with large lesions (T3, T4). Of the 134 patients who experienced CR, 83 were observed without any further treatment after bleomycin-radiation combination alone. Local recurrence-free rates of these patients were 72 % for T1, T2 lesions and 48 % for T3, T4 lesions. Local control rates were increased to 85 % and 78 %, respectively, with successful salvage treatment involving surgery or interstitial radiotherapy for post-irradiation failures. (author)

  4. Cavity-enhanced resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers: A novel technique for ultratrace gas analysis and high-resolution spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Michael; Mohr, Christian; Keen, Katherine A; McNaghten, Edward D

    2010-07-28

    Cavity-enhanced resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy with optical feedback cw diode lasers (OF-CERPAS) is introduced as a novel technique for ultratrace gas analysis and high-resolution spectroscopy. In the scheme, a single-mode cw diode laser (3 mW, 635 nm) is coupled into a high-finesse linear cavity and stabilized to the cavity by optical feedback. Inside the cavity, a build-up of laser power to at least 2.5 W occurs. Absorbing gas phase species inside the cavity are detected with high sensitivity by the photoacoustic effect using a microphone embedded in the cavity. To increase sensitivity further, coupling into the cavity is modulated at a frequency corresponding to a longitudinal resonance of an organ pipe acoustic resonator (f=1.35 kHz and Q approximately 10). The technique has been characterized by measuring very weak water overtone transitions near 635 nm. Normalized noise-equivalent absorption coefficients are determined as alpha approximately 4.4x10(-9) cm(-1) s(1/2) (1 s integration time) and 2.6x10(-11) cm(-1) s(1/2) W (1 s integration time and 1 W laser power). These sensitivities compare favorably with existing state-of-the-art techniques. As an advantage, OF-CERPAS is a "zero-background" method which increases selectivity and sensitivity, and its sensitivity scales with laser power.

  5. Collective and boson mapping description of a system of N Josephson junctions in a resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, A.; Civitarese, O.; Herranz, F.J.; Reboiro, M.

    2003-01-01

    A system of N two-level Josephson junctions, interacting between themselves and with a single-mode cavity field, is described in terms of the superposition of fermionic and bosonic excitations. The results of the exact diagonalization are compared with the results of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation and with the results of a boson mapping. It is found that the boson mapping provides a suitable description of the spectrum, sum rules, and response function of the system. The dependence of the results upon the number of junctions, the excitation of the cavity modes, and the coupling strengths is investigated

  6. Surface wave resonance and chirality in a tubular cavity with metasurface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuzhou; Fang, Yangfu; Wang, Lu; Tang, Shiwei; Sun, Shulin; Liu, Zhaowei; Mei, Yongfeng

    2018-06-01

    Optical microcavities with whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) have been indispensable in both photonic researches and applications. Besides, metasurfaces, have attracted much attention recently due to their strong abilities to manipulate electromagnetic waves. Here, combining these two optical elements together, we show a tubular cavity can convert input propagating cylindrical waves into directed localized surface waves (SWs), enabling the circulating like WGMs along the wall surface of the designed tubular cavity. Finite element method (FEM) simulations demonstrate that such near-field WGM shows both large chirality and high local field. This work may stimulate interesting potential applications in e.g. directional emission, sensing, and lasing.

  7. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  8. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots” were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD, and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations. All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  9. Investigation of ultra-high sensitivity Klystron cavity transducers for broadband resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, Guilherme Leite

    2008-01-01

    We show that, with a suitable choice of the parameters of the gravitational wave detector Mario Schoenberg, with technological accessible parameters (using state-of-art electronics), its sensitivity curve can be improved over the current project curve to become competitive with interferometric detectors in a frequency band of 1500 Hz, in the region from 1000 to 10000 Hz (these competitive bands are centered at the sphere's quadrupole modes). The sensitivity curve of an array of 100 identical spheres identical to the Schoenberg one is also analyzed, and is competitive against advanced LIGO in the entire band. A detailed study of the project's viability is conducted, with an emphasis on the project of the klystron resonant cavity, which will have a center post with a 1 nm gap, which represents a great technological challenge. This challenge is analyzed in terms of the cavity project as well as with a focus on the Casimir effect on the cavity. This could open an opportunity for precise measurements of this effect on a new distance scale compared to current measurements (in the μm scale). (author)

  10. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; Sukhanov, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2018-02-01

    Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is underway for the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw) mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L 0 , L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 . Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), will be used in section L 1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs) excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  11. Selective reflection of resonance radiation from excited media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veklenko, B.A.; Gusarov, R.B.; Sherkunov, Yu.B.

    1998-01-01

    According to quantum electrodynamics, the cross section for resonant scattering of radiation on an aggregate of excited atoms can be written as a sum of positive definite terms. This type of structure is not consistent with the Fresnel formulas for the reflection coefficient of radiation from thermally excited media. The difference shows up on a macroscopic level and indicates that semiclassical radiation theory cannot be used. A study of the correlation between elastic scattering and stimulated emission processes clarifies the reason for the discrepancies. The resulting singularities require summing of Feynman diagrams which appear beginning in the sixth order of perturbation theory. A lower bound estimate for the reflection coefficient from a plane layer is given, including processes which violate the statistics of radiation. The contribution of stimulated emission processes caused by the initially scattered photon are examined specifically. An experiment is proposed which would settle the choice of theories

  12. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  13. Micromachined Microwave Cavity Resonator Filters for 5G: a Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van R.; Smolders, A.B.; Hon, de B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Micromachined microwave cavity filters offer a light-weight, high-Q and highly integrated alternative in the frequency range of 20 GHz–100 GHz as compared to conventional filter types. The filter technology shows potential for use in 5G portable devices and as such, the design of a duplexer

  14. Derivation of gyrotron's reduced equations and its application on the analysis of resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, R.A.; Barroso, J.J.; Montes, A.

    1988-05-01

    In this paper, it is presented a derivation of a reduced set of equations for the electron motion, based upon Lorentz equation, where the applicability conditions and approximations employed are clearly indicated. As an example of practical interest, scaling relations are discussed in the analysis of cavities appropriate for high efficiency operation. (author)

  15. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya, E-mail: mpezgy@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Deng, Jie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-11-30

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  16. Analysis and characterization. Nuclear resonant scattering with the synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffer, R.; Teillet, J.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear resonant scattering using the synchrotron radiation combines the uncommon properties of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and those of the synchrotron radiation. Since its first observation in 1984, this technique and its applications have been developed rapidly. The nuclear resonant scattering is now a standard technique for all the synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation. As the Moessbauer spectroscopy, it is a method of analysis at the atomic scale and a non destructive method. It presents the advantage not to require the use of radioactive sources of incident photons which can be difficult to make, of a lifetime which can be short and of an obviously limited intensity. The current applications are the hyperfine spectroscopy and the structural dynamics. In hyperfine spectroscopy, the nuclear resonant scattering can measure the same size than the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Nevertheless, it is superior in the ranges which exploit the specific properties of the synchrotron radiation, such as the very small samples, the monocrystals, the measures under high pressures, the geometry of small angle incidence for surfaces and multilayers. The structural dynamics, in a time scale of the nanosecond to the microsecond can be measured in the temporal scale. Moreover, the nuclear inelastic scattering gives for the first time a tool which allows to have directly the density of states of phonons and then allow to deduce the dynamical and thermodynamical properties of the lattice. The nuclear resonant scattering technique presented here, which corresponds to the Moessbauer spectroscopy technique (SM), is called 'nuclear forward scattering' (NFS). Current applications in physics and chemistry are develop. The NFS is compared to the usual SM technique in order to reveal its advantages and disadvantages. (O.M.)

  17. Mode coupling in terahertz metamaterials using sub-radiative and super-radiative resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Shen; Zhang, Yaxin; Zhao, Yuncheng; Xu, Gaiqi; Sun, Han; Yang, Ziqiang; Liang, Shixiong

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally explored the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) mode-coupling in terahertz (THz) metamaterial resonators, in which a dipole resonator with a super-radiative mode is coupled to an inductance-capacitance resonator with a sub-radiative mode. The interference between these two resonators depends on the relative spacing between them, resulting in a tunable transparency window in the absorption spectrum. Mode coupling was experimentally demonstrated for three spacing dependent EIT metamaterials. Transmittance of the transparency windows could be either enhanced or suppressed, producing different spectral linewidths. These spacing dependent mode-coupling metamaterials provide alternative ways to create THz devices, such as filters, absorbers, modulators, sensors, and slow-light devices

  18. Radiation-induced malignant melanoma following radiation treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity - a case report and review of literature -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Ju; Yang, Koang Mo; Suh, Hyun Suk

    1998-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is rare, accounting for 1 to 8% of all malignant melanomas. The overall prognosis remains poor despite the available treatments such as radical surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy due to failure in early detection and tendency in early metastasis. The etiology of mucosal malignant melanoma remains unkown. However, there are few cases of malignant melanoma of the oral cavity reported in the literature, which might be related to preexisting melanosis and radiation treatment. A case with malignant melanoma developed on the same site after 6 years following irradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity is reported in this article

  19. Analysis of the resonance frequency shift in cylindrical cavities containing a sphere and its prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco Santillán, Arturo; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    of the cavity due to the presence of the levitated object. The Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle has been used to obtain an analytical expression for the resonance frequency shift in a cylindrical cavity produced by a small sphere, with kR .... The validity of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest method has been investigated by means of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) and confirmed with experiments....

  20. Performance test of a vertically-directed electric-field cavity resonator made for the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Atsushi.

    1996-06-01

    A cavity resonator with vertically-directed electric field was produced and attached to 'the rapid gelation apparatus with microwave heating' previously reported. Using the rapid gelation apparatus, drops of a simulated solution and of U-containing solutions for internal gelation were heated. The results indicated that the heating required for gelation of the U-containing solutions was possible. However, the electric field strength in the cavity resonator at that time was comparable to that causing the discharge due to the gaseous ammonia released from the heated drops. As a result, gel microspheres were not obtained in a stable state. The discussion suggests that the stable gelation would be realized by improving the cavity resonator shape and/or by modifying the power supply accompanied with using a power stabilizer. (author)

  1. Non-gray gas radiation effect on mixed convection in lid driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherifi, Mohammed, E-mail: production1998@yahoo.fr; Benbrik, Abderrahmane, E-mail: abenbrik@umbb.dz; Laouar-Meftah, Siham, E-mail: laouarmeftah@gmail.com [M’Hamed Bougara University, Faculty of Hydrocarbons and Chemistry, 35000 Boumerdes (Algeria); Lemonnier, Denis, E-mail: denis.lemonnier@ensma.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS, ENSMA, University of Poitiers, Poitiers Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-02

    A numerical study is performed to investigate the effect of non-gray radiation on mixed convection in a vertical two sided lid driven square cavity filled with air-H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2} gas mixture. The vertical moving walls of the enclosure are maintained at two different but uniform temperatures. The horizontal walls are thermally insulated and considered as adiabatic walls. The governing differential equations are solved by a finite-volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm was adopted to solve the pressure–velocity coupling. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is solved by the discrete ordinates method (DOM). The spectral line weighted sum of gray gases model (SLW) is used to account for non-gray radiation properties. Simulations are performed in configurations where thermal and shear forces induce cooperating buoyancy forces. Streamlines, isotherms, and Nusselt number are analyzed for three different values of Richardson’s number (from 0.1 to 10) and by considering three different medium (transparent medium, gray medium using the Planck mean absorption coefficient, and non-gray medium assumption).

  2. Feasibility Study for a Combined Radiation Environment in the ACRR-FRECII Cavity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this report is to determine the feasibility of a combined pulsed - power accelerator machine, similar to HERMES - III, with the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Fueled - Ring External Cavity (FREC - II) in a new facility. The document is conceptual in nature, and includes some neutronic analysis that i llustrates that that the physics of such a concept would be feasible. There would still be many engineering design considerations and issues that would need to be investigated in order to determine the true viability of such a concept. This report does n ot address engineering design details, the cost of such a facility, or what would be required to develop the safety authorization of the concept. The radiation requirements for the "on - target" gamma - ray dose and dose rate are not addressed in this report . It is assumed that if the same general on - target specifications for a HERMES - III type machine could be met with the proposed concept, that the machine would b e considered highly useful as a radiation effects sciences platform. In general, the combined accelerator/ACRR reactor concept can be shown to be feasible with no major issues that would preclude the usefulness of such a facility. The new facility would provide a capability that currently does not exist in the radiation testing complex.

  3. Utilization of Dexaltin ointment to radiation stomatitis in patients with cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, Yasushi; Abe, Masaki; Ueda, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Dexaltin ointment (sodium polyactylic acid, containing 0.1% dexamethasone) was used to the patients with stomatitis induced by radiotherapy. Fifteen patients with cancer of the oral cavity, aged from 44 to 77, were exposed to 60 Co γ-rays or electron beams, with the irradiation dose of 2400 to 9000 rad. About 60 g of the ointment was pasted for mean period of 6.6 weeks after meals, before sleep, and whenever the patients wanted. Therapeutic effect was observed in every case and in 87% of the case the pain at meals was decreased. The ointment adhered mostly for 1 - 2 hrs and in some cases, more than 3 hrs. No adverse reaction was observed. Therefore it was suggested that Dexaltin was a promising ointment to the radiation stomatitis. (Nakanishi, T.)

  4. Numerical research of dynamic characteristics in tower solar cavity receiver based on step-change radiation flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengwei; Wang, Yueshe; Hao, Yun; Wang, Qizhi

    2013-07-01

    The solar cavity receiver is an important light-energy to thermal-energy convector in the tower solar thermal power plant system. The heat flux in the inner surface of the cavity will show the characteristics of non-continuous step change especially in non-normal and transient weather conditions, which may result in a continuous dynamic variation of the characteristic parameters. Therefore, the research of dynamic characteristics of the receiver plays a very important role in the operation and the control safely in solar cavity receiver system. In this paper, based on the non-continuous step change of radiation flux, a non-linear dynamic model is put forward to obtain the effects of the non-continuous step change radiation flux and step change feed water flow on the receiver performance by sequential modular approach. The subject investigated in our study is a 1MW solar power station constructed in Yanqing County, Beijing. This study has obtained the dynamic responses of the characteristic parameters in the cavity receiver, such as drum pressure, drum water level, main steam flow and main steam enthalpy under step change radiation flux. And the influence law of step-change feed water flow to the dynamic characteristics in the receiver also has been analyzed. The results have a reference value for the safe operation and the control in solar cavity receiver system.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of syrinx cavity. Differentiation between syrinx with spinal cord tumor and without tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Nemoto, Yutaka

    1987-12-01

    Syrinx cavity may result from a number of intramedullary tumors or non-neoplastic conditions such as Chiari malformation, trauma and meningitis. The surgical procedure to repair the syrinx is quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, it is important to determine whether syrinx is associated with tumor or not before surgery. We reviewed MR images of 26 cases with syrinx cavity; 20 of which were not associated with tumor (12 Chiari malformation, 5 trauma, 1 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus, 1 idiopathic) and 6 of which were associated with intramedullary tumor (3 ependymoma, 2 astrocytoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma). The syrinx showed low signal in all 26 cases on T1 weighted images (SE 600/40). All 6 cases with syrinx associated with intramedullary tumor showed high intensity on T2 weighted images (SE 2000/120). On the other hand, the syrinx of 19 of 20 cases with no tumor condition showed reduced intensity on T2 weighted images. Only one post-traumatic small syrinx showed high signal. This was quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, when the syrinx cavity shows high signal on T2 weighted images, an intramedullary tumor is strongly suggested.

  6. Cavity magnon polaritons with lithium ferrite and three-dimensional microwave resonators at millikelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Watt, Stuart; Bourhill, Jeremy; Kostylev, Mikhail; Tobar, Michael E.

    2018-04-01

    Single crystal lithium ferrite (LiFe) spheres of sub-mm dimension are examined at mK temperatures, microwave frequencies, and variable dc magnetic field, for use in hybrid quantum systems and condensed matter and fundamental physics experiments. Strong coupling regimes of the photon-magnon interaction (cavity magnon polariton quasiparticles) were observed with coupling strength of up to 250 MHz at 9.5 GHz (2.6%) with magnon linewidths of order 4 MHz (with potential improvement to sub-MHz values). We show that the photon-magnon coupling can be significantly improved and exceed that of the widely used yttrium iron garnet crystal, due to the small unit cell of LiFe, allowing twice the spins per unit volume. Magnon mode softening was observed at low dc fields and, combined with the normal Zeeman effect, creates magnon spin-wave modes that are insensitive to first-order magnetic-field fluctuations. This effect is observed in the Kittel mode at 5.5 GHz (and another higher order mode at 6.5 GHz) with a dc magnetic field close to 0.19 tesla. We show that if the cavity is tuned close to this frequency, the magnon polariton particles exhibit an enhanced range of strong coupling and insensitivity to magnetic field fluctuations with both first-order and second-order insensitivity to magnetic field as a function of frequency (double magic point clock transition), which could potentially be exploited in cavity QED experiments.

  7. The 938 MHz resonant damping loops for the 200 MHz SPS travelling wave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the beam stability in the SPS in 1982 - 1983 have shown a transversal instability for high intensity beams [1]. The fact that this related technical note is published nearly 30 years later, is related to the revival of interest in the frame of SPS impedance evaluation for LS1. Until now there was just a barely known paper folder available which could be consulted on request. The instability mentioned above was identified from beam measurements as raised by a deflecting mode at approximately 940 MHz in the 200 MHz travelling wave cavities of the SPS. Estimates showed that an attenuation of this particular mode by 20 dB would be desirable. In order to achieve this attenuation some vacuum ports on top of the cavities were available. For the damping devices three requirements had to be met: - sufficient damping at about 940 MHz - no serious change of cavity input VSWR at 200 MHz - no water cooling requirement for this higher order mode coupler.

  8. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  9. Cavity QED experiments with a whispering-gallery-mode bottle resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, D.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of a two-level atom with a single mode of the quantized electromagnetic field constitutes one of the most fundamental systems investigated in quantum optics. We have pursued such an investigation where rubidium atoms are strongly coupled to the modes of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator that is itself interfaced with an optical fiber. In order to facilitate studies of this atom-light interaction, an experimental apparatus was constructed around a novel type of WGM resonator developed in our group. The spectral and spatial mode structure of this resonator yield an intriguing atom-light response arising principally from the existence of two frequency-degenerate modes. This thesis reports on high resolution experiments studying the transmission and reflection spectra of modes with a high quality factor (Q=10 7 -10 8 ) in our WGM resonator. Light is coupled into and out of WGMs by frustrated total internal reflection using an optical nanofiber. The atom-light interaction is facilitated by an atomic fountain that delivers a cloud of atoms to the location of the resonator. At random moments, single-atoms are clearly observed transiting the evanescent field of the resonator modes with a transit time of a few microseconds. A high-speed experimental control system was developed to firstly detect the coupling of individual atoms to the resonator and secondly to perform time-resolved spectroscopy on the strongly coupled atom-resonator system. Spectral measurements clearly resolve an atom-induced change in the resonant transmission of the coupled system (65% absolute change) that is much larger than predicted in the standard Jaynes-Cummings model (25% absolute change) and that has thus far not been observed. To gain further insight, we experimentally explored the properties of the interaction and performed supporting simulations. Spectroscopy was performed on the atom-resonator system using two nanofibers to in- and out-couple light for probing

  10. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. I. Simulation predictions of resonance Raman and pump-probe transient absorption spectra of cavity and non-cavity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zho, Chen-Chen; Farr, Erik P.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    We use one-electron non-adiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations to explore the temperature dependence of both the ground-state structure and the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. We compare the results for both the traditional cavity picture and a more recent non-cavity model of the hydrated electron and make definite predictions for distinguishing between the different possible structural models in future experiments. We find that the traditional cavity model shows no temperature-dependent change in structure at constant density, leading to a predicted resonance Raman spectrum that is essentially temperature-independent. In contrast, the non-cavity model predicts a blue-shift in the hydrated electron's resonance Raman O-H stretch with increasing temperature. The lack of a temperature-dependent ground-state structural change of the cavity model also leads to a prediction of little change with temperature of both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the hydrated electron following photoexcitation. This is in sharp contrast to the predictions of the non-cavity model, where both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time are expected to decrease significantly with increasing temperature. These simulation-based predictions should be directly testable by the results of future time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Finally, the temperature-dependent differences in predicted excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the two models also lead to different predicted pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy of the hydrated electron as a function of temperature. We perform such experiments and describe them in Paper II [E. P. Farr et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074504 (2017)], and find changes in the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time with temperature that match well with the predictions of the non-cavity model. In particular, the experiments

  11. Generation of maximally entangled mixed states of two atoms via on-resonance asymmetric atom-cavity couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shang-Bin

    2007-01-01

    A scheme for generating the maximally entangled mixed state of two atoms on-resonance asymmetrically coupled to a single mode optical cavity field is presented. The part frontier of both maximally entangled mixed states and maximal Bell violating mixed states can be approximately reached by the evolving reduced density matrix of two atoms if the ratio of coupling strengths of two atoms is appropriately controlled. It is also shown that exchange symmetry of global maximal concurrence is broken if and only if coupling strength ratio lies between (√(3)/3) and √(3) for the case of one-particle excitation and asymmetric coupling, while this partial symmetry breaking cannot be verified by detecting maximal Bell violation

  12. Cavity quantum electrodynamics using a near-resonance two-level system: Emergence of the Glauber state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarabi, B.; Ramanayaka, A. N. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Burin, A. L. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Wellstood, F. C. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Osborn, K. D. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Random tunneling two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics have been of interest recently because they adversely affect the performance of superconducting qubits. The coupling of TLSs to qubits has allowed individual TLS characterization, which has previously been limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling barriers made from aluminum oxide. Here, we report on the measurement of an individual TLS within the capacitor of a lumped-element LC microwave resonator, which forms a cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system and allows for individual TLS characterization in a different structure and material than demonstrated with qubits. Due to the reduced volume of the dielectric (80 μm{sup 3}), even with a moderate dielectric thickness (250 nm), we achieve the strong coupling regime as evidenced by the vacuum Rabi splitting observed in the cavity spectrum. A TLS with a coherence time of 3.2 μs was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than seen from superconducting qubits. As the drive power is increased, we observe an unusual but explicable set of continuous and discrete crossovers from the vacuum Rabi split transitions to the Glauber (coherent) state.

  13. Solar radiation pressure resonances in Low Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Elisa Maria; Schettino, Giulia; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to highlight the crucial role that orbital resonances associated with solar radiation pressure can have in Low Earth Orbit. We review the corresponding literature, and provide an analytical tool to estimate the maximum eccentricity which can be achieved for well-defined initial conditions. We then compare the results obtained with the simplified model with the results obtained with a more comprehensive dynamical model. The analysis has important implications both from a theoretical point of view, because it shows that the role of some resonances was underestimated in the past, and also from a practical point of view in the perspective of passive deorbiting solutions for satellites at the end-of-life.

  14. Coherent radiation by a spherical medium of resonant atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Sudhakar; Glauber, Roy J.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation by the atoms of a resonant medium is a cooperative process in which the medium participates as a whole. In two previous papers we treated this problem for the case of a medium having slab geometry, which, under plane-wave excitation, supports coherent waves that propagate in one dimension. We extend the treatment here to the three-dimensional problem, focusing principally on the case of spherical geometry. By regarding the radiation field as a superposition of electric and magnetic multipole fields of different orders, we express it in terms of suitably defined scalar fields. The latter fields possess a sequence of exponentially decaying eigenmodes corresponding to each multipole order. We consider several examples of spherically symmetric initial excitations of a sphere. Small uniformly excited spheres, we find, tend to radiate superradiantly, while the radiation from a large sphere with an initially excited inner core exhibits temporal oscillations that result from the participation of a large number of coherently excited amplitudes in different modes. The frequency spectrum of the emitted radiation possesses a rich structure, including a frequency gap for large spheres and sharply defined and closely spaced peaks caused by the small frequency shifts and even smaller decay rates characteristic of the majority of eigenmodes.

  15. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  16. Self-resonance after inflation: Oscillons, transients, and radiation domination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozanov, Kaloian D.; Amin, Mustafa A.

    2018-01-01

    Homogeneous oscillations of the inflaton after inflation can be unstable to small spatial perturbations even without coupling to other fields. We show that for inflaton potentials ∝|ϕ |2n near |ϕ |=0 and flatter beyond some |ϕ |=M , the inflaton condensate oscillations can lead to self-resonance, followed by its complete fragmentation. We find that for nonquadratic minima (n >1 ), shortly after backreaction, the equation of state parameter, w →1 /3 . If M ≪mPl, radiation domination is established within less than an e -fold of expansion after the end of inflation. In this case self-resonance is efficient and the condensate fragments into transient, localised spherical objects which are unstable and decay, leaving behind them a virialized field with mean kinetic and gradient energies much greater than the potential energy. This end-state yields w =1 /3 . When M ˜mPl we observe slow and steady, self-resonance that can last many e -folds before backreaction eventually shuts it off, followed by fragmentation and w →1 /3 . We provide analytical estimates for the duration to w →1 /3 after inflation, which can be used as an upper bound (under certain assumptions) on the duration of the transition between the inflationary and the radiation dominated states of expansion. This upper bound can reduce uncertainties in CMB observables such as the spectral tilt ns, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r . For quadratic minima (n =1 ), w →0 regardless of the value of M . This is because when M ≪mPl, long-lived oscillons form within an e -fold after inflation, and collectively behave as pressureless dust thereafter. For M ˜mPl, the self-resonance is inefficient and the condensate remains intact (ignoring long-term gravitational clustering) and keeps oscillating about the quadratic minimum, again implying w =0 .

  17. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  18. Regimes of radiative and nonradiative transitions in transport through an electronic system in a photon cavity reaching a steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar; Jonsson, Thorsteinn H.; Bernodusson, Maria Laura; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Sitek, Anna; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    We analyze how a multilevel many-electron system in a photon cavity approaches the steady state when coupled to external leads. When a plunger gate is used to lower cavity photon dressed one- and two-electron states below the bias window defined by the external leads, we can identify one regime with nonradiative transitions dominating the electron transport, and another regime with radiative transitions. Both transitions trap the electrons in the states below the bias bringing the system into a steady state. The order of the two regimes and their relative strength depends on the location of the bias window in the energy spectrum of the system and the initial conditions.

  19. Non-resonant diagrams in radiative four-fermion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabata, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1994-06-01

    The complete tree level cross section for e + e - → e - ν-bar e ud-barγ is computed and discussed in comparison with the cross sections for e + e - → e - V-bar e u d-bar and e + e - → u-bar d u d-bar. Event generators based on the GRACE package for the non-radiative and radiative case are presented. Special interest is brought to the effect of the non-resonant diagrams overlooked so far in other studies. Their contribution to the total cross section is presented for the LEP II energy range for future linear colliders (√s = 500 GeV). (author)

  20. Investigating spin-transfer torques induced by thermal gradients in magnetic tunnel junctions by using micro-cavity ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansever, H.; Narkowicz, R.; Lenz, K.; Fowley, C.; Ramasubramanian, L.; Yildirim, O.; Niesen, A.; Huebner, T.; Reiss, G.; Lindner, J.; Fassbender, J.; Deac, A. M.

    2018-06-01

    Similar to electrical currents flowing through magnetic multilayers, thermal gradients applied across the barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction may induce pure spin-currents and generate ‘thermal’ spin-transfer torques large enough to induce magnetization dynamics in the free layer. In this study, we describe a novel experimental approach to observe spin-transfer torques induced by thermal gradients in magnetic multilayers by studying their ferromagnetic resonance response in microwave cavities. Utilizing this approach allows for measuring the magnetization dynamics on micron/nano-sized samples in open-circuit conditions, i.e. without the need of electrical contacts. We performed first experiments on magnetic tunnel junctions patterned into 6  ×  9 µm2 ellipses from Co2FeAl/MgO/CoFeB stacks. We conducted microresonator ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) under focused laser illumination to induce thermal gradients in the layer stack and compared them to measurements in which the sample was globally heated from the backside of the substrate. Moreover, we carried out broadband FMR measurements under global heating conditions on the same extended films the microstructures were later on prepared from. The results clearly demonstrate the effect of thermal spin-torque on the FMR response and thus show that the microresonator approach is well suited to investigate thermal spin-transfer-driven processes for small temperatures gradients, far below the gradients required for magnetic switching.

  1. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thotakura, Vijaya [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  2. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1–3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  3. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J.

    1991-01-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain

  4. Radiative neutron capture: Hauser Feshbach vs. statistical resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochman, D., E-mail: dimitri-alexandre.rochman@psi.ch [Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Ferroukhi, H. [Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2017-01-10

    The radiative neutron capture rates for isotopes of astrophysical interest are commonly calculated on the basis of the statistical Hauser Feshbach (HF) reaction model, leading to smooth and monotonically varying temperature-dependent Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS). The HF approximation is known to be valid if the number of resonances in the compound system is relatively high. However, such a condition is hardly fulfilled for keV neutrons captured on light or exotic neutron-rich nuclei. For this reason, a different procedure is proposed here, based on the generation of statistical resonances. This novel technique, called the “High Fidelity Resonance” (HFR) method is shown to provide similar results as the HF approach for nuclei with a high level density but to deviate and be more realistic than HF predictions for light and neutron-rich nuclei or at relatively low sub-keV energies. The MACS derived with the HFR method are systematically compared with the traditional HF calculations for some 3300 neutron-rich nuclei and shown to give rise to significantly larger predictions with respect to the HF approach at energies of astrophysical relevance. For this reason, the HF approach should not be applied to light or neutron-rich nuclei. The Doppler broadening of the generated resonances is also studied and found to have a negligible impact on the calculated MACS.

  5. Cavity syncronisation of underdamped Josephson junction arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbara, P.; Filatrella, G.; Lobb, C.

    2003-01-01

    the junctions in the array and an electromagnetic cavity. Here we show that a model of a one-dimensional array of Josephson junctions coupled to a resonator can produce many features of the coherent be havior above threshold, including coherent radiation of power and the shape of the array current...

  6. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  7. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses

  8. Combined Natural Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer of Various Absorbing-Emitting-Scattering Media in a Square Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model is developed to simulate combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer of various anisotropic absorbing-emitting-scattering media in a 2D square cavity based on the discrete ordinate (DO method and Boussinesq assumption. The effects of Rayleigh number, optical thickness, scattering ratio, scattering phase function, and aspect ratio of square cavity on the behaviors of heat transfer are studied. The results show that the heat transfer of absorbing-emitting-scattering media is the combined results of radiation and natural convection, which depends on the physical properties and the aspect ratio of the cavity. When the natural convection becomes significant, the convection heat transfer is enhanced, and the distributions of NuR and Nuc along the walls are obviously distorted. As the optical thickness increases, NuR along the hot wall decreases. As the scattering ratio decreases, the NuR along the walls decreases. At the higher aspect ratio, the more intensive thermal radiation and natural convection are formed, which increase the radiation and convection heat fluxes. This paper provides the theoretical research for the optimal thermal design and practical operation of the high temperature industrial equipments.

  9. Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-01

    PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

  10. Generation of strong electromagnetic power at 35 GHz from the interaction of a resonant cavity with a relativistic electron beam generated by a free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Thibaut

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of electron-positron linear colliders must reach the TeV energy range. For this, one requires an adequate RF power source to feed the accelerating cavities of the collider. One way to generate this source is to use the Two Beam Accelerator concept in which the RF power is produced in resonant cavities driven by an intense bunched beam. In this thesis, I present the experimental results obtained at the CEA/CESTA using an electron beam generated by an induction linac. First, some studies were performed with the LELIA induction linac (2.2 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) as a buncher at 35 GHz. A second part relates the experiment made with the PIVAIR induction linac (7 MeV, 1 kA, 80 ns) in order to measure the RF power extracted from a resonant cavity at 35 GHz, which is driven by the bunches produced in the FEL. One can also find a simple theoretical modeling of the beam-cavity interaction, and the numerical results dealing with the design of the cavity we tested. (author) [fr

  11. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Gurevich, Alexander V. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  12. Radiation dosimetry in human bone using electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate measurements of dose in bone are required in order to improve the dosimetry of systemic radiotherapy for osseous metastases. Bone is an integrating dosimeter which records the radiation history of the skeleton. During irradiation, electrons become trapped in the crystalline component of bone mineral (hydroxyapatite). The traps are very stable; at room temperature, emptying of the traps occurs with a half-life of many years. The population of trapped unpaired electrons is proportional to the radiation dose administered to the bone and can be measured in excised bone samples using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR spectra of synthetic hydroxyapatite, irradiated with Co-60, were obtained at room temperature and at 77 K. At room temperature, the radiation-induced signal, with a g-value of 2.001 ± 0.001 increased linearly with absorbed dose above a lower threshold of 3 Gy, up to doses of 200 Gy. In contrast with pure hydroxyapatite, EPR spectra of excised human bone showed a broad 'native' signal, due to the organic component of bone, which masks the dosimetrically important signal. This native signal is highly variable from sample to sample and precludes the use of EPR as an absolute dosimetry technique. However, after subtraction of the background signal, irradiated human bone showed a linear response with a lower limit of measurement similar to that of synthetic hydroxyapatite. Bone is an in vivo linear dosimeter which can be exploited to develop accurate estimates of the radiation dose delivered during systemic radiotherapy and teletherapy. However, improved sensitivity of the EPR dosimetry technique is necessary before it can be applied reliably in clinical situations. (author)

  13. Analysis of average radiation widths of neutron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malezki, H.; Popov, A.B.; Trzeciak, K.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the available data on parameters of neutron resonances average values of radiation widths (GITAsub(γ)) are calculated for a wide range of nuclei in the 50 upto 250 atomic weight range. Experimental values are compared with different variants of theoretical estimates of GITAsub(γ) which are reduced to the GITAsub(γ) dependence upon atomic weight A, excitation energy U and level density parameter a as GITAsub(γ)=CAsup(α)Usup(β)asup(γ). Besides, empirical values C, α, β, γ are selected satisfying the experimental data best of all. It is determined that the use of a=kA hypothesis leads to a sufficiently better agreement between all theoretical estimates of GITAsub(γ) and experimental values. It turned out that the estimations by Weisskopf, Bondarenko-Urin or with empirically chosen parameters give an approximately similar correspondence of calculated values GITAsub(γ)sup(p) to experimental data [ru

  14. Hot-cavity studies for the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henares, J.L.; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Kron, T.; Lassen, J.; Le Blanc, F.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Raeder, S.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) has emerged as an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability, and ability to ionize target elements efficiently and element selectively. GISELE is an off-line RILIS test bench to study the implementation of an on-line laser ion source at the GANIL separator facility. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. The ion source geometry was tested in several configurations in order to find a solution with optimal ionization efficiency and beam emittance. Furthermore, a low work function material was tested to reduce the contaminants and molecular sidebands generated inside the ion source. First results with ZrC ionizer tubes will be presented. Furthermore, a method to measure the energy distribution of the ion beam as a function of the time of flight will be discussed.

  15. Design and Analysis of Enhanced Modulation Response in Integrated Coupled Cavities DBR Lasers Using Photon-Photon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bardella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, various solutions have been proposed to increase the modulation bandwidth and, consequently, the transmission bit-rate of semiconductor lasers. In this manuscript, we discuss a design procedure for a recently proposed laser cavity realized with the monolithic integration of two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR lasers allowing one to extend the modulation bandwidth. Such an extension is obtained introducing in the dynamic response a photon-photon resonance (PPR at a frequency higher than the modulation bandwidth of the corresponding single-section laser. Design guidelines will be proposed, and dynamic small and large signal simulations results, calculated using a finite difference traveling wave (FDTW numerical simulator, will be discussed to confirm the design results. The effectiveness of the design procedure is verified in a structure with PPR frequency at 35 GHz allowing one to obtain an open eye diagram for a non-return-to-zero (NRZ digital signal up to 80 GHz . Furthermore, the investigation of the rich dynamics of this structure shows that with proper bias conditions, it is possible to obtain also a tunable self-pulsating signal in a frequency range related to the PPR design.

  16. Enhanced escape rate for Hg 254 nm resonance radiation in fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, James E; Raizen, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    The potential of the low-cost MAGIS isotopic separation method to improve fluorescent lamp efficacy is explored using resonance radiation transport simulations. New Hg isotopic mixes are discovered that yield escape rates for 254 nm Hg I resonance radiation equal to 117% to 122% of the rate for a natural isotopic mix under the same lamp conditions. (paper)

  17. Dispersive shock mediated resonant radiations in defocused nonlinear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Rik; Bhadra, Shyamal Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We report the evolution of resonant radiation (RR) in a self-defocused nonlinear medium with two zero dispersion wavelengths. RR is generated from dispersive shock wave (DSW) front when the pump pulse is in non-solitonic regime close to first zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW). DSW is responsible for pulse splitting resulting in the generation of blue solitons when leading edge of the pump pulse hits the first ZDW. DSW also generates a red shifted dispersive wave (DW) in the presence of higher order dispersion coefficients. Further, DSW through cross-phase modulation with red shifted dispersive wave (DW) excites a localized radiation. The presence of zero nonlinearity point in the system restricts red-shift of RR and enhances the red shifting of DW. It also helps in the formation of DSW at shorter distance and squeezes the solitonic region beyond second zero dispersion point. Predicted results indicate that the spectral evolution depends on the product of Kerr nonlinearity and group velocity dispersion.

  18. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy.

  19. Resonant influence of a longitudinal hypersonic field on the radiation from channeled electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, L.Sh.; Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Mkrtchyan, A.H.; Khachatryan, H.F.; Prade, H.; Wagner, W.; Piestrup, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The wave function of a planar/axially channeled electron with energy 10 MeV≤E<<1 GeV under the influence of a longitudinal hypersonic wave excited in a single crystal is calculated. Conditions for the resonant influence of the hypersonic wave on the quantum state of the channeled electron are deduced. Expressions for the wave function that are applicable in the case of resonance are obtained. Angular and spectral distributions of the radiation intensity from the planar/axially channeled electron are also calculated. The possibility of significant amplification of channeling radiation by a hypersonic wave is substantiated. It is found that the hypersound can excite inverse radiative transitions through which the transversal energy of the channeled electron is increased. These transitions have a resonant nature and can lead to a considerable intensification of the electron channeling radiation. In the case of axial channeling, the resonance radiation is sustained also by direct radiative transitions of the electron

  20. Interaction of surface radiation and free convection in open and closed cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateshan, S.P.; Balaji, C.

    1996-01-01

    Research focussing on the interaction of all the modes of heat transfer in closed cavities, open cavities and L corners are scarce. Hence an earnest attempt to explore the interaction between the various modes of heat transfer in the above mentioned geometries to gain insight into the nature of interaction, and, develop useful correlations for computing the overall heat transfer are the main thrusts of the present study. 21 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Amplification of an Autodyne Signal in a Bistable Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser with the Use of a Vibrational Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhevsky, V. N.

    2018-01-01

    For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that a vibrational resonance in a polarization-bistable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser can be used to increase the laser response in autodyne detection of microvibrations from reflecting surfaces. In this case, more than 25-fold signal amplification is achieved. The influence of the asymmetry of the bistable potential on the microvibration-detection efficiency is studied.

  2. A hybrid polarization-selective atomic sensor for radio-frequency field detection with a passive resonant-cavity field amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, David A.; Paradis, Eric G.; Raithel, Georg

    2018-01-01

    We present a hybrid atomic sensor that realizes radio-frequency electric field detection with intrinsic field amplification and polarization selectivity for robust high-sensitivity field measurement. The hybrid sensor incorporates a passive resonator element integrated with an atomic vapor cell that provides amplification and polarization selectivity for detection of incident radio-frequency fields. The amplified intra-cavity radio-frequency field is measured by atoms using a quantum-optical ...

  3. Apparatus for treating the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus for reaing carcinoma of the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity is described. An elongated tube has an inner end adapted to be placed in the pelvic cavity and an outer end adapted to extend through to the outside of the body. Radioactive material is placed at the inner end. An inner balloon above the radioactive material is inflated to hold a body of liquid shielding material such as mercury. A lower balloon portion beneath the inner balloon spaces areas to be treated such as the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity from the radioactive material. An upper balloon portion above the inner balloon keeps the intestines out of the pelvic cavity and away from the radioactive material. The apparatus is inserted into the pelvic cavity through an abdominal incision. When treating a woman for carcinoma in the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity the tube is moved through the vaginal passage from the inside outwardly. When treating a woman with a closed vaginal passage, as may result from surgery, or when treating a man, such as for carcinoma of the bladder, the tube will pass out of the body through a lower abdominal incision. Following treatment, all balloons are deflated so that the apparatus can be withdrawn through the vaginal passage or the lower abdominal incision, as the case may be. (auth)

  4. Investigation of some parameters influencing the sensitivity of human tooth enamel to gamma radiation using electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Faramawy, N.

    2008-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been successfully used as a physical technique for gamma radiation dose reconstruction using calcified tissues. To minimize potential discrepancies between EPR readings in future studies, the effects of cavity response factor, tooth position and donor gender on the estimated gamma radiation dose were studied. It was found that the EPR response per sample mass used for assessment of doses in teeth outside of the 70-100 mg range should be corrected by a factor which is a function of the sample mass. In the EPR measurements, the difference in sensitivity of different tooth positions to γ-radiation was taken into consideration. It was determined that among all the premolars and molars tooth positions, the relative standard deviation of sensitivity was 6.5%, with the wisdom teeth and the first molars having the highest and lowest sensitivity to γ-radiation, respectively. The current results reveal no effect of the donor gender on the sensitivity to γ-radiation. (author)

  5. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  6. Further Insight Relative to Cavity Radiation: A Thought Experiment Refuting Kirchhoff's Law (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission demands that all cavities contain blackbody, or normal, radiation which is dependent solely on the temperature and the frequency of observation, while remaining independent of the nature of t he enclosure. For over 150 years, this law has stood as a great pillar for those who believe that gaseous stars could emit a blackbody spectrum. However, it is well-known that, u nder laboratory condi- tions, gases emit in bands and cannot produce a thermal spectrum. Furthermore, all laboratory blackbodies are constructed from nearly ideal a bsorbers. This fact strongly opposes the validity of Kirchhoff’s formulation. Clearly, if Kirchhoff had been correct, then laboratory blackbodies could be constructed of any arbitrary material. Through the use of two cavities in temperature equilibrium with one another, a thought experiment is presented herein which soundly refutes Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission.

  7. Effect of volumetric radiation on natural convection in a cavity with a horizontal fin using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighchi, Hashem Ahmadi; Sobhani, Masoud; Esfahani, Javad Abolfazli

    2018-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is presented for the effects of volumetric radiation on laminar natural convection in a square cavity with a horizontal fin on the hot wall containing an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. Accordingly, the flow, energy and radiative equations are solved by separate distribution functions in the LBM. A parametric study is performed: the effects of Rayleigh number and radiative parameters, such as extinction coefficient and scattering albedo on the flow and temperature fields are investigated. It is found that the isotherms become dense near the cold wall, due to highly participating properties and Rayleigh number. Also, the Nusselt number ratio (NNR) on the clod wall is examined for values of fin length and height. The maximum NNR is found at the longest fin length and near top wall for a given Rayleigh number.

  8. Radiative decays of the upsilon (2S) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, J.

    1984-04-01

    The Crystal Ball Detector at DORIS II was used to study radiative decays of the upsilon (2S) resonance with more than twice the previously available data. The inclusive photon spectrum of hadronic upsilon (2S) decays and the exclusive channel upsilon (2S) → γγ upsilon (1S) → γγ l + l - were analyzed. In the inclusive spectrum three significant photon lines at energies of Eγ 1 = (108.2 +- 0.7 +- 4) MeV, Eγ 1 = (127.1 +- 0.8 +- 4) MeV and Eγ 3 = (160.0 +- 2.4 +- 4) MeV with branching fractions of (6.0 +- 0.7 +- 0.9)%, (6.6 +- 0.8 +- 1.0)%, (2.6 +- 0.7 +- 0.8)% respectively were measured. The lines are consistent with being transitions from the upsilon (2S) to the 3 P 2 , 3 P 1 and 3 P 0 states. In addition a line at Eγ approx. 427 MeV was observed which is interpreted as transitions from the 3 P 2 1 states to the upsilon (1S). 17 references

  9. Dual-resonances approach to broadband cavity-assisted optical signal processing beyond the carrier relaxation rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a differential control scheme for cavity-enhanced optical signal processing devices based on carrier nonlinearities. The scheme relies on two optical cavities to increase the bandwidth beyond the limit given by the slowest carrier relaxation rate of the medium. Practical...

  10. High-dose superselective intra-arterial cisplatin and concomitant radiation therapy for carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Gen; Tanaka, Norimitsu; Ogo, Etuyo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-dose superselective intra-arterial cisplatin and concomitant radiation therapy for carcinoma of the oral cavities. The subjects consisted of 18 patients with carcinoma of the oral, and cavity treated with superselective intra-arterial infusion of high dose cisplatin (100 mg/body) concomitant with delivery of external beam radiotherapy (median total dose, 60.8 Gy) between 2001 and 2004. Sodium thiosulfate was administered intravenously to provide effective cisplatin neutlization. They were International Union Against Cancer (UICC)1997 stage II-IV (stage II: 4 patients, stage III: 4 patients, stage IV: 10 patients). Patients ranged from 43-81 years of age, with a median of 60 years, and included 14 men and 4 women. A follow-up period was 6 months minimum from the atart of the radiation therapy, the median follow up period at 28 months. The three-year overall survival rate was 71%. The three-year disease free rate and local control rate were 60% and 65%, respectively. Three-year local control rate of the T2-3 was achieved at 83%, and that for T4 at 50%. There was borderline significant difference in local control rate between T2-3 and T4 (p=0.05). We conclude that the high-dose superselective intra-arterial cisplatin and concomitant radiation therapy provides effective results in organ preservation for cancer of oral cavities. Further studies are also required to determine the validity of this method. (author)

  11. Parametrically tunable soliton-induced resonant radiation by three-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Liu, Xing; Guo, Hairun

    2017-01-01

    We show that a temporal soliton can induce resonant radiation by three-wave mixing nonlinearities. This constitutes a new class of resonant radiation whose spectral positions are parametrically tunable. The experimental verification is done in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, where...... a femtosecond near-IR soliton is excited and resonant radiation waves are observed exactly at the calculated soliton phasematching wavelengths via the sum- and difference-frequency generation nonlinearities. This extends the supercontinuum bandwidth well into the mid IR to span 550–5000 nm, and the mid-IR edge...

  12. Generation of linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Awata, Takaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuharu; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yogo, Akifumi; Itoh, Akio; Imanishi, Nobutsugu

    2000-01-01

    We have proposed a method to generate almost linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X rays by using a rectangular slit placed on an electron beam axis. Our calculation predicted that the linearity is 93.5% for the resonant transition radiation X-ray beam extracted through a slit of 0.5 mrad long and 0.2 mrad wide in case of 1-GeV electron beam irradiating a 7.5-μm thick Kapton foil stack. (author)

  13. Generation of linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Awata, Takaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuharu; Ikeda, Kenichi; Yogo, Akifumi; Itoh, Akio; Imanishi, Nobutsugu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2000-03-01

    We have proposed a method to generate almost linearly polarized resonant transition radiation X rays by using a rectangular slit placed on an electron beam axis. Our calculation predicted that the linearity is 93.5% for the resonant transition radiation X-ray beam extracted through a slit of 0.5 mrad long and 0.2 mrad wide in case of 1-GeV electron beam irradiating a 7.5-{mu}m thick Kapton foil stack. (author)

  14. Approximate Teleportation of an Unknown Atomic-Entangled State with Dissipative Atom-Cavity Resonant Jaynes-Cummings Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zong-Liang; LI Shao-Hua; CHEN Chang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme for approximately and conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic-entangled state in dissipative cavity QED.It is the further development of the scheme of [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302],where the cavity mode decay has not been considered and the state teleportated is an unknown atomic state.In this paper,we investigate the influence of the decay on the approximate and conditional teleportation of the unknown atomic-entangled state,which is different from that teleportated in [Phys.Rev.A 69 (2004) 064302] and then give the fidelity of the teleportation,which depends on the cavity mode decay.The scheme may be generalized to not only the teleportation of the cavity-mode-entangled-state by means of a single atom but also the teleportation of the unknown trapped-ion-entangled-state in a linear ion trap.

  15. Resolving the stratification discrepancy of turbulent natural convection in differentially heated air-filled cavities. Part III: A full convection–conduction–surface radiation coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Shihe; Salat, Jacques; Joubert, Patrice; Sergent, Anne; Penot, François; Quéré, Patrick Le

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent natural convection is studied numerically and experimentally. ► DNS of full conduction–convection–radiation coupling is performed. ► Spectral methods are combined with domain decomposition. ► Considering surface radiation improves strongly numerical results. ► Surface radiation is responsible for the weak stratification. -- Abstract: The present study concerns an air-filled differentially heated cavity of 1 m × 0.32 m × 1 m (width × depth × height) subject to a temperature difference of 15 K and is motivated by the need to understand the persistent discrepancy observed between numerical and experimental results on thermal stratification in the cavity core. An improved experiment with enhanced metrology was set up and experimental data have been obtained along with the characteristics of the surfaces and materials used. Experimental temperature distributions on the passive walls have been introduced in numerical simulations in order to provide a faithful prediction of experimental data. By means of DNS using spectral methods, heat conduction in the insulating material is first coupled with natural convection in the cavity. As heat conduction influences only the temperature distribution on the top and bottom surfaces and in the near wall regions, surface radiation is added to the coupling of natural convection with heat conduction. The temperature distribution in the cavity is strongly affected by the polycarbonate front and rear walls of the cavity, which are almost black surfaces for low temperature radiation, and also other low emissivity walls. The thermal stratification is considerably weakened by surface radiation. Good agreement between numerical simulations and experiments is observed on both time-averaged fields and turbulent statistics. Treating the full conduction–convection–radiation coupling allowed to confirm that experimental wall temperatures resulted from the coupled phenomena and this is another way to

  16. On the contribution of circumferential resonance modes in acoustic radiation force experienced by cylindrical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Majid; Behzad, Mehdi

    2014-10-01

    A body insonified by a constant (time-varying) intensity sound field is known to experience a steady (oscillatory) force that is called the steady-state (dynamic) acoustic radiation force. Using the classical resonance scattering theorem (RST) which suggests the scattered field as a superposition of a resonance field and a background (non-resonance) component, we show that the radiation force acting on a cylindrical shell may be synthesized as a composition of three components: background part, resonance part and their interaction. The background component reveals the pure geometrical reflection effects and illustrates a regular behavior with respect to frequency, while the others demonstrate a singular behavior near the resonance frequencies. The results illustrate that the resonance effects associated to partial waves can be isolated by the subtraction of the background component from the total (steady-state or dynamic) radiation force function (i.e., residue component). In the case of steady-state radiation force, the components are exerted on the body as static forces. For the case of oscillatory amplitude excitation, the components are exerted at the modulation frequency with frequency-dependant phase shifts. The results demonstrate the dominant contribution of the non-resonance component of dynamic radiation force at high frequencies with respect to the residue component, which offers the potential application of ultrasound stimulated vibro-acoustic spectroscopy technique in low frequency resonance spectroscopy purposes. Furthermore, the proposed formulation may be useful essentially due to its intrinsic value in physical acoustics. In addition, it may unveil the contribution of resonance modes in the dynamic radiation force experienced by the cylindrical objects and its underlying physics.

  17. Heat performance resulting from combined effects of radiation and mixed convection in a rectangular cavity ventilated by injection or suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzaraa, K.; Bahlaoui, A.; Arroub, I.; Raji, A.; Hasnaoui, M.; Naïmi, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we investigated numerically heat transfer by mixed convection coupled to thermal radiation in a vented rectangular enclosure uniformly heated from below with a constant heat flux. The fresh fluid is admitted into the cavity by injection or suction, by means of two openings located on the lower part of both right and left vertical sides. Another opening is placed on the middle of the top wall to ensure the ventilation. Air, a radiatively transparent medium, is considered to be the cooling fluid. The inner surfaces, in contact with the fluid, are assumed to be gray, diffuse emitters and reflectors of radiation with identical emissivities. The effects of some pertinent parameters such as the Reynolds number, 300 ≤ Re ≤ 5000, and the emissivity of the walls, 0 ≤ ɛ ≤ 0.85, on flow and temperature patterns as well as on the heat transfer rate within the enclosure are presented for the two ventilation modes (injection and suction). The results indicate that the flow and thermal structures are affected by the thermal radiation for the two modes of imposed flow. However, the suction mode is found to be more favorable to the heat transfer in comparison with the injection one.

  18. Radiation quality factor of spherical antennas with material cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the radiation quality factor and resonances of spherical antennas with material cores. Conditions for cavity and radiating resonances are given, and a theoretical description of the radiation quality factor, as well as simple expressions describing the relative...

  19. The influence of boundary conditions on resonant frequencies of cavities in 3-D FDTD algorithm using non-orthogonal co-ordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.; Tong, L.S. [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Research Inst. of Electronics; Carter, R.G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Engineering Dept.

    1994-09-01

    The 3-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method in non-orthogonal co-ordinates (non-standard FDTD) is used to calculate the frequencies of resonators. The numerical boundary conditions of the method are presented. The Influences of boundary conditions and discrete meshes on the numerical accuracy are investigated. The authors present the nonstandard FDTD method using the boundary-orthogonal mesh and equivalent dielectric constant so that the error is reduced from 8.66% to 3.0% for the cylindrical cavity loaded by a dielectric button.

  20. An exploration in acoustic radiation force experienced by cylindrical shells via resonance scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Majid; Behzad, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    In nonlinear acoustic regime, a body insonified by a sound field is known to experience a steady force that is called the acoustic radiation force (RF). This force is a second-order quantity of the velocity potential function of the ambient medium. Exploiting the sufficiency of linear solution representation of potential function in RF formulation, and following the classical resonance scattering theorem (RST) which suggests the scattered field as a superposition of the resonant field and a background (non-resonant) component, we will show that the radiation force is a composition of three components: background part, resonant part and their interaction. Due to the nonlinearity effects, each part contains the contribution of pure partial waves in addition to their mutual interaction. The numerical results propose the residue component (i.e., subtraction of the background component from the RF) as a good indicator of the contribution of circumferential surface waves in RF. Defining the modal series of radiation force function and its components, it will be shown that within each partial wave, the resonance contribution can be synthesized as the Breit-Wigner form for adequately none-close resonant frequencies. The proposed formulation may be helpful essentially due to its inherent value as a canonical subject in physical acoustics. Furthermore, it may make a tunnel through the circumferential resonance reducing effects on radiation forces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerical simulations of radiation hydrodynamics and modeling of high temperature hohlraum cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Godwal, B.K.

    2003-10-01

    A summary of our efforts towards the validation of radiation hydrodynamics and opacity models are presented. Effects of various parameters on the radiation temperature inside an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum, the effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions on emission and absorption, and the hydrodynamics of aluminium and gold foils driven by radiation are studied. LTE and non-LTE predictions for emitted radiation are compared with the experimental results and it is seen that non-LTE simulations show a marked improvement over LTE results. It is shown that the mixing of two high Z materials can lead to an enhancement in the Rosseland mean. An experimental study of soft x-ray emission from laser-irradiated Au-Cu mix-Z targets confirmed these predictions. It is seen that only multi group non-LTE radiation transport is able to explain experimentally observed features in the conversion efficiency of laser light to x-rays. One group radiation transport under predicts the radiation temperature. It is shown that erroneous results can be obtained if the space mesh in the hohlraum wall is not fine enough. Hydrodynamics of a wedge shaped aluminium foil driven by the hohlraum radiation is also presented and results are compared with NOVA laser experiments. Laser driven shock wave EOS and gold hohlraum experiments carried out at CAT are analyzed and they confirmed our theoretical estimates. (author)

  2. Assessment of radiation injuries: role of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khushu, Subhash; Rana, Poonam

    2014-01-01

    In the event of an intentional or accidental release of ionizing radiation, timely assessment of the radiation exposure is critical for the triage and to facilitate timely and optimal medical care to the effected population. In addition to mild to severe injuries to tissues and organs, radiation injury can also cause cognitive decline, depressive behavior and affective state disturbances following exposure to both high and low doses of radiation. These may be even seen without evident tissue injury within hours to days or months to years after exposure to low doses of radiation. In this study, we exploited the multi-parametric contrast of NMR/MRI and its potential to assess radiation dose absorbed and radiation sickness thereof. High resolution NMR spectroscopy experiments were conducted on urine and serum samples collected from mice irradiated (whole body and focal irradiation) with 3, 5 and 8 Gray of γ-radiation at different time points post irradiation. Irradiated mice serum and urine showed distinct metabolic phenotypes and revealed dose and time dependent clustering of irradiated groups depicting different phases of radiation sickness. Increased concentration of urine metabolites related to gut microflora and energy metabolism were observed during different phases of radiation sickness. On the other hand serum spectra reflected changes associated with lipid, energy and membrane metabolism during radiation sickness. In vivo NMR spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was also performed in different regions of brain post irradiation in animal model, which showed radiation induced metabolite changes in hippocampus region. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) also demonstrated dose related changes in various brain regions which corroborated well with the behavioral parameters. The results of the present work lay a scientific foundation for development of high throughput radiation bio-dosimetry. This could further be useful in development

  3. HF power couplers for pulsed superconducting cavity resonators; Coupleurs de puissance HF pour cavites supraconductrices en mode pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenhani, Hassen [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    Recent years have seen an impressive improvement in the accelerating gradients obtained in superconducting cavities. Consequently, such cavities have become attractive candidates for large superconducting linear accelerator projects such as the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC). As a result, there is a strong interest in reducing RF conditioning time and improving the performance of the input power couplers for these cavities. The so-called TTF-III input power coupler, adopted for the XFEL superconducting RF cavities are complex components. In order to better understand the behavior of this component we have performed a series of experiments on a number of such couplers. Initially, we developed a fully automated RF high power test stand for coupler conditioning procedure. Following this, we performed a series of coupler conditioning tests. This has allowed the study of the coupler behavior during processing. A number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the in-situ baking effect on the conditioning time. Some of the conditioned couplers were sent to DESY in order to be tested on 9-cells TESLA cavities under cryogenic conditions. These tests have shown that the couplers in no way limit the cavity performance, even up to gradients of 35 MV/m. The main objective of our coupler studies was the reduction of their conditioning time, which represents one of the most important criteria in the choice of coupler for high energy linacs. Excellent progress in reducing the conditioning time has been demonstrated by making appropriate modifications to the conditioning procedure. Furthermore, special attention was paid to electron generation processes in the couplers, via multipacting. Simulations of this process were made on both the TTF-III coupler and on a new coupler prototype, TTF-V. Experiments aimed at suppressing multipacting were also successfully achieved by using a DC bias on the inner conductor of the co-axial coupler. (author)

  4. Teleportation of N-qubit W State without Bell-State Measurement via Selective Resonant Interaction in Cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Wenxue; Geng Jun; Cheng Guangling; Chen Aixi

    2010-01-01

    We present a scheme in which the N-atom W state is teleported by employing the selective interaction of a cavity field with a driven three-level atom in the A configuration and detecting a single atom in one of the ground states. The long-lived W state is teleported from atom A to atom B when the atoms B and A are sent through a cavity successively and atom A is then detected. The advantage is that the present one does not involve the Bell-state measurement and is robust against the atomic spontaneous emission. (general)

  5. Dynamics of moving interacting atoms in a laser radiation field and optical size resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomskii, O.N.; Glukhov, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    The forces acting on interacting moving atoms exposed to resonant laser radiation are calculated. It is shown that the forces acting on the atoms include the radiation pressure forces as well as the external and internal bias forces. The dependences of the forces on the atomic spacing, polarization, and laser radiation frequency are given. It is found that the internal bias force associated with the interaction of atomic dipoles via the reemitted field may play an important role in the dynamics of dense atomic ensembles in a light field. It is shown that optical size resonances appear in the system of interacting atoms at frequencies differing substantially from transition frequencies in the spectrum of atoms. It is noted that optical size resonances as well as the Doppler frequency shift in the spectrum of interacting atoms play a significant role in the processes of laser-radiation-controlled motion of the atoms

  6. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in five daily fractions for post-operative surgical cavities in brain metastases patients with and without prior whole brain radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omair, Ameen; Soliman, Hany; Xu, Wei; Karotki, Aliaksandr; Mainprize, Todd; Phan, Nicolas; Das, Sunit; Keith, Julia; Yeung, Robert; Perry, James; Tsao, May; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-12-01

    Our purpose was to report efficacy of hypofractionated cavity stereotactic radiotherapy (HCSRT) in patients with and without prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). 32 surgical cavities in 30 patients (20 patients/21 cavities had no prior WBRT and 10 patients/11 cavities had prior WBRT) were treated with image-guided linac stereotactic radiotherapy. 7 of the 10 prior WBRT patients had "resistant" local disease given prior surgery, post-operative WBRT and a re-operation, followed by salvage HCSRT. The clinical target volume was the post-surgical cavity, and a 2-mm margin applied as planning target volume. The median total dose was 30 Gy (range: 25-37.5 Gy) in 5 fractions. In the no prior and prior WBRT cohorts, the median follow-up was 9.7 months (range: 3.0-23.6) and 15.3 months (range: 2.9-39.7), the median survival was 23.6 months and 39.7 months, and the 1-year cavity local recurrence progression- free survival (LRFS) was 79 and 100%, respectively. At 18 months the LRFS dropped to 29% in the prior WBRT cohort. Grade 3 radiation necrosis occurred in 3 prior WBRT patients. We report favorable outcomes with HCSRT, and well selected patients with prior WBRT and "resistant" disease may have an extended survival favoring aggressive salvage HCSRT at a moderate risk of radiation necrosis.

  7. New analytical calculations of the resonance modes in lens-shaped cavities: applications to the calculations of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, J; Loualiche, S

    2003-01-01

    The problem of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots is studied in the parabolic coordinates system. A conventional effective mass Hamiltonian is written. For an infinite potential barrier, it is related to the more general problem of finding the resonance modes in a cavity. The problem is found to be separable for a biconvex-shaped cavity or quantum dot with an infinite potential barrier. This first shape of quantum dot corresponds to the intersection of two orthogonal confocal parabolas. Then plano-convex lens-shaped cavities or quantum dots are studied. This problem is no more separable in the parabolic coordinates but using symmetry properties, we show that the exact solutions of the problem are simple combinations of the previous solutions. The same approach is used for spherical coordinates and hemispherical quantum dots. It is finally shown that convex lens-shaped quantum dots give a good description of self-organized InAs quantum dots grown on InP

  8. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II is underway for the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L0, L1, L2, and L3. Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, will be used in section L1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  9. Nanofluid MHD natural convection through a porous complex shaped cavity considering thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Li, Zhixiong; Shamlooei, M.

    2018-06-01

    Control volume based finite element method (CVFEM) is applied to simulate H2O based nanofluid radiative and convective heat transfer inside a porous medium. Non-Darcy model is employed for porous media. Influences of Hartmann number, nanofluid volume fraction, radiation parameter, Darcy number, number of undulations and Rayleigh number on nanofluid behavior were demonstrated. Thermal conductivity of nanofluid is estimated by means of previous experimental correlation. Results show that Nusselt number enhances with augment of permeability of porous media. Effect of Hartmann number on rate of heat transfer is opposite of radiation parameter.

  10. Quantum dynamics of crystals of molecular magnets inside microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Garcia-Santiago, A. E-mail: antonio@ubxlab.comtoni@ubxlab.com

    2004-05-01

    It is shown that crystals of molecular nanomagnets exhibit enhanced magnetic relaxation when placed inside a resonant cavity. Strong dependence of the magnetization curve on the geometry of the cavity has been observed, providing evidence of the coherent microwave radiation by the crystals. These observations open the possibility of building a nanomagnetic microwave laser pumped by the magnetic field.

  11. Quantum dynamics of crystals of molecular magnets inside microwave resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E.M.; Hernandez, J.M.; Garcia-Santiago, A.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that crystals of molecular nanomagnets exhibit enhanced magnetic relaxation when placed inside a resonant cavity. Strong dependence of the magnetization curve on the geometry of the cavity has been observed, providing evidence of the coherent microwave radiation by the crystals. These observations open the possibility of building a nanomagnetic microwave laser pumped by the magnetic field

  12. Production of narrowband tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation by noncollinear resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Hollenstein, U.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation (bandwidth ≲300 MHz) tunable around 91 nm is produced by use of two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing on the Kr resonance at 94 093 cm

  13. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  14. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, J.; Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations

  15. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  16. Effects of radiation and α-tocopherol on saliva flow rate, amylase activity, total protein and electrolyte levels in oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate early and late effects of radiation and a-tocopherol on the secretion rate of saliva and on selected saliva salivary parameters in oral cavity cancer patients. Patients & Methods: Eighty-nine histologically confirmed oral cavity cancer patients (OCC were enrolled in the study. Resting whole saliva was collected before, during and at the end of the radiation therapy (RT and simultaneous supplementation with α - tocopherol to the radiation treated patients (RT + AT. Results: Salivary flow rate, pH, amylase activity, total protein, sodium and potassium were analyzed. Increased pH, potassium and decreased flow rate, amylase activity, protein content and sodium were observed in 6 weeks of radiation treated patients when compared to OCC patients. A significant improvement of those parameters was observed on α - tocopherol supplementation in RT + AT patients. Conclusion: Supplementation with α - tocopherol improves the salivary flow rate thereby, maintains salivary parameters.

  17. Current-voltage characteristic of a resonant tunneling diode under electromagnetic radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Hatefi Kargan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, current-voltage characteristic of a resonant tunneling diode under electromagnetic radiation has been calculated and compared with the results when there is no electromagnetic radiation. For calculating current -voltage characteristic, it is required to calculate the transmission coefficient of electrons from the well and barrier structures of this device. For calculating the transmission coefficient of electrons at the presence of electromagnetic radiation, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method has been used and when there is no electromagnetic radiation Transfer Matrix Method (TMM and finite diffirence time domain method have been used. The results show that the presence of electromagnetic radiation causes resonant states other than principal resonant state (without presence of electromagnetic radiation to appear on the transmition coefficient curve where they are in distances from the principal peak and from each other. Also, the presence of electromagnetic radiation causes peaks other than principal peak to appear on the current-voltage characteristics of the device. Under electromagnetic radiation, the number of peaks on the current-voltage curve is smaller than the number of peaks on the current-voltage transmission coefficient. This is due to the fact that current-voltage curve is the result of integration on the energy of electrons, Thus, the sharper and low height peaks on the transmission coefficient do not appear on the current-voltage characteristic curve.

  18. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance; Dosimetria de radiaciones ionizantes por resonancia paramagnetica electronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J [UAM-I, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  19. Investigation of Fano resonances induced by higher order plasmon modes on a circular nano-disk with an elongated cavity

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad Ruhul; Bagci, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a planar metallic nanostructure design, which supports two distinct Fano resonances in its extinction cross-section spectrum under normally incident and linearly polarized electromagnetic field, is proposed. The proposed design

  20. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s(-1).

  1. Calculation and measurement of radiation corrections for plasmon resonances in nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Lee, S. Y.; McGovern, O.; Rabin, O.; Mayergoyz, I.

    2013-08-01

    The problem of plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem under the condition that the wavelengths of the incident radiation are much larger than the particle dimensions. As the nanoparticle size increases, the quasistatic condition is no longer valid. For this reason, the accuracy of the electrostatic approximation may be compromised and appropriate radiation corrections for the calculation of resonance permittivities and resonance wavelengths are needed. In this paper, we present the radiation corrections in the framework of the eigenvalue method for plasmon mode analysis and demonstrate that the computational results accurately match analytical solutions (for nanospheres) and experimental data (for nanorings and nanocubes). We also demonstrate that the optical spectra of silver nanocube suspensions can be fully assigned to dipole-type resonance modes when radiation corrections are introduced. Finally, our method is used to predict the resonance wavelengths for face-to-face silver nanocube dimers on glass substrates. These results may be useful for the indirect measurements of the gaps in the dimers from extinction cross-section observations.

  2. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 μm 2 /ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 μm 2 /ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  3. Tunable soliton-induced resonant radiation by three-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, B. B.; Liu, X.; Guo, H. R.

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable feature about the temporal optical soliton is that it can be phase-matched to new frequencies, emitting so-called resonant radiation (RR). This constitutes an efficient source of ultrafast pulses in emerging wavelength regimes, and plays a vital role in coherently extending the super......A remarkable feature about the temporal optical soliton is that it can be phase-matched to new frequencies, emitting so-called resonant radiation (RR). This constitutes an efficient source of ultrafast pulses in emerging wavelength regimes, and plays a vital role in coherently extending...

  4. Nonlinear narrow Doppler-free resonances for optical transitions and annihilation radiation of a positronium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities of obtaining narrow resonances without the Doppler broadening for transition between the fine structure levels of the ground and first excited states of a positronium atom are considered. An analysis is carried out of the conditions required for observation of the narrow resonances of saturation of single quantum absorption in the 1S-2P transitions and observation of narrow two-photon absorption resonances in the 1S-2S transitions. It is shown that narrow 2γ annihilation radiation lines of a positronium atom may be obtained with a width much smaller than the Doppler one

  5. Interaction of a parametric transducer with a resonant bar gravitational radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linthorne, N.P.; Veitch, P.J.; Blair, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that a microwave parametric transducer for a resonant bar gravitational radiation antenna can achieve high electromechanical coupling without degrading the acoustic Q of the antenna. The reactive coupling of the transducer to the antenna leads to both cold-damping and modification of the antenna's resonant frequency. These effects are examined in a 1.5 tonne niobium resonant bar antenna. At low coupling the observed behaviour is found to be in good agreement with theory. At higher coupling, the behaviour is complicated by other effects. We discuss how these parametric effects may be used to advantage when suitably controlled. (author)

  6. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  7. Electron scattering by an atom in the field of resonant laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agre, M.; Rapoport, L.

    1982-01-01

    The collision of an electron with an atom in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation that is at resonance with two atomic multiplets is investigated theoretically. Expressions are obtained for the amplitudes of the elastic and inelastic scattering with emission (absorption) of photons. The case of a ground state at resonance with a doublet is considered in detail. It is shown that photon absorption takes place predominantly in the case of resonance in inelastic transitions from a state of the lower multiplet, and photon emission takes place in transitions from a state of the upper multiplet

  8. Parenteral nutrition in experimental acute radiation injury of the abdominal cavity organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdov, S.P.; Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Kendysh, I.N.; Vasilevskaya, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The peculiarities of metabolism in rats after partial body irradiation of the abdomen in a high dose and the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with various compositions of diagrams on metabolic indexes with the aim of explaining diagram under conditions of intensive radiation injury of gastrointestinal tract, are investigated. Experiments have been carried out on male rats of the Vistar line, subjected to partial-body X-ray irradiation of the abdomen with the dose of 1400 R. It is shown that under conditions of radiation effect with predominnt unjury of the abdomen, considerable suppression of oxidation processes limits metabolism of nutritious substances. A decrease of glucose and amino acid content in PN produces a pronounced therapeutic effect under these conditions. The increase of lipid component in the PN composition and retabolile introduction increases PN therapeutic effect [ru

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance pO2 Image Tumor Oxygen-Guided Radiation Therapy Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Maggio, Matt; Pelizzari, Charles; Halpern, Howard J

    2017-01-01

    Modern standards for radiation treatment do not take into account tumor oxygenation for radiation treatment planning. Strong correlation between tumor oxygenation and radiation treatment success suggests that oxygen-guided radiation therapy (OGRT) may be a promising enhancement of cancer radiation treatment. We have developed an OGRT protocol for rodents. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is used for recording oxygen maps with high spatial resolution and excellent accuracy better than 1 torr. Radiation is delivered with an animal intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) XRAD225Cx micro-CT/ therapy system. The radiation plan is delivered in two steps. First, a uniform 15% tumor control dose (TCD 15 ) is delivered to the whole tumor. In the second step, an additional booster dose amounting to the difference between TCD 98 and TCD 15 is delivered to radio-resistant, hypoxic tumor regions. Delivery of the booster dose is performed using a multiport conformal beam protocol. For radiation beam shaping we used individual radiation blocks 3D-printed from tungsten infused ABS polymer. Calculation of beam geometry and the production of blocks is performed next to the EPR imager, immediately after oxygen imaging. Preliminary results demonstrate the sub-millimeter precision of the radiation delivery and high dose accuracy. The efficacy of the radiation treatment is currently being tested on syngeneic FSa fibrosarcoma tumors grown in the legs of C3H mice.

  10. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Richard Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Patrick J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  11. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, A.; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, E.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wijnands, T.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements - vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryo-module beam tubes - have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions. (authors)

  12. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, A; Ferrari, A; Tsoulou, E; Vlachoudis, V; Wijnands, T

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements-vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryomodule beam tubes-have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Liana Macedo de

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures

  14. RESONANCE CONTROL FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC USING A CLOSED-LOOP WATER COOLING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Brown, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the protons to an energy of 185 MeV. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems

  15. Radiation dose to the supraclavicular cavity for different field adjustments of post-irradiated mastectomized women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.J.

    1972-01-01

    It was investigated by exact dose measurements in the supraclavicular fossa whether the skin reactions occasionally found in the median region of the supraclavicular fossa and in the adjoining regions of the neck of mastectomized women treated by conventional radiotherapy using four steady state fields are due to excessive amounts of radiation or to a special property of the skin at this point. X-ray dose measurements were performed by means of capacitor chambers. The highest X-ray doses are measured in the middle of the supraclavicular fossa as a result of direct supraclavicular field irradiation. The strong exposure of the skin as a result of this field setting is unavoidable and cannot be the cause of the skin reactions in the median region because the other areas of the skin are exposed even more strongly. A major fraction of the exposure of the skin in the supraclavicular fossa is contributed by the axillary field irradiation in which a non-uniformity of the angles is to be observed in repeated settings of the irradiation field, which has major consequences upon the skin of the supraclavicular fossa. It can be shown by intentional systematic variation of the angle of exposure that the radiation will be distributed most uniformly throughout the supraclavicular fossa at angles between 30 0 and 40 0 and, hence, that the exposure of the skin accordingly will not be concentrated upon a specific point. (orig./RF) [de

  16. 1999-2003 Shortwave Characterizations of Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS)/Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Broadband Active Cavity Radiometer Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Smith, George L.; Wong, Takmeng

    2008-01-01

    From October 1984 through May 2005, the NASA Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS/ )/Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)ERBE nonscanning active cavity radiometers (ACR) were used to monitor long-term changes in the earth radiation budget components of the incoming total solar irradiance (TSI), earth-reflected TSI, and earth-emitted outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). From September1984 through September 1999, using on-board calibration systems, the ERBS/ERBE ACR sensor response changes, in gains and offsets, were determined from on-orbit calibration sources and from direct observations of the incoming TSI through calibration solar ports at measurement precision levels approaching 0.5 W/sq m , at satellite altitudes. On October 6, 1999, the onboard radiometer calibration system elevation drive failed. Thereafter, special spacecraft maneuvers were performed to observe cold space and the sun in order to define the post-September 1999 geometry of the radiometer measurements, and to determine the October 1999-September 2003 ERBS sensor response changes. Analyses of these special solar and cold space observations indicate that the radiometers were pointing approximately 16 degrees away from the spacecraft nadir and on the anti-solar side of the spacecraft. The special observations indicated that the radiometers responses were stable at precision levels approaching 0.5 W/sq m . In this paper, the measurement geometry determinations and the determinations of the radiometers gain and offset are presented, which will permit the accurate processing of the October 1999 through September 2003 ERBE data products at satellite and top-of-the-atmosphere altitudes.

  17. Activities on superconductivity cavities at the IPN Orsay, in collaboration with: LAL-CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay; CEA-DAPNIA/SEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; DESY, Hamburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Different topics concerning superconducting cavity resonators are overviewed. Field emission phenomena and surface effects are discussed in detail. Thermometers, cryostats and radiation mapping instruments are also concerned. 6 items are indexed separately for INIS database. (K.A.).

  18. Activities on superconductivity cavities at the IPN Orsay, in collaboration with: LAL-CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay; CEA-DAPNIA/SEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; DESY, Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Different topics concerning superconducting cavity resonators are overviewed. Field emission phenomena and surface effects are discussed in detail. Thermometers, cryostats and radiation mapping instruments are also concerned. 6 items are indexed separately for INIS database. (K.A.)

  19. Development of Control System for Fast Frequency Tuners of Superconducting Resonant Cavities for FLASH and XFEL Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przygoda, K

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation covers the recent research and development (R&D) activities of control systems for the fast frequency tuners of TESLA cavities and predicts the implications foreseen for large scale machines such as the FLASH and the planned XFEL. In particular, the framework of the presented activities is the effort toward the: 1. R&D of the driving circuit, 2. R&D of the control algorithm, 3. R&D of the control system. The main result of these activities is the permanent installation of the target piezo control system and its commissioning for 40 cavities divided into 5 accelerating modules at the DESY FLASH facility. The author’s contribution was the study of possible designs of high-voltage, high-current power amplifiers, used for driving the fast frequency tuners, shows that several parameters of such a device needs to be considered. The most important parameter is the input and output power estimation. This arises from the fact that the estimation is the most crucial issue for both po...

  20. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S; Gerace, D; Drezet, A; Franca Santos, M

    2011-01-01

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  1. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S [CEA/CNRS/UJF Joint Team ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' , Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gerace, D [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and UdR CNISM, Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Drezet, A [Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Franca Santos, M, E-mail: msantos@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, CP 702, 30123-970 (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  2. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities

  3. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco Santillan, Arturo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    devices. It is shown that the use of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance allows the derivation of an expression for the resonance frequency shift in a simpler and more direct way than a method based on a Green’s function reported in the literature. The position of the sphere can...

  4. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation from nuclei in the Brownian motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razdan, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    The time evolution of the coherent forward scattering of the synchrotron radiation for resonant nuclei in Brownian motion is studied. Apart from target thickness, the appearance of the dynamical beats also depends on 'α' which is the ratio of the harmonic force constant to the damping force constant of harmonic oscillator undergoing Brownian motion

  5. Experimental study of intense radiation in terahertz region based on cylindrical surface wave resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Shaoyan; Ogura, Kazuo; Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Nomizu, Shintaro; Shirai, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Kosuke; Kawamura, Jun; Miura, Takuro; Takanashi, Sho; San, Min Thu

    2015-01-01

    Periodical corrugations structured on a cylindrical conductor have cylindrical surface waves (CSWs), which are reflected at the corrugation ends and form a CSW-resonator. In this paper, intense radiations in terahertz region based on the CSW-resonator are reported. The CSW-resonators with upper cut off frequencies in the modern IEEE G-band (110–300 GHz) are excited by a coaxially injected annular beam in a weakly relativistic region less than 100 kV. It is shown that there exists an oscillation starting energy for the CSW-resonator. Above the starting energy, very intense terahertz radiations on the order of kW are obtained. The operation frequencies in the range of 166–173 GHz and 182–200 GHz are obtained using two types of CSW-resonator with the different corrugation amplitude. Electromagnetic properties of the CSW-resonator can be controlled by the artificial structure and may play an important role in high-intensity terahertz generations and applications

  6. The isovector quadrupole resonance in yttrium excited by neutron radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorro, R.; Bergqvist, I.

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (ΔT=1, ΔS=0) in the A=90 mass region, gamma-ray spectra from the reaction 89 Y(n,γ) 90 Y were recorded at several neutron energies in the energy range 12 to 27 MeV at 55 0 , 90 0 and 125 0 . The measured fore-aft asymmetry for the ground-state transition is very small in the low-energy region, but becomes appreciable above a neutron energy of 18 MeV. The observed asymmetry is attributed to interference between radiation from the isovector giant quadrupole resonance and radiation of opposite parity (from the high-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance and direct E1 capture). The data obtained in the present work, interpreted in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model, indicate that the excitation energy of the isovector E2 resonance in 90 Y is 26 ± 1 MeV. The data are consistent with a resonance width of 10 ± 2 MeV and with complete exhaustion of the energy-weighted sum rule for the lower isospin component of the resonance. (orig.)

  7. Nuclear reactor cavity streaming shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, R.J.; Stephen, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The upper portion of a nuclear reactor vessel supported in a concrete reactor cavity has a structure mounted below the top of the vessel between the outer vessel wall and the reactor cavity wall which contains hydrogenous material which will attenuate radiation streaming upward between vessel and the reactor cavity wall while preventing pressure buildup during a loss of coolant accident

  8. Resonance effects of transition radiation emitted from thin foil stacks using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, Takaaki; Yajima, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; and others

    1997-03-01

    Transition Radiation(TR) X rays are expected to be a high brilliant X-ray source because the interference among TR X rays emitted from many thin foils placed periodically in vacuum can increase their intensity and make them quasi-monochromatic. In order to study the interference (resonance) effects of TR, we measured the energy spectra of TR for several sets of thin-foil stacks at various emission angles. It was found that the resonance effects of TR are classified into intrafoil and interfoil resonances and the intensity of TR X rays increases nonlinearly with increasing foil number, attributing to the interfoil resonance. It became evident that the brilliance of TR is as high as that of SR. (author)

  9. Investigation of resonant polarization radiation of relativistic electrons in gratings at small angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleinik, A.N.; Chefonov, O.V.; Kalinin, B.N.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.; Saruev, G.A.; Sharafutdinov, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    The resonant optical polarization radiation (ROPR) in the Smith-Purcell geometry and the one from the inclined grating at the Tomsk synchrotron and 6-MeV microtron have been investigated. The polarization radiation was observed at 4.2 deg. from the 200 MeV electron beam and at 5 deg. from the 6.2 MeV electron beam. Two methods of measurement of ROPR maxima in these two cases have been used. In the first case (the experiment on synchrotron) we have fixed the wavelength of radiation using an optical filter; the orientation dependence of this radiation was measured. In this dependence we have observed two peaks of radiation from electrons in gold foil grating of 0.1 mm period. The first large peak is a zeroth order peak in direction of specular reflection, and the second one is the first-order peak of resonant polarization radiation. In the experiment on microtron the spectra of ROPR from aluminum foil strip grating of 0.2 mm period in the Smith-Purcell geometry were measured, and the peak of the first-order Smith-Purcell radiation in these spectra was observed. The comparison of data obtained with the simulation results has been performed

  10. Transverse resonance-radiation pressure on atomic beams and the influence of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Ashkin, A.; Pearson, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated that a beam of neutral sodium atoms can be focused to a spot diameter of approx. 50 μ using the transverse dipole resonance-radiation pressure exerted by a 40 mW laser beam. Simple analysis shows that in some cases the spot sizes are limited by the random fluctuations of the spontaneous radiation pressure; with 1 W of laser power, spot sizes less than 10 μ should be attainable. The effects of heating by spontaneous scattering can have important detrimental effects in other applications of resonance - radiation pressure on atoms, such as the slowing or guiding of atoms. Consideration of heating effects is of paramount importance in the design of optical traps for neutral atoms. (KBE)

  11. Radiation-induced electron paramagnetic resonance signal and soybean isoflavones content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos R.R. de; Mandarino, José M.G.; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2012-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique that detects paramagnetic centers and can detect free radicals with high sensitivity. In food, free radicals can be generated by several commonly used industrial processes, such as radiosterilization or heat treatment. EPR spectroscopy is used to detect radioinduced free radicals in food. In this work the relation between EPR signal induced by gamma irradiation treatment and soybean isoflavones content was investigated. Present results did not show correlation between total isoflavones content and the EPR signal. Nevertheless, some isoflavone contents had a negative correlation with the radiation-induced EPR signal. - Highlights: ► Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) detects free radicals. ► Ionizing radiation as free radicals inducer. ► Total soybean isoflvones do not correlate with radiation-induced EPR intensity but a soybean glucosyl glucoside isoflavone does.

  12. Ultrasound appearance of radiation-induced hepatic injury. Correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Chang, R.; Kaplan, K.; White, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrasound findings in three cases of radiation-induced hepatic injury are described and compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Fatty infiltration of the liver was present in two of the cases in which concurrent chemotherapy was being administered. On ultrasound B-scans, the regions of radiation injury were hypoechoic relative to the remainder of the liver. This finding was more obvious in the patients with fatty livers. CT scans on the patients with fatty infiltrated livers showed higher attenuation in the irradiated region than in unexposed liver. In the patient where no fatty infiltration was present, the radiated section of liver had lower attenuation consistent with previous reports. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decreased signal in the exposed areas on T1 weighted images

  13. Measured pulse width of sonoluminescence flashes in the form of resonance radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Asis; Arakeri, Vijay H.

    1998-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the measured flash widths from single and multibubble sonoluminescence are in subnanosecond or even picosecond regime. Here, we provide conclusive evidence for the existence of nanosecond multibubble sonoluminescence. This has become possible by our ability to find a medium from which exclusive sodium D line resonance radiation as a form of sonoluminescence is possible. The measured flash width of this emission is found to be in the range of tens of nanoseconds and is sensitively dependent on experimental parameters. Our finding is important since all the earlier pulse width measurements have been limited to emission with the physical source or species responsible for observed optical radiation not being clearly identified. We propose that the presently observed resonance radiation is from ``soft'' bubble collapse as analyzed by V. Kamath et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 248 (1993)].

  14. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Lim, Chee Ming; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk; Lee, Chuanyo; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-01-01

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  15. Radiation response of hydrated urea evaluated using 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance is utilized to detect radiation-induced changes in urea over the 0- to 300-Gy dose range. The spin-spin relaxation time exhibits a consistent change as a function of delivered dose in hydrated urea under exposure to 60 Co gamma radiation. No changes to the spin-spin relaxation time are observed in urea samples that were not hydrated. The radiation-induced changes are attributed to indirect radiation interactions with the water surrounding the urea molecules and are explained by the formation of subtle changes in the electron bonding configurations surrounding the 14 N nuclei, not major structural rearrangements. These subtle changes may provide additional insight into the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems

  16. Predicting the severity and prognosis of trismus after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oral cancer patients by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    Full Text Available To develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indicators to predict trismus outcome for post-operative oral cavity cancer patients who received adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 22 patients with oral cancer treated with IMRT were studied over a two-year period. Signal abnormality scores (SA scores were computed from Likert-type ratings of the abnormalities of nine masticator structures and compared with the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test between groups. Seventeen patients (77.3% experienced different degrees of trismus during the two-year follow-up period. The SA score correlated with the trismus grade (r = 0.52, p<0.005. Patients having progressive trismus had higher mean doses of radiation to multiple structures, including the masticator and lateral pterygoid muscles, and the parotid gland (p<0.05. In addition, this group also had higher SA-masticator muscle dose product at 6 months and SA scores at 12 months (p<0.05. At the optimum cut-off points of 0.38 for the propensity score, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 93% for predicting the prognosis of the trismus patients. The SA score, as determined using MRI, can reflect the radiation injury and correlate to trismus severity. Together with the radiation dose, it could serve as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome and guide the management of trismus following radiation therapy.

  17. Magnetic resonance in medicine occupational exposure to static magnetic field and radiofrequency radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivkovic, D.; Hrnjak, M.; Ivanovic, C.

    1997-01-01

    Medical personnel working with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices could be exposed to static magnetic (M) field, time-varying M fields and radiofrequency (RF) radiation. The aim of work was to investigate the density of magnetic flux of static magnetic field and the power density of RF radiation which appear in the working environment around the 0.5 T MRI unit in one hospital. The density of magnetic flux of static magnetic field was measured with Hall Effect Gauss meter - Magnetech (Great Britain), and the power density of RF radiation was measured with broadband isotropic meter - The Narda Microwave Corp. (USA). The results of measurement show that the density of magnetic flux of static M field on working places are below threshold limit of exposure and the intensities of RF radiation are far below maximum permissible level. (author)

  18. Spin and time-resolved magnetic resonance in radiation chemistry. Recent developments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR and ODMR in studies on early events in radiation chemistry are examined. It is concluded that these techniques yield valuable and diverse information about chemical reactions in spurs, despite the fact that the spur reactions occur on a time scale that is much shorter than the time resolution of these methods. Several recent examples include EPR of H/D atoms in vitreous silica and cryogenic liquids and ODMR of doped alkane solids and amorphous semiconductors. It is argued that a wider use of time-resolved magnetic resonance methods would benefit the studies on radiation chemistry of disordered solids, simple liquids, and polymers. (author)

  19. Decay of giant resonances states in radiative pion capture by 1p shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogotar, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of the giant resonance states excited in tthe radiative pion capture on the 9 Be, 11 B, 13 C and 14 N nuclei is considered in the shell model with intermediate coupling. It is shown that the excited states in the daughter nuclei (A-1, Z-1) are mainly populated by intermediate states with spin by two units larger than the spin of the target nuclei. Selected coincidence experiments are proposed

  20. Synchrotron radiation in the Far-Infrared: Adsorbate-substrate vibrations and resonant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, F.M.; Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J.; Chabal, Y.J.

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the Far Infrared offers the potential for a broadband source of high brightness and intensity. Recent development of a Far-Infrared Beamline at the NSLS in Brookhaven provides an unique high intensity source in the FIR spectral range (800-10 cm -1 ). This talk reviews its application to surface vibrational spectroscopy of low frequency adsorbate-substrate vibrations and resonant interactions on metal surfaces

  1. Improvement of the matching speed of AIMS for development of an automatic totally tuning system for hyperthermia treatment using a resonant cavity applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Y; Kato, K; Tsuchiya, K; Hirashima, T; Suzuki, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the improvement of the speed of AIMS (Automatic Impedance Matching System) to automatically make impedance matching for a re-entrant resonant cavity applicator for non-invasive deep brain tumors hyperthermia treatments. We have already discussed the effectiveness of the heating method using the AIMS, with experiments of heating agar phantoms. However, the operating time of AIMS was about 30 minutes. To develop the ATT System (Automatic Totally Tuning System) including the automatic frequency tuning system, we must improve this problem. Because, when using the ATTS, the AIMS is used repeatedly to find the resonant frequency. In order to improve the speed of impedance matching, we developed the new automatic impedance matching system program (AIMS2). In AIMS, the stepping motors were connected to the impedance matching unit's dials. These dials were turned to reduce the reflected power. AIMS consists of two phases: all range searching and detailed searching. We focused on the three factors affecting the operating speed and improved them. The first factor is the interval put between the turning of the motors and AD converter. The second factor is how the steps of the motor when operating all range searching. The third factor is the starting position of the motor when detail searching. We developed the simple ATT System (ATT-beta) based on the AIMS2. To evaluate the developed AIMS2 and ATT- beta, experiments with an agar phantom were performed. From these results, we found that the operating time of the AIMS2 is about 4 minutes, which was approximately 12% of AIMS. From ATT-beta results, it was shown that it is possible to tune frequency and automatically match impedance with the program based on the AIMS2.

  2. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  3. Early radiation effects in highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Murata, Osamu; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Takeo; Nasu, Sachiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra ( 31 P-MRS) were obtained from highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts before and up to 24 hr following graded doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 30 Gy. Radiation-induced apoptosis was also estimated up to 24 hr by scoring apoptotic cells in tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: Highly apoptotic murine lymphoma cells, EL4, were subcutaneously transplanted into C57/BL mice. At 7 days after transplantation, radiation was given to the tumor with a single dose at 3, 10, and 30 Gy. The β-ATP/Pi, PME/Pi, and β-ATP/PME values were calculated from the peak area of each spectrum. Radiation-induced apoptosis was scored with counting apoptotic cells on hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens (%apoptosis). Results: The values of % apoptosis 4, 8, and 24 hr after radiation were 21.8, 19.6, and 4.6% at 3 Gy, 35.1, 25.6, and 14.8% at 10 Gy, 38.4, 38.0, and 30.6% at 30 Gy, respectively (cf. 4.4% in control). There was no correlation between early change in β-ATP/Pi and % apoptosis at 4 hr after radiation when most of the apoptosis occurred. An early decrease in PME/Pi was observed at 4 hr after radiation dose at 30 Gy. For each dose, the values of β-ATP/Pi 24 hr after radiation were inversely related to radiation dose. Conclusion: The increase in β-ATP/Pi observed by 31 P-MRS was linked to the degree of histological recovery from radiation-induced apoptosis

  4. A new way of controlling NesCOPOs (nested cavity doubly resonant OPO) for faster and more efficient high resolution spectrum measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges des Aulnois, Johann; Szymanski, Benjamin; Grimieau, Axel; Sillard, Léo.

    2018-02-01

    Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) is a well-known solution when wide tunability in the mid-infrared is needed. A specific design called NesCOPO (Nested Cavity doubly resonant OPO) is currently integrated in the X-FLR8 portable gas analyzer from Blue Industry and Science. Thanks to its low threshold this OPO can be pumped by a micro-chip nanosecond YAG (4 kHz repetition rate and a 30 GHz bandwidth). To achieve very high resolution spectra (10 pm of resolution or better), the emitted wavelength has to be finely controlled. Commercial Wavemeter do not meet price and compactness required in the context of an affordable and portable gas analyzer. To overcome this issue, Blue first integrated an active wavelength controller using multiple tunable Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometers. The required resolution was achieved at a 10 Hz measurement rate. We now present an enhanced Wavemeter architecture, based on fixed FP etalons, that is 100 times faster and 2 times smaller. We avoid having FP `blind zones' thanks to one source characteristic: the knowledge of the FSR (Free Spectral Range) of the OPO source and thus, the fact that only discrete wavelengths can be emitted. First results are displayed showing faster measurement for spectroscopic application, and potential future improvement of the device are discussed.

  5. Single and Coupled Nanobeam Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    for analysis and design of photonic crystal devices, such as 2D ring resonators for filters, single and coupled nanobeam cavities, birefringence in photonic crystal cavities, threshold analysis in photonic crystal lasers, gap solitons in photonic crystals, novel photonic atolls, dynamic characteristics...

  6. Open microwave cavities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeba, Petr; Rotter, I.; Mueller, M.; Persson, C.; Pichugin, Konstantin N.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2001), s. 484-487 ISSN 1386-9477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A02/98:Z1-010-914 Keywords : microwave cavity * resonances Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.009, year: 2001

  7. Geometric optimization of a solar cubic-cavity multi-tubular thermochemical reactor using a Monte Carlo-finite element radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valades-Pelayo, P.J.; Romero-Paredes, H.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Villafán-Vidales, H.I.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the optimization of a multi-tubular solar thermochemical cavity reactor is carried out. The reactor consists of a cubic cavity made of woven graphite, housing nine 2.54 cm diameter tungsten tubes. A heat transfer model is developed and implemented considering high-temperature radiative transfer at steady state. The temperature distribution on the receiver tubes is determined by using a hybrid Monte Carlo-finite volume approach. The optimization aims at maximizing average tube temperature by varying tube locations. Optimal tube distributions are explored by using a custom-made stochastic, multi-parameter, global optimization algorithm. A considerable increase in average temperature as well as improvement on temperature uniformity is found in the optimized tube arrays. Patterns among the different optimal distributions are found, and general features are discussed.

  8. Cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, Herbert; Varcoe, Benjamin T H; Englert, Berthold-Georg; Becker, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the work on cavity quantum electrodynamics of free atoms. In recent years, cavity experiments have also been conducted on a variety of solid-state systems resulting in many interesting applications, of which microlasers, photon bandgap structures and quantum dot structures in cavities are outstanding examples. Although these phenomena and systems are very interesting, discussion is limited here to free atoms and mostly single atoms because these systems exhibit clean quantum phenomena and are not disturbed by a variety of other effects. At the centre of our review is the work on the one-atom maser, but we also give a survey of the entire field, using free atoms in order to show the large variety of problems dealt with. The cavity interaction can be separated into two main regimes: the weak coupling in cavity or cavity-like structures with low quality factors Q and the strong coupling when high-Q cavities are involved. The weak coupling leads to modification of spontaneous transitions and level shifts, whereas the strong coupling enables one to observe a periodic exchange of photons between atoms and the radiation field. In this case, atoms and photons are entangled, this being the basis for a variety of phenomena observed, some of them leading to interesting applications in quantum information processing. The cavity experiments with free atoms reached a new domain with the advent of experiments in the visible spectral region. A review on recent achievements in this area is also given

  9. Radiation-induced conductivity and high-temperature Q changes in quartz resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    While high temperature electrolysis has proven beneficial as a technique to remove interstitial impurities from quartz, reliable indices to measure the efficacy of such a processing step are still under development. The present work is directed toward providing such an index. Two techniques have been investigated - one involves measurement of the radiation induced conductivity in quartz along the optic axis, and the second involves measurement of high temperature Q changes. Both effects originate when impurity charge compensators are released from their traps, in the first case resulting in ionic conduction and in the second case resulting in increased acoustic losses. Radiation induced conductivity measurements have been carried out with a 200 kV, 14 mA x-ray machine producing 5 rads/s. With electric fields of the order of 10 4 V/cm, the noise level in the current measuring system is equivalent to an ionic current generated by quartz impurities in the 1 ppB range. The accuracy of the high temperature ( 300 to 800 0 K) Q -1 measurement technique will be determined. A number of resonators constructed of quartz material of different impurity contents have been tested and both the radiation induced conductivity and the high temperature Q -1 results compared with earlier radiation induced frequency and resonator resistance changes. 10 figures

  10. Flexible nanomembrane photonic-crystal cavities for tensilely strained-germanium light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jian; Wang, Xiaowei; Paiella, Roberto [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Cui, Xiaorui; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Lagally, Max G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    Flexible photonic-crystal cavities in the form of Si-column arrays embedded in polymeric films are developed on Ge nanomembranes using direct membrane assembly. The resulting devices can sustain large biaxial tensile strain under mechanical stress, as a way to enhance the Ge radiative efficiency. Pronounced emission peaks associated with photonic-crystal cavity resonances are observed in photoluminescence measurements. These results show that ultrathin nanomembrane active layers can be effectively coupled to an optical cavity, while still preserving their mechanical flexibility. Thus, they are promising for the development of strain-enabled Ge lasers, and more generally uniquely flexible optoelectronic devices.

  11. Earth-ionosphere cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, A.; Polk, C.

    1976-01-01

    To analyze ELF wave propagation in the earth-ionosphere cavity, a flat earth approximation may be derived from the exact equations, which are applicable to the spherical cavity, by introducing a second-order or Debye approximation for the spherical Hankel functions. In the frequency range 3 to 30 Hz, however, the assumed conditions for the Debye approximation are not satisfied. For this reason an exact evaluation of the spherical Hankel functions is used to study the effects of the flat earth approximation on various propagation and resonance parameters. By comparing the resonance equation for a spherical cavity with its flat earth counterpart and by assuming that the surface impedance Z/sub i/ at the upper cavity boundary is known, the relation between the eigenvalue ν and S/sub v/, the sine of the complex angle of incidence at the lower ionosphere boundary, is established as ν(ν + 1) = (kaS/sub v/) 2 . It is also shown that the approximation ν(ν + 1) approximately equals (ν + 1/2) 2 which was used by some authors is not adequate below 30 Hz. Numerical results for both spherical and planar stratification show that (1) planar stratification is adequate for the computation of the lowest three ELF resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz; (2) planar stratification will lead to errors in cavity Q and wave attenuation which increase with frequency; (3) computation of resonance frequencies to within 0.1 Hz requires the extension of the lower boundary of the ionosphere to a height where the ratio of conduction current to displacement current, (sigma/ωepsilon 0 ), is less than 0.3; (4) atmospheric conductivity should be considered down to ground level in computing cavity Q and wave attenuation

  12. Evaluation of the radiation width of the 27.7 keV resonance in 56Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A critical review is given of measurements of the radiation width of the 27.7 keV resonance in 56 Fe. An evaluation of results yields a recommended value of GAMMA #betta# + 1.00 +- 0.04 eV for this resonance

  13. Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance of irradiated nails: challenges for a dosimetry in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize samples of human nails exposed to high doses of radiation, applying the technique of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The objective is to establish a dose response study that allow determine the absorbed dose by exposed individuals in situations of radiological accidents, in a retrospective form. Samples of human nails were collected and afterward irradiated with gamma radiation, and received dose of 20 Gy. The EPR measurement performed on the samples, before irradiation, permitted the signal identification of the components associated with effects caused by the mechanical stress during the fingernail cutting, the so-called mechanically induced signal (MIS). After the irradiation, different species of free radicals were identified, the so-called radiation induced signal (RIS). (author)

  14. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  15. Characterisation of a microwave re-entrant cavity resonator for phase-equilibrium measurements and new dew-point data for a (0.25 argon + 0.75 carbon dioxide) mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsankova, Gergana; Richter, Markus; Madigan, Adele; Stanwix, Paul L.; May, Eric F.; Span, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A microwave reentrant cavity resonator was refurbished and extensively characterised. • Vacuum resonance frequencies and Q-factors were modelled and experimentally validated. • Whispering gallery-type modes first-time reported for present cavity geometry. • Dew points of a (0.2491 argon + 0.7509 carbon dioxide) mixture were measured. • Measurements were carried out from T = (252–280) K at pressures up to 6.9 MPa. - Abstract: An apparatus based on a microwave re-entrant cavity resonator, originally built for accurate measurements of the dielectric permittivity of natural gas mixtures, was refurbished and extensively characterised. This was done to enable the future investigation of phase equilibria and (p, ρ, T, x) behaviour of fluid mixtures utilizing the present experimental technique. Vacuum resonance frequencies and Q-factors of the resonator’s modes were modelled using both analytic and finite element methods, and found to compare well with experimental values. The finite element models helped to identify two whispering gallery-type modes not previously reported for such cavity geometries. The models also predict distributions of the electric and magnetic fields in the re-entrant cavity resonator useful for identifying regions in the cavity more sensitive to the presence of a liquid. Following the resonator’s characterisation, its ability to measure dew points was tested using a gravimetrically prepared (0.2501 argon + 0.7499 carbon dioxide) mixture over the temperature range from (252 to 280) K at pressures from (2.8 to 6.9) MPa. The combined expanded uncertainty with a level of confidence of approximately 95% (k = 2) in dew-point temperature and pressure ranged between (0.025 and 0.044) K and from (0.009 to 0.015) MPa, respectively. We compared the experimental dew-point pressures with the recently developed multi-parameter equation of state optimised for combustion gases (EOS-CG), showing relative deviations in the range of (0

  16. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  17. Heat transfer study for convection and radiation in an open cavity; Estudio de de la transferencia de calor por convencion y radiacion en una cavidad abierta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanillas Lopez, Rafael E [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Estrada Gasca, Claudio A [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Alvarez Garcia, Gabriela S [CENIDET, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Interaction of natural convection and radiation heat transfer in an open side square cavity has been simulated numerically. Previous studies have shown results of the simulation of heat transfer for convection on this geometry. This paper reports the effect of considering both the convection and the radiation mechanisms. Radiation was found to have a great influence on the total amount of heat lost by the cavity as well as on the pattern of flow and on the temperature field. Computations were performed within the domain of the cavity for two-dimensional laminar flow problem. The average of heat transfer coefficient was calculated for several values of the Grashof number for air (Pr = 0.7), with the bottom wall at 500 K (constant temperature) and the open side at 300 K. [Spanish] Se presenta el estudio de la interaccion conveccion natural-radiacion en una cavidad rectangular abierta. Algunos estudios anteriores han mostrado resultados sobre la transferencia de calor por el mecanismo de conveccion natural sobre cavidades abiertas. Aqui se presenta la influencia de considerar ambos mecanismos de transferencia de calor, la conveccion y la radiacion. Se demuestra que el intercambio radiactivo tiene una gran influencia tanto en la cantidad total de calor perdido por la cavidad al ambiente, como en el patron de flujo y de temperatura dentro de la cavidad. Se resuelven numericamente las ecuaciones gobernantes para flujo laminar en dos dimensiones y se calcula el coeficiente promedio de transferencia de calor para diferentes valores del Grashof en una cavidad llena de aire (Pr 0.7), teniendo la pared del fondo de la cavidad a 500 K y los alrededores a 300 K.

  18. Study of the fluctuations of the partial and total radiative widths by neutron capture resonance method; Etude des fluctuations des largeurs radiatives partielles et totales par la capture des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, V D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    Radiative capture experiments by neutron time-of-flight methods have been made for following studies: distribution of partial radiative widths, effects of correlation between different radiative transitions, fluctuations of total radiative widths {gamma}{sub {gamma}} from resonance to resonance, variation of {gamma}{sub {gamma}} with number of mass and the search for the existence of potential capture. Also, some other experiments with the use of neutron capture gamma-rays spectra have been investigated. (author) [French] Par la capture des neutrons de resonance dont les energies sont selectionnees a l'aide de la technique du temps de vol, differents types d'experiences ont ete realisees concernant les etudes des distributions des largeurs radiatives partielles, des effets de correlation entre differentes voies de desexcitation, de la fluctuation des largeurs radiatives totales {gamma}{sub {gamma}} de resonance a resonance, de la variation de la quantite {gamma}{sub {gamma}} en fonction du nombre de masse et de la mise en evidence de l'existence du processus de capture potentielle. Quelques autres applications de l'emploi du spectre de rayons gamma ont egalement ete presentees. (auteur)

  19. Study of the fluctuations of the partial and total radiative widths by neutron capture resonance method; Etude des fluctuations des largeurs radiatives partielles et totales par la capture des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, V.D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    Radiative capture experiments by neutron time-of-flight methods have been made for following studies: distribution of partial radiative widths, effects of correlation between different radiative transitions, fluctuations of total radiative widths {gamma}{sub {gamma}} from resonance to resonance, variation of {gamma}{sub {gamma}} with number of mass and the search for the existence of potential capture. Also, some other experiments with the use of neutron capture gamma-rays spectra have been investigated. (author) [French] Par la capture des neutrons de resonance dont les energies sont selectionnees a l'aide de la technique du temps de vol, differents types d'experiences ont ete realisees concernant les etudes des distributions des largeurs radiatives partielles, des effets de correlation entre differentes voies de desexcitation, de la fluctuation des largeurs radiatives totales {gamma}{sub {gamma}} de resonance a resonance, de la variation de la quantite {gamma}{sub {gamma}} en fonction du nombre de masse et de la mise en evidence de l'existence du processus de capture potentielle. Quelques autres applications de l'emploi du spectre de rayons gamma ont egalement ete presentees. (auteur)

  20. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by 18 F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by 18 F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV max ) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p 2 = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p 2 = 0.37 and p 2 = 0.48, respectively). 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV max .

  1. Studies of new light resonances decaying into two hadronic jets produced in association with a radiated jet

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhiying

    This report presents combinatorics studies in the search for a resonance of below 800 GeV which decay product is a pair of hadronic jets from quarks. The resonance, predicted as a dark matter mediator, has couplings to dark matter particles as well as quarks and gluons. The resonance is created in association with a radiated object that can be either a photon or a jet. In the case of the radiation being a jet, the dijet from the resonance and the radiated jet cannot be distinguished. Choosing the wrong dijet to reconstruct the resonance decreases the sensitivity of the search. The study focuses on studies that help improve the search sensitivity. The signal samples used in this thesis are generated with Monte Carlo simulation and passed through the ATLAS detector simulation. Firstly, in an attempt to identify the jet from radiation, samples where a jet is radiated and a photon is radiated are compared. However, due to the differences in the sample generations, this attempt does not lead to a successful identi...

  2. Fractional Boltzmann equation for multiple scattering of resonance radiation in low-temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T, E-mail: vuchaikin@gmail.com, E-mail: ren_sib@bk.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, 432000, 42 Leo Tolstoy str., Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-08

    The fractional Boltzmann equation for resonance radiation transport in plasma is proposed. We start with the standard Boltzmann equation; averaging over photon frequencies leads to the appearance of a fractional derivative. This fact is in accordance with the conception of latent variables leading to hereditary and non-local dynamics (in particular, fractional dynamics). The presence of a fractional material derivative in the equation is concordant with heavy tailed distribution of photon path lengths and with spatiotemporal coupling peculiar to the process. We discuss some methods of solving the obtained equation and demonstrate numerical results in some simple cases.

  3. Fractional Boltzmann equation for multiple scattering of resonance radiation in low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T

    2011-01-01

    The fractional Boltzmann equation for resonance radiation transport in plasma is proposed. We start with the standard Boltzmann equation; averaging over photon frequencies leads to the appearance of a fractional derivative. This fact is in accordance with the conception of latent variables leading to hereditary and non-local dynamics (in particular, fractional dynamics). The presence of a fractional material derivative in the equation is concordant with heavy tailed distribution of photon path lengths and with spatiotemporal coupling peculiar to the process. We discuss some methods of solving the obtained equation and demonstrate numerical results in some simple cases.

  4. Radiative open charm decay of the Y(3940), Z(3930), X(4160) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, W.H.; Molina, R.; Oset, E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the radiative decay amplitudes for the decay into D * and anti Dγ, or D * s and anti D s γ of some of the charmonium-like states classified as X, Y, Z resonances, plus some other hidden charm states which are dynamically generated from the interaction of vector mesons with charm. The mass distributions as a function of the anti Dγ or anti D s γ invariant mass show a peculiar behavior as a consequence of the D * anti D * nature of these states. The experimental search of these magnitudes can shed light on the nature of these states. (orig.)

  5. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium.

  6. Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation: Applications in magnetism of layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlage, Kai; Röhlsberger, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Depth-resolved determination of magnetic spin structures. •Isotopic probe layers allow for probing selected depths in the sample. •High sensitivity to magnetic domain patterns via diffuse scattering. -- Abstract: Nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation has become an established tool within condensed-matter research. Synchrotron radiation with its outstanding brilliance, transverse coherence and polarization has opened this field for many unique studies, for fundamental research in the field of light-matter interaction as well as for materials science. This applies in particular for the electronic and magnetic structure of very small sample volumes like micro- and nano-structures and samples under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. This article is devoted to the application of the technique to nanomagnetic systems such as thin films and multilayers. After a basic introduction into the method, a number of our experiments are presented to illustrate how magnetic spin structures within such layer systems can be revealed

  7. Retrospective radiation dosimetry using electron paramagnetic resonance in canine dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rao F.H.; Pekar, J.; Rink, W.J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) biodosimetry of human tooth enamel has been widely used for measuring radiation doses in various scenarios. We have now developed EPR dosimetry in tooth enamel extracted from canines. Molars and incisors from canines were cleaned by processing in supersaturated aqueous potassium hydroxide solution. The dosimetric signal in canine tooth enamel was found to increase linearly as a function of laboratory added dose from 0.44±0.02 to 4.42±0.22 Gy. The gamma radiation sensitivity of the canine molar enamel was found to be comparable to that of human tooth enamel. The dosimetric signal in canine enamel has been found to be stable up to at least 6 weeks after in vitro irradiation. A dosimetric signal variation of 10-25% was observed for canines ranging from in age 3 years to 16 year old

  8. Radiation Characteristics Enhancement of Dielectric Resonator Antenna Using Solid/Discrete Dielectric Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. E. Malhat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The radiation characteristics of the dielectric resonator antennas (DRA is enhanced using different types of solid and discrete dielectric lenses. One of these approaches is by loading the DRA with planar superstrate, spherical lens, or by discrete lens (transmitarray. The dimensions and dielectric constant of each lens are optimized to maximize the gain of the DRA. A comparison between the radiations characteristics of the DRA loaded with different lenses are introduced. The design of the dielectric transmitarray depends on optimizing the heights of the dielectric material of the unit cell. The optimized transmitarray achieves 7 dBi extra gain over the single DRA with preserving the circular polarization. The proposed antenna is suitable for various applications that need high gain and focused antenna beam.

  9. New developed cylindrical TM010 mode EPR cavity for X-band in vivo tooth dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Junwang

    Full Text Available EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity's cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry.

  10. The effect of water vapor in the reactor cavity in a MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor] on the radiation heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses have been completed to determine the effect of the presence of water vapor in the reactor cavity in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor on the predicted radiation heat transfer from the vessel wall to the reactor cavity cooling system. The analysis involves the radiation heat transfer between two parallel plates with an absorbing and emitting medium present. Because the absorption in the water vapor is spectrally dependent, the solution is difficult even for simple geometries. A computer code was written to solve the problem using the Monte Carlo method. The code was validated against closed form solutions, and shows excellent agreement. In the analysis of the reactor problem, the results show that the reduction in heat transfer, and the consequent increase in the vessel wall temperature, can be significant. This effect can be cast in terms of a reduction in the wall surface emissivities from 0.8 to 0.59. Because of the insulating effect of the water vapor, increasing the gap distance between the vessel wall and the cooling system will cause the vessel wall temperature to increase further. Care should be taken in the design of the facility to minimize the gap distance and keep temperature increase within allowable limits. 3 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO): Transition of a magnetic resonance simulator to a brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roberta; Armour, Elwood; Beeckler, Courtney; Briner, Valerie; Choflet, Amanda; Cox, Andrea; Fader, Amanda N; Hannah, Marie N; Hobbs, Robert; Huang, Ellen; Kiely, Marilyn; Lee, Junghoon; Morcos, Marc; McMillan, Paige E; Miller, Dave; Ng, Sook Kien; Prasad, Rashmi; Souranis, Annette; Thomsen, Robert; DeWeese, Theodore L; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2018-03-13

    As a core component of a new gynecologic cancer radiation program, we envisioned, structured, and implemented a novel Interventional Radiation Oncology (IRO) unit and magnetic resonance (MR)-brachytherapy environment in an existing MR simulator. We describe the external and internal processes required over a 6-8 month time frame to develop a clinical and research program for gynecologic brachytherapy and to successfully convert an MR simulator into an IRO unit. Support of the institution and department resulted in conversion of an MR simulator to a procedural suite. Development of the MR gynecologic brachytherapy program required novel equipment, staffing, infrastructural development, and cooperative team development with anesthetists, nurses, therapists, physicists, and physicians to ensure a safe and functional environment. Creation of a separate IRO unit permitted a novel billing structure. The creation of an MR-brachytherapy environment in an MR simulator is feasible. Developing infrastructure includes several collaborative elements. Unique to the field of radiation oncology, formalizing the space as an Interventional Radiation Oncology unit permits a sustainable financial structure. Copyright © 2018 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Scattering-free optical levitation of a cavity mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guccione, G; Hosseini, M; Adlong, S; Johnsson, M T; Hope, J; Buchler, B C; Lam, P K

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of levitating a small mirror using only radiation pressure. In our scheme, the mirror is supported by a tripod where each leg of the tripod is a Fabry-Perot cavity. The macroscopic state of the mirror is coherently coupled to the supporting cavity modes allowing coherent interrogation and manipulation of the mirror motion. The proposed scheme is an extreme example of the optical spring, where a mechanical oscillator is isolated from the environment and its mechanical frequency and macroscopic state can be manipulated solely through optical fields. We model the stability of the system and find a three-dimensional lattice of trapping points where cavity resonances allow for buildup of optical field sufficient to support the weight of the mirror. Our scheme offers a unique platform for studying quantum and classical optomechanics and can potentially be used for precision gravitational field sensing and quantum state generation.

  13. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the cavity

  14. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-09-06

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the

  15. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  16. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J. [Hayward, CA; Hartemann, Frederic V [San Ramon, CA; McNabb, Dennis P [Alameda, CA; Pruet, Jason A [Brentwood, CA

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  17. Anomalous resonance-radiation energy-transfer rate in a scattering dispersive medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhtman, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a generalization of the concept of group velocity as an energy-transfer rate in a dispersive medium with complex refractive index when the polaritons, which are energy carriers, undergo scattering, in contrast to the classical concept of the group velocity of free polaritons (i.e., without scattering in the medium). The concept of delay time from quantum multichannel-scattering, theory is used as the fundamental concept. Based on Maxwell's equations and the new mathematical Φ-function method, a consistent conceptual definition of group velocity in terms of the ratio of the coherent-energy flux density to the coherent-energy density is obtained for the first time, and a critical analysis of the earlier (Brillouin) understanding of energy-transfer rate is given in the light of radiation-trapping theory and the quantum theory of resonance scattering. The role of generalized group velocity is examined for the interpretation of the phenomenon of multiple resonance scattering, or radiation diffusion. The question of causality for the given problem is touched upon; a new relationship is obtained, called the microcausality condition, which limits the anomalous values of group velocity by way of the indeterminacy principle and the relativistic causality principle for macroscopic time intervals directly measurable in experiment, whereby attention is focused on the connection of the given microcausality condition and the well-known Wigner inequality for the time delay of spherical waves. 22 refs

  18. ECR [electron cyclotron resonance] discharges maintained by radiation in the millimeter wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, Yu.V.; Golubev, S.V.; Eremeev, A.G.; Zorin, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that plasmas formed by microwave breakdown of gases under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions can serve as an efficient source for ion beams. The major disadvantage of this type of source is relatively low ion beam currents which generally do not exceed 1 A (for an electron density of ∼10 12 cm -3 in the discharge). Raising the current density in the ion beams requires a higher plasma density, which can be obtained by using higher frequencies. Thus, a study has recently been made of the parameters of the plasma formed by ECR breakdown in a linear confinement system employing pulsed radiation at a frequency of 60 GHz. The maximum electron densities obtained in the experiment were 2·10 13 cm -3 at a gas pressure of 3·10 -4 torr. In this paper the authors describe some experiments on the creation of plasmas by means of quasi-cw electromagnetic radiation at a frequency of 100 GHz under electron cyclotron resonance conditions

  19. High energy radiation precursors to the collapse of black holes binaries based on resonating plasma modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.

    2018-05-01

    The presence of well organized plasma structures around binary systems of collapsed objects [1,2] (black holes and neutron stars) is proposed in which processes can develop [3] leading to high energy electromagnetic radiation emission immediately before the binary collapse. The formulated theoretical model supporting this argument shows that resonating plasma collective modes can be excited in the relevant magnetized plasma structure. Accordingly, the collapse of the binary approaches, with the loss of angular momentum by emission of gravitational waves [2], the resonance conditions with vertically standing plasma density and magnetic field oscillations are met. Then, secondary plasma modes propagating along the magnetic field are envisioned to be sustained with mode-particle interactions producing the particle populations responsible for the observable electromagnetic radiation emission. Weak evidence for a precursor to the binary collapse reported in Ref. [2], has been offered by the Agile X-γ-ray observatory [4] while the August 17 (2017) event, identified first by the LIGO-Virgo detection of gravitational waves and featuring the inferred collapse of a neutron star binary, improves the evidence of such a precursor. A new set of experimental observations is needed to reassess the presented theory.

  20. Acoustic radiation force induced resonance elastography of coagulating blood: theoretical viscoelasticity modeling and ex vivo experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Manish; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Destrempes, François; Chayer, Boris; Kazemirad, Siavash; Cloutier, Guy

    2018-03-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is a common vascular disease that can lead to pulmonary embolism and death. The early diagnosis and clot age staging are important parameters for reliable therapy planning. This article presents an acoustic radiation force induced resonance elastography method for the viscoelastic characterization of clotting blood. The physical concept of this method relies on the mechanical resonance of the blood clot occurring at specific frequencies. Resonances are induced by focusing ultrasound beams inside the sample under investigation. Coupled to an analytical model of wave scattering, the ability of the proposed method to characterize the viscoelasticity of a mimicked venous thrombosis in the acute phase is demonstrated. Experiments with a gelatin-agar inclusion sample of known viscoelasticity are performed for validation and establishment of the proof of concept. In addition, an inversion method is applied in vitro for the kinetic monitoring of the blood coagulation process of six human blood samples obtained from two volunteers. The computed elasticity and viscosity values of blood samples at the end of the 90 min kinetics were estimated at 411  ±  71 Pa and 0.25  ±  0.03 Pa · s for volunteer #1, and 387  ±  35 Pa and 0.23  ±  0.02 Pa · s for volunteer #2, respectively. The proposed method allowed reproducible time-varying thrombus viscoelastic measurements from samples having physiological dimensions.

  1. Fermilab linac upgrade side coupled cavity temperature control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisp, J.; Satti, J.

    1991-05-01

    Each cavity section has a temperature control system which maintains the resonant frequency by exploiting the 17.8 ppm/degree C frequency sensitivity of the copper cavities. Each accelerating cell has a cooling tube brazed azimuthally to the outside surface. Alternate supply and return connection to the water manifolds reduce temperature gradients and maintain physical alignment of the cavity string. Special tubing with spiral inner fins and large flow rate are used to reduce the film coefficient. Temperature is controlled by mixing chilled water with the water circulating between the cavity and the cooling skid located outside the radiation enclosure. Chilled water flow is regulated with a valve controlled by a local microcomputer. The temperature loop set point will be obtained from a slower loop which corrects the phase error between the cavity section and the rf drive during normal beam loaded conditions. Time constants associated with thermal gradients induced in the cavity with the rf power require programming it to the nominal 7.1 MW level over a 1 minute interval to limit the reverse power. 4 refs., 4 figs

  2. Single-mode Brillouin fiber laser passively stabilized at resonance frequency with self-injection locked pump laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirin, V V; Lopez-Mercado, C A; Megret, P; Fotiadi, A A

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a single-mode Brillouin fiber ring laser, which is passively stabilized at pump resonance frequency by using self-injection locking of semiconductor pump laser. Resonance condition for Stokes radiation is achieved by length fitting of Brillouin laser cavity. The laser generate single-frequency Stokes wave with linewidth less than 0.5 kHz using approximately 17-m length cavity

  3. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  4. Resonance-Based Time-Frequency Manifold for Feature Extraction of Ship-Radiated Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiaquan; Sun, Haixin; Chen, Hailan; Junejo, Naveed Ur Rehman; Cheng, En

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel time-frequency signature using resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD), phase space reconstruction (PSR), time-frequency distribution (TFD) and manifold learning is proposed for feature extraction of ship-radiated noise, which is called resonance-based time-frequency manifold (RTFM). This is suitable for analyzing signals with oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics in a situation of serious noise pollution. Unlike the traditional methods which are sensitive to noise and just consider one side of oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics, the proposed RTFM can provide the intact feature signature of all these characteristics in the form of a time-frequency signature by the following steps: first, RSSD is employed on the raw signal to extract the high-oscillatory component and abandon the low-oscillatory component. Second, PSR is performed on the high-oscillatory component to map the one-dimensional signal to the high-dimensional phase space. Third, TFD is employed to reveal non-stationary information in the phase space. Finally, manifold learning is applied to the TFDs to fetch the intrinsic non-linear manifold. A proportional addition of the top two RTFMs is adopted to produce the improved RTFM signature. All of the case studies are validated on real audio recordings of ship-radiated noise. Case studies of ship-radiated noise on different datasets and various degrees of noise pollution manifest the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:29565288

  5. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  6. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.37 and p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.48, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV{sub max}.

  7. Simultaneous cooling and entanglement of mechanical modes of a micromirror in an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes, Claudiu; Vitali, David; Tombesi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling of a mechanical mode of a resonator by the radiation pressure of a detuned optical cavity mode has been recently demonstrated by various groups in different experimental configurations. Here, we consider the effect of a second mechanical mode with a close but different resonance frequency. We show that the nearby mechanical resonance is simultaneously cooled by the cavity field, provided that the difference between the two mechanical frequencies is not too small. When this frequency difference becomes smaller than the effective mechanical damping of the secondary mode, the two cooling processes interfere destructively similarly to what happens in electromagnetically induced transparency, and cavity cooling is suppressed in the limit of identical mechanical frequencies. We show that also the entanglement properties of the steady state of the tripartite system crucially depend upon the difference between the two mechanical frequencies. If the latter is larger than the effective damping of the second mechanical mode, the state shows fully tripartite entanglement and each mechanical mode is entangled with the cavity mode. If instead, the frequency difference is smaller, the steady state is a two-mode biseparable state, inseparable only when one splits the cavity mode from the two mechanical modes. In this latter case, the entanglement of each mechanical mode with the cavity mode is extremely fragile with respect to temperature.

  8. Superconducting cavities for HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwersteg, B.; Ebeling, W.; Moeller, W.D.; Renken, D.; Proch, D.; Sekutowicz, J.; Susta, J.; Tong, D.

    1988-01-01

    Superconducting 500 MHz cavities are developed to demonstrate the feasibility of upgrading the e-beam energy of the HERA storage ring. A prototype module with 2 x 4 cell resonators and appropriate fundamental and higher mode couplers has been designed at DESY and is being built by industrial firms. The design and results of RF and cryogenic measurements are reported in detail. 17 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  9. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  10. Tuner Design for PEFP Superconducting RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yazhe; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Cho, Yong Sub

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity will be used to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV at 700 MHz in a linac of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) and its extended project. In order to control the SRF cavity's operating frequency at a low temperature, a new tuner has been developed for the PEFP SRF cavities. Each PEFP superconducting RF cavity has one tuner to match the cavity resonance frequency with the desired accelerator operating frequency; or to detune a cavity frequency a few bandwidths away from a resonance, so that the beam will not excite the fundamental mode, when the cavity is not being used for an acceleration. The PEFP cavity tuning is achieved by varying the total length of the cavity. The length of the cavity is controlled differentially by tuner acting with respect to the cavity body. The PEFP tuner is attached to the helium vessel and drives the cavity Field Probe (FP) side to change the frequency of the cavity

  11. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  12. Photons in a spherical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Pallas, N.; Vlad, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    The spectrum of black body radiation at the absolute temperature T, in an ideal spherical cavity of radius R, is studied. The departures from the classical predictions of Planck's theory, due to the discrete energies of the radiation quanta confined inside the cavity, depend on the adiabatic invariant RT and are significant for RT≤ 1 cm K. Special attention was paid to evidence sudden changes in the spectrum intensities, forbidden bands of frequency, as well as major modifications of the total energy for RT≤ 1 cm K. Similar effects were present in case of a cubic cavity too. (authors)

  13. Piezoelectric Tuner Compensation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean Delayen; Davis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed operation of superconducting cavities can induce large variations of the resonant frequency through excitation of the mechanical modes by the radiation pressure. The phase and amplitude control system must be able to accommodate this frequency variation; this can be accomplished by increasing the capability of the rf power source. Alternatively, a piezo electric tuner can be activated at the same repetition rate as the rf to counteract the effect of the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated such a system on the prototype medium beta SNS cryomodule with a reduction of the dynamic Lorentz detuning during the rf pulse by a factor of 3. Piezo electric tuners can also be used to reduce the level of microphonics in low-current cw accelerators. We have measured the amplitude and phase of the transfer function of the piezo control system (from input voltage to cavity frequency) up to several kHz

  14. Electron-spin-resonance study of radiation-induced paramagnetic defects in oxides grown on (100) silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.Y.; Lenahan, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have used electron-spin resonance to investigate radiation-induced point defects in Si/SiO 2 structures with (100) silicon substrates. We find that the radiation-induced point defects are quite similar to defects generated in Si/SiO 2 structures grown on (111) silicon substrates. In both cases, an oxygen-deficient silicon center, the E' defect, appears to be responsible for trapped positive charge. In both cases trivalent silicon (P/sub b/ centers) defects are primarily responsible for radiation-induced interface states. In earlier electron-spin-resonance studies of unirradiated (100) substrate capacitors two types of P/sub b/ centers were observed; in oxides prepared in three different ways only one of these centers, the P/sub b/ 0 defect, is generated in large numbers by ionizing radiation

  15. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  16. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Cadmium-Polyethylene (CdPoly) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kaiser, Krista Irene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arnold, James F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clovis, Ralph D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Lonnie E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Quirk, Thomas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the cadmium-polyethylene (CdPoly) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-CdPoly-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to Drew Tonigan for helping field the activation experiments in ACRR, David Samuel for helping to finalize the drawings and get the parts fabricated, and Elliot Pelfrey for preparing the active dosimetry plots.

  17. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures

  18. Radioanalytical prediction of radiative capture in 99Mo production via transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing by cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Pazirandeh, Ali; Tenreiro, Claudio; Kadi, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing (TARC) concept was estimated in Mo-99 radioisotope production via radiative capture reaction in two designs. The TARC method was composed of moderating neutrons in lead or a composition of lead and water. Additionally, the target was surrounded by a moderator assembly and a graphite reflector district. Produced neutrons were investigated by (p,xn) interactions with 30 MeV and 300 mu A proton beam on tungsten, beryllium, and tantalum targets. The Mo-99 production yield was related to the moderator property, cross section, and sample positioning inside the distinct region of neutron storage as must be proper to achieve gains. Gathered thermal flux of neutrons can contribute to molybdenum isotope production. Moreover, the sample positioning to gain higher production yield was dependent on a greater flux in the length of thermal neutrons and region materials inside the moderator or reflector. When the sample radial distance from Be was 38 cm inside the...

  19. Physical optimization of a wavy porous cavity filled by nanofluids in the presence of solar radiations using the Box-Behnken design (BBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, A.; Tahari, M.; Hatami, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the physical optimization of a wavy porous cavity is evaluated while it is filled with nanofluids and under the solar radiation heat flux by using numerical and statistical methods. The effect of four parameters is discussed on the Nusselt number: Wavy amplitude ( Am, solar heat flux, Darcy number and Rayleigh number. To find the effect and interaction of these parameters on the heat transfer, a Box-Behnken design (BBD) is used and analysis is performed on the 27 experiments proposed by BBD. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the results revealed that solar heat flux and wave amplitude have a strong effect on the Nusselt number compared to Darcy and Rayleigh numbers. Finally, the response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to find the optimized case while its error was 0.002% in predicting the Nusselt number for the optimized case which confirms the high accuracy of results.

  20. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a 60Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H. Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating 60 Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create 60 Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The 60 Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All 60 Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for 60 Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all 60 Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial 60 Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system

  1. Application of the Electron paramagnetic resonance to the ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urena N, F.

    2000-01-01

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is defined as the resonant absorption of electromagnetic energy in paramagnetic substances by the spin transition of a non-pairing electron between different energy levels in presence of a magnetic field. (Slighter, 1989). One of the more important characteristic of EPR is that the electron spin levels are subdivided by the electron interaction with the magnetic dipoles of the nearby nucleus giving occasion for a spectral structure called hyperfine structure. In this kind of interactions two limit cases are distinguished: 1. when the non-pairing electron is located in a central ion surrounded of atoms belonging to coordinate molecules. 2. When a non-pairing electron interactioning in the same form with a number of equivalent nucleus, which is common in organic radicals, these will give as result spectra. Some EPR spectrometer can be used to dosimetric purposes by free radicals via. In this work, it is presented the application of EPR to dosimetry of ionizing radiations by free radicals via which allows to determinations of high doses. (Author)

  2. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroll J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154–158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ′ data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  3. A Study of the interaction of radiation and semiconductor lasers: an analysis of transient and permanent effects induced on edge emitting and vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailharey, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of laser diodes under transient environment is presented in this work. The first section describes the basic phenomena of radiation interaction with matter. The radiative environments, the main characteristics of laser diodes and the research undertaken on the subject are presented and discussed. The tests on 1300 nm edge emitting laser diode are presented in the second section. The response to a transient ionizing excitation is explored using a 532 nm laser beam. The time of return to steady state after the perturbation is decomposed into several steps: decrease of the optical power during excitation, turn-on delay, relaxation oscillations and optical power offset. Their origins are analyzed using the device structure. To include all the phenomena in a numerical simulation of the device, an individual study of low conductivity materials used for the lateral confinement of the current density is undertaken. The effects of a single particle traversing the optical cavity and an analysis of permanent damages induced by neutrons are also determined. In the last section, 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSEL) are studied. The behavior of these devices which performances are in constant evolution, is investigated as a function of both temperature and polarization. Then VCSEL are submitted to transient ionizing irradiation and their responses are compared to those of edge emitting diodes. When proton implantation is used in the process, we observe the same behavior for both technologies. VCSEL were submitted to neutron fluence and we have studied the influence of the damages on threshold current, emission patterns and maximum of optical power. (author) [fr

  4. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-01-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient

  5. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  6. Nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation as a unique electronic, structural and thermodynamic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E. Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Toellner, Thomas S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Leu, Bogdan M.

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of Moessbauer effect in a nuclear transition was a remarkable development. It revealed how long-lived nuclear states with relatively low energies in the kiloelectron volt (keV) region can be excited without recoil. This new effect had a unique feature involving a coupling between nuclear physics and solid-state physics, both in terms of physics and sociology. Physics coupling originates from the fact that recoilless emission and absorption or resonance is only possible if the requirement that nuclei have to be bound in a lattice with quantized vibrational states is fulfilled, and that the finite electron density on the nucleus couples to nuclear degrees of freedom leading to hyperfine interactions. thus, Moessbauer spectroscopy allows peering into solid-state effects using unique nuclear transitions. Sociological aspects of this coupling had been equally startling and fruitful. The interaction between diverse scientific communities, who learned to use Moessbauer spectroscopy proved to be very valuable. For example, biologists, geologists, chemists, physics, materials scientists, and archeologists, all sharing a common spectroscopic technique, also learned to appreciate the beauty and intricacies of each other's fields. As a laboratory-based technique, Moessbauer spectroscopy matured by the end of the 1970s. Further exciting developments took place when accelerator-based techniques were employed, like synchrotron radiation or 'in-beam'Moessbauer experiments with implanted radioactive ions. More recently, two Moessbauer spectrometers on the surface of the Mars kept the technique vibrant and viable up until present time. In this chapter, the authors look into some of the unique aspects of nuclear resonance excited with synchrotron radiation as a probe of condensed matter, including magnetism, valence, vibrations, and lattice dynamics, and review the development of nuclear resonance inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of Ho-166 Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, Peter R.; van de Maat, Gerrit H.; de Wit, Tim C.; Vente, Maarten A. D.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional Ho-166 activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in Ho-166-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere (Ho-166-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization.

  8. Radiation dosimetry for residents of the Chernobyl region: a comparison of cytogenetic and electron spin resonance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serezhenkov, V A; Mordvintcev, P I; Vanin, A F; Voevodskaya, N V [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii; Domracheva, E V; Kulikov, S M; Kuznetsov, S A; Schklovsky-Kordi, N E; Vorobiev, A I [National Center for Haematology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klevezal, G A; Sukhovskaya, L I [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Developmental Biology

    1992-01-01

    Persons from the Gomel region of Byelorussia who were irradiated by the Chernobyl reactor accident have been studied. Estimations of their radiation doses using electron spin resonance spectrometry of dental enamel showed good agreement with dosimetry by chromosomal analysis of blood lymphocytes. (author).

  9. Even-parity resonances with synchrotron radiation from Laser Excited Lithium at 1s^22p State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tie; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    Correlated many-body dynamics is still one of the unsolved fundamental problems in physics. Such correlation effects can be most clearly studied in processes involving single atoms for their simplicity.Lithium, being the simplest open shell atom, has been under a lot of study. Most of the studies focused on ground state lithium. However, only odd parity resonances can be populated through single photon (synchrotron radiation) absorption from ground state lithium (1s^22s). Lithium atoms, after being laser excited to the 1s^22p state, allow the study of even parity resonances. We have measured some of the even parity resonances of lithium for resonant energies below 64 eV. A single-mode diode laser is used to excite lithium from 1s^22s ground state to 1s^22p (^2P3/2) state. Photoions resulting from the interaction between the excited lithium and synchrotron radiation were analyzed and collected by an ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a Z- stack channel plate detector. The Li^+ ion yield was recorded while scanning the undulator along with the monochromator. The energy scans have been analyzed regarding resonance energies and parameters of the Fano profiles. Our results for the observed resonances will be presented.

  10. Monte Carlo treatment of resonance-radiation imprisonment in fluorescent lamps—revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James B.

    2016-12-01

    We reported in 1985 a Monte Carlo treatment of the imprisonment of the 253.7 nm resonance radiation from mercury in the mercury-argon discharge of fluorescent lamps. The calculated spectra of the emitted radiation were found in good agreement with measured spectra. The addition of the isotope mercury-196 to natural mercury was found, also in agreement with experiments, to increase lamp efficiency. In this paper we report the extension of the earlier work with increased accuracy, analysis of photon exit-time distributions, recycling of energy released in quenching, analysis of dynamic similarity for different lamp sizes, variation of Mrozowski transfer rates, prediction and analysis of the hyperfine ultra-violet spectra, and optimization of tailored mercury isotope mixtures for increased lamp efficiency. The spectra were found insensitive to the extent of quenching and recycling. The optimized mixtures were found to increase efficiencies by as much as 5% for several lamp configurations. Optimization without increasing the mercury-196 fraction was found to increase efficiencies by nearly 1% for several configurations.

  11. Monte Carlo treatment of resonance-radiation imprisonment in fluorescent lamps—revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, James B

    2016-01-01

    We reported in 1985 a Monte Carlo treatment of the imprisonment of the 253.7 nm resonance radiation from mercury in the mercury–argon discharge of fluorescent lamps. The calculated spectra of the emitted radiation were found in good agreement with measured spectra. The addition of the isotope mercury-196 to natural mercury was found, also in agreement with experiments, to increase lamp efficiency. In this paper we report the extension of the earlier work with increased accuracy, analysis of photon exit-time distributions, recycling of energy released in quenching, analysis of dynamic similarity for different lamp sizes, variation of Mrozowski transfer rates, prediction and analysis of the hyperfine ultra-violet spectra, and optimization of tailored mercury isotope mixtures for increased lamp efficiency. The spectra were found insensitive to the extent of quenching and recycling. The optimized mixtures were found to increase efficiencies by as much as 5% for several lamp configurations. Optimization without increasing the mercury-196 fraction was found to increase efficiencies by nearly 1% for several configurations. (paper)

  12. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, Leith J., E-mail: Leith_Rankine@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Mein, Stewart [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Oldham, Mark [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, H. Harold, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  13. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, Leith J.; Mein, Stewart; Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen; Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin; Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe; Oldham, Mark; Li, H. Harold

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  14. Effect of Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion-guided Biopsy on Radiation Treatment Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Aaron; Valle, Luca F.; Shankavaram, Uma; Krauze, Andra; Kaushal, Aradhana; Schott, Erica; Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wood, Bradford [Center for Interventional Oncology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Pinto, Peter [Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Choyke, Peter; Turkbey, Baris [Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy (MRI-Bx) has recently been compared with the standard of care extended sextant ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (SOC-Bx), with the former associated with an increased rate of detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. The present study sought to determine the influence of MRI-Bx on radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) recommendations. Methods and Materials: All patients who had received radiation treatment and had undergone SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx at our institution were included. Using the clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score, patients were categorized into National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk groups and radiation treatment or ADT recommendations assigned. Intensification of the recommended treatment after multiparametric MRI, SOC-Bx, and MRI-Bx was evaluated. Results: From January 2008 to January 2016, 73 patients received radiation therapy at our institution after undergoing a simultaneous SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx (n=47 with previous SOC-Bx). Repeat SOC-Bx and MRI-Bx resulted in frequent upgrading compared with previous SOC-Bx (Gleason score 7, 6.7% vs 44.6%; P<.001; Gleason score 8-10, 2.1% vs 38%; P<.001). MRI-Bx increased the proportion of patients classified as very high risk from 24.7% to 41.1% (P=.027). Compared with SOC-Bx alone, including the MRI-Bx findings resulted in a greater percentage of pathologically positive cores (mean 37% vs 44%). Incorporation of multiparametric MRI and MRI-Bx results increased the recommended use and duration of ADT (duration increased in 28 of 73 patients and ADT was added for 8 of 73 patients). Conclusions: In patients referred for radiation treatment, MRI-Bx resulted in an increase in the percentage of positive cores, Gleason score, and risk grouping. The benefit of treatment intensification in accordance with the MRI-Bx findings is unknown.

  15. Experimental Verification of Isotropic Radiation from a Coherent Dipole Source via Electric-Field-Driven LC Resonator Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; de Lustrac, André

    2013-09-01

    It has long been conjectured that isotropic radiation by a simple coherent source is impossible due to changes in polarization. Though hypothetical, the isotropic source is usually taken as the reference for determining a radiator’s gain and directivity. Here, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that an isotropic radiator can be made of a simple and finite source surrounded by electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials designed by space manipulation. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the first isotropic source with omnidirectional radiation from a dipole source (applicable to all distributed sources), which can open up several possibilities in axion electrodynamics, optical illusion, novel transformation-optic devices, wireless communication, and antenna engineering. Owing to the electric- field-driven LC resonator realization scheme, this principle can be readily applied to higher frequency regimes where magnetism is usually not present.

  16. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  17. Development of 119Sn nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation and first applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barla, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis the NRS technique has been developed and applied, for the first time at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, at the resonance of 119 Sn. Elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS) is ideal for studies of hyperfine interactions, where information about the electronic and magnetic properties of solids is obtained. On the other hand nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) allows one to study the phonon density of states (DOS) of Moessbauer isotopes in various kinds of systems. In the first stage, technical developments have been made, particularly with regards the used optical elements. A key point has been the construction of a high resolution monochromator (HRM) for the resonance of 119 Sn, with an energy resolution of about 0.65 meV, perfectly suited to perform NIS experiments. A second HRM optimised in throughput has been constructed and used, in combination with focussing elements (bent crystals and compound refractive lenses), to perform NFS experiments at very high pressure. For the first applications of 119 Sn NIS, the phonon DOS of β-Sn has been directly determined from the NIS spectra measured at T = 100 K and T = 300 K. An excellent agreement has been found with the phonon DOS obtained theoretically by previous calculations. Moreover, dynamical and thermodynamical properties of β-Sn extracted from the determined DOS, such as the Lamb-Moessbauer factor and the specific heat, are found to be in good agreement with previously published results. As a first application of 119 Sn NFS experiments at high pressure, the system U(In 1-x Sn x ) 3 has been chosen. (orig.)

  18. Development of {sup 119}Sn nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation and first applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barla, A.

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis the NRS technique has been developed and applied, for the first time at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, at the resonance of {sup 119}Sn. Elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS) is ideal for studies of hyperfine interactions, where information about the electronic and magnetic properties of solids is obtained. On the other hand nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) allows one to study the phonon density of states (DOS) of Moessbauer isotopes in various kinds of systems. In the first stage, technical developments have been made, particularly with regards the used optical elements. A key point has been the construction of a high resolution monochromator (HRM) for the resonance of {sup 119}Sn, with an energy resolution of about 0.65 meV, perfectly suited to perform NIS experiments. A second HRM optimised in throughput has been constructed and used, in combination with focussing elements (bent crystals and compound refractive lenses), to perform NFS experiments at very high pressure. For the first applications of {sup 119}Sn NIS, the phonon DOS of {beta}-Sn has been directly determined from the NIS spectra measured at T = 100 K and T = 300 K. An excellent agreement has been found with the phonon DOS obtained theoretically by previous calculations. Moreover, dynamical and thermodynamical properties of {beta}-Sn extracted from the determined DOS, such as the Lamb-Moessbauer factor and the specific heat, are found to be in good agreement with previously published results. As a first application of {sup 119}Sn NFS experiments at high pressure, the system U(In{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}){sub 3} has been chosen. (orig.)

  19. Noninvasive monitoring of radiation-induced treatment response using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in a colorectal tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Roe, Kathrine; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) can monitor radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts in mice. Materials and methods: HT29 xenografts in mice received a dose of 15 Gy. In vivo 1 H MRS and DW-MRI were acquired pretreatment and 1, 3, 6 and 10 days post-irradiation. After imaging, tumors were excised for histological analysis. The amounts of necrosis, fibrosis and viable cells in the cross sections were scored and compared to changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and choline/water ratio. Results: Radiation-induced necrosis in the xenografts was observed as increased tumor ADC. In-growth of fibrosis three days post-irradiation restricting water mobility was accompanied by decreased tumor ADC. Choline/water ratio correlated with metabolic activity and tumor growth. Conclusions: ADC and choline/water ratio assessed by in vivo DW-MRI and 1 H MRS depicts radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts following irradiation

  20. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins (≤4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion

  1. Pathways for the direct extension of malignant pleural mesothelioma into peritoneal cavity. Assessment using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Takashi; Inoue, Yasushi; Iida, Shinichiro; Tonomura, Atsushi; Miyake, Mitsutomi; Togawa, Naoki; Hada, Toshikazu [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Chahinian, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated pathways for the direct extension of malignant pleural mesothelioma into peritoneal cavity using CT and MRI, and compared the radiographic findings with the corresponding gross pathologic features at thoracotomy or autopsy to make sure an accurate radiologic assessment. Three different pathways could be recognized ; direct invasion of diaphragmatic muscle to penetrate into peritoneal cavity, direct contiguous extension along the descending aorta into retroperitoneum through the aortic hiatus, and extension from the medial and lateral arcuate ligaments into retroperitoneum along the psoas major muscle and quadratus lumbrum muscle. MRI could evaluate a diaphragmatic muscle invasion and differentiate it from transdiaphragmatic extension. Irregularity of the infradiaphragmatic fat tissue in T1-weighted image was a reliable indicator of transdiaphragmatic extension. MRI is of value in assessing diaphragmatic involvement in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. (author)

  2. The use of manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rat radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xiyin; Wang Jiazhou; Zhou Lijun; Zhu Guopei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish a rat model of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) by delivering a single radiation dose to the optic chiasm. The aim of our study was to analysis the feasibility and effectiveness of manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) in RION. Methods: 34 Wistar rats were randomized to the control group(4 rats), the 2-month group(5 rats), the 4-month group(4 rats) and the 6-month group(11 rats) according to the different feeding period after irradiation. MEMRI scan were performed when the respective feeding periods of all groups expired. The rats were then killed for histological studies with hematoxylin and eosin stain, Luxol Fast Blue stain, and electron microscopy analysis. Results: The ratio of RION in the four groups were 0/3, 1/5, 2/4 and 11/11, respectively(χ"2 = 15.443, P < 0.05). There was an inverse correlation between the relative optical density value in the LFB stain and the interval between irradiation and pathological examination(R = -0.643, P < 0.05). The number of glial cells in the HE stain in the four groups were 194±65, 234±19, 124±11 and 345±98, respectively(R = 0.590, P < 0.05). When compared MEMRI scan with the corresponding histological examination, we found that there was loss of signals of optic nerve on MEMRI imaging in one of 5 rats in the 2-month group, while no significant histological difference was found between this rat and the others. Conclusions: RION can be non-invasively detected and semi-quantitative analysed by MEMRI scan. Moreover, RION can be early diagnosed by MEMRI scan which is capable to show physiological change in advance of pathological change. (authors)

  3. Detection of radiation induced lung injury in rats using dynamic hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Matthew S.; Ouriadov, Alexei; Hegarty, Elaine; Thind, Kundan; Wong, Eugene; Hope, Andrew; Santyr, Giles E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung injury (RILI) is a common side effect for patients undergoing thoracic radiation therapy (RT). RILI can lead to temporary or permanent loss of lung function and in extreme cases, death. Combining functional lung imaging information with conventional radiation treatment plans may lead to more desirable treatment plans that reduce lung toxicity and improve the quality of life for lung cancer survivors. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the lung following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129 Xe may provide a useful nonionizing approach for probing changes in lung function and structure associated with RILI before, during, or after RT (early and late time-points). Methods: In this study, dynamic 129 Xe MR spectroscopy was used to measure whole-lung gas transfer time constants for lung tissue and red blood cells (RBC), respectively (T Tr-tissue and T Tr-RBC ) in groups of rats at two weeks and six weeks following 14 Gy whole-lung exposure to radiation from a 60 Co source. A separate group of six healthy age-matched rats served as a control group. Results: T Tr-tissue values at two weeks post-irradiation (51.6 ± 6.8 ms) were found to be significantly elevated (p < 0.05) with respect to the healthy control group (37.2 ± 4.8 ms). T Tr-RBC did not show any significant changes between groups. T Tr-tissue was strongly correlated with T Tr-RBC in the control group (r = 0.9601 p < 0.05) and uncorrelated in the irradiated groups. Measurements of arterial partial pressure of oxygen obtained by arterial blood sampling were found to be significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the two-week group (54.2 ± 12.3 mm Hg) compared to those from a representative control group (85.0 ± 10.0 mm Hg). Histology of a separate group of similarly irradiated animals confirmed the presence of inflammation due to radiation exposure with alveolar wall thicknesses that were significantly different (p < 0.05). At six weeks post-irradiation, T Tr-tissue returned to values (35

  4. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, Jin; Sokolov, Sergei; Yuce, E.; Combrie, S.; de Rossi, A.; Mosk, Allard

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a coupled resonator optical waveguide made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the inherent dispersive cavity

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of resonance radiative transfer through a semi-infinite atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.; Salpeter, E.E.; Wasserman, I.

    1982-01-01

    The results of Monte Carlo calculations of radiative transfer through a semi-infinite plane-parallel atmosphere of resonant scatterers are presented. With a photon source at optical depth tau/sub ES/ we model the semi-infinite geometry by embedding a perfectly reflecting mirror at depth tau/sub MS/+tau/sub ES/. Although some quantities characterizing the emergent photons diverge as tau/sub MS/→infinity, the mean number of scatters, N/sub ES/, and path length, L/sub ES/, accumulated between the source and the edge of the atmosphere converge. Accurate results of N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, X/sub pk/, the most probable frequency shift of the escaping photons, and tau/sub LAST/, the mean optical depth at which they last scatter, are obtained by choosing tau/sub MS/ = 4tau/sub ES/. Approximate analytic calculations of N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, N, the mean total number of scatters undergone by escaping photons, L, their mean total path length, and , their mean (absolute) frequency shift, are presented for a symmetric slab with αtau/sub ES/>>1 and tau/sub MS/>>tau/sub ES/. Analogous calculations for an asymmetric slab are discussed. Analytic fitting formulae for N/sub ES/, L/sub ES/, X/sub pk/, and tau/sub LAST/ are given

  6. Study of the ionization of sodium vapor in the presence of resonant laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, B.

    1986-06-01

    Ionization of a diffuse sodium jet, excited by laser radiation (D2 resonance), either continuous or pulsed, is studied by electron spectroscopy. Results show: associative ionization (AI) in the collision of two Na(3p) excited atoms; occupancy of highly excited nl states in energy association collisions of two Na(3p) followed by Penning collisional ionization (CI) in the system Na(nl) + Na(3p); heating of electrons by 1, 2, or 3 superelastic collisions with Na(3p). For both the excitation cases (continuous or pulsed source) analysis of experiment results leads to a description of the whole of the ionized medium, characterized as being low density and the site of the ambipolar diffusion of charged particles. A highly simplified model describes the kinetic and electrokinetic equilibrium (continuous case) in which the different populations of distinct nonthermalized energy (low energy primary electrons, hot electrons) play specific roles. The cross sections associated with AI and CI are estimated from experiment results using the model [fr

  7. The fate of allogenic radiation sterilized bone grafts controlled by the electron spin resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowski, K.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.

    1981-01-01

    The normal fate of bone grafts is their resorption and substitution by the own host's bone tissue. This phenomenon described as creeping substitution process was controlled using biopsies from the grafted region in allogenic experimental system. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry was used for independent evaluation of resorption and substitution processes. The measurements were based on the process of induction in the hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals of bone mineral of stable paramagnetic centers which can be detected by ESR spectrometry. The loss of total amount of spins connected with the paramagnetic centers expressed in percent describes the kinetics of resorption. The changes in the concentration of spins due to the ''dilution'' of spins implanted with the graft by the nonirradiated ingrowing host's own bone describe the kinetics of the substitution process. Allogenic bone of calvaria was grafted orthotopically into rabbits after lyophilization and radiation sterilization with a dose of 3.5 Mrads. The process of graft's rebuilding was evaluated using the described ESR method. The application of the described technique in the human clinic is possible. (author)

  8. Towards radiation detected resonance ionization spectroscopy on transfermium elements in a buffer gas cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautenschlaeger, Felix; Walther, Thomas [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, TU Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Block, Michael [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut [Institut fuer Kernphysik, JGU Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Hessberger, Fritz-Peter [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The study of the atomic structure of transfermium elements like nobelium (No) and lawrencium (Lr) via Radiation Detected Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RADRIS) is one of the most fascinating disciplines of modern atomic physics. It allows the determination of relativistic effects at the heaviest elements and provides a critical test of theoretical predictions. For these transfermium elements no experimental data on atomic level schemes are available at present. First experiments on {sup 254}No were performed in 2007, in which a buffer gas cell with an overall efficiency of 1%. In this experiment the evaporation temperature of nobelium was determined for the first time. To increase the efficiency of the buffer gas cell, off-line measurements have been performed with nat. ytterbium, the chemical homologue of nobelium. Also on-line experiments during a parasitic beam-time in 2012 provided an insight into the critical parameters of our setup. The results of the off-line and on-line measurements are briefly summarized in this talk.

  9. High Radiation Doses from Radiotherapy Measured by Electron Spin Resonance in Dental Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pass, B.; Wood, R.E.; Liu, F.; McLean, M.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    For radiotherapy, an error in the complicated treatment planning or treatment procedure is a possibility, however remote. Thus, in the present study electron spin resonance (ESR) in dental enamel was investigated for the first time as a means of retrospective dosimetry for validating applied radiotherapy doses to the head and neck regions. Total absorbed radiation doses measured by ESR in dental enamel were compared to the doses determined by treatment planning for 19 patients who received radiotherapy for intra-oral, pharyngeal or laryngeal malignancies, or total-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplants (BMT). For the 15 tumour irradiations there was, within the framework of the tooth positions as presented, general agreement between the treatment planned and ESR dose determinations. There were, however, both significant and minor discrepancies. For the BMT patients there were major discrepancies for two of the four patients investigated. This study indicates that ESR in dental enamel may be useful as the only means of retrospective dosimetry for validating applied radiotherapy doses after treatment. However, further research must be carried out before this technique can be accepted as accurate and reliable. (author)

  10. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  11. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  12. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  13. Radiation Dose–Dependent Hippocampal Atrophy Detected With Longitudinal Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, Tyler M.; Karunamuni, Roshan [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Bartsch, Hauke [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Kaifi, Samar [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Krishnan, Anitha Priya [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Dalia, Yoseph; Burkeen, Jeffrey; Murzin, Vyacheslav; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Kuperman, Joshua; White, Nathan S. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Brewer, James B. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Farid, Nikdokht [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McDonald, Carrie R. [Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT) to the brain, patients often experience memory impairment, which may be partially mediated by damage to the hippocampus. Hippocampal sparing in RT planning is the subject of recent and ongoing clinical trials. Calculating appropriate hippocampal dose constraints would be improved by efficient in vivo measurements of hippocampal damage. In this study we sought to determine whether brain RT was associated with dose-dependent hippocampal atrophy. Methods and Materials: Hippocampal volume was measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 52 patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT for primary brain tumors. Study patients had high-resolution, 3-dimensional volumetric MRI before and 1 year after RT. Images were processed using software with clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration and Conformité Européene marking for automated measurement of hippocampal volume. Automated results were inspected visually for accuracy. Tumor and surgical changes were censored. Mean hippocampal dose was tested for correlation with hippocampal atrophy 1 year after RT. Average hippocampal volume change was also calculated for hippocampi receiving high (>40 Gy) or low (<10 Gy) mean RT dose. A multivariate analysis was conducted with linear mixed-effects modeling to evaluate other potential predictors of hippocampal volume change, including patient (random effect), age, hemisphere, sex, seizure history, and baseline volume. Statistical significance was evaluated at α = 0.05. Results: Mean hippocampal dose was significantly correlated with hippocampal volume loss (r=−0.24, P=.03). Mean hippocampal volume was significantly reduced 1 year after high-dose RT (mean −6%, P=.009) but not after low-dose RT. In multivariate analysis, both RT dose and patient age were significant predictors of hippocampal atrophy (P<.01). Conclusions: The hippocampus demonstrates radiation dose–dependent atrophy after treatment for brain

  14. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S.; Roessler, R.; Klett, R.; Bauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor recurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with 99m Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 25 refs

  15. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S.; Roessler, R.; Klett, R.; Bauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy, was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor occurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with 99m Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 14 refs

  16. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S. [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Dept. of Radiology, Giessen (Germany); Roessler, R. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Dept. of Periodontology, Giessen (Germany); Klett, R.; Bauer, R. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Giessen (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy, was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor occurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 14 refs.

  17. A chip-scale integrated cavity-electro-optomechanics platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winger, M.; Blasius, T. D.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrated optomechanical and electromechanical nanocavity, in which a common mechanical degree of freedom is coupled to an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal defect cavity and an electrical circuit. The system allows for wide-range, fast electrical tuning of the optical nanocavity...... resonances, and for electrical control of optical radiation pressure back-action effects such as mechanical amplification (phonon lasing), cooling, and stiffening. These sort of integrated devices offer a new means to efficiently interconvert weak microwave and optical signals, and are expected to pave...

  18. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.

    2000-01-01

    The static and dynamic structural behavior of superconducting cavities for various projects was determined by finite element structural analysis. The β = 0.61 cavity shape for the Neutron Science Project was studied in detail and found to meet all design requirements if fabricated from five millimeter thick material with a single annular stiffener. This 600 MHz cavity will have a Lorentz coefficient of minus1.8 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2 and a lowest structural resonance of more than 100 Hz. Cavities at β = 0.48, 0.61, and 0.77 were analyzed for a Neutron Science Project concept which would incorporate 7-cell cavities. The medium and high beta cavities were found to meet all criteria but it was not possible to generate a β = 0.48 cavity with a Lorentz coefficient of less than minus3 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2

  19. Characterization of carotenoids in soil bacteria and investigation of their photodegradation by UVA radiation via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar B N, Vinay; Kampe, Bernd; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    A soil habitat consists of an enormous number of pigmented bacteria with the pigments mainly composed of diverse carotenoids. Most of the pigmented bacteria in the top layer of the soil are photoprotected from exposure to huge amounts of UVA radiation on a daily basis by these carotenoids. The photostability of these carotenoids depends heavily on the presence of specific features like a carbonyl group or an ionone ring system on its overall structure. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive and powerful techniques to detect and characterize these carotenoids and also monitor processes associated with them in their native system at a single cell resolution. However, most of the resonance Raman profiles of carotenoids have very minute differences, thereby making it extremely difficult to confirm if these differences are attributed to the presence of different carotenoids or if it is a consequence of their interaction with other cellular components. In this study, we devised a method to overcome this problem by monitoring also the photodegradation of the carotenoids in question by UVA radiation wherein a differential photodegradation response will confirm the presence of different carotenoids irrespective of the proximities in their resonance Raman profiles. Using this method, the detection and characterization of carotenoids in pure cultures of five species of pigmented coccoid soil bacteria is achieved. We also shed light on the influence of the structure of the carotenoid on its photodegradation which can be exploited for use in the characterization of carotenoids via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Olivier; Fontenot, Jonas D; Fields, Robert S; Gibbons, John P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  1. Note: Theoretical study on the gas pressure dependence of x-ray yield in TE111 cavity based electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Sen, Soubhadra; Baskaran, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adopting Langevin methodology, a pressure dependent frictional force term which represents the collisional effect is added to the Lorentz equation. The electrons are assumed to be starting from the uniformly distributed co-ordinates on the central plane. The trajectory of each electron is numerically simulated by solving the modified Lorentz equation for a given pressure. The Bremsstrahlung x-ray energy spectrum for each electron crossing the cavity wall boundary is obtained using the Duane-Hunt law. The total x-ray yield is estimated by adding the spectral contribution of each electron. The calculated yields are compared with the experimental results and a good agreement is found

  2. Optimization of the microwave coupler and microwave measurements of the microtron cavity for 20 MeV pre-injector microtron for INDUS-I SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, Y.D.; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    A 20 MeV microtron was developed indigenously by CAT for pre-injection of 20 MeV electrons to the 450 MeV/700 MeV Booster Synchrotron for INDUS-I and INDUS-II Synchrotron Radiation Sources. The injector microtron uses a high Q microwave cavity for acceleration of electrons. The microwave power is fed to the microtron cavity through an iris type coupler whose dimensions are optimized for the coupling factor and resonant frequency for the accelerator. The present paper gives the procedure details for coupling factor optimization, tuning of the resonant frequency and results achieved. (author)

  3. Confluent Heun functions and the physics of black holes: Resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering of scalar waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    We apply the confluent Heun functions to study the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum), the Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves, in a class of spacetimes, namely, the ones generated by a Kerr–Newman–Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole) and a Reissner–Nordström black hole surrounded by a magnetic field (Ernst spacetime). In both spacetimes, the solutions for the angular and radial parts of the corresponding Klein–Gordon equations are obtained exactly, for massive and massless fields, respectively. The special cases of Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions obtained, as well as in the case of a Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a magnetic field. In all these special situations, the resonant frequencies, Hawking radiation and scattering are studied. - Highlights: • Charged massive scalar field in the dyon black hole and massless scalar field in the Ernst spacetime are analyzed. • The confluent Heun functions are applied to obtain the solution of the Klein–Gordon equation. • The resonant frequencies are obtained. • The Hawking radiation and the scattering process of scalar waves are examined.

  4. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  5. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Dongsu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  6. Varying the agglomeration position of particles in a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force beyond the resonance condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Olivier; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    It is well-known that particles can be focused at mid-height of a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) tuned at the resonance frequency (h=λ/2). The resonance condition is a strong limitation to the use of acoustophoresis (particles manipulation using acoustic force) in many applications. In this study we show that it is possible to focus the particles anywhere along the height of a micro-channel just by varying the acoustic frequency, in contradiction with the resonance condition. This result has been thoroughly checked experimentally. The different physical properties as well as wall materials have been changed. The wall materials is finally the only critical parameters. One of the specificity of the micro-channel is the thickness of the carrier and reflector layer. A preliminary analysis of the experimental results suggests that the acoustic focusing beyond the classic resonance condition can be explained in the framework of the multilayered resonator proposed by Hill [1]. Nevertheless, further numerical studies are needed in order to confirm and fully understand how the acoustic pressure node can be moved over the entire height of the micro channel by varying the acoustic frequency. Despite some uncertainties about the origin of the phenomenon, it is robust and can be used for improved acoustic sorting or manipulation of particles or biological cells in confined set-ups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Liquid radiation detectors based on nano-silver surface plasmon resonance phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puiso, J.; Laurikaitiene, J.; Adliene, D.; Prosycevas, I.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of micro- and nano-structures containing silver nano-particles is based on their unique physical properties. Despite the new applications of silver nano-particles in nano-medicine are under heavy discussions, silver nano-particles could be used in liquid radiation detectors thanks to the irradiation-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomena observed in the colloidal solutions. Silver nitrate (1 mM AgNO 3 ) and sodium citrate (1 wt% and 5 wt% C 6 H 5 O 7 Na 3 ) were used as precursors for the fabrication of colloidal solutions. Prepared solutions were exposed to gamma-rays from a 60 Co gamma therapy unit 'Rokus-M' to varying absorbed doses, from 2 to 250 Gy. A UV/VIS/NIR spectrometer (Avantes-2048) was used for the measurement of the optical properties (absorbance) of the silver solutions. It was found that an initial absorbed dose of 2 Gy induced the formation of spherical silver nano-particles as it was indicated in the absorbance spectrum of the solution, which had a well-pronounced absorption maximum at the wavelength of 410 nm. There is a potential to measure absorbed doses down to around 20 mGy. The SPR peaks at the wavelengths of 500-700 nm were found at the highest investigated doses > 100 Gy, indicating the presence of silver nano-rods. The colour of colloidal solutions ranged from pale yellow to green and was dependent on the absorbed dose. The investigation has shown that density, size and shape of synthesised silver nano-particles are dependent on the absorbed dose and that shape transformations of the particles due to irradiation are possible. Application of colloidal solutions containing silver nano-particles for dosimetric purposes is discussed on the basis of the obtained results. (authors)

  8. Development of Side Coupled Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conto, J.M. de; Carretta, J.M.; Gomez-Martinez, Y.; Micoud, R.

    2008-01-01

    Side coupled Cavities are good candidates for proton accelerations in the 90-180 MeV range, as it has been first proposed for the CERN LINAC4 project. A side coupled Linac is made of a lump chain of resonant cavities, alternatively accelerating and coupling. A side coupled cavity has been designed in a CERN-LPSC collaboration to achieve LINAC4 requirements. After RF studies, a complete thermal study has been done, showing that 10-15% is the absolute maximum duty-cycle achievable by such a cavity. Error studies have been developed. They have shown that a tuning ring is mandatory and that a K equals 3% coupling factor is a good choice. A prototype has been built and each cell has been measured and tuned. A simple and accurate method has been used to get both the resonant frequency and the coupling factor, with a movable tuner and a linear fit. A similar method has been used to get the second order coupling factor. A large dispersion is observed on K. This is mainly due to the shape of the coupling apertures, which are very sensitive to mechanical errors. A future and realistic design must be very careful to guarantee a constant aperture (the important parameter is more the dispersion of k than its exact value). Finally, we analyse how to tune the cavity. This has to checked carefully and probably improved or corrected. Results are expected for mid-2008

  9. Radiation-induced free radicals in DNA studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, A.

    1974-01-01

    Radiation biology aims at an understanding of the effects of radiation on biological material. The studied systems may vary in complexity and size from a whole organism to the molecular constituents of a cell. The observed effects are accordingly varied, from visible somatic effects on the organism to physico-chemical molecular changes. Radiation biophysics may be considered as a specialized branch of radiation biology, dealing with physical aspects of radiation damage, particularly at a molecular or sub-cellular level. The work to be presented here is in the field of radiation biophysics, and concerns physical studies of radiation effects on deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA, the hereditary substance of all living organisms. (author)

  10. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  11. A split-cavity design for the incorporation of a DC bias in a 3D microwave cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.A.; Yuan, M.; de Jong, B.W.A.; Beukers, Ewout; Bosman, S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a technique for applying a DC bias in a 3D microwave cavity. We achieve this by isolating the two halves of the cavity with a dielectric and directly using them as DC electrodes. As a proof of concept, we embed a variable capacitance diode in the cavity and tune the resonant

  12. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei; Andrews, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications. (paper)

  13. Investigation on computation of elliptical microwave plasma cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoli; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Kai

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the advance of the elliptical resonant cavity and focus cavity is known by many people. There are homogeneous and multipatternal virtues in the focus dimensional microwave field of the elliptical resonant cavity. It is very suitable for applying the low power microwave biological effect equipment. However, when designing the elliptical resonant cavity may meet the problems of complex and huge computation need to be solved. This paper proposed the simple way of approximate processing the Mathieu function. It can greatly simplify the difficulty and decrease the scale of computation. This method can satisfy the requirements of research and development within project permitted precision.

  14. Off-resonance R1ρ relaxation outside of the fast exchange limit: An experimental study of a cavity mutant of T4 lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2003-01-01

    An 15 N off-resonance R 1ρ spin relaxation study of an L99A point mutant of T4 lysozyme is presented. Previous CPMG-based relaxation dispersion studies of exchange in this protein have established that the molecule interconverts between a populated ground state and an excited state (3.4%) with an exchange rate constant of 1450 s -1 at 25 deg. C. It is shown that for the majority of residues in this protein the offset dependence of the R 1ρ relaxation rates cannot be well fit using models which are only valid in the fast exchange regime. In contrast, a recently derived expression by Trott and Palmer (J. Magn. Reson., 154, 157-160, 2002) which is valid over a wider window of exchange than other relations, is shown to fit the data well. Values of (signed) chemical shift differences between exchanging sites have been extracted and are in reasonable agreement with shift differences measured using CPMG methods. A set of simulations is presented which help establish the exchange regimes that are best suited to analysis by off-resonance R 1ρ techniques

  15. Basic principles of RF superconductivity and superconducting cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Schmüser, P

    2006-01-01

    The basics of superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the features which are relevant for the application of superconductors in radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. For a cylindrical resonator (“pill box cavity”) the electromagnetic field in the cavity and important parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor and shunt impedance are calculated analytically. The design and performance of practical cavities is shortly addressed.

  16. Electron–Cyclotron Laser Using Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Radiation in a Strong Uniform Axial Magnetic Field and an Alternating Axial Electric Field in a Voltage-Supplied Pill-Box Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the radiation from the beam electrons traveling in a strong uniform axial magnetic field and an axial alternating electric field of wavelength λ_w generated by a voltage-supplied pill-box cavity. The beam electrons emit genuine laser radiation that propagates only in the axial direction through free-electron two-quantum Stark radiation. We find that laser radiation takes place only at the expense of the axial kinetic energy when λ_w ≪ c/(ω_c/γ), where ω_c/γ is the relativistic electron–cyclotron frequency. We formulate the laser power based on quantum-wiggler electrodynamics, and envision a laser of length 10 m with estimated power 0.1 GW/(kA) in the 10"−"4 cm wavelength range. (paper)

  17. Cavity enhancement by controlled directional scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for designing cavity enclosures is presented that can be applied to the design of a nonimaging concentrator. The method maintains high transmission at the expense of some concentration in the presence of a gap between the reflector and the receiver. The slight loss of concentration may be partly offset by enhanced absorption of radiation by the receiver, resulting from the cavity effect.

  18. Vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions to the resonance dipole-dipole interaction between two atoms near a reflecting boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenting; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the resonance dipole-dipole interaction energy between two identical atoms, one in the ground state and the other in the excited state, interacting with the electromagnetic field in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plane boundary. The atoms are prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) Bell-type state. Following a procedure due to Dalibard et al. [J. Dalibard et al., J. Phys. (Paris) 43, 1617 (1982);, 10.1051/jphys:0198200430110161700 J. Phys. (Paris) 45, 637 (1984), 10.1051/jphys:01984004504063700], we separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction (source) field to the resonance interaction energy between the two atoms and show that only the source field contributes to the interatomic interaction, while vacuum field fluctuations do not. By considering specific geometric configurations of the two-atom system with respect to the mirror and specific choices of dipole orientations, we show that the presence of the mirror significantly affects the resonance interaction energy and that different features appear with respect to the case of atoms in free space, for example, a change in the spatial dependence of the interaction. Our findings also suggest that the presence of a boundary can be exploited to tailor and control the resonance interaction between two atoms, as well as the related energy transfer process. The possibility of observing these phenomena is also discussed.

  19. Online Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy: First Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Kashani, Rojano; Parikh, Parag; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Wooten, Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Rodriguez, Vivian; Olsen, Lindsey; Robinson, Clifford; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of online adaptive magnetic resonance (MR) image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) through reporting of our initial clinical experience and workflow considerations. Methods and Materials: The first clinically deployed online adaptive MR-IGRT system consisted of a split 0.35T MR scanner straddling a ring gantry with 3 multileaf collimator-equipped "6"0Co heads. The unit is supported by a Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system that allows real-time adaptive planning with the patient on the table. All patients undergo computed tomography and MR imaging (MRI) simulation for initial treatment planning. A volumetric MRI scan is acquired for each patient at the daily treatment setup. Deformable registration is performed using the planning computed tomography data set, which allows for the transfer of the initial contours and the electron density map to the daily MRI scan. The deformed electron density map is then used to recalculate the original plan on the daily MRI scan for physician evaluation. Recontouring and plan reoptimization are performed when required, and patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is performed using an independent in-house software system. Results: The first online adaptive MR-IGRT treatments consisted of 5 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies. The clinical setting included neoadjuvant colorectal (n=3), unresectable gastric (n=1), and unresectable pheochromocytoma (n=1). Recontouring and reoptimization were deemed necessary for 3 of 5 patients, and the initial plan was deemed sufficient for 2 of the 5 patients. The reasons for plan adaptation included tumor progression or regression and a change in small bowel anatomy. In a subsequently expanded cohort of 170 fractions (20 patients), 52 fractions (30.6%) were reoptimized online, and 92 fractions (54.1%) were treated with an online-adapted or previously adapted plan. The median time for recontouring, reoptimization, and QA was 26

  20. Online Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy: First Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Kashani, Rojano; Parikh, Parag; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Wooten, Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Rodriguez, Vivian; Olsen, Lindsey; Robinson, Clifford; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey, E-mail: jolsen@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of online adaptive magnetic resonance (MR) image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) through reporting of our initial clinical experience and workflow considerations. Methods and Materials: The first clinically deployed online adaptive MR-IGRT system consisted of a split 0.35T MR scanner straddling a ring gantry with 3 multileaf collimator-equipped {sup 60}Co heads. The unit is supported by a Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system that allows real-time adaptive planning with the patient on the table. All patients undergo computed tomography and MR imaging (MRI) simulation for initial treatment planning. A volumetric MRI scan is acquired for each patient at the daily treatment setup. Deformable registration is performed using the planning computed tomography data set, which allows for the transfer of the initial contours and the electron density map to the daily MRI scan. The deformed electron density map is then used to recalculate the original plan on the daily MRI scan for physician evaluation. Recontouring and plan reoptimization are performed when required, and patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is performed using an independent in-house software system. Results: The first online adaptive MR-IGRT treatments consisted of 5 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies. The clinical setting included neoadjuvant colorectal (n=3), unresectable gastric (n=1), and unresectable pheochromocytoma (n=1). Recontouring and reoptimization were deemed necessary for 3 of 5 patients, and the initial plan was deemed sufficient for 2 of the 5 patients. The reasons for plan adaptation included tumor progression or regression and a change in small bowel anatomy. In a subsequently expanded cohort of 170 fractions (20 patients), 52 fractions (30.6%) were reoptimized online, and 92 fractions (54.1%) were treated with an online-adapted or previously adapted plan. The median time for recontouring, reoptimization, and QA was 26

  1. Radiation-induced frequency transients in AT, BT, and SC cut quartz resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Earlier studies of transient frequency changes in high-purity swept AT quartz resonators led to the conclusion that impurity-induced effects were small, while the observed changes were qualitatively and quantitatively well characterized in terms of the time changing temperature of the vibrating quartz and its effect on frequency. 5 MHz, AT cut fifth overtone, and BT and SC cut third overtone resonators were prepared from a single stone of Sawyer swept Premium-Q quartz. The resonators were operated in precision ovenized oscillators at or near their turnover temperatures. Pulsed irradiation, at dose levels of the order of 10 4 rads (Si) per pulse, was accomplished at Sandia. The experimental data display negative frequency transients for the AT cut resonators, positive frequency transients for the BT cut resonators, and very small transient effects for the SC cut resonators. From these experimental results, it is concluded that no measurable impurity-induced frequency changes are observed in this high-purity swept-quartz and that the frequency transients are accurately modelled in terms of transient temperature effects stemming from the thermal characteristics of the resonator structure

  2. Formation of H_2^+ and its Isotopomers by Radiative Association: the Role of Shape and Feshbach Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Maximilian; Merkt, Frederic

    2017-06-01

    The recent observations [1,2] of shape and Feshbach resonances in the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of H_2, HD and D_2 in the vicinity of the dissociation thresholds of H_2^+, HD^+ and D_2^+ raise questions concerning their potential role in the formation of H_2^+ and its isotopomers in the early universe by radiative association, a topic of astrophysical interest [3]. Close-coupling calculations for the cross sections of the reactions {H}^+ + {H} &\\to {H}_2^+ + hν {H}^+ + {D} &\\to {HD}^+ + hν {D}^+ + {H} &\\to {HD}^+ + hν {D}^+ + {D} &\\to {D}_2^+ + hν, will be presented which take into account nonadiabatic couplings involving rovibronic and hyperfine interactions, as well as relativistic and radiative corrections. The calculated energies and widths will be compared with the experimental results of Ref. [1,2] for H_2^+ and new data for HD^+ and D_2^+. The effect of the resonances on the radiative association rate coefficients will be discussed, also in comparison with earlier studies [4]. [1] M. Beyer and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 093001 (2016). [2] M. Beyer and F. Merkt, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 330, 147 (2016). [3] Molecule formation in dust-poor environments, J. F. Babb and K. P. Kirby, in "The molecular astrophysics of stars and galaxies", T. W. Hartquist and D. A. Williams, eds., Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998, pp. 11-34. [4] D. E. Ramaker and J. M. Peek, Phys. Rev. A 13, 58 (1976).

  3. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods for planning and monitoring radiation therapy in patients with high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Janine M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2014-10-01

    This review explores how the integration of advanced imaging methods with high-quality anatomical images significantly improves the characterization, target definition, assessment of response to therapy, and overall management of patients with high-grade glioma. Metrics derived from diffusion-, perfusion-, and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, allows us to characterize regions of edema, hypoxia, increased cellularity, and necrosis within heterogeneous tumor and surrounding brain tissue. Quantification of such measures may provide a more reliable initial representation of tumor delineation and response to therapy than changes in the contrast-enhancing or T2 lesion alone and have a significant effect on targeting resection, planning radiation, and assessing treatment effectiveness. In the long term, implementation of these imaging methodologies can also aid in the identification of recurrent tumor and its differentiation from treatment-related confounds and facilitate the detection of radiationinduced vascular injury in otherwise normal-appearing brain tissue.

  4. Resonance generation of photons from vacuum in cavities due to strong periodical changes of conductivity in a thin semiconductor boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, A V; Dodonov, V V

    2005-01-01

    We study a possibility of photon generation from vacuum in a cavity with an artificial effective time-dependent plasma mirror, which could be created by means of periodical short laser pulses, illuminating a thin semiconductor slab. We take into account two important circumstances: a big imaginary part of the complex time-dependent dielectric permeability inside the slab and a strong dependence of this imaginary part on the distance from the surface of the slab. We find the conditions under which the usual unitary quantization schemes in time-dependent media with real dielectric permeability can be applied to the problem concerned with relatively small (a few per cent) error. We show that, by using a slab with thickness of the order of 1 mm, it is possible to generate a large number of microwave (GHz) photons (up to 10 8 or more) after several thousand picosecond pulses with repetition frequency of the order of 1 GHz, provided that semiconductor materials with high mobility of carriers, high photoabsorption efficiency and small recombination time (less than 1 ns) can be found. We discuss the possible advantages of modes with TM polarization over TE ones, as well as some other important problems to be solved

  5. Polariton condensation, superradiance and difference combination parametric resonance in mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Egorov, V. S.; Chekhonin, I. A.; Chekhonin, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    The generation of the ring mode-locked laser containing resonant absorption medium in the cavity was investigated. It is shown that near the strong resonant absorption lines a condensation of polaritons arises. Intensive radiation looks like as superradiance in a medium without population inversion. We studied theoretically the microscopic mechanism of these phenomena. It was shown that in this system in absorbing medium a strong self-induced difference combination parametric resonance exists. Superradiance on polaritonic modes in the absorbing medium are due to the emergence of light-induced resonant polarization as a result of fast periodic nonadiabatic quantum jumps in the absorber.

  6. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Simrock, S.; Brand, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Chase, B.; Carcagno, R.; Cancelo, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Koeth, T.W. [Rutgers - the State Univ. of New Jersey, NJ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The digital control of several superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity and ACC1 module of the VU-FEL TTF in DESY-Hamburg have both been driven by a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based system. Additionally, a single 9-cell TESLA Superconducting cavity of the FNPL Photo Injector at FERMILAB has been remotely controlled from WUT-ISE laboratory with the support of the DESY team using the same FPGA control system. These experiments focused attention on the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. An electrical model of the resonator was taken as a starting point. Calibration of the signal path is considered key in preparation for the efficient driving of a cavity. Identification of the resonator parameters has been proven to be a successful approach in achieving required performance; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time while requiring reasonable levels of power consumption. Feed-forward and feedback modes were successfully applied in operating the cavities. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  7. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S.; Simrock, S.; Brand, A.; Chase, B.; Carcagno, R.; Cancelo, G.; Koeth, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    The digital control of several superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity and ACC1 module of the VU-FEL TTF in DESY-Hamburg have both been driven by a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based system. Additionally, a single 9-cell TESLA Superconducting cavity of the FNPL Photo Injector at FERMILAB has been remotely controlled from WUT-ISE laboratory with the support of the DESY team using the same FPGA control system. These experiments focused attention on the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. An electrical model of the resonator was taken as a starting point. Calibration of the signal path is considered key in preparation for the efficient driving of a cavity. Identification of the resonator parameters has been proven to be a successful approach in achieving required performance; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time while requiring reasonable levels of power consumption. Feed-forward and feedback modes were successfully applied in operating the cavities. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  8. On-chip plasmonic cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rate at the zero-phonon line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siampour, Hamidreza; Kumar, Shailesh; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    Highly confined surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes can be utilized to enhance light-matter interaction at the single emitter level of quantum optical systems [1-4]. Dielectric-loaded SPP waveguides (DLSPPWs) confine SPPs laterally with relatively low propagation loss, enabling to benefit both ...... and an up to 42-fold spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the zero-phonon line (a ∼7-fold resonance enhancement in addition to a ∼6-fold broadband enhancement) is achieved, revealing the potential of our approach for on-chip realization of quantum-optical networks....... from a large Purcell factor and from a large radiative efficiency (low quenching rates) [1, 2]. In this work, we present a DLSPPW-based Bragg cavity resonator to direct emission from a single diamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) center into the zero-phonon line (Fig. 1). A quality factor of ∼70 for the cavity...

  9. Generation of multipartite entangled states for chains of atoms in the framework of cavity-QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonta, Denis

    2010-07-07

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics is a research field that studies electromagnetic fields in confined spaces and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. Experimentally, the simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with modes of a high-finesse resonator. Theoretically, such system bears an excellent framework for quantum information processing in which atoms and light are interpreted as bits of quantum information and their mutual interaction provides a controllable entanglement mechanism. In this thesis, we present several practical schemes for generation of multipartite entangled states for chains of atoms which pass through one or more high-finesse resonators. In the first step, we propose two schemes for generation of one- and two-dimensional cluster states of arbitrary size. These schemes are based on the resonant interaction of a chain of Rydberg atoms with one or more microwave cavities. In the second step, we propose a scheme for generation of multipartite W states. This scheme is based on the off-resonant interaction of a chain of three-level atoms with an optical cavity and a laser beam. We describe in details all the individual steps which are required to realize the proposed schemes and, moreover, we discuss several techniques to reveal the non-classical correlations associated with generated small-sized entangled states. (orig.)

  10. Generation of multipartite entangled states for chains of atoms in the framework of cavity-QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonta, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics is a research field that studies electromagnetic fields in confined spaces and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. Experimentally, the simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with modes of a high-finesse resonator. Theoretically, such system bears an excellent framework for quantum information processing in which atoms and light are interpreted as bits of quantum information and their mutual interaction provides a controllable entanglement mechanism. In this thesis, we present several practical schemes for generation of multipartite entangled states for chains of atoms which pass through one or more high-finesse resonators. In the first step, we propose two schemes for generation of one- and two-dimensional cluster states of arbitrary size. These schemes are based on the resonant interaction of a chain of Rydberg atoms with one or more microwave cavities. In the second step, we propose a scheme for generation of multipartite W states. This scheme is based on the off-resonant interaction of a chain of three-level atoms with an optical cavity and a laser beam. We describe in details all the individual steps which are required to realize the proposed schemes and, moreover, we discuss several techniques to reveal the non-classical correlations associated with generated small-sized entangled states. (orig.)

  11. Nonlinear real index of refraction variations of a gas medium due to a monochromatic radiation near resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, J.I.C.

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear real index of refraction variations of a gas medium due to a strong monochromatic radiation causing saturation effects is calculated. The gas is supposed to be composed of two-level molecules with which the external field is nearly resonant. It is assumed homogeneous (hard collisions, spontaneous decay) and inhomogeneous (Doppler effect) broadening mechanisms acting on the real index of refraction of the medium. The nonlinear dispersion of the medium is studied as a function of the detuning frequencies, saturation conditions and for various ratios between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous linewidths. In particular, the modification of the index of refraction due to saturation effects are emphasized. (Author) [pt

  12. Radiation shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crookes, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    This patent application describes a shelter comprising a cavity for receiving life to be sheltered; a roof for covering at least a portion of said cavity, and at least one aqueous, protective barrier layer adapted to prevent transmission through said roof and into said cavity of at least a portion of radiation in a predetermined spectrum. The cavity walls may be impregnated with an oil suitable for dressing burns. (author)

  13. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  14. Longitudinal diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study of radiation-induced white matter damage in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Silun; Wu, Ed X; Qiu, Deqiang; Leung, Lucullus H T; Lau, Ho-Fai; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2009-02-01

    Radiation-induced white matter (WM) damage is a major side effect of whole brain irradiation among childhood cancer survivors. We evaluate longitudinally the diffusion characteristics of the late radiation-induced WM damage in a rat model after 25 and 30 Gy irradiation to the hemibrain at 8 time points from 2 to 48 weeks postradiation. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (lambda(//)), and radial diffusivity (lambda( perpendicular)) can accurately detect and monitor the histopathologic changes of radiation-induced WM damage, measured at the EC, and that these changes are dose and time dependent. Results showed a progressive reduction of FA, which was driven by reduction in lambda(//) from 4 to 40 weeks postradiation, and an increase in lambda( perpendicular) with return to baseline in lambda(//) at 48 weeks postradiation. Histologic evaluation of irradiated WM showed reactive astrogliosis from 4 weeks postradiation with reversal at 36 weeks, and demyelination, axonal degeneration, and necrosis at 48 weeks postradiation. Moreover, changes in lambda(//) correlated with reactive astrogliosis (P histopathologic changes of WM damage and our results support the use of DTI as a biomarker to noninvasively monitor radiation-induced WM damage.

  15. Acoustofluidics: Theory and simulation of streaming and radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    fields, which are directly related to the acoustic radiation force on single particles and to the acoustic streaming of the liquid. For the radiation pressure effects, there is good agreement between theory and simulation, while the numeric results for the acoustic streaming effects are more problematic...

  16. Self-consistent Maxwell-Bloch model of quantum-dot photonic-crystal-cavity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartar, William; Mørk, Jesper; Hughes, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    We present a powerful computational approach to simulate the threshold behavior of photonic-crystal quantum-dot (QD) lasers. Using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, Maxwell-Bloch equations representing a system of thousands of statistically independent and randomly positioned two-level emitters are solved numerically. Phenomenological pure dephasing and incoherent pumping is added to the optical Bloch equations to allow for a dynamical lasing regime, but the cavity-mediated radiative dynamics and gain coupling of each QD dipole (artificial atom) is contained self-consistently within the model. These Maxwell-Bloch equations are implemented by using Lumerical's flexible material plug-in tool, which allows a user to define additional equations of motion for the nonlinear polarization. We implement the gain ensemble within triangular-lattice photonic-crystal cavities of various length N (where N refers to the number of missing holes), and investigate the cavity mode characteristics and the threshold regime as a function of cavity length. We develop effective two-dimensional model simulations which are derived after studying the full three-dimensional passive material structures by matching the cavity quality factors and resonance properties. We also demonstrate how to obtain the correct point-dipole radiative decay rate from Fermi's golden rule, which is captured naturally by the FDTD method. Our numerical simulations predict that the pump threshold plateaus around cavity lengths greater than N =9 , which we identify as a consequence of the complex spatial dynamics and gain coupling from the inhomogeneous QD ensemble. This behavior is not expected from simple rate-equation analysis commonly adopted in the literature, but is in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. Single-mode to multimode lasing is also observed, depending on the spectral peak frequency of the QD ensemble. Using a statistical modal analysis of the average decay rates, we also

  17. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Gianluca [CNR-Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO), Pozzuoli (Italy); Loock, Hans-Peter (ed.) [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing. It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperature and pressure.

  18. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Loock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing.  It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperat...

  19. Effects of Freestream Turbulence on Cavity Tone and Sound Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yokoyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the effects of freestream turbulence on cavity tones, flow and acoustic fields were directly predicted for cavity flows with various intensities of freestream turbulence. The freestream Mach number was 0.09 and the Reynolds number based on the cavity length was 4.0 × 104. The depth-to-length ratio of the cavity, D/L, was 0.5 and 2.5, where the acoustic resonance of a depth-mode occurs for D/L = 2.5. The incoming boundary layer was laminar. The results for the intensity of freestream turbulence of Tu = 2.3% revealed that the reduced level of cavity tones in a cavity flow with acoustic resonance (D/L=2.5 was greater than that without acoustic resonance (D/L=0.5. To clarify the reason for this, the sound source based on Lighthill’s acoustic analogy was computed, and the contributions of the intensity and spanwise coherence of the sound source to the reduction of the cavity tone were estimated. As a result, the effects of the reduction of spanwise coherence on the cavity tone were greater in the cavity flow with acoustic resonance than in that without resonance, while the effects of the intensity were comparable for both flows.

  20. Inhibited emission of electromagnetic modes confined in subwavelength cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Thomas, N.; Houdre, R.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the active inhibition of subwavelength confined cavity modes emission and quality factor enhancement by controlling the cavity optical surrounding. The intrinsic radiation angular spectrum of modes confined in planar photonics crystal cavities as well as its modifications depending on the environment are inferred via a transfer matrix modeling and k-space imaging.

  1. Changes in mitochondrial functioning with electromagnetic radiation of ultra high frequency as revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, Anatoly; Selyuk, Marina; Gafurov, Marat; Lukin, Sergei; Potaskalova, Viktoria; Sidorik, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    To study the effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of ultra high frequency (UHF) in the doses equivalent to the maximal permitted energy load for the staffs of the radar stations on the biochemical processes that occur in the cell organelles. Liver, cardiac and aorta tissues from the male rats exposed to non-thermal UHF EMR in pulsed and continuous modes were studied during 28 days after the irradiation by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods including a spin trapping of superoxide radicals. The qualitative and quantitative disturbances in electron transport chain (ETC) of mitochondria are registered. A formation of the iron-nitrosyl complexes of nitric oxide (NO) radicals with the iron-sulphide (FeS) proteins, the decreased activity of FeS-protein N2 of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and flavo-ubisemiquinone growth combined with the increased rates of superoxide production are obtained. (i) Abnormalities in the mitochondrial ETC of liver and aorta cells are more pronounced for animals radiated in a pulsed mode; (ii) the alterations in the functioning of the mitochondrial ETC cause increase of superoxide radicals generation rate in all samples, formation of cellular hypoxia, and intensification of the oxide-initiated metabolic changes; and (iii) electron paramagnetic resonance methods could be used to track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the mitochondrial ETC caused by the UHF EMR.

  2. Time dependence of resonance γ-radiation modulated by acoustic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Arakelyan, A.R.; Gabrielyan, R.G.; Kocharyan, L.A.; Grigoryan, G.R.; Slavinskii, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the time dependence of the γ-resonance absorption line intensity in case of modulation by acoustic waves are presented. 57 Co was used as source and a stainless steel foil was chosen as an absorber. The time dependences of the counting rate of the resonant γ-quanta corresponding to excitations with 3400 Hz and with 1.5 or 7 V at the vibrosystem transducer are plotted. The measurements show that the method has principal advantages over the conventional Moessbauer spectroscopy

  3. Acoustofluidics: theory and simulation of radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is combined with numerical simulations to optimize designs and functionalities of acoustofluidic devices, i.e. microfluidic devices in which ultrasound waves are used to anipulate biological particles. The resonance frequencies and corresponding modes of the acoustic fields...... are calculated for various specific geometries of glass/silicon chips containing water-filled microchannels. A special emphasis is put on taking the surrounding glass/silicon material into account, thus going beyond the traditional transverse half-wavelength picture. For the resonance frequencies, where...

  4. Effects of low-intensity GaAlAs laser radiation (λ=660 nm) on dentine-pulp interface after class I cavity preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, Bruno Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity irradiation with GaAlAs laser (red emission) on the ultrastructure of dentine-pulp interface after conventionally prepared class I cavity preparation. Two patients with 8 premolars for extraction indicated for orthodontic reasons. Class I cavities were prepared in these teeth that were then divided into two groups. The first group received a treatment with laser with continuous emission, λ=660 nm, with maximum power output of 30 mW. The dosimetry applied was of approximately 2J/cm 2 , directly and perpendicularly into the cavity in only one section. After the irradiation, the cavities were filled with composite resin. The second group received the same treatment, except by the laser therapy. Twenty-eight days after the preparation, the teeth were extracted and were processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Two sound teeth, without any preparation, were also studied. The irradiated group presented odontoblastic processes in higher contact with the extracellular matrix and the collagen fibers appeared more aggregated and organized than those of control group. These results were also observed in the healthy-teeth. Thus, we suggest that laser irradiation accelerates the recovery of the dental structures involved in the cavity preparation at the pre-dentine level. (author)

  5. Different optical properties in different periodic slot cavity geometrical morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Shen, Meng; Du, Lan; Deng, Caisong; Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, optical properties of two-dimensional periodic annular slot cavity arrays in hexagonal close-packing on a silica substrate are theoretically characterized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation method. By simulating reflectance spectra, electric field distribution, and charge distribution, we confirm that multiple cylindrical surface plasmon resonances can be excited in annular inclined slot cavities by linearly polarized light, in which the four reflectance dips are attributed to Fabry-Perot cavity resonances in the coaxial cavity. A coaxial waveguide mode TE11 will exist in these annular cavities, and the wavelengths of these reflectance dips are effectively tailored by changing the geometrical pattern of slot cavity and the dielectric materials filled in the cavities. These resonant wavelengths are localized in annular cavities with large electric field enhancement and dissipate gradually due to metal loss. The formation of an absorption peak can be explained from the aspect of phase matching conditions. We observed that the proposed structure can be tuned over the broad spectral range of 600-4000 nm by changing the outer and inner radii of the annular gaps, gap surface topography. Meanwhile, different lengths of the cavity may cause the shift of resonance dips. Also, we study the field enhancement at different vertical locations of the slit. In addition, dielectric materials filling in the annular gaps will result in a shift of the resonance wavelengths, which make the annular cavities good candidates for refractive index sensors. The refractive index sensitivity of annular cavities can also be tuned by the geometry size and the media around the cavity. Annular cavities with novel applications can be implied as surface enhanced Raman spectra substrates, refractive index sensors, nano-lasers, and optical trappers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178044), the Natural Science Foundation

  6. Voltage control of cavity magnon polariton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, S., E-mail: kaurs3@myumanitoba.ca; Rao, J. W.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M., E-mail: hu@physics.umanitoba.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Yao, B. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-07-18

    We have experimentally investigated the microwave transmission of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) generated by integrating a low damping magnetic insulator onto a 2D microwave cavity. The high tunability of our planar cavity allows the cavity resonance frequency to be precisely controlled using a DC voltage. By appropriately tuning the voltage and magnetic bias, we can observe the cavity photon magnon coupling and the magnetic coupling between a magnetostatic mode and the generated CMP. The dispersion of the generated CMP was measured by either tuning the magnetic field or the applied voltage. This electrical control of CMP may open up avenues for designing advanced on-chip microwave devices that utilize light-matter interaction.

  7. General trend and local variations of neutron resonance cascade gamma-decay radiative strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Furman, W.I.; Khitrov, V.A.; Jovancevic, N.

    2012-01-01

    A new hypothesis on the dependence of the form of the radiative strength functions of electric and magnetic dipole gamma transitions in a heated nucleus on the excited level density was suggested and tested experimentally. For this purpose, the region of possible values of random values of the level density and radiative strength functions which precisely reproduced experimental intensity of two-step cascades for 41 nuclei from 40K to 200Hg was determined. It was obtained that the suggested hypothesis can provide the maximal increase of radiative strength functions values by order of magnitude in comparison with existing notations as a result of collective effects enhancement. This result points to the necessity to take into account this possibility in existing and future models of radiative strength functions

  8. Retrospective Reconstruction of Radiation Doses of Chernobyl Liquidators by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chumak, V

    1997-01-01

    .... The Scientific Center of Radiation Medicine (SCRM) has developed and refined this technique in order to meet the practical demands of large scale epidemiologic followup of the Chernobyl liquidators...

  9. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy applied to radiation dosimetry and other fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, C.C.J.

    1994-12-01

    A short introduction to the theory and practice of ESR spectroscopy is given. ESR alanine dosimetry for low and high LET (linear energy transfer) ionising radiation is described, indicating its advantages over traditional methods. Problems arising in the therapy dose range (below 5 Gy), and possible future developments, are mentioned. The application of ESR to the radiation processing of materials and foodstuffs, to geological dating, biology, molecular chemistry and to medicine is discussed. Some examples of chemical analyses are also presented. (orig.)

  10. RF cavity evaluation with the code SUPERFISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Ueda, N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SUPERFISH calculates axisymmetric rf fields and is most applicable to re-entrant cavities of an Alvarez linac. Some sample results are shown for the first Alvarez's in NUMATRON project. On the other hand the code can also be effectivily applied to TE modes excited in an RFQ linac when the cavity is approximately considered as positioning at an infinite distance from the symmetry axis. The evaluation was made for several RFQ cavities, models I, II and a test linac named LITL, and useful results for the resonator design were obtained. (author)

  11. Interaction of IREB with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.; Mishra, Mamta; Purkayastha, A.D.; Rambabu, P.; Maheshwari, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    The propagation of an intense pulsed relativistic electron beam (IREB) through a cavity resonator is considered. The cavity gets shock excited. The electromagnetic fields so generated interact with the beam in such a way that the energy is transferred from the front of the beam to the back. As a result the beams gets energized but shortened in time. Analysis for the chosen dominant mode of the cavity viz. TMsub(010) is carried out. The induced electric field excited is calculated and the accelerating potential is estimated. The results are compared with the recent-experiments. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  12. Large intracranial vessel occlusive vasculopathy after radiation therapy in children: clinical features and usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Motoko; Aida, Noriko; Sekido, Kenichi; Kakehi, Masae; Matsubara, Sho

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between large intracranial vessel occlusive vasculopathy (vasculopathy) and radiation therapy, and to clarify the clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis and screening of the vasculopathy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and serial MR images for 32 pediatric patients, in whom radiation therapy had been given to fields including the circle of Willis and major cerebral arteries. All children had periodically undergone follow-up neurologic assessment and MR imaging examinations at Kanagawa Children's Medical Center for more than one year after radiation therapy (range 1.3-14 years). Patients who had not remained free of tumor progression up to the time of final evaluation were excluded. Results: Vasculopathy developed in 6 of 32 patients 2-13 years after radiation therapy. Three of them presented with transient ischemic attacks (TIA) and the other three showed infarctions without preceding TIA. Steno-occlusive changes of major cerebral arteries were identified by MR imaging in all six patients, but not obtained in the remaining 26 patients. In the patients with TIA, MR imaging demonstrated steno-occlusive changes at the time of TIA, before irreversible infarction. They have been doing well subsequent to encephaloduraoarteriosyn-angiosis. In the three patients who presented infarction without preceding TIA, MR imaging did not demonstrate the vascular change before the onset of infarction, and two of them developed neurologic deficits. The mean exposure dose for the circle of Willis and major cerebral arteries in these six patients was significantly higher than that in the remaining 26 patients without this sequela (61Gy vs. 50Gy, p < 0.05). The mean age at radiation therapy of the six patients was lower, but the difference was not significant. Conclusion: The incidence of vasculopathy after radiation therapy has a considerable correlation with radiation dose and

  13. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-10-15

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo{sup 1}H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 {+-} 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 {+-} 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. {sup 1}H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation.

  14. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo 1 H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 ± 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 ± 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. 1 H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation

  15. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  16. Harnessing the mode mixing in optical fiber-tip cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of Fabry–Pérot optical cavities with Gaussian-shape mirrors formed between tips of optical fibers. Such cavities can be fabricated by laser machining of fiber tips and are promising systems for achieving strong coupling between atomic particles and an optical field as required for quantum information applications. Using a mode mixing matrix method, we analyze the cavity optical eigenmodes and corresponding losses depending on a range of cavity-shape parameters, such as mirror radius of curvature, indentation depth and cavity length. The Gaussian shape of the mirrors causes mixing of optical modes in the cavity. We investigate the effect of the mode mixing on the coherent atom-cavity coupling as well as the mode matching between the cavity and a single-mode optical fiber. While the mode mixing is associated with increased cavity losses, it can also lead to an enhancement of the local optical field. We demonstrate that around the resonance between the fundamental and 2nd order Laguerre–Gaussian modes of the cavity it is possible to obtain 50% enhancement of the atom-cavity coupling at the cavity center while still maintaining low cavity losses and high cavity-fiber optical coupling. (paper)

  17. Numerical study of combustion initiation in a supersonic flow of H2-air mixture by resonance laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezgin, L V; Kopchenov, V I; Kuleshov, P S; Titova, N S; Starik, A M

    2012-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the efficiency of approaches based on the exposure of reacting gas to resonance laser radiation to enhance combustion in a supersonic flow of H 2 -air mixture is conducted. The kinetic processes responsible for the intensification of chain reactions in premixed and non-premixed H 2 -air flows upon photodissociation of O 2 molecules by 193.3 nm laser radiation, excitation of these molecules to the singlet sigma state by laser photons with 762.346 nm wavelength and heating the mixture by laser radiation are analysed in a detailed manner. It is shown that both photochemical methods, photodissociation and excitation of O 2 molecules, are much more effective in shortening the ignition delay length than merely heating the mixture. For the premixed flow, the photodissociation of O 2 molecules ensures a slightly higher reduction in the ignition delay than the laser-induced excitation of molecular oxygen to the singlet sigma state. However, in the non-premixed flow the situation is inverted. The analysis shows that both photochemical methods make it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of reactant chemical energy to thermal energy released during combustion compared with the method of heating the mixtures. (paper)

  18. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Chun; Xing, Yunhui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Zhongshui

    2014-01-01

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields

  19. Phase-sensitive detection of optical resonances by using an acousto-optic modulator in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V N; Domnin, Yu S; Kopylov, L N

    2007-01-01

    A new method for frequency control of an external cavity diode laser without direct modulation of the injection current is proposed. The Pound - Drever optical heterodyne technique or the method of frequency control by frequency-modulated sidebands, in which an acousto-optic modulator operating in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode is used as an external phase modulator, can be employed to obtain error signals upon automatic frequency locking of the diode laser to the saturated absorption resonances within the D 2 line of cesium atoms or to the optical cavity resonances. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  20. Photoionization pathways and thresholds in generation of Lyman-α radiation by resonant four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg A. Louchev; Norihito Saito; Yu Oishi; Koji Miyazaki; Kotaro Okamura; Jumpei Nakamura; Masahiko Iwasaki; Satoshi Wada

    2016-01-01

    We develop a set of analytical approximations for the estimation of the combined effect of various photoionization processes involved in the resonant four-wave mixing generation of ns pulsed Lyman-α (L-α) radiation by using 212.556 nm and 820-845 nm laser radiation pulses in Kr-Ar mixture: (i) multi-photon ionization, (ii) step-wise (2+1)-photon ionization via the resonant 2-photon excitation of Kr followed by 1-photon ionization and (iii) laser-induced avalanche ionization produced by genera...