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Sample records for resonance-based biosensor study

  1. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C; Leduc, A; Barbeau, J; Saoudi, B; Yahia, L'H; Crescenzo, G De

    2006-01-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty

  2. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Leduc, A.; Barbeau, J.; Saoudi, B.; Yahia, L'H.; DeCrescenzo, G.

    2006-08-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  3. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance based biosensor: A new platform for rapid diagnosis of livestock diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravas Ranjan Sahoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR based biosensors are the most advanced and developed optical label-free biosensor technique used for powerful detection with vast applications in environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security as well in livestock sector. The livestock sector which contributes the largest economy of India, harbors many bacterial, viral, and fungal diseases impacting a great loss to the production and productive potential which is a major concern in both small and large ruminants. Hence, an accurate, sensitive, and rapid diagnosis is required for prevention of these above-mentioned diseases. SPR based biosensor assay may fulfill the above characteristics which lead to a greater platform for rapid diagnosis of different livestock diseases. Hence, this review may give a detail idea about the principle, recent development of SPR based biosensor techniques and its application in livestock sector.

  5. The application of neoglycopeptides in the development of sensitive surface plasmon resonance-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, C.E.P.; de Souza, A.C.; Halkes, K.M.; Upton, P.J.; Reeman, S.M.; André, S.; Gabius, H.-J.; McDonnell, M.B.; Kamerling, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance is described for the detection of carbohydrate-binding proteins in solution on a Biacore 2000 instrument, using immobilized glycopeptides as ligands. Their selection was based on previous screenings of solid-phase glycopeptide

  6. Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  7. Asymmetric split-ring resonator-based biosensor for detection of label-free stress biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Suji; Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, an asymmetric split-ring resonator, metamaterial element, is presented as a biosensing transducer for detection of highly sensitive and label-free stress biomarkers. In particular, the two biomarkers, cortisol and α-amylase, are used for evaluating the sensitivity of the proposed biosensor. In case of cortisol detection, the competitive reaction between cortisol-bovine serum albumin and free cortisol is employed, while alpha-amylase is directly detected by its antigen-antibody reaction. From the experimental results, we find that the limit of detection and sensitivity of the proposed sensing device are about 1 ng/ml and 1.155 MHz/ng ml-1, respectively.

  8. [INVITED] Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic chemical and biosensors utilizing bulk and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Banshi D.; Kant, Ravi

    2018-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has established itself as an immensely acclaimed and influential optical sensing tool with quintessential applications in life sciences, environmental monitoring, clinical diagnostics, pharmaceutical developments and ensuring food safety. The implementation of sensing principle of surface plasmon resonance employing an optical fiber as a substrate has concomitantly resulted in the evolution of fiber optic surface plasmon resonance as an exceptionally lucrative scaffold for chemical and biosensing applications. This perspective article outlines the contemporary studies on fiber optic sensors founded on the sensing architecture of propagating as well as localized surface plasmon resonance. An in-depth review of the prevalent analytical and surface chemical tactics involved in configuring the sensing layer over an optical fiber for the detection of various chemical and biological entities is presented. The involvement of nanomaterials as a strategic approach to enhance the sensor sensitivity is furnished concurrently providing an insight into the diverse geometrical blueprints for designing fiber optic sensing probes. Representative examples from the literature are discussed to appreciate the latest advancements in this potentially valuable research avenue. The article concludes by identifying some of the key challenges and exploring the opportunities for expanding the scope and impact of surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensors.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Biosensors for Exploring the Influence of Alkaloids on Aggregation of Amyloid-β Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the presented study was the development of a simple analytical tool for exploring the influence of naturally occurring compounds on the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ40 in order to find potential anti-neurodegenerative drugs. The gold discs used for surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements were modified with thioaliphatic acid. The surface functionalized with carboxylic groups was used for covalent attaching of Aβ40 probe by creation of amide bonds in the presence of EDC/NHS. The modified SPR gold discs were used for exploring the Aβ40 aggregation process in the presence of selected alkaloids: arecoline hydrobromide, pseudopelletierine hydrochloride, trigonelline hydrochloride and α-lobeline hydrochloride. The obtained results were discussed with other parameters which govern the phenomenon studied such as lipophilicity/ hydrophilicy and Aβ40-alkaloid association constants.

  10. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Rebecca L; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Flynn, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users...... the remaining panel of participants was 620 pM with a standard deviation of 980 pM. These results demonstrate that when this biosensor assay was designed and executed appropriately, the reported rate constants were consistent, and independent of which protein was immobilized and which biosensor was used....

  11. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giusseppe A.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Beusink, J.B.; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.; more, more

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users

  12. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  13. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Weiguo; Che, Wenti; Guimai, Zuo; Chen, Jiejing; Li, Liping; Li, Wuxian; Dai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. Methods: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23), low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23), and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12). Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( CH-CH 2 -CH = O), L5 lipids (-CH 2 -C = O), and L3 lipids (-CH 2 -CH 2 -C = O) as well as lower levels of β-glucose, α-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. Conclusions: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high-risk groups in our research

  14. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Weiguo; Che, Wenti; Guimai, Zuo; Chen, Jiejing [181st Hospital Guangxi, Central Laboratory, Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases Research, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Liping [Guangxi Normal University, The Life Science College, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Wuxian [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education Ministry, Chongqiong Medical University, Chongqing (China); Dai, Yong [Clinical Medical Research Center, the Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University (Shenzhen People' s Hospital), Shenzhen, Guangdong Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Objectives: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. Methods: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23), low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23), and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12). Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( CH-CH{sub 2}-CH = O), L5 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-C = O), and L3 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-C = O) as well as lower levels of {beta}-glucose, {alpha}-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. Conclusions: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high

  15. Study of squeeze film damping in a micro-beam resonator based on micro-polar theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghanbari

    Full Text Available In this paper, squeeze film damping in a micro-beam resonator based on micro-polar theory has been investigated. The proposed model for this study consists of a clamped-clamped micro-beam bounded between two fixed layers. The gap between the micro-beam and layers is filled with air. As fluid behaves differently in micro scale than macro, the micro-scale fluid field in the gap has been modeled based on micro-polar theory. Equation of motion governing transverse deflection of the micro- beam based on modified couple stress theory and also non-linear Reynolds equation of the fluid field based on micropolar theory have been non-dimensionalized, linearized and solved simultaneously in order to calculate the quality factor of the resonator. The effect of micropolar parameters of air on the quality factor has been investigated. The quality factor of the of the micro-beam resonator for different values of non-dimensionalized length scale of the beam, squeeze number and also non-dimensionalized pressure has been calculated and compared to the obtained values of quality factor based on classical theory.

  16. BioSentinel: Biosensors for Deep-Space Radiation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokugamage, Melissa P.; Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The BioSentinel mission will be deployed on NASA's Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2018. We will use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a biosensor to study the effect of deep-space radiation on living cells. The BioSentinel mission will be the first investigation of a biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. Radiation can cause damage such as double stand breaks (DSBs) on DNA. The yeast cell was chosen for this mission because it is genetically controllable, shares homology with human cells in its DNA repair pathways, and can be stored in a desiccated state for long durations. Three yeast strains will be stored dry in multiple microfluidic cards: a wild type control strain, a mutant defective strain that cannot repair DSBs, and a biosensor strain that can only grow if it gets DSB-and-repair events occurring near a specific gene. Growth and metabolic activity of each strain will be measured by a 3-color LED optical detection system. Parallel experiments will be done on the International Space Station and on Earth so that we can compare the results to that of deep space. One of our main objectives is to characterize the microfluidic card activation sequence before the mission. To increase the sensitivity of yeast cells as biosensors, desiccated yeast in each card will be resuspended in a rehydration buffer. After several weeks, the rehydration buffer will be exchanged with a growth medium in order to measure yeast growth and metabolic activity. We are currently working on a time-course experiment to better understand the effects of the rehydration buffer on the response to ionizing radiation. We will resuspend the dried yeast in our rehydration medium over a period of time; then each week, we will measure the viability and ionizing radiation sensitivity of different yeast strains taken from this rehydration buffer. The data obtained in this study will be useful in finalizing the card activation sequence for

  17. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jin; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Marshall Porterfield, D [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University (United States); Claussen, Jonathan C; Ul Haque, Aeraj; Diggs, Alfred R [Physiological Sensing Facility, Bindley Bioscience Center and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University (United States); McLamore, Eric S [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida (United States); Calvo-Marzal, Percy, E-mail: porterf@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University (United States)

    2011-09-02

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 {+-} 0.5 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 {mu}M), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  18. A Study of Wearable Bio-Sensor Technologies and Applications in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mehmood

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world the rapid advancements in Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS and Nano technology have improved almost all the aspects of daily life routine with the help of different smart devices such as smart phones, compact electronic devices etc. The prime example of these emerging developments is the development of wireless sensors for healthcare procedures. One kind of these sensors is wearable bio-sensors. In this paper, the technologies of two types of bio-sensors (ECG, EMG are investigated and also compared with traditional ECG, EMG equipment. We have taken SHIMMERTM wireless sensor platform as an example of wearable biosensors technology. We have investigated the systems developed for analysis techniques with SHIMMERTM ECG and EMG wearable bio-sensors and these biosensors are used in continuous remote monitoring. For example, applications in continuous health monitoring of elderly people, critical chronic patients and Fitness & Fatigue observations. Nevertheless, early fall detection in older adults and weak patients, treatment efficacy assessment. This study not only provides the basic concepts of wearable wireless bio-sensors networks (WBSN, but also provides basic knowledge of different sensor platforms available for patient’s remote monitoring. Also various healthcare applications by using bio-sensors are discussed and in last comparison with traditional ECG and EMG is presented.

  19. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jin; Jaroch, David; Rickus, Jenna L; Marshall Porterfield, D; Claussen, Jonathan C; Ul Haque, Aeraj; Diggs, Alfred R; McLamore, Eric S; Calvo-Marzal, Percy

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 ± 0.5 μA mM -1 cm -2 ), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 μM), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H 2 O 2 response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  20. A comparative study of enzyme immobilization strategies for multi-walled carbon nanotube glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin; Claussen, Jonathan C.; McLamore, Eric S.; Haque, Aeraj ul; Jaroch, David; Diggs, Alfred R.; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Rickus, Jenna L.; Porterfield, D. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    This work addresses the comparison of different strategies for improving biosensor performance using nanomaterials. Glucose biosensors based on commonly applied enzyme immobilization approaches, including sol-gel encapsulation approaches and glutaraldehyde cross-linking strategies, were studied in the presence and absence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Although direct comparison of design parameters such as linear range and sensitivity is intuitive, this comparison alone is not an accurate indicator of biosensor efficacy, due to the wide range of electrodes and nanomaterials available for use in current biosensor designs. We proposed a comparative protocol which considers both the active area available for transduction following nanomaterial deposition and the sensitivity. Based on the protocol, when no nanomaterials were involved, TEOS/GOx biosensors exhibited the highest efficacy, followed by BSA/GA/GOx and TMOS/GOx biosensors. A novel biosensor containing carboxylated MWNTs modified with glucose oxidase and an overlying TMOS layer demonstrated optimum efficacy in terms of enhanced current density (18.3 ± 0.5 µA mM - 1 cm - 2), linear range (0.0037-12 mM), detection limit (3.7 µM), coefficient of variation (2%), response time (less than 8 s), and stability/selectivity/reproducibility. H2O2 response tests demonstrated that the most possible reason for the performance enhancement was an increased enzyme loading. This design is an excellent platform for versatile biosensing applications.

  1. Application of the SSB biosensor to study in vitro transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alexander; Hari-Gupta, Yukti; Toseland, Christopher P

    2018-02-12

    Gene expression, catalysed by RNA polymerases (RNAP), is one of the most fundamental processes in living cells. The majority of methods to quantify mRNA are based upon purification of the nucleic acid which leads to experimental inaccuracies and loss of product, or use of high cost dyes and sensitive spectrophotometers. Here, we describe the use of a fluorescent biosensor based upon the single stranded binding (SSB) protein. In this study, the SSB biosensor showed similar binding properties to mRNA, to that of its native substrate, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). We found the biosensor to be reproducible with no associated loss of product through purification, or the requirement for expensive dyes. Therefore, we propose that the SSB biosensor is a useful tool for comparative measurement of mRNA yield following in vitro transcription. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolite profiling, antioxidant, and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of germinated rice: nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based metabolomics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaiwan Pramai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to profile the metabolites of three different varieties of germinated rice, specifically black (GBR, red, and white rice, a 1H-nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based metabolomics approach was conducted. Multivariate data analysis was applied to discriminate between the three different varieties using a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA model. The PLS model was used to evaluate the relationship between chemicals and biological activities of germinated rice. The PLS-DA score plot exhibited a noticeable separation between the three rice varieties into three clusters by PC1 and PC2. The PLS model indicated that α-linolenic acid, γ-oryzanol, α-tocopherol, γ-aminobutyric acid, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, fumaric acid, fatty acids, threonine, tryptophan, and vanillic acid were significantly correlated with the higher bioactivities demonstrated by GBR that was extracted in 100% ethanol. Subsequently, the proposed biosynthetic pathway analysis revealed that the increased quantities of secondary metabolites found in GBR may contribute to its nutritional value and health benefits.

  4. Study on a hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase/GNPs-thionine/chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Xiaobin; Pang Guangchang; Liang Xinyi; Wang Meng; Liu Jing; Zhu Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Glutaraldehyde was used as the bridge linking agent to covalently bonded thionine in chitosan, which is more stable and could effectively prevalent leakage of the electronic mediator. ► The effect of GNPs adsorbed HRP was first accurately characterized by bio-layer interferometry using the ForteBio Octer system. ► The application of self-assembly technology increases the biosensor stability. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase/GNPs-thionine/chitosan has been developed. Gold nanoparticles fixed with horseradish peroxidase were adsorbed on glassy carbon electrode by the chitosan which cross-linked with the electron mediator of horseradish peroxidase as the bridge linking agent. The assembly procedures were monitored by UV–visible spectral scanning, bio-layer interferometry, cyclic voltammetric and alternating current impedance. The chronoamperometry was used to measure hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide biosensor linear range of detection is 1 × 10 −7 –1 × 10 −4 mol/L, detection limit up to 5.0 × 10 −8 mol/L. Moreover the stability, reproducibility and selectivity of the biosensor were also studied and the results confirmed that the biosensor exhibit fast response to hydrogen peroxide and possess high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  5. Studies Regarding the Membranous Support of a Glucose Biosensor Based on Gox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia Bizerea-Spiridon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available To obtain glucose biosensors based on glucose oxidase (GOx, the enzyme can be immobilized on the sensitive surface of a glass electrode by different techniques: deposition on membranous support (cellophane or other macromolecular material or entrapment in a matrix. Deposition on membranous support also involves cross-linking with glutaraldehyde or entrapment in silica gel, following the sol-gel procedure. The aim of this preliminary work was to study the influence of cellophane replacement with a PVA based membranous support on the glucose biosensor performance. The data obtained at pH measurements of buffer solutions with cellophane and PVA membranous supports respectively, show that the PVA based membrane assures superior performances of the biosensor for low glucose concentrations determination (about 10-4 M. These results allow the transition to an improved immobilization technique, namely the enzyme entrapment in membranous material.

  6. Development of a microscale NOx- biosensor for the study of nitrogen cycling in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzocchi, Ugo

    application of this microscale biosensor is constrained mainly because of a short lifetime caused by the fragility of some of its components. Moreover a detailed study characterizing the ESC efficiency under different condition is still missing. The aims of this thesis are: (i) to contribute......-) microscale biosensor matches these requirements. In fact, it can be constructed with a tip diameter ranging between 25 and 100 µm. Its functioning is based on the reduction of NOx- to N2O by denitrifying bacteria and the subsequent detection of N2O by means of an amperometric microsensor. The sensitivity...... of the biosensor can be amplified by the electrophoretic sensitivity control system (ESC) which positively polarizes the inner side of the sensor against an external reference inserted into the analyzed medium, inducing the migration of NOx- anions into the bacterial chamber. However, nowadays the widespread...

  7. Biosensors and environmental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Preedy, Victor R; Patel, Vinood B

    2012-01-01

    ..., bacterial biosensors, antibody-based biosensors, enzymatic, amperometric and electrochemical aspects, quorum sensing, DNA-biosensors, cantilever biosensors, bioluminescence and other methods and applications...

  8. Optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Establishing ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance based metabonomics fingerprinting profile for spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Peng, Jin; Zhou, Zhi-yuan; Duan, Yu; Chen, Wei; Cai, Bin; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex trauma that consists of multiple pathological mechanisms involving cytotoxic, oxidation stress and immune-endocrine. This study aimed to establish plasma metabonomics fingerprinting atlas for SCI using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabonomics methodology and principal component analysis techniques. Nine Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats were randomly divided into SCI, normal and sham-operation control groups. Plasma samples were collected for (1)H NMR spectroscopy 3 days after operation. The NMR data were analyzed using principal component analysis technique with Matlab software. Metabonomics analysis was able to distinguish the three groups (SCI, normal control, sham-operation). The fingerprinting atlas indicated that, compared with those without SCI, the SCI group demonstrated the following characteristics with regard to second principal component: it is made up of fatty acids, myc-inositol, arginine, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (TG), glucose, and 3-methyl-histamine. The data indicated that SCI results in several significant changes in plasma metabolism early on and that a metabonomics approach based on (1)H NMR spectroscopy can provide a metabolic profile comprising several metabolite classes and allow for relative quantification of such changes. The results also provided support for further development and application of metabonomics technologies for studying SCI and for the utilization of multivariate models for classifying the extent of trauma within an individual.

  10. Microelectromechanical resonator based digital logic elements

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2016-10-20

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. However, its full realization has been hindered by the difficulty in realizing complex combinational logics, in which the logic function is constructed by cascading multiple smaller logic blocks. In this work we report an alternative approach for implementation of digital logic core elements, multiplexer and demultiplexer, which can be used to realize combinational logic circuits by suitable concatenation. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  11. Microelectromechanical resonator based digital logic elements

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. However, its full realization has been hindered by the difficulty in realizing complex combinational logics, in which the logic function is constructed by cascading multiple smaller logic blocks. In this work we report an alternative approach for implementation of digital logic core elements, multiplexer and demultiplexer, which can be used to realize combinational logic circuits by suitable concatenation. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  12. Nanochannels Photoelectrochemical Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Ruan, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Li-Bin; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2018-02-06

    Nanochannels have brought new opportunities for biosensor development. Herein, we present the novel concept of a nanochannels photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor based on the integration of a unique Cu x O-nanopyramid-islands (NPIs) photocathode, an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalytic chemistry. The Cu x O-NPIs photocathode possesses good performance, and further assembly with AAO yields a designed architecture composed of vertically aligned, highly ordered nanoarrays on top of the Cu x O-NPIs film. After biocatalytic precipitation (BCP) was stimulated within the channels, the biosensor was used for the successful detection of ALP activity. This study has not only provided a novel paradigm for an unconventional nanochannels PEC biosensor, which can be used for general bioanalytical purposes, but also indicated that the new concept of nanochannel-semiconductor heterostructures is a step toward innovative biomedical applications.

  13. UV-SPR biosensor for biomolecular interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, F. A.; Fossati, S.; Khan, I.; Gisbert Quilis, N.; Knoll, W.; Dostalek, J.

    2017-05-01

    UV surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for direct in situ detection of protein binding events is reported. A crossed relief aluminum grating was employed for diffraction coupling to surface plasmons as an alternative to more commonly used attenuated total reflection method. Wavelength interrogation of SPR was carried out by using transmission measurements in order to probe odorant-binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). The native oxide layer on the top of an aluminum grating sensor chip allows for covalent coupling of protein molecules by using regular silane-based linkers. The probing of bound OBP14 protein at UV with confined field of surface plasmons holds potential for further studies of interaction with recently developed artificial fluorescent odorants.

  14. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  15. Microbial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yu; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device that couples microorganisms with a transducer to enable rapid, accurate and sensitive detection of target analytes in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental monitoring, defense, food processing and safety. The earlier microbial biosensors used the respiratory and metabolic functions of the microorganisms to detect a substance that is either a substrate or an inhibitor of these processes. Recently, genetically engineered microorganisms based on fusing of the lux, gfp or lacZ gene reporters to an inducible gene promoter have been widely applied to assay toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the recent trends in the development and application of microbial biosensors. Current advances and prospective future direction in developing microbial biosensor have also been discussed

  16. A study of the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods on a glucose biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huiyu; Yang Liuqing; Ren Xiangling; Tang Fangqiong; Ren Jun; Chen Dong

    2010-01-01

    A new glucose biosensor based on the electron transfer and photothermal effect of gold nanorods (GNRs) is reported here. The biosensor was prepared by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) on a platinum (Pt) electrode by a composite film consisting of GNRs, polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and glutaraldehyde. GNRs were synthesized by a gold seed-mediated cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant-assisted approach. The fabrication, characterization and analytical performance of the glucose biosensor based on GNRs are described in this paper. Moreover, the modulation of the biosensor by the photothermal effect based on the unique surface plasma resonance (SPR) property of GNRs was investigated for the first time. The results show that the current response of a glucose biosensor can significantly increase, induced by the electrical conductivity and photothermal effect of GNRs.

  17. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  18. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G., E-mail: gajananggm@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India-444602 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphate buffer.

  19. Comparative study of thermal stability of magnetostrictive biosensor between two kinds of biorecognition elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xue-mei; Guntupalli, R.; Lakshmanan, R.S.; Chin, Bryan A.; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Magnetostrictive biosensors specific to Salmonella typhimurium were prepared by immobilizing antibody or phage as biorecognition elements onto the magnetostrictive sensor platform. The sensors were stored at temperatures of 25 °C (room temperature), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively, and the ability to bind S. typhimurium was detected by testing the resonant frequency shift using a HP network analyzer after exposure to 1 mL of 1 × 10 9 cfu/mL of S. typhimurium at a predetermined schedule. The binding of S. typhimurium to biosensors was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that there existed an initial sudden drop in the average density of S. typhimurium bound to the biosensor surface versus duration at different temperatures for the two kinds of recognition elements, and the binding ability to S. typhimurium of phage-immobilized biosensors was much better than that of antibody-immobilized biosensors, with longevity longer than 30 days at all tested temperatures, though decreasing gradually over the testing period. While the longevity of antibody-immobilized biosensors was only about 30, 8 and 5 days at room temperature (25 °C), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively. Meanwhile, the activation energy of the two kinds of biosensors was investigated, and it was found that phage immobilized sensors showed much higher activation energy than antibody immobilized sensors, which resulted in less dependency on temperature and thus having much better thermal stability than antibody immobilized sensors. - Highlights: • Phage immobilized biosensors has much better thermal stability. • The longevity of phage immobilized biosensors was longer than 30 days even at 65 °C. • The activation energy of phage immobilized biosensors is much higher

  20. Comparative study of thermal stability of magnetostrictive biosensor between two kinds of biorecognition elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xue-mei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Guntupalli, R.; Lakshmanan, R.S.; Chin, Bryan A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States); Hu, Jing, E-mail: jinghoo@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Magnetostrictive biosensors specific to Salmonella typhimurium were prepared by immobilizing antibody or phage as biorecognition elements onto the magnetostrictive sensor platform. The sensors were stored at temperatures of 25 °C (room temperature), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively, and the ability to bind S. typhimurium was detected by testing the resonant frequency shift using a HP network analyzer after exposure to 1 mL of 1 × 10{sup 9} cfu/mL of S. typhimurium at a predetermined schedule. The binding of S. typhimurium to biosensors was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that there existed an initial sudden drop in the average density of S. typhimurium bound to the biosensor surface versus duration at different temperatures for the two kinds of recognition elements, and the binding ability to S. typhimurium of phage-immobilized biosensors was much better than that of antibody-immobilized biosensors, with longevity longer than 30 days at all tested temperatures, though decreasing gradually over the testing period. While the longevity of antibody-immobilized biosensors was only about 30, 8 and 5 days at room temperature (25 °C), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively. Meanwhile, the activation energy of the two kinds of biosensors was investigated, and it was found that phage immobilized sensors showed much higher activation energy than antibody immobilized sensors, which resulted in less dependency on temperature and thus having much better thermal stability than antibody immobilized sensors. - Highlights: • Phage immobilized biosensors has much better thermal stability. • The longevity of phage immobilized biosensors was longer than 30 days even at 65 °C. • The activation energy of phage immobilized biosensors is much higher.

  1. Plasmonic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ryan T

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and popularity of film-based SPR sensing. This review surveys the current plasmonic biosensor landscape with emphasis on the basic operating principles of each plasmonic sensing technique and the practical considerations when developing a sensing platform with the various techniques. The 'gold standard' film SPR technique is reviewed briefly, but special emphasis is devoted to the up-and-coming localized surface plasmon resonance and plasmonically coupled sensor technology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Electrochemical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Cosnier, Serge

    2015-01-01

    "This is an excellent book on modern electrochemical biosensors, edited by Professor Cosnier and written by leading international experts. It covers state-of-the-art topics of this important field in a clear and timely manner."-Prof. Joseph Wang, UC San Diego, USA  "This book covers, in 13 well-illustrated chapters, the potential of electrochemical methods intimately combined with a biological component for the assay of various analytes of biological and environmental interest. Particular attention is devoted to the description of electrochemical microtools in close contact with a biological cell for exocytosis monitoring and to the use of nanomaterials in the electrochemical biosensor architecture for signal improvement. Interestingly, one chapter describes the concept and design of self-powered biosensors derived from biofuel cells. Each topic is reviewed by experts very active in the field. This timely book is well suited for providing a good overview of current research trends devoted to electrochemical...

  3. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Rostova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  4. Development of Novel Piezoelectric Biosensor Using PZT Ceramic Resonator for Detection of Cancer Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Fong, Chi-Chun; Cheung, Pik-Yuan; Yang, Mengsu

    2017-01-01

    A novel biosensor based on piezoelectric ceramic resonator was developed for direct detection of cancer markers in the study. For the first time, a commercially available PZT ceramic resonator with high resonance frequency was utilized as transducer for a piezoelectric biosensor. A dual ceramic resonators scheme was designed wherein two ceramic resonators were connected in parallel: one resonator was used as the sensing unit and the other as the control unit. This arrangement minimizes environmental influences including temperature fluctuation, while achieving the required frequency stability for biosensing applications. The detection of the cancer markers Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and α-Fetoprotein (AFP) was carried out through frequency change measurement. The device showed high sensitivity (0.25 ng/ml) and fast detection (within 30 min) with small samples (1 μl), which is compatible with the requirements of clinical measurements. The results also showed that the ceramic resonator-based piezoelectric biosensor platform could be utilized with different chemical interfaces, and had the potential to be further developed into biosensor arrays with different specificities for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes.

  5. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Polydiacetylene-Poly (Ethylene Oxide Electrospun Fibers Used as Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K M Mashud Alam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polydiacetylene (PDA is an attractive conjugated material for use in biosensors due to its unique characteristic of undergoing a blue-to-red color change in response to external stimuli. 10,12-Pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA and poly (ethylene oxide (PEO were used in this study to develop fiber composites via an electrospinning method at various mass ratios of PEO to PCDA, solution concentrations, and injection speeds. The PEO-PDA fibers in blue phase were obtained via photo-polymerization upon UV-light irritation. High mass ratios of PEO to PCDA, low polymer concentrations of spinning solution, and low injection speeds promoted fine fibers with small diameters and smooth surfaces. The colorimetric transition of the fibers was investigated when the fibers were heated at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 120 °C. A color switch from blue to red in the fibers was observed when the fibers were heated at temperatures greater than 60 °C. The color transition was more sensitive in the fibers made with a low mass ratio of PEO to PCDA due to high fraction of PDA in the fibers. The large diameter fibers also promoted the color switch due to high reflectance area in the fibers. All of the fibers were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and compared before and after the color change occurred. The colorimetric transitional mechanism is proposed to occur due to conformational changes in the PDA macromolecules.

  7. Developing Biosensors in Developing Countries: South Africa as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice

    2016-02-02

    A mini-review of the reported biosensor research occurring in South Africa evidences a strong emphasis on electrochemical sensor research, guided by the opportunities this transduction platform holds for low-cost and robust sensing of numerous targets. Many of the reported publications centre on fundamental research into the signal transduction method, using model biorecognition elements, in line with international trends. Other research in this field is spread across several areas including: the application of nanotechnology; the identification and validation of biomarkers; development and testing of biorecognition agents (antibodies and aptamers) and design of electro-catalysts, most notably metallophthalocyanine. Biosensor targets commonly featured were pesticides and metals. Areas of regional import to sub-Saharan Africa, such as HIV/AIDs and tuberculosis diagnosis, are also apparent in a review of the available literature. Irrespective of the targets, the challenge to the effective deployment of such sensors remains shaped by social and economic realities such that the requirements thereof are for low-cost and universally easy to operate devices for field settings. While it is difficult to disentangle the intertwined roles of national policy, grant funding availability and, certainly, of global trends in shaping areas of emphasis in research, most notable is the strong role that nanotechnology, and to a certain extent biotechnology, plays in research regarding biosensor construction. Stronger emphasis on collaboration between scientists in theoretical modelling, nanomaterials application and or relevant stakeholders in the specific field (e.g., food or health monitoring) and researchers in biosensor design may help evolve focused research efforts towards development and deployment of low-cost biosensors.

  8. Developing Biosensors in Developing Countries: South Africa as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Fogel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A mini-review of the reported biosensor research occurring in South Africa evidences a strong emphasis on electrochemical sensor research, guided by the opportunities this transduction platform holds for low-cost and robust sensing of numerous targets. Many of the reported publications centre on fundamental research into the signal transduction method, using model biorecognition elements, in line with international trends. Other research in this field is spread across several areas including: the application of nanotechnology; the identification and validation of biomarkers; development and testing of biorecognition agents (antibodies and aptamers and design of electro-catalysts, most notably metallophthalocyanine. Biosensor targets commonly featured were pesticides and metals. Areas  of regional import to sub-Saharan Africa, such as HIV/AIDs and tuberculosis diagnosis, are also apparent in a review of the available literature. Irrespective of the targets, the challenge to the effective deployment of such sensors remains shaped by social and economic realities such that the requirements thereof are for low-cost and universally easy to operate devices for field settings. While it is difficult to disentangle the intertwined roles of national policy, grant funding availability and, certainly, of global trends in shaping areas of emphasis in research, most notable is the strong role that nanotechnology, and to a certain extent biotechnology, plays in research regarding biosensor construction. Stronger emphasis on collaboration between scientists in theoretical modelling, nanomaterials application and or relevant stakeholders in the specific field (e.g., food or health monitoring and researchers in biosensor design may help evolve focused research efforts towards development and deployment of low-cost biosensors.

  9. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  10. The study of a fluorescent biosensor based on polyelectrolyte microcapsules with encapsulated glucose oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakova, L. I.; Sirota, N. P.; Sirota, T. V.; Shabarchina, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    A fluorescent biosensor is synthesized and described. The biosensor consists of polyelectrolyte microcapsules with glucose oxidase (GOx) entrapped in the cavities and an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent indicator Ru(dpp) immobilized in shells, where Ru(dpp) is tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride. The theoretical activity of the encapsulated GOx and the effect storage time and medium composition have on the stability of sensor microcapsules are determined from polarographic measurements. No change in the activity of the encapsulated enzyme and or its loss to the storage medium are detected over the test period. The dispersion medium (water or a phosphate buffer) are shown to have no effect on the activity of microcapsules with immobilized GOx. The described optical sensor could be used as an alternative to electrochemical sensors for in vitro determination of glucose in the clinically important range of concentrations (up to 10 mmol/L).

  11. Dynamic monitoring of transmembrane potential changes: a study of ion channels using an electrical double layer-gated FET biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkathodi, Anil Kumar; Sarangadharan, Indu; Chen, Yi-Hong; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2018-03-27

    In this research, we have designed, fabricated and characterized an electrical double layer (EDL)-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) biosensor array to study the transmembrane potential changes of cells. The sensor array platform is designed to detect and count circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of colorectal cancer (CRC) and investigate cellular bioelectric signals. Using the EDL FET biosensor platform, cellular responses can be studied in physiological salt concentrations, thereby eliminating complex automation. Upon investigation, we discovered that our sensor response follows the transmembrane potential changes of captured cells. Our whole cell sensor platform can be used to monitor the dynamic changes in the membrane potential of cells. The effects of continuously changing electrolyte ion concentrations and ion channel blocking using cadmium are investigated. This methodology has the potential to be used as an electrophysiological probe for studying ion channel gating and the interaction of biomolecules in cells. The sensor can also be a point-of-care diagnostic tool for rapid screening of diseases.

  12. Study and fabrication of a broadband receiver with frequency change for a spectrometer by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance based on pulse in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avril, Robert

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this work has been, by using the pulsed NMR technique, to study and produce a set for the reception of the nuclear precession signal for a broadband (1-60 MHz) spectrometer. In a first part, the author recalls some fundamental elements of pulsed NMR, and discusses the assessment of the precession signal amplitude which can be expected. Then, he gives a detailed description of the various components of the reception chain (modulator, amplifiers, broadband pre-amplifiers, diode gate, frequency changer, synchronous detection), and, through experimentation and measurements, outlines the ease of implementation and adaptation to measurement conditions

  13. Electrochemical behavior of antioxidants: Part 3. Electrochemical studies of caffeic Acid–DNA interaction and DNA/carbon nanotube biosensor for DNA damage and protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Abdel-Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode biosensor was used for electrochemical studies of caffeic acid–dsDNA interaction in phosphate buffer solution at pH 2.12. Caffeic acid, CAF, shows a well-defined cyclic voltammetric wave. Its anodic peak current decreases and the peak potential shifts positively on the addition of dsDNA. This behavior was ascribed to an interaction of CAF with dsDNA giving CAF–dsDNA complex by intercalative binding mode. The apparent binding constant of CAF–dsDNA complex was determined using amperometric titrations. The oxidative damage caused to DNA was detected using the biosensor. The damage caused by the reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radical (·−OH generated by the Fenton system on the DNA-biosensor was detected. It was found that CAF has the capability of scavenging the hydroxide radical and protecting the DNA immobilized on the GCE surface.

  14. A New Nanobody-Based Biosensor to Study Endogenous PARP1 In Vitro and in Live Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Buchfellner

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 is a key player in DNA repair, genomic stability and cell survival and it emerges as a highly relevant target for cancer therapies. To deepen our understanding of PARP biology and mechanisms of action of PARP1-targeting anti-cancer compounds, we generated a novel PARP1-affinity reagent, active both in vitro and in live cells. This PARP1-biosensor is based on a PARP1-specific single-domain antibody fragment (~ 15 kDa, termed nanobody, which recognizes the N-terminus of human PARP1 with nanomolar affinity. In proteomic approaches, immobilized PARP1 nanobody facilitates quantitative immunoprecipitation of functional, endogenous PARP1 from cellular lysates. For cellular studies, we engineered an intracellularly functional PARP1 chromobody by combining the nanobody coding sequence with a fluorescent protein sequence. By following the chromobody signal, we were for the first time able to monitor the recruitment of endogenous PARP1 to DNA damage sites in live cells. Moreover, tracing of the sub-nuclear translocation of the chromobody signal upon treatment of human cells with chemical substances enables real-time profiling of active compounds in high content imaging. Due to its ability to perform as a biosensor at the endogenous level of the PARP1 enzyme, the novel PARP1 nanobody is a unique and versatile tool for basic and applied studies of PARP1 biology and DNA repair.

  15. A New Nanobody-Based Biosensor to Study Endogenous PARP1 In Vitro and in Live Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchfellner, Andrea; Yurlova, Larisa; Nüske, Stefan; Scholz, Armin M; Bogner, Jacqueline; Ruf, Benjamin; Zolghadr, Kourosh; Drexler, Sophie E; Drexler, Guido A; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Romer, Tina; Friedl, Anna A; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a key player in DNA repair, genomic stability and cell survival and it emerges as a highly relevant target for cancer therapies. To deepen our understanding of PARP biology and mechanisms of action of PARP1-targeting anti-cancer compounds, we generated a novel PARP1-affinity reagent, active both in vitro and in live cells. This PARP1-biosensor is based on a PARP1-specific single-domain antibody fragment (~ 15 kDa), termed nanobody, which recognizes the N-terminus of human PARP1 with nanomolar affinity. In proteomic approaches, immobilized PARP1 nanobody facilitates quantitative immunoprecipitation of functional, endogenous PARP1 from cellular lysates. For cellular studies, we engineered an intracellularly functional PARP1 chromobody by combining the nanobody coding sequence with a fluorescent protein sequence. By following the chromobody signal, we were for the first time able to monitor the recruitment of endogenous PARP1 to DNA damage sites in live cells. Moreover, tracing of the sub-nuclear translocation of the chromobody signal upon treatment of human cells with chemical substances enables real-time profiling of active compounds in high content imaging. Due to its ability to perform as a biosensor at the endogenous level of the PARP1 enzyme, the novel PARP1 nanobody is a unique and versatile tool for basic and applied studies of PARP1 biology and DNA repair.

  16. A New Nanobody-Based Biosensor to Study Endogenous PARP1 In Vitro and in Live Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüske, Stefan; Scholz, Armin M.; Bogner, Jacqueline; Ruf, Benjamin; Zolghadr, Kourosh; Drexler, Sophie E.; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Romer, Tina; Friedl, Anna A.; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a key player in DNA repair, genomic stability and cell survival and it emerges as a highly relevant target for cancer therapies. To deepen our understanding of PARP biology and mechanisms of action of PARP1-targeting anti-cancer compounds, we generated a novel PARP1-affinity reagent, active both in vitro and in live cells. This PARP1-biosensor is based on a PARP1-specific single-domain antibody fragment (~ 15 kDa), termed nanobody, which recognizes the N-terminus of human PARP1 with nanomolar affinity. In proteomic approaches, immobilized PARP1 nanobody facilitates quantitative immunoprecipitation of functional, endogenous PARP1 from cellular lysates. For cellular studies, we engineered an intracellularly functional PARP1 chromobody by combining the nanobody coding sequence with a fluorescent protein sequence. By following the chromobody signal, we were for the first time able to monitor the recruitment of endogenous PARP1 to DNA damage sites in live cells. Moreover, tracing of the sub-nuclear translocation of the chromobody signal upon treatment of human cells with chemical substances enables real-time profiling of active compounds in high content imaging. Due to its ability to perform as a biosensor at the endogenous level of the PARP1 enzyme, the novel PARP1 nanobody is a unique and versatile tool for basic and applied studies of PARP1 biology and DNA repair. PMID:26950694

  17. Determination of Irreducible Water Saturation from nuclear magnetic resonance based on fractal theory — a case study of sandstone with complex pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, L.; Pan, H.; Ma, H.; Zhao, P.; Qin, R.; Deng, C.

    2017-12-01

    The irreducible water saturation (Swir) is a vital parameter for permeability prediction and original oil and gas estimation. However, the complex pore structure of the rocks makes the parameter difficult to be calculated from both laboratory and conventional well logging methods. In this study, an effective statistical method to predict Swir is derived directly from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data based on fractal theory. The spectrum of transversal relaxation time (T2) is normally considered as an indicator of pore size distribution, and the micro- and meso-pore's fractal dimension in two specific range of T2 spectrum distribution are calculated. Based on the analysis of the fractal characteristics of 22 core samples, which were drilled from four boreholes of tight lithologic oil reservoirs of Ordos Basin in China, the positive correlation between Swir and porosity is derived. Afterwards a predicting model for Swir based on linear regressions of fractal dimensions is proposed. It reveals that the Swir is controlled by the pore size and the roughness of the pore. The reliability of this model is tested and an ideal consistency between predicted results and experimental data is found. This model is a reliable supplementary to predict the irreducible water saturation in the case that T2 cutoff value cannot be accurately determined.

  18. Biosensors and preparation thereof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A low-temp. prepn. method for a biosensor device with a layer of reagent on the sensor surface is disclosed. During manufg. biol. interaction between the biosensor substrate and the reagent layer material is reduced, e.g. by cooling the biosensor substrate and depositing the reagent layer on the

  19. Cholinesterase-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Recently, cholinesterase-based biosensors are widely used for assaying anticholinergic compounds. Primarily biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening of inhibitors, such as organophosphates and carbamates. The present review is aimed at compilation of the most important facts about cholinesterase based biosensors, types of physico-chemical transduction, immobilization strategies and practical applications.

  20. A review study of (bio)sensor systems based on conducting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Murat

    2013-05-01

    This review article concentrates on the electrochemical biosensor systems with conducting polymers. The area of electro-active polymers confined to different electrode surfaces has attracted great attention. Polymer modified carbon substrate electrodes can be designed through polymer screening to provide tremendous improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility of the electrode response to detect a variety of analytes. The electro-active films have been used to entrap different enzymes and/or proteins at the electrode surface, but without obvious loss of their bioactivity for the development of biosensors. Electropolymerization is a well-known technique used to immobilize biomaterials to the modified electrode surface. Polymers might be covalently bonding to enzymes or proteins; therefore, thickness, permeation and charge transport characteristics of the polymeric films can be easily and precisely controlled by modulating the electrochemical parameters for various electrochemical techniques, such as chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry. This review article is divided into three main parts as given in the table of contents related to the immobilization process of some important conducting polymers, polypyrrole, polythiophene, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), polycarbazole, polyaniline, polyphenol, poly(o-phenylenediamine), polyacetylene, polyfuran and their derivatives. A total of 216 references are cited in this review article. The literature reviewed covers a 7 year period beginning from 2005. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Bansi D; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Chandra Mouli

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection. (paper)

  2. Bulk disk resonator based ultrasensitive mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Davis, Zachary James

    2009-01-01

    range. The sensor has been characterized in terms of sensitivity both for distributed mass detection, performing six consecutive depositions of e-beam evaporated Au, and localized mass detection, depositing approximately 7.5 pg of Pt/Ga/C three times consecutively with a Focused Ion Beam system......In the framework of developing an innovative label-free sensor for multiarrayed biodetection applications, we present a novel bulk resonator based mass sensor. The sensor is a polysilicon disk which shows a Q-factor of 6400 in air at 68.8 MHz, resulting in mass resolutions down in the femtogram....... The sensor has an extremely high distributed mass to frequency shift sensitivity of 60104 Hzcm2/¿g and shows a localized mass to frequency sensitivity up to 4405 Hz/pg with a localized mass resolution down to 15 fg. The device has been fabricated with a new microfabrication process that uses only two...

  3. Nanopolyaniline as immobilization template for signal enhancement of surface plasmon resonance biosensor - A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarun, Dzaraini; Abdul Azem, Nor Hazirah Kamel; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Mohd, Ahmad Faiza; Abdullah @ Mohd Noor, Mashita

    2012-07-01

    A technique for the enhancement of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) signal for sensing biomolecular interactions is described. Polyaniline (PANI) of particle size in the range of 1 to 15 nm was synthesized and used as the template for the immobilization of protein molecules. Biomolecular interactions of unbound and PANI-bound proteins with antibody molecules were SPR-monitored using a model system comprising of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and anti BSA. A 7-fold increased in the signal was recorded from interactions of the PANI-bound BSA with anti BSA compared to the interactions of its unbound counterpart. This preliminary observation provides new avenue in immunosensor technology for improving the detection sensitivity of SPR biosensor; and thereby increasing the lower detection limit of biomolecules.

  4. Development of electrochemical biosensors with various types of zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkina, O. V.; Kucherenko, I. S.; Soldatkin, O. O.; Pyeshkova, V. M.; Dudchenko, O. Y.; Akata Kurç, B.; Dzyadevych, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    In the work, different types of zeolites were used for the development of enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors. Zeolites were added to the biorecognition elements of the biosensors and served as additional components of the biomembranes or adsorbents for enzymes. Three types of biosensors (conductometric, amperometric and potentiometric) were studied. The developed biosensors were compared with the similar biosensors without zeolites. The biosensors contained the following enzymes: urease, glucose oxidase, glutamate oxidase, and acetylcholinesterase and were intended for the detection of urea, glucose, glutamate, and acetylcholine, respectively. Construction of the biosensors using the adsorption of enzymes on zeolites has several advantages: simplicity, good reproducibility, quickness, absence of toxic compounds. These benefits are particularly important for the standardization and further mass production of the biosensors. Furthermore, a biosensor for the sucrose determination contained a three-enzyme system (invertase/mutatorase/glucose oxidase), immobilized by a combination of adsorption on silicalite and cross-linking via glutaraldehyde; such combined immobilization demonstrated better results as compared with adsorption or cross-linking separately. The analysis of urea and sucrose concentrations in the real samples was carried out. The results, obtained with biosensors, had high correlation with the results of traditional analytical methods, thus the developed biosensors are promising for practical applications.

  5. Biosensor Architectures for High-Fidelity Reporting of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushek, Omer; Lellouch, Annemarie C.; Vaux, David J.; Shahrezaei, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms of information processing in cellular signaling networks requires quantitative measurements of protein activities in living cells. Biosensors are molecular probes that have been developed to directly track the activity of specific signaling proteins and their use is revolutionizing our understanding of signal transduction. The use of biosensors relies on the assumption that their activity is linearly proportional to the activity of the signaling protein they have been engineered to track. We use mechanistic mathematical models of common biosensor architectures (single-chain FRET-based biosensors), which include both intramolecular and intermolecular reactions, to study the validity of the linearity assumption. As a result of the classic mechanism of zero-order ultrasensitivity, we find that biosensor activity can be highly nonlinear so that small changes in signaling protein activity can give rise to large changes in biosensor activity and vice versa. This nonlinearity is abolished in architectures that favor the formation of biosensor oligomers, but oligomeric biosensors produce complicated FRET states. Based on this finding, we show that high-fidelity reporting is possible when a single-chain intermolecular biosensor is used that cannot undergo intramolecular reactions and is restricted to forming dimers. We provide phase diagrams that compare various trade-offs, including observer effects, which further highlight the utility of biosensor architectures that favor intermolecular over intramolecular binding. We discuss challenges in calibrating and constructing biosensors and highlight the utility of mathematical models in designing novel probes for cellular signaling. PMID:25099816

  6. Biosensors and bioelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Karunakaran, Chandran; Benjamin, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics presents the rapidly evolving methodologies that are relevant to biosensors and bioelectronics fabrication and characterization. The book provides a comprehensive understanding of biosensor functionality, and is an interdisciplinary reference that includes a range of interwoven contributing subjects, including electrochemistry, nanoparticles, and conducting polymers. Authored by a team of bioinstrumentation experts, this book serves as a blueprint for performing advanced fabrication and characterization of sensor systems-arming readers with an application-based re

  7. Improved Biosensors for Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Cheng, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes drive processes in the Earth system far exceeding their physical scale, affecting crop yields, water quality, the mobilization of toxic materials, and fundamental aspects of soil biogeochemistry. The tools of synthetic biology have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbial Earth system processes: for example, synthetic microbes can be be programmed to report on environmental conditions that stimulate greenhouse gas production, metal oxidation, biofilm formation, pollutant degradation, and microbe-plant symbioses. However, these tools are only rarely deployed in the lab. This research gap arises because synthetically programmed microbes typically report on their environment by producing molecules that are detected optically (e.g., fluorescent proteins). Fluorescent reporters are ideal for petri-dish applications and have fundamentally changed how we study human health, but their usefulness is quite limited in soils where detecting fluorescence is challenging. Here we describe the construction of gas-reporting biosensors, which release nonpolar gases that can be detected in the headspace of incubation experiments. These constructs can be used to probe microbial processes within soils in real-time noninvasive lab experiments. These biosensors can be combined with traditional omics-based approaches to reveal processes controlling soil microbial behavior and lead to improved environmental management decisions.

  8. Nanostructured zinc oxide thin film for application to surface plasmon resonance based cholesterol biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2015-11-01

    ZnO thin film was deposited on gold coated glass prism by RF sputtering technique in glancing angle deposition (GLAD) configuration. The structural, morphological and optical properties of the deposited film were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. ZnO coated Au prisms (ZnO/Au/prism) were used to excite surface plasmons in Kretschmann configuration at the Au- ZnO interface on a laboratory assembled Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) measurement setup. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) enzyme was immobilized on the ZnO/Au/prism structure by physical adsorption technique. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels were fabricated over ChOx/ZnO/Au/prism system and various concentrations of cholesterol were passed over the sensor surface. The concentration of cholesterol was varied from 0.12 to 10.23 mM and the SPR reflectance curves were recorded in both static as well as dynamic modes demonstrating a high sensitivity of 0.36° mM-1.

  9. Design of a Label-Free, Distributed Bragg Grating Resonator Based Dielectric Waveguide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Kehl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a resonant, dielectric waveguide device based on distributed Bragg gratings for label-free biosensing applications. The refractive index sensitive optical transducer aims at improving the performance of planar waveguide grating sensor systems with limited Q-factor and dynamic range by combing the advantages of resonant cavities, such as a multitude of resonance peaks with high finesse, with the manageable complexity of waveguide grating couplers. The general sensor concept is introduced and supported by theoretical considerations as well as numerical simulations based on Coupled Mode Theory. In contrast to a single Bragg grating reflector, the presented Fabry-Pérot type distributed Bragg resonator exhibits an extended measurement range as well as relaxed fabrication tolerances. The resulting, relatively simple sensor structure can be fabricated with standard lithographic means and is independent of expensive light-sources and/or detectors, making an affordable but sensitive device, potentially suitable for point-of-care applications.

  10. Nanopatterned Bulk Metallic Glass Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Emily R; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Yu, Roy; Corona, Sydney L; Li, Jinyang; Vaddiraju, Sagar; Legassey, Allen; Loye, Ayomiposi; Balestrini, Jenna; Solly, Dawson A; Schroers, Jan; Taylor, André D; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Herzog, Raimund I; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-12-22

    Nanopatterning as a surface area enhancement method has the potential to increase signal and sensitivity of biosensors. Platinum-based bulk metallic glass (Pt-BMG) is a biocompatible material with electrical properties conducive for biosensor electrode applications, which can be processed in air at comparably low temperatures to produce nonrandom topography at the nanoscale. Work presented here employs nanopatterned Pt-BMG electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase enzyme to explore the impact of nonrandom and highly reproducible nanoscale surface area enhancement on glucose biosensor performance. Electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric voltammetry (AV) were completed to compare the performance of 200 nm Pt-BMG electrodes vs Flat Pt-BMG control electrodes. Glucose dosing response was studied in a range of 2 mM to 10 mM. Effective current density dynamic range for the 200 nm Pt-BMG was 10-12 times greater than that of the Flat BMG control. Nanopatterned electrode sensitivity was measured to be 3.28 μA/cm 2 /mM, which was also an order of magnitude greater than the flat electrode. These results suggest that nonrandom nanotopography is a scalable and customizable engineering tool which can be integrated with Pt-BMGs to produce biocompatible biosensors with enhanced signal and sensitivity.

  11. Design and test of a biosensor-based multisensorial system: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Grasso, Simone; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2013-12-04

    Sensors are often organized in multidimensional systems or networks for particular applications. This is facilitated by the large improvements in the miniaturization process, power consumption reduction and data analysis techniques nowadays possible. Such sensors are frequently organized in multidimensional arrays oriented to the realization of artificial sensorial systems mimicking the mechanisms of human senses. Instruments that make use of these sensors are frequently employed in the fields of medicine and food science. Among them, the so-called electronic nose and tongue are becoming more and more popular. In this paper an innovative multisensorial system based on sensing materials of biological origin is illustrated. Anthocyanins are exploited here as chemical interactive materials for both quartz microbalance (QMB) transducers used as gas sensors and for electrodes used as liquid electrochemical sensors. The optical properties of anthocyanins are well established and widely used, but they have never been exploited as sensing materials for both gas and liquid sensors in non-optical applications. By using the same set of selected anthocyanins an integrated system has been realized, which includes a gas sensor array based on QMB and a sensor array for liquids made up of suitable Ion Sensitive Electrodes (ISEs). The arrays are also monitored from an optical point of view. This embedded system, is intended to mimic the working principles of the nose, tongue and eyes. We call this setup BIONOTE (for BIOsensor-based multisensorial system for mimicking NOse, Tongue and Eyes). The complete design, fabrication and calibration processes of the BIONOTE system are described herein, and a number of preliminary results are discussed. These results are relative to: (a) the characterization of the optical properties of the tested materials; (b) the performance of the whole system as gas sensor array with respect to ethanol, hexane and isopropyl alcohol detection

  12. Design and Test of a Biosensor-Based Multisensorial System: A Proof of Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Santonico

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are often organized in multidimensional systems or networks for particular applications. This is facilitated by the large improvements in the miniaturization process, power consumption reduction and data analysis techniques nowadays possible. Such sensors are frequently organized in multidimensional arrays oriented to the realization of artificial sensorial systems mimicking the mechanisms of human senses. Instruments that make use of these sensors are frequently employed in the fields of medicine and food science. Among them, the so-called electronic nose and tongue are becoming more and more popular. In this paper an innovative multisensorial system based on sensing materials of biological origin is illustrated. Anthocyanins are exploited here as chemical interactive materials for both quartz microbalance (QMB transducers used as gas sensors and for electrodes used as liquid electrochemical sensors. The optical properties of anthocyanins are well established and widely used, but they have never been exploited as sensing materials for both gas and liquid sensors in non-optical applications. By using the same set of selected anthocyanins an integrated system has been realized, which includes a gas sensor array based on QMB and a sensor array for liquids made up of suitable Ion Sensitive Electrodes (ISEs. The arrays are also monitored from an optical point of view. This embedded system, is intended to mimic the working principles of the nose, tongue and eyes. We call this setup BIONOTE (for BIOsensor-based multisensorial system for mimicking NOse, Tongue and Eyes. The complete design, fabrication and calibration processes of the BIONOTE system are described herein, and a number of preliminary results are discussed. These results are relative to: (a the characterization of the optical properties of the tested materials; (b the performance of the whole system as gas sensor array with respect to ethanol, hexane and isopropyl alcohol

  13. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  14. Biosensors in the small scale: methods and technology trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senveli, Sukru U; Tigli, Onur

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a review on biosensors with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. A brief history accompanied by a detailed description of the biosensor concepts is followed by rising trends observed in contemporary micro- and nanoscale biosensors. Performance metrics to quantify and compare different detection mechanisms are presented. A comprehensive analysis on various types and subtypes of biosensors are given. The fields of interest within the scope of this review are label-free electrical, mechanical and optical biosensors as well as other emerging and popular technologies. Especially, the latter half of the last decade is reviewed for the types, methods and results of the most prominently researched detection mechanisms. Tables are provided for comparison of various competing technologies in the literature. The conclusion part summarises the noteworthy advantages and disadvantages of all biosensors reviewed in this study. Furthermore, future directions that the micro- and nanoscale biosensing technologies are expected to take are provided along with the immediate outlook.

  15. Electrochemical study of quinone redox cycling: A novel application of DNA-based biosensors for monitoring biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Jamei, Hamid Reza; Heydari-Bafrooei, Esmaeil; Rezaei, B

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of voltammetric and impedimetric DNA-based biosensors for monitoring biological and chemical redox cycling reactions involving free radical intermediates. The concept is based on associating the amounts of radicals generated with the electrochemical signals produced, using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). For this purpose, a pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes and poly-diallydimethlammonium chloride decorated with double stranded fish sperm DNA was prepared to detect DNA damage induced by the radicals generated from a redox cycling quinone (i.e., menadione (MD; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone)). Menadione was employed as a model compound to study the redox cycling of quinones. A direct relationship was found between free radical production and DNA damage. The relationship between MD-induced DNA damage and free radical generation was investigated in an attempt to identify the possible mechanism(s) involved in the action of MD. Results showed that DPV and EIS were appropriate, simple and inexpensive techniques for the quantitative and qualitative comparisons of different reducing reagents. These techniques may be recommended for monitoring DNA damages and investigating the mechanisms involved in the production of redox cycling compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Complutense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-08-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated. (author)

  17. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli

    2008-01-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated

  18. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  19. A Highly Responsive Silicon Nanowire/Amplifier MOSFET Hybrid Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Hybrid Biosensor Jieun Lee1,2, Jaeman Jang1, Bongsik Choi1, Jinsu Yoon1, Jee-Yeon Kim3, Yang-Kyu Choi3, Dong Myong Kim1, Dae Hwan Kim1 & Sung-Jin Choi1...This study demonstrates a hybrid biosensor comprised of a silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with an amplifier MOSFET to improve the current response...of field-effect-transistor (FET)-based biosensors . The hybrid biosensor is fabricated using conventional CMOS technology, which has the potential

  20. A comparative study of in-flow and micro-patterning biofunctionalization protocols for nanophotonic silicon-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Ana Belén; Alvarez, Mar; García Castaño, Andrés; Domínguez, Carlos; Lechuga, Laura M

    2013-03-01

    Reliable immobilization of bioreceptors over any sensor surface is the most crucial step for achieving high performance, selective and sensitive biosensor devices able to analyze human samples without the need of previous processing. With this aim, we have implemented an optimized scheme to covalently biofunctionalize the sensor area of a novel nanophotonic interferometric biosensor. The proposed method is based on the ex-situ silanization of the silicon nitride transducer surface by the use of a carboxyl water soluble silane, the carboxyethylsilanetriol sodium salt (CTES). The use of an organosilane stable in water entails advantages in comparison with usual trialkoxysilanes such as avoiding the generation of organic waste and leading to the assembly of compact monolayers due to the high dielectric constant of water. Additionally, cross-linking is prevented when the conditions (e.g. immersion time, concentration of silane) are optimized. This covalent strategy is followed by the bioreceptor linkage on the sensor area surface using two different approaches: an in-flow patterning and a microcontact printing using a biodeposition system. The performance of the different bioreceptor layers assembled is compared by the real-time and label-free immunosensing of the proteins BSA/mAb BSA, employed as a model molecular pair. Although the results demonstrated that both strategies provide the biosensor with a stable biological interface, the performance of the bioreceptor layer assembled by microcontact printing slightly improves the biosensing capabilities of the photonic biosensor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review, with 19 references, is given on challenges and possible opportunities for the development of biosensors for environmental monitoring applications. The high cost and slow turnaround times typically associated with the measurement of regulated pollutants clearly indicates...

  2. Triggered optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-10-02

    An optical biosensor is provided for the detection of a multivalent target biomolecule, the biosensor including a substrate having a bilayer membrane thereon, a recognition molecule situated at the surface, the recognition molecule capable of binding with the multivalent target biomolecule, the recognition molecule further characterized as including a fluorescence label thereon and as being movable at the surface and a device for measuring a fluorescence change in response to binding between the recognition molecule and the multivalent target biomolecule.

  3. Molecular Approaches to Optical Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fierke, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was to develop methodologies for the optimization of field-deployable optical biosensors, in general, and, in particular, to optimize a carbonic anhydrase-based fiber optic zinc biosensor...

  4. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Study of the biosensor based on platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes and sugar-lectin biospecific interactions for the determination of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjuan; Yuan Ruo; Chai Yaqin; Zhong Huaan; Wang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This work described the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. → The Pt nano -CNTs were used to construct biosensor for the determination of glucose. → GOD can be assembled into multilayer thin films via sugar-lectin affinity. → The protocol can avoid the chemical denaturation of the enzyme. → It improve the stability and sensitivity of the enzyme biosensor. - Abstract: Highly sensitive electrochemical platform based on Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt nano -CNTs) and sugar-lectin biospecific interactions is developed for the direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD). Firstly, Pt nano -CNTs nanocomposites were prepared in the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and then the mixture was cast on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using chitosan as a binder. Thereafter, concanavalin A (Con A) was adsorbed onto the precursor film by the electrostatic force between positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged Con A. Finally, the multilayers of Con A/GOD films were prepared based on biospecific affinity of Con A and GOD via layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was studied using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The electrochemical parameters of GOD in the film were calculated with the results of the electron transfer coefficient (α) and the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) as 0.5 and 5.093 s -1 , respectively. Experimental results show that the biosensor responded linearly to glucose in the range from 1.2 x 10 -6 to 2.0 x 10 -3 M, with a detection limit of 4.0 x 10 -7 M under optimized conditions.

  6. Recent Progress in Lectin-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress in the development of lectin-based biosensors used for the determination of glucose, pathogenic bacteria and toxins, cancer cells, and lectins. Lectin proteins have been widely used for the construction of optical and electrochemical biosensors by exploiting the specific binding affinity to carbohydrates. Among lectin proteins, concanavalin A (Con A is most frequently used for this purpose as glucose- and mannose-selective lectin. Con A is useful for immobilizing enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP on the surface of a solid support to construct glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors, because these enzymes are covered with intrinsic hydrocarbon chains. Con A-modified electrodes can be used as biosensors sensitive to glucose, cancer cells, and pathogenic bacteria covered with hydrocarbon chains. The target substrates are selectively adsorbed to the surface of Con A-modified electrodes through strong affinity of Con A to hydrocarbon chains. A recent topic in the development of lectin-based biosensors is a successful use of nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, for amplifying output signals of the sensors. In addition, lectin-based biosensors are useful for studying glycan expression on living cells.

  7. Introduction to biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Biosensors in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickx, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is a device that uses biological materials to detect and monitor the presence of specific chemicals in an area. Traditional methods of volatile detection used by law enforcement agencies and rescue teams typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. This concept of using dogs to detect specific substances is quite old. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. Thus, the possibility of using other organisms as biosensors including rats, dolphins, honeybees, and parasitic wasps for detecting explosives, narcotics and cadavers has been developed. Insects have several advantages unshared by mammals. Insects are sensitive, cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical-detection task. Moreover, insects might be a preferred sensing method in scenarios that are deemed too dangerous to use mammals. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the biosensors used in forensic sciences.

  9. Introduction to Biosensors From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors discusses underlying circuitry of sensors for biomedical and biological engineers as well as biomedical sensing modalities for electrical engineers while providing an applications-based approach to the study of biosensors with over 13 extensive, hands-on labs. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors and ending with more complicated biosensors. This book also: Provides electrical engineers with the specific knowledge they need to understand biological sensing modalities Provides biomedical engineers with a solid background in circuits and systems Includes complete coverage of temperature sensors, electrochemical sensors, DNA and immunosensors, piezoelectric sensors and immunosensing in a micofluidic device Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors aims to provide an interdisciplinary approach to biosensors that will be apprecia...

  10. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  11. Introduction to biosensors from electric circuits to immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    This book equips students with a thorough understanding of various types of sensors and biosensors that can be used for chemical, biological, and biomedical applications, including but not limited to temperature sensors, strain sensor, light sensors, spectrophotometric sensors, pulse oximeter, optical fiber probes, fluorescence sensors, pH sensor, ion-selective electrodes, piezoelectric sensors, glucose sensors, DNA and immunosensors, lab-on-a-chip biosensors, paper-based lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and microcontroller-based sensors. The author treats the study of biosensors with an applications-based approach, including over 15 extensive, hands-on labs given at the end of each chapter. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors, and ending with more complicated biosensors. New to this second edition are sections on op-amp filters, pulse oximetry, meat quality monitoring, advanced fluorescent dyes, autofluorescence, various...

  12. Biosensors: Future Analytical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors offer considerable promises for attaining the analytic information in a faster, simpler and cheaper manner compared to conventional assays. Biosensing approach is rapidly advancing and applications ranging from metabolite, biological/ chemical warfare agent, food pathogens and adulterant detection to genetic screening and programmed drug delivery have been demonstrated. Innovative efforts, coupling micromachining and nanofabrication may lead to even more powerful devices that would accelerate the realization of large-scale and routine screening. With gradual increase in commercialization a wide range of new biosensors are thus expected to reach the market in the coming years.

  13. Potentiality of application of the conductometric L-arginine biosensors for the real sample analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffrezic-Renault N.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine an influence of serum components on the L-arginine biosensor sensitivity and to formulate practical recommendations for its reliable analysis. Methods. The L-arginine biosensor comprised arginase and urease co-immobilized by cross-linking. Results. The biosensor specificity was investigated based on a series of representative studies (namely, through urea determination in the serum; inhibitory effect studies of mercury ions; high temperature treatment of sensors; studying the biosensor sensitivity to the serum treated by enzymes, and selectivity studies. It was found that the response of the biosensor to the serum injections was determined by high sensitivity of the L-arginine biosensor toward not only to L-arginine but also toward two other basic amino acids (L-lysine and L-histidine. Conclusions. A detailed procedure of optimization of the conductometric biosensor for L-arginine determination in blood serum has been proposed.

  14. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  17. Amperometric biosensors based on conducting nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes a multidisciplinary study towards the development of a glucose biosensor that in the future can be used for in vivo implantations. The research focuses on three major topics, viz. the construction of the glucose sensor, the development of a biocompatible coating and a study of

  18. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson,Vânia da Silva; Duran,Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  19. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  20. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Eric de Souza; Melo, Giselle Rodrigues de

    2010-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, fo...

  1. Fabrication of Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Conducting Polyaniline (NSPANI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshikha SAINI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 biosensors based on nanostructured conducting polyaniline (NSPANI (synthesized using sodiumdodecyl sulphate (SDS as structure directing agent were developed. Because of the large specific surface area, excellent conductivity of NSPANI, horseradish peroxidase (HRP and glucose oxidase (GOx could be easily immobilized with high loading and activity. In addition the small dimensions and the high surface-to-volume ratio of the NSCP allow the rapid transmission of electron and enhance current response. The linear dynamic range of optical glucose and H2O2 biosensors is 5–40 mM for glucose and 1–50 mM for H2O2, respectively where as the bulk PANI exhibits linearity between 5-20 mM/l. The miniature optical glucose biosensor also exhibits good reproducibility. The storage stability of optical glucose and H2O2 biosensors is two weeks for glucose and five days for H2O2. The high response value of NSPANI based biosensors as compared to bulk PANI based biosensor reflects higher enzymatic affinity of GOx/NSPANI and HRP/NSPANI with glucose and H2O2 due to biocompatibility, active surface area and high electron communication capability of nanobiopolymer film. In conclusion, the NSPANI based biosensors proposed herein have many advantages such as a low response time, high reproducibility, high sensitivity, stable and wide dynamic range.

  2. A Highly Responsive Silicon Nanowire/Amplifier MOSFET Hybrid Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Jang, Jaeman; Choi, Bongsik; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates a hybrid biosensor comprised of a silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with an amplifier MOSFET to improve the current response of field-effect-transistor (FET)-based biosensors. The hybrid biosensor is fabricated using conventional CMOS technology, which has the potential advantage of high density and low noise performance. The biosensor shows a current response of 5.74 decades per pH for pH detection, which is 2.5 × 10(5) times larger than that of a single SiNW sensor. In addition, we demonstrate charged polymer detection using the biosensor, with a high current change of 4.5 × 10(5) with a 500 nM concentration of poly(allylamine hydrochloride). In addition, we demonstrate a wide dynamic range can be obtained by adjusting the liquid gate voltage. We expect that this biosensor will be advantageous and practical for biosensor applications which requires lower noise, high speed, and high density.

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  4. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  5. Synthetic Electric Microbial Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    domains and DNA-binding domains into a single protein for deregulation of down stream genes of have been favored [10]. Initially experiments with... Germany DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited.   Talk title: “Synthetic biology based microbial biosensors for the...toolbox” in Heidelberg, Germany Poster title: “Anaerobic whole cell microbial biosensors” Link: http://phdsymposium.embl.org/#home   September, 2014

  6. Biosensor. Seitai sensa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, I [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    1993-06-15

    Present state of the art of biosensors is described by taking taste sensors and odor sensors as examples. Bio-devices that response only to specific chemical substances are made using membranes that recognize particular molecules. Biosensors are constructed in combination of bio-devices with electronics devices that transduce the response of bio-devices to electric signals. Enzymes are used often as bio-devices to recognize molecules. They recognize strictly chemical substances and promote chemical reactions. Devices to measure electrochemically substances consumed or produced in the reactions serve as sensors. For taste sensors, inosinic acid or glutamic acid that is a component of taste, is recognized and measured. Combination of various bio-devices other than enzymes with various transducers makes it possible to produce biosensors based on a variety of principles. Odor sensors recognize odors by measuring frequency change of the electrode of quartz oscillator. The change occurs with weight change due to odorous substances absorbed on the oscillator electrode coated with lipids which exist in olfactory cells. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  7. Glycerol capped PbS/CdS core/shell nanoparticles at different molar ratio and its application in biosensors: An optical properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D., E-mail: ddasphy014@gmail.com; Hussain, A. M. P. [Department of Physics, Cotton College, Guwahati, Assam, India- 781001 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Glycerol capped PbS/CdS core/shell type nanoparticles fabricated with two different molar ratios are characterized for study of structural and optical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern exhibits cubic phased polycrystalline nanocrystals. The calculated grain sizes from Williamson-Hall plot were found to be around 6 nm with increased strain. HRTEM investigation confirms the formation of core/shell nanostructures and the sizes of the particles were found to be around 7 nm which is in good agreement with the results of the W-H plot. An increase of band gap with the decrease in precursor concentration is confirmed from the blue shift in the absorption spectra and also from Tauc plot. A clear blue shifted intense emission is observed in the photoluminescence spectra with decrease in particle size. Intense luminescence from the core/shell nanostructure may be applied in bio labelling and biosensors.

  8. Preparation and electrochemical application of a new biosensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrocatalytic behaviour of oxidized acetaminophen was studied at the surface of the biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. The advantages of this ..... each case, a few ml of methanol was added to sample, and then it was ...

  9. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  10. Affinity biosensors: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Kim R; Mulchandani, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    ..., and government to begin or expand their biosensors research. This volume, Methods in Biotechnology vol. 7: Affinity Biosensors: Techniques and Protocols, describes a variety of classical and emerging transduction technologies that have been interfaced to bioaffinity elements (e.g., antibodies and receptors). Some of the reas...

  11. Theoretical analysis and simulation study of low-power CMOS electrochemical impedance spectroscopy biosensor in 55 nm deeply depleted channel technology for cell-state monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Keisuke; Kayano, Keisuke; Nakazato, Kazuo; Niitsu, Kiichi

    2018-01-01

    We present an impedance-detection complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) biosensor circuit for cell-state observation. The proposed biosensor can measure the expected impedance values encountered by a cell-state observation measurement system within a 0.1-200 MHz frequency range. The proposed device is capable of monitoring the intracellular conditions necessary for real-time cell-state observation, and can be fabricated using a 55 nm deeply depleted channel CMOS process. Operation of the biosensor circuit with 0.9 and 1.7 V supply voltages is verified via a simulated program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE) simulation. The power consumption is 300 µW. Further, the standby power consumption is 290 µW, indicating that this biosensor is a low-power instrument suitable for use in Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

  12. A novel biosensor method for surfactant determination based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucherenko, I S; Soldatkin, O O; Arkhypova, V M; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2012-01-01

    A novel enzyme biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition for the determination of surfactants in aqueous solutions is described. Acetylcholinesterase-based bioselective element was deposited via glutaraldehyde on the surface of conductometric transducers. Different variants of inhibitory analysis of surfactants were tested, and finally surfactant's concentration was evaluated by measuring initial rate of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Besides, we studied the effect of solution characteristics on working parameters of the biosensor for direct measurement of acetylcholine and for inhibitory determination of surfactants. The biosensor's sensitivity to anionic and cationic surfactants (0.35 mg l −1 ) was tested. The high operational stability of the biosensor during determination of acetylcholine (RSD 2%) and surfactants (RSD 11%) was shown. Finally, we discussed the selectivity of the biosensor toward surfactants and other AChE inhibitors. The proposed biosensor can be used as a component of the multibiosensor for ecological monitoring of toxicants. (paper)

  13. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  14. Biosensor Regeneration: A Review of Common Techniques and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, J A; Rushworth, J V H; Millner, P A

    2015-06-16

    Biosensors are ideally portable, low-cost tools for the rapid detection of pathogens, proteins, and other analytes. The global biosensor market is currently worth over 10 billion dollars annually and is a burgeoning field of interdisciplinary research that is hailed as a potential revolution in consumer, healthcare, and industrial testing. A key barrier to the widespread adoption of biosensors, however, is their cost. Although many systems have been validated in the laboratory setting and biosensors for a range of analytes are proven at the concept level, many have yet to make a strong commercial case for their acceptance. Though it is true with the development of cheaper electrodes, circuits, and components that there is a downward pressure on costs, there is also an emerging trend toward the development of multianalyte biosensors that is pushing in the other direction. One way to reduce the cost that is suitable for certain systems is to enable their reuse, thus reducing the cost per test. Regenerating biosensors is a technique that can often be used in conjunction with existing systems in order to reduce costs and accelerate the commercialization process. This article discusses the merits and drawbacks of regeneration schemes that have been proven in various biosensor systems and indicates parameters for successful regeneration based on a systematic review of the literature. It also outlines some of the difficulties encountered when considering the role of regeneration at the point of use. A brief meta-analysis has been included in this review to develop a working definition for biosensor regeneration, and using this analysis only ∼60% of the reported studies analyzed were deemed a success. This highlights the variation within the field and the need to normalize regeneration as a standard process across the field by establishing a consensus term.

  15. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  16. Roughness effect on the efficiency of dimer antenna based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barchiesi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication process of nanodevices is continually improved. However, most of the nanodevices, such as biosensors present rough surfaces with mean roughness of some nanometers even if the deposition rate of material is more controlled. The effect of roughness on performance of biosensors was fully addressed for plane biosensors and gratings, but rarely addressed for biosensors based on Local Plasmon Resonance. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate numerically the influence of nanometric roughness on the efficiency of a dimer nano-biosensor (two levels of roughness are considered. Therefore, we propose a general numerical method, that can be applied to any other nanometric shape, to take into account the roughness in a three dimensional model. The study focuses on both the far-field, which corresponds to the experimental detected data, and the near-field, responsible for exciting and then detecting biological molecules. The results suggest that the biosensor efficiency is highly sensitive to the surface roughness. The roughness can produce important shifts of the extinction efficiency peak and a decrease of its amplitude resulting from changes in the distribution of near-field and absorbed electric field intensities.

  17. Designed graphene-peptide nanocomposites for biosensor applications: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yujie; Wu, Aiguo; Wei, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The modification of graphene with biomacromolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and others extends the potential applications of graphene materials in various fields. The bound biomacromolecules could improve the biocompatibility and bio-recognition ability of graphene-based nanocomposites, therefore could greatly enhance their biosensing performances on both selectivity and sensitivity. In this review, we presented a comprehensive introduction and discussion on recent advance in the synthesis and biosensor applications of graphene-peptide nanocomposites. The biofunctionalization of graphene with specifically designed peptides, and the synthesis strategies of graphene-peptide (monomer, nanofibrils, and nanotubes) nanocomposites were demonstrated. On the other hand, the fabrication of graphene-peptide nanocomposite based biosensor architectures for electrochemical, fluorescent, electronic, and spectroscopic biosensing were further presented. This review includes nearly all the studies on the fabrication and applications of graphene-peptide based biosensors recently, which will promote the future developments of graphene-based biosensors in biomedical detection and environmental analysis. - Highlights: • A comprehensive review on the fabrication and application of graphene-peptide nanocomposites was presented. • The design of peptide sequences for biofunctionalization of various graphene materials was presented. • Multi-strategies on the fabrication of biosensors with graphene-peptide nanocomposites were discussed. • Designed graphene-peptide nanocomposites showed wide biosensor applications.

  18. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  19. On-chip food safety monitoring: multi-analyte screening with imaging surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.

    2010-01-01

    Food safety is an increasing health concern, recognised and promoted by many
    institutions across the globe. Food products can be contaminated with pathogenic
    microorganisms, environmental pollutants, veterinary drug residues, allergens and toxins.
    Public health concerns which have

  20. Immobilization techniques in the fabrication of nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, William; Ronkainen, Niina J

    2013-04-11

    The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  1. Microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for toxic carbon monoxide monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Yi

    2018-01-01

    This study presents an innovative microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for carbon monoxide (CO) monitoring. The hypothesis for the function of the biosensor is that CO inhibits bacterial activity in the anode and thereby reduces electricity production. A mature electrochemically active biofilm...... increasing CO concentration over 70%. Besides, the response time of the biosensor was 1 h. The compact design and simple operation of the biosensor makes it easy to be integrated in existing CO-based industrial facilities either as a forewarning sensor for CO toxicity or even as an individual on...

  2. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun; Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range

  3. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  4. Stepped piezoresistive microcantilever designs for biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu; Urban, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of a piezoresistive microcantilever biosensor strongly depends on its ability to convert the surface stress-induced deflections into large resistance change. To improve the sensitivity, we present stepped microcantilever biosensor designs that show significant resistance change compared with commonly used rectangular designs. The cantilever is made of silicon dioxide with a u-shaped silicon piezoresistor. The surface stress-induced deflections, bimorph deflection, fundamental resonant frequency and self-heating properties of the cantilever are studied using the FEM software. The surface stress-induced deflections are compared against the analytical model derived in this work. Results show that stepped designs have better signal-to-noise ratio than the rectangular ones and cantilevers with l/L between 0.5 and 0.75 are better designs for improving sensitivity. (paper)

  5. Biosensors based on gold nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Vidotti,Marcio; Carvalhal,Rafaela F.; Mendes,Renata K.; Ferreira,Danielle C. M.; Kubota,Lauro T.

    2011-01-01

    The present review discusses the latest advances in biosensor technology achieved by the assembly of biomolecules associated with gold nanoparticles in analytical devices. This review is divided in sections according to the biomolecule employed in the biosensor development: (i) immunocompounds; (ii) DNA/RNA and functional DNA/RNA; and (iii) enzymes and Heme proteins. In order to facilitate the comprehension each section was subdivided according to the transduction mode. Gold nanoparticles bas...

  6. Micro- and nanogap based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Jules L.

    2017-01-01

    Biosensors are used for the detection of a range of analytes for applications in healthcare, food production, environmental monitoring and biodefence. However, many biosensing platforms are large, expensive, require skilled operators or necessitate the analyte to be labelled. Direct electrochemical detection methods present a particularly attractive platform due to the simplified instrumentation when compared to other techniques such as fluorescence-based biosensors. With modern integrated ci...

  7. Recycling microcavity optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Heather K; Armani, Andrea M

    2011-04-01

    Optical biosensors have tremendous potential for commercial applications in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety evaluation. In these applications, sensor reuse is desirable to reduce costs. To achieve this, harsh, wet chemistry treatments are required to remove surface chemistry from the sensor, typically resulting in reduced sensor performance and increased noise due to recognition moiety and optical transducer degradation. In the present work, we suggest an alternative, dry-chemistry method, based on O2 plasma treatment. This approach is compatible with typical fabrication of substrate-based optical transducers. This treatment completely removes the recognition moiety, allowing the transducer surface to be refreshed with new recognition elements and thus enabling the sensor to be recycled.

  8. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation study on discrete charge effects of SiNW biosensors according to bound target position using a 3D TCAD simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, In-Young; Jang, Hyeri; Lee, Jieun; Moon, Hyunggeun; Seo, Sung Min; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a simulation method for the biosensor environment which treats the semiconductor and the electrolyte region together, using the well-established semiconductor 3D TCAD simulator tool. Using this simulation method, we conduct electrostatic simulations of SiNW biosensors with a more realistic target charge model where the target is described as a charged cube, randomly located across the nanowire surface, and analyze the Coulomb effect on the SiNW FET according to the position and distribution of the target charges. The simulation results show the considerable variation in the SiNW current according to the bound target positions, and also the dependence of conductance modulation on the polarity of target charges. This simulation method and the results can be utilized for analysis of the properties and behavior of the biosensor device, such as the sensing limit or the sensing resolution.

  10. Simulation study on discrete charge effects of SiNW biosensors according to bound target position using a 3D TCAD simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, In-Young; Moon, Hyunggeun; Jang, Hyeri; Lee, Jieun; Kim, Dae Hwan; Seo, Sung Min

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a simulation method for the biosensor environment which treats the semiconductor and the electrolyte region together, using the well-established semiconductor 3D TCAD simulator tool. Using this simulation method, we conduct electrostatic simulations of SiNW biosensors with a more realistic target charge model where the target is described as a charged cube, randomly located across the nanowire surface, and analyze the Coulomb effect on the SiNW FET according to the position and distribution of the target charges. The simulation results show the considerable variation in the SiNW current according to the bound target positions, and also the dependence of conductance modulation on the polarity of target charges. This simulation method and the results can be utilized for analysis of the properties and behavior of the biosensor device, such as the sensing limit or the sensing resolution. (paper)

  11. A reduced graphene oxide based electrochemical biosensor for tyrosine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junhua; Qiu, Jingjing; Li, Li; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Xianwen; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Wang, Shiren

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a ‘green’ and safe hydrothermal method has been used to reduce graphene oxide and produce hemin modified graphene nanosheet (HGN) based electrochemical biosensors for the determination of l-tyrosine levels. The as-fabricated HGN biosensors were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experimental results indicated that hemin was successfully immobilized on the reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (rGO) through π-π interaction. TEM images and EDX results further confirmed the attachment of hemin on the rGO nanosheet. Cyclic voltammetry tests were carried out for the bare glass carbon electrode (GCE), the rGO electrode (rGO/GCE), and the hemin-rGO electrode (HGN/GCE). The HGN/GCE based biosensor exhibits a tyrosine detection linear range from 5 × 10-7 M to 2 × 10-5 M with a detection limitation of 7.5 × 10-8 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensitivity of this biosensor is 133 times higher than that of the bare GCE. In comparison with other works, electroactive biosensors are easily fabricated, easily controlled and cost-effective. Moreover, the hemin-rGO based biosensors demonstrate higher stability, a broader detection linear range and better detection sensitivity. Study of the oxidation scheme reveals that the rGO enhances the electron transfer between the electrode and the hemin, and the existence of hemin groups effectively electrocatalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine. This study contributes to a widespread clinical application of nanomaterial based biosensor devices with a broader detection linear range, improved stability, enhanced sensitivity and reduced costs.

  12. Rapid, Sensitive, and Reusable Detection of Glucose by a Robust Radiofrequency Integrated Passive Device Biosensor Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Young; Adhikari, Kishor Kumar; Dhakal, Rajendra; Chuluunbaatar, Zorigt; Wang, Cong; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous demands for sensitive and reliable label-free biosensors have stimulated intensive research into developing miniaturized radiofrequency resonators for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a robust, reusable radiofrequency resonator based integrated passive device biosensor chip fabricated on a gallium arsenide substrate for the detection of glucose in water-glucose solutions and sera. As a result of the highly concentrated electromagnetic energy between the two divisions of an intertwined spiral inductor coupled with an interdigital capacitor, the proposed glucose biosensor chip exhibits linear detection ranges with high sensitivity at center frequency. This biosensor, which has a sensitivity of up to 199 MHz/mgmL−1 and a short response time of less than 2 sec, exhibited an ultralow detection limit of 0.033 μM and a reproducibility of 0.61% relative standard deviation. In addition, the quantities derived from the measured S-parameters, such as the propagation constant (γ), impedance (Z), resistance (R), inductance (L), conductance (G) and capacitance (C), enabled the effective multi-dimensional detection of glucose. PMID:25588958

  13. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  14. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING: A REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biosensors show the potential to complement laboratory-based analytical methods for environmental applications. Although biosensors for potential environmental-monitoring applications have been reported for a wide range of environmental pollutants, from a regulatory perspective, ...

  15. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  16. Impedimetric biosensors and immunosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodromidis, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    The development of methods targeting the direct monitoring of antibody-antigen interactions is particularly attractive. The design of label-free affinity-based probing concepts is the objective of much current research, at both academic and industrial levels, towards establishing alternative methods to the already existing ELISA-based immunoassays. Among these, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) represents one of the most powerful methods, due to the ability of EIS-based sensors to be more easily integrated into multi-array or microprocessor, controlled diagnostic tools. During the last decade, EIS and the concept of biochemical capacitors have been widely used for probing various types of biomolecular interactions (immunosensors, DNA hybridization, protein-protein interactions). So far, impedimetric or capacitive immunosensors have been successfully applied at the academic level. However, no prototypes have been released into the market, since major fundamental issues still exist. Even though this fact has brought the reliability of impedimetric immunosensors into question, features associated with electrochemical approaches, namely the ability to be miniaturized, remote control of implanted sensors, low cost of electrode mass production and cost effective instrumentation (without need of high-energy sources) keep impedimetric sensors particularly attractive as compared to other approaches based on microbalances, surface plasmon resonance or ellipsometry. This lecture outlines the theoretical background of impedimetric immunosensors and presents different types of impedimetric biosensors as well as the instrumental approaches that have been so far proposed in the literature. (author)

  17. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Conducting Polymers in the Application of SPR Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapiphun Janmanee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, conducting polymers have emerged as one of the most promising transducers for both chemical, sensors and biosensors owing to their unique electrical, electrochemical and optical properties that can be used to convert chemical information or biointeractions into electrical or optical signals, which can easily be detected by modern techniques. Different approaches to the application of conducting polymers in chemo- or biosensing applications have been extensively studied. In order to enhance the application of conducting polymers into the area of biosensors, one approach is to introduce functional groups, including carboxylic acid, amine, sulfonate, or thiol groups, into the conducting polymer chain and to form a so-called “self-doped” or by doping with negatively charged polyelectrolytes. The functional conducting polymers have been successfully utilized to immobilize enzymes for construction of biosensors. Recently, the combination of SPR and electrochemical, known as electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR, spectroscopy, has been used for in situ investigation of optical and electrical properties of conducting polymer films. Moreover, EC-SPR spectroscopy has been applied for monitoring the interaction between biomolecules and electropolymerized conjugated polymer films in biosensor and immunosensor applications. In this paper, recent development and applications on EC-SPR in biosensors will be reviewed.

  19. A novel conductometric biosensor based on hexokinase for determination of adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherenko, I S; Kucherenko, D Yu; Soldatkin, O O; Lagarde, F; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a simple and inexpensive reusable biosensor for determination of the concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous samples. The biosensor is based on a conductometric transducer which contains two pairs of gold interdigitated electrodes. An enzyme hexokinase was immobilized onto one pair of electrodes, and bovine serum albumin-onto another pair (thus, a differential mode of measurement was used). Conditions of hexokinase immobilization on the transducer by cross-linking via glutaraldehyde were optimized. Influence of experimental conditions (concentration of magnesium ions, ionic strength and concentration of the working buffer) on the biosensor work was studied. The reproducibility of biosensor responses and operational stability of the biosensor were checked during one week. Dry storage at -18 °C was shown to be the best conditions to store the biosensor. The biosensor was successfully applied for measurements of ATP concentration in pharmaceutical samples. The proposed biosensor may be used in future for determination of ATP and/or glucose in water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A.; Tulip, Fahmida S.; MacArthur, Kimberly; McFarlane, Nicole; Islam, Syed K.; Hensley, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  1. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.

  2. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  3. Micro-and nanoelectromechanical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nicu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Most books dedicated to the issues of bio-sensing are organized by the well-known scheme of a biosensor. In this book, the authors have deliberately decided to break away from the conventional way of treating biosensing research by uniquely addressing biomolecule immobilization methods on a solid surface, fluidics issues and biosensing-related transduction techniques, rather than focusing simply on the biosensor. The aim is to provide a contemporary snapshot of the biosensing landscape without neglecting the seminal references or products where needed, following the downscaling (from the micr

  4. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  5. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  6. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  7. Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; White, Victor; Dougherty, Dennis; Maurer, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop improved biosensors of a type based on ion channels in biomimetic membranes. These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. As described, these sensors offer a number of advantages over prior sensors of this type.

  8. An electromagnetic system for biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an electromagnetic system for biosensors, in which the system can switch quickly between high magnetic gradients, without the need of movement of mech. elements. This is realized by two independent emu which are sepd. in the region of the pole shoes over a gap, in which a

  9. Development of Biosensors From Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑞红; 孙红; 李霄寒; 于冲

    2017-01-01

    Graphene's success has stimulated great interest and research in the synthesis and characterization of graphene -like 2D materials, single and few -atom -thick layers of van der Waals materials, which show fascinating and technologically useful properties.This review presents an overview of recent electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene and on graphene-like 2D materials.

  10. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  11. Biosensors and multiple mycotoxin analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, B. van der; Spath, S.; Dietrich, H.; Stigter, E.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Osenbruggen, T. van; Koopal, K.

    2003-01-01

    An immunochemical biosensor assay for the detection of multiple mycotoxins in a sample is described.The inhibition assay is designed to measure four different mycotoxins in a single measurement, following extraction, sample clean-up and incubation with an appropriate cocktail of anti-mycotoxin

  12. A High-Content Assay for Biosensor Validation and for Examining Stimuli that Affect Biosensor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Scott D; Hahn, Klaus M

    2014-12-01

    Biosensors are valuable tools used to monitor many different protein behaviors in vivo. Demand for new biosensors is high, but their development and characterization can be difficult. During biosensor design, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of different biosensor structures on specificity, brightness, and fluorescence responses. By co-expressing the biosensor with upstream proteins that either stimulate or inhibit the activity reported by the biosensor, one can determine the difference between the biosensor's maximally activated and inactivated state, and examine response to specific proteins. We describe here a method for biosensor validation in a 96-well plate format using an automated microscope. This protocol produces dose-response curves, enables efficient examination of many parameters, and unlike cell suspension assays, allows visual inspection (e.g., for cell health and biosensor or regulator localization). Optimization of single-chain and dual-chain Rho GTPase biosensors is addressed, but the assay is applicable to any biosensor that can be expressed or otherwise loaded in adherent cells. The assay can also be used for purposes other than biosensor validation, using a well-characterized biosensor as a readout for effects of upstream molecules. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Resonance-Based Time-Frequency Manifold for Feature Extraction of Ship-Radiated Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiaquan; Sun, Haixin; Chen, Hailan; Junejo, Naveed Ur Rehman; Cheng, En

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel time-frequency signature using resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD), phase space reconstruction (PSR), time-frequency distribution (TFD) and manifold learning is proposed for feature extraction of ship-radiated noise, which is called resonance-based time-frequency manifold (RTFM). This is suitable for analyzing signals with oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics in a situation of serious noise pollution. Unlike the traditional methods which are sensitive to noise and just consider one side of oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics, the proposed RTFM can provide the intact feature signature of all these characteristics in the form of a time-frequency signature by the following steps: first, RSSD is employed on the raw signal to extract the high-oscillatory component and abandon the low-oscillatory component. Second, PSR is performed on the high-oscillatory component to map the one-dimensional signal to the high-dimensional phase space. Third, TFD is employed to reveal non-stationary information in the phase space. Finally, manifold learning is applied to the TFDs to fetch the intrinsic non-linear manifold. A proportional addition of the top two RTFMs is adopted to produce the improved RTFM signature. All of the case studies are validated on real audio recordings of ship-radiated noise. Case studies of ship-radiated noise on different datasets and various degrees of noise pollution manifest the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:29565288

  14. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-17

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

  15. Orientation of llama antibodies strongly increases sensitivity of biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.; Hesselink, T.; Houwelingen, van A.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; Jongsma, M.A.; Schoffelen, S.; Hest, van J.C.M.; Zuilhof, J.T.; Beekwilder, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of biosensors depends on theorientation of bio-receptors on the sensor surface.The objective of this study was to organize bio-receptors on surfaces in a way that their analyte binding site is exposed to the analyte solution. VHH proteins recognizing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)

  16. Nanomolar detection of methylparaben by a cost-effective hemoglobin-based biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, A., E-mail: ali.hajian@fmf.uni-freiburg.de [Freiburg Materials Research Center, FMF, University of Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Str.21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Laboratory for Sensors, Department of Microsystems Engineering, IMTEK, University of Freiburg, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ghodsi, J.; Afraz, A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yurchenko, O. [Freiburg Materials Research Center, FMF, University of Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Str.21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Urban, G. [Freiburg Materials Research Center, FMF, University of Freiburg, Stefan-Meier-Str.21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Laboratory for Sensors, Department of Microsystems Engineering, IMTEK, University of Freiburg, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the development of a new biosensor for methylparaben determination using electrocatalytic properties of hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The voltammetric oxidation of methylparaben by the proposed biosensor in phosphate buffer (pH = 7.0), a physiological pH, was studied and it was confirmed that methylparaben undergoes a one electron-one proton reaction in a diffusion-controlled process. The biosensor was fabricated by carbon paste electrode modified with hemoglobin and multiwalled carbon nanotube. Based on the excellent electrochemical properties of the modified electrode, a sensitive voltammetric method was used for determination of methylparaben within a linear range from 0.1 to 13 μmol L{sup −1} and detection limit of 25 nmol L{sup −1}. The developed biosensor possessed accurate and rapid response to methylparaben and showed good sensitivity, stability, and repeatability. Finally, the applicability of the proposed biosensor was verified by methylparaben evaluation in various real samples. - Highlights: • A new methylparaben biosensor was constructed by modification of carbon paste electrode with hemoglobin and MWCNTs. • The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode and electrochemical behavior of the methylparaben on the electrode surface were studied. • The response of modified GCE was analyzed by voltammetry technique (CV and DPV). • The electrode was used to the determination of methylparaben in real samples • The performance of the fabricated biosensor was satisfactorily compared to the previously reported electrochemical sensors for methylparaben determination.

  17. Functional characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from different genera as multiplex cadmium biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara; Aracic, Sanja; Kannan, Ruban; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley E

    2017-08-15

    Widespread presence of cadmium in soil and water systems is a consequence of industrial and agricultural processes. Subsequent accumulation of cadmium in food and drinking water can result in accidental consumption of dangerous concentrations. As such, cadmium environmental contamination poses a significant threat to human health. Development of microbial biosensors, as a novel alternative method for in situ cadmium detection, may reduce human exposure by complementing traditional analytical methods. In this study, a multiplex cadmium biosensing construct was assembled by cloning a single-output cadmium biosensor element, cadRgfp, and a constitutively expressed mrfp1 onto a broad-host range vector. Incorporation of the duplex fluorescent output [green and red fluorescence proteins] allowed measurement of biosensor functionality and viability. The biosensor construct was tested in several Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Enterobacter. The multiplex cadmium biosensors were responsive to cadmium concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10µgml -1 , as well as several other heavy metals, including arsenic, mercury and lead at similar concentrations. The biosensors were also responsive within 20-40min following exposure to 3µgml -1 cadmium. This study highlights the importance of testing biosensor constructs, developed using synthetic biology principles, in different bacterial genera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on graphene-gold nanocomposite and calcined layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chen; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Zheng, Yuhe; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-05-10

    In this study, a novel acetylcholinesterase-based biosensor was fabricated. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was immobilized onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with the aid of Cu-Mg-Al calcined layered double hydroxide (CLDH). CLDH can provide a bigger effective surface area for AChE loading, which could improve the precision and stability of AChE biosensor. However, the poor electroconductibility of CLDHs could lead to the low sensitivity of AChE biosensor. In order to effectively compensate the disadvantages of CLDHs, graphene-gold nanocomposites were used for improving the electron transfer rate. Thus, the graphene-gold nanocomposite (GN-AuNPs) was firstly modified onto the GCE, and then the prepared CLDH-AChE composite was immobilized onto the modified GCE to construct a sensitive AChE biosensor for pesticides detection. Relevant parameters were studied in detail and optimized, including the pH of the acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCl) solution, the amount of AChE immobilized on the biosensor and the inhibition time governing the analytical performance of the biosensor. The biosensor detected chlorpyrifos at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 150μg/L. The detection limit for chlorpyrifos was 0.05μg/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SPR imaging biosensor for the quantitation of fibronectin concentration in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankiewicz, Anna; Romanowicz, Lech; Pyc, Marlena; Hermanowicz, Adam; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study was presentation of a new biosensor capable of determination of fibronectin. This biosensor was based on the specific interaction of anti-fibronectin antibody produced in rabbit with fibronectin. The surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) technique was used as a detecting method. Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied. The determination of fibronectin concentration in natural samples was done. The results were compared with a reference method (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay-ELISA). The analytically useful dynamic response range of biosensor is between 5 and 400ngmL -1 . The detection limit is 1.5ngmL -1 and limit quantification is 5ngmL -1 . The proposed SPRI biosensor showed good selectivity for potential interferences. It was applied to determine fibronectin concentrations in plasma of healthy donors and of patients after thermal injury. Good correlations between results obtained using the SPRI biosensor and ELISA test (correlation coefficients for healthy donors 0.996, for patients 0.984) were obtained. The average fibronectin concentration of healthy donors was 140.5±24.6μgmL -1 and the average fibronectin concentration of patients was 601.5±72.1μgmL -1 , which was in agreement with results obtained by other investigators. The obtained results indicate that the developed biosensor may be a candidate for monitoring fibronectin concentration in blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanomolar detection of methylparaben by a cost-effective hemoglobin-based biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajian, A.; Ghodsi, J.; Afraz, A.; Yurchenko, O.; Urban, G.

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development of a new biosensor for methylparaben determination using electrocatalytic properties of hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The voltammetric oxidation of methylparaben by the proposed biosensor in phosphate buffer (pH = 7.0), a physiological pH, was studied and it was confirmed that methylparaben undergoes a one electron-one proton reaction in a diffusion-controlled process. The biosensor was fabricated by carbon paste electrode modified with hemoglobin and multiwalled carbon nanotube. Based on the excellent electrochemical properties of the modified electrode, a sensitive voltammetric method was used for determination of methylparaben within a linear range from 0.1 to 13 μmol L −1 and detection limit of 25 nmol L −1 . The developed biosensor possessed accurate and rapid response to methylparaben and showed good sensitivity, stability, and repeatability. Finally, the applicability of the proposed biosensor was verified by methylparaben evaluation in various real samples. - Highlights: • A new methylparaben biosensor was constructed by modification of carbon paste electrode with hemoglobin and MWCNTs. • The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode and electrochemical behavior of the methylparaben on the electrode surface were studied. • The response of modified GCE was analyzed by voltammetry technique (CV and DPV). • The electrode was used to the determination of methylparaben in real samples • The performance of the fabricated biosensor was satisfactorily compared to the previously reported electrochemical sensors for methylparaben determination.

  1. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bosch Ojeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  2. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  3. Green Chemistry Glucose Biosensor Development using Etlingera elatior Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoni, A.; Anggraeni, M. D.; Zusfahair; Iqlima, H.

    2018-01-01

    Glucose biosensor development is one of the important strategies for early detection of diabetes mellitus disease. This study was aimed to explore the flower extract of Etlingera elatior for a green-analysis method of glucose biosensor. Flowers were extracted using ethanol: HCl and tested its performances as an indicator of glucose biosensor using glucose oxidase enzyme. The glucose oxidase react with glucose resulted hydrogen peroxide that would change the color of the flower extract. Furthermore, the extract was also studied including their stability to pH, oxidizing and reducing, temperature, and storage. The results showed that the Etlingera elatior extract had high correlation between color change and glucose concentration with regression equation of y = -0.0005x + 0.4724 and R2 of 0.9965. The studied biosensor showed a wide linear range to detect glucose sample of 0 to 500 mM. The extract characterization showed a more stable in low pH (acid), reducing agent addition, heating treatment and storage.

  4. Discrete dipole approximation simulation of bead enhanced diffraction grating biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, Khalid Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    We present the discrete dipole approximation simulation of light scattering from bead enhanced diffraction biosensor and report the effect of bead material, number of beads forming the grating and spatial randomness on the diffraction intensities of 1st and 0th orders. The dipole models of gratings are formed by volume slicing and image processing while the spatial locations of the beads on the substrate surface are randomly computed using discrete probability distribution. The effect of beads reduction on far-field scattering of 632.8 nm incident field, from fully occupied gratings to very coarse gratings, is studied for various bead materials. Our findings give insight into many difficult or experimentally impossible aspects of this genre of biosensors and establish that bead enhanced grating may be used for rapid and precise detection of small amounts of biomolecules. The results of simulations also show excellent qualitative similarities with experimental observations. - Highlights: • DDA was used to study the relationship between the number of beads forming gratings and ratio of first and zeroth order diffraction intensities. • A very flexible modeling program was developed to design complicated objects for DDA. • Material and spatial effects of bead distribution on surfaces were studied. • It has been shown that bead enhanced grating biosensor can be useful for fast detection of small amounts of biomolecules. • Experimental results qualitatively support the simulations and thus open a way to optimize the grating biosensors.

  5. Enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive biolayer interferometry biosensor for palytoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shunxiang; Zheng, Xin; Hu, Bo; Sun, Mingjuan; Wu, Jihong; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Lianghua

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we coupled biolayer interferometry (BLI) with competitive binding assay through an enzyme-linked aptamer and developed a real-time, ultra-sensitive, rapid quantitative method for detection of the marine biotoxin palytoxin. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled aptamers were used as biorecognition receptors to competitively bind with palytoxin, which was immobilized on the biosensor surface. The palytoxin: horseradish peroxidase-aptamer complex was then submerged in a 3,3'-diaminobenzidine solution, which resulted in formation of a precipitated polymeric product directly on the biosensor surface and a large change in the optical thickness of the biosensor layer. This change could obviously shift the interference pattern and generate a response profile on the BLI biosensor. The biosensor showed a broad linear range for palytoxin (200-700pg/mL) with a low detection limit (0.04pg/mL). Moreover, the biosensor was applied to the detection of palytoxin in spiked extracts and showed a high degree of selectivity for palytoxin, good reproducibility, and stability. This enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive BLI biosensor offers a promising method for rapid and sensitive detection of palytoxin and other analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Disposable Tear Glucose Biosensor-Part 4: Preliminary Animal Model Study Assessing Efficacy, Safety, and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Belle, Jeffrey T; Engelschall, Erica; Lan, Kenneth; Shah, Pankti; Saez, Neil; Maxwell, Stephanie; Adamson, Teagan; Abou-Eid, Michelle; McAferty, Kenyon; Patel, Dharmendra R; Cook, Curtiss B

    2014-01-01

    A prototype tear glucose (TG) sensor was tested in New Zealand white rabbits to assess eye irritation, blood glucose (BG) and TG lag time, and correlation with BG. A total of 4 animals were used. Eye irritation was monitored by Lissamine green dye and analyzed using image analysis software. Lag time was correlated with an oral glucose load while recording TG and BG readings. Correlation between TG and BG were plotted against one another to form a correlation diagram, using a Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) and self-monitoring of blood glucose as the reference measurements. Finally, TG levels were calculated using analytically derived expressions. From repeated testing carried over the course of 12 months, little to no eye irritation was detected. TG fluctuations over time visually appeared to trace the same pattern as BG with an average lag times of 13 minutes. TG levels calculated from the device current measurements ranged from 4 to 20 mg/dL and correlated linearly with BG levels of 75-160 mg/dL (TG = 0.1723 BG = 7.9448 mg/dL; R 2 = .7544). The first steps were taken toward preliminary development of a sensor for self-monitoring of tear glucose (SMTG). No conjunctival irritation in any of the animals was noted. Lag time between TG and BG was found to be noticeable, but a quantitative modeling to correlate lag time in this study is unnecessary. Measured currents from the sensors and the calculated TG showed promising correlation to BG levels. Previous analytical bench marking showed BG and TG levels consistent with other literature. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  7. Features and application of wearable biosensors in medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ajami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the new technologies in the field of health is wearable biosensor, which provides vital signs monitoring of patients, athletes, premature infants, children, psychiatric patients, people who need long-term care, elderly, and people in impassable regions far from health and medical services. The aim of this study was to explain features and applications of wearable biosensors in medical services. This was a narrative review study that done in 2015. Search conducted with the help of libraries, books, conference proceedings, through databases of Science Direct, PubMed, Proquest, Springer, and SID (Scientific Information Database. In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations; vital sign monitoring, medical smart shirt, smart clothing, wearable biosensors, physiological monitoring system, remote detection systems, remote control health, and bio-monitoring system. The preliminary search resulted in 54 articles, which published between 2002 and 2015. After a careful analysis of the content of each paper, 41 sources selected based on their relevancy. Although the use of wearable in healthcare is still in an infant stage, it could have a magic effect on healthcare. Smart wearable in the technology industry for 2015 is one that is looking to be a big and profitable market. Wearable biosensors capable of continuous vital signs monitoring and feedback to the user will be significantly effective in timely prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases.

  8. Development and testing of a fluorescence biosensor for glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Sapsford, Kim

    2012-06-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive biosensors for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance management of diabetes mellitus and improve patient outcome in intensive care settings. Recent studies have indicated that implantable biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) can provide high sensitivity in quantifying glucose concentrations. However, standard approaches for determining the potential for interference from other biological constituents have not been established. The aim of this work was to design and optimize a FRET-based glucose sensor and assess its specificity to glucose. A sensor based on competitive binding between concanavalin A and dextran, labeled with long-wavelength acceptor and donor fluorophores, was developed. This process included optimization of dextran molecular weight and donor concentration, acceptor to donor ratio, and hydrogel concentration, as well as the number of polymer layers for encapsulation. The biosensor performance was characterized in terms of its response to clinically relevant glucose concentrations. The potential for interference and the development of test methods to evaluate this effect were studied using a potential clinical interferent, maltose. Results indicated that our biosensor had a prediction accuracy of better than 11% and that the robustness to maltose was highly dependent on glucose level.

  9. Development of Electrochemical Biosensors for Ultrasensitive Detection of Bacteria in the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fapyane, Deby

    2018-01-01

    to those conventional methods, are intensively studied. Biosensor technology is one of the strategies for rapid monitoring of pathogens such as bacteria, virus, and parasites in the environment. Among them, the electrochemical biosensor offers simple, rapid, cost-effective and possibility...... for ultrasensitive detection of bacterial cells, DNA and rRNA. Several key operational parameters were assessed such as the optimization of probe design and labeling molecules. Here, more specifically we used two novel labels for the development of the electrochemical biosensor for bacteria detection; cellulase...

  10. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  11. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  12. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Akshitha

    Improving the sensitivity of existing biosensors is an active research topic that cuts across several disciplines, including engineering and biology. Optical biosensors are the one of the most diverse class of biosensors which can be broadly categorized into two types based on the detection scheme: label-based and label-free detection. In label-based detection, the target bio-molecules are labeled with dyes or tags that fluoresce upon excitation, indicating the presence of target molecules. Label-based detection is highly-sensitive, capable of single molecule detection depending on the detector type used. One method of improving the sensitivity of label-based fluorescence detection is by enhancement of the emission of the labels by coupling them with metal nanostructures. This approach is referred as plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). PEF is achieved by increasing the electric field around the nano metal structures through plasmonics. This increased electric field improves the enhancement from the fluorophores which in turn improves the photon emission from the fluorophores which, in turn, improves the limit of detection. Biosensors taking advantage of the plasmonic properties of metal films and nanostructures have emerged an alternative, low-cost, high sensitivity method for detecting labeled DNA. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors employing noble metal nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention as a new class of plasmonic nanosensors. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanostructures is carried out. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed using software from Lumerical Inc. to design a novel LSPR structure that exhibit resonance overlapping with the absorption and emission wavelengths of quantum dots (QD). Simulations of a composite Au/SiO2 nanopillars on silicon substrate were performed using FDTD software to show peak plasmonic enhancement at QD emission wavelength

  13. Development of phage/antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liling

    There is an urgent need for biosensors that are able to detect and quantify the presence of a small amount of pathogens in a real-time manner accurately and quickly to guide prevention efforts and assay food and water quality. Acoustic wave (AW) devices, whose performance is defined by mass sensitivity (Sm) and quality factor (Q value), have been extensively studied as high performance biosensor platforms. However, current AW devices still face some challenges such as the difficulty to be employed in liquid and low Q value in practical applications. The objective of this research is to develop magnetostrictive sensors which include milli/microcantilever type (MSMC) and particle type (MSP). Compared to other AW devices, MSMC exhibits the following advantages: (1) wireless/remote driving and sensing; (2) easy to fabricate; (3) works well in liquid; (4) exhibits a high Q value (> 500 in air). The fundamental study of the damping effect on MSMCs from the surrounding media including air and liquids were conducted to improve the Q value of MSMCs. The experiment results show that the Q value is dependent on the properties of surrounding media (e.g. viscosity, density), the geometry of the MSMCs, and the harmonic mode on the resonance behavior of MSMCs, etc. The phage-coated MSMC has high specificity and sensitivity even while used in water with a low concentration of targeted bacteria. Two currently developed phages, JRB7 and E2, respectively respond to Bacillus anthracis spores and Salmonella typhimurium, were employed as bio-recognition elements in this research. The phage-immobilized MSMC biosensors exhibited high performance and detection of limit was 5 x 104 cfu/ml for the MSMC in size of 1.4 x 0.8 x 0.035 mm. The MSMC-based biosensors were indicated as a very potential method for in-situ monitoring of the biological quality in water. The MSP combine antibody was used to detect Staphylococcus aureus in this experiment. The interface between MSPs and antibody was

  14. Lignin and silicate based hydrogels for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, S. L.; Jairam, S.; Vanegas, D. C.; Tong, Z.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Advances in biocompatible materials and electrocatalytic nanomaterials have extended and enhanced the field of biosensors. Immobilization of biorecognition elements on nanomaterial platforms is an efficient technique for developing high fidelity biosensors. Single layer (i.e., Langmuir-Blodgett) protein films are efficient, but disadvantages of this approach include high cost, mass transfer limitations, and Vromer competition for surface binding sites. There is a need for simple, user friendly protein-nanomaterial sensing membranes that can be developed in laboratories or classrooms (i.e., outside of the clean room). In this research, we develop high fidelity nanomaterial platforms for developing electrochemical biosensors using sustainable biomaterials and user-friendly deposition techniques. Catalytic nanomaterial platforms are developed using a combination of self assembled monolayer chemistry and electrodeposition. High performance biomaterials (e.g., nanolignin) are recovered from paper pulp waste and combined with proteins and nanomaterials to form active sensor membranes. These methods are being used to develop electrochemical biosensors for studying physiological transport in biomedical, agricultural, and environmental applications.

  15. Study on the effect of nanoparticle bimetallic coreshell Au-Ag for sensitivity enhancement of biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widayanti; Abraha, K

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Au-Ag core-shell, a type of composite spherical nanoparticle consisting of a spherical Au core covered by Ag shell, have been used as active material for biomolecular analyte detection based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. SPR technology evolved into a key technology for characterization of biomolecular interaction. In this paper, we want to show the influence of nanoparticle bimettalic Au-Ag coreshell for optic respon of LSPR biosensor through attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum. The method consist of several steps begin from make a model LSPR system with Kretschmann configuration, dielectric function determination of composite bimetallic coreshell nanoparticle using effective medium theory approximation and the last is reflectivity calculation for size variation of core and shell bimetallic nanoparticle. Our result show that, by varying the radius of core and shell thickness, the peak of the reflectivity (ATR spectrum) shifted to the different angle of incident light and the addition of coreshell in SPR biosensor leads to enhancement the sensitivity. (paper)

  16. A luminescent hybridoma-based biosensor for rapid detection of V. cholerae upon induction of calcium signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Parichehr; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Zeinoddini, Mehdi; Bakhshi, Bita

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a hybridoma based biosensor was developed for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 which converts the antibody-antigen binding to bioluminescence light. After investigation on hybridoma performance, the biosensor was constructed by transfecting specific hybridoma cells with aequorin reporter gene and the bioluminescence activities of stable biosensor were measured. The sensitivity of biosensor was as few as 50 CFU/ml and it showed no responses to other entric bacteria. Moreover, the response time of biosensor was estimated in 7th second which means this method is considerably faster than many available detection assays. In addition, this biosensor was successfully applied to V. cholerae detection in environmental samples with no significant loss in sensitivity, demonstrating our proposed biosensor provides a sensitive and reliable method for detection of V. cholerae in natural samples. The application of whole hybridoma cell directly as a sensing element in biosensor construction which mentioned for the first time in present study suggests that hybridoma cells could provide a valuable tool for future studies in both basic and diagnostic sciences and could be considered as a fast and specific sensing element for detection of other pathogens in different applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-Sensitivity Temperature-Independent Silicon Photonic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangbaek

    Optical biosensors that can precisely quantify the presence of specific molecular species in real time without the need for labeling have seen increased use in the drug discovery industry and molecular biology in general. Of the many possible optical biosensors, the TM mode Si biosensor is shown to be very attractive in the sensing application because of large field amplitude on the surface and cost effective CMOS VLSI fabrication. Noise is the most fundamental factor that limits the performance of sensors in development of high-sensitivity biosensors, and noise reduction techniques require precise studies and analysis. One such example stems from thermal fluctuations. Generally SOI biosensors are vulnerable to ambient temperature fluctuations because of large thermo-optic coefficient of silicon (˜2x10 -4 RIU/K), typically requiring another reference ring and readout sequence to compensate temperature induced noise. To address this problem, we designed sensors with a novel TM-mode shallow-ridge waveguide that provides both large surface amplitude for bulk and surface sensing. With proper design, this also provides large optical confinement in the aqueous cladding that renders the device athermal using the negative thermo-optic coefficient of water (~ --1x10-4RIU/K), demonstrating cancellation of thermo-optic effects for aqueous solution operation near 300K. Additional limitations resulting from mechanical actuator fluctuations, stability of tunable lasers, and large 1/f noise of lasers and sensor electronics can limit biosensor performance. Here we also present a simple harmonic feedback readout technique that obviates the need for spectrometers and tunable lasers. This feedback technique reduces the impact of 1/f noise to enable high-sensitivity, and a DSP lock-in with 256 kHz sampling rate can provide down to micros time scale monitoring for fast transitions in biomolecular concentration with potential for small volume and low cost. In this dissertation, a novel

  18. Antibody orientation on biosensor surfaces: a minireview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Detection elements play a key role in analyte recognition in biosensors. Therefore, detection elements with high analyte specificity and binding strength are required. While antibodies (Abs) have been increasingly used as detection elements in biosensors, a key challenge remains – the immobilization

  19. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaikha Mazlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM (R2 = 0.979 and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  20. Background reduction in a young interferometer biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H. K P; Subramaniam, V.; Kanger, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical Young interferometer (IOYI) biosensors are among the most sensitive label-free biosensors. Detection limits are in the range of 20 fg/mm2. The applicability of these sensors is however strongly hampered by the large background that originates from both bulk refractive index

  1. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Siti Zulaikha; Lee, Yook Heng; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2017-12-09

    Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM ( R ² = 0.979) and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  2. Surface plasmon optics for biosensors with advanced sensitivity and throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic biosensors represent a rapidly advancing technology which enables rapid and sensitive analysis of target analytes. This thesis focuses on novel metallic and polymer structures for plasmonic biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (SPF). It comprises four projects addressing key challenges concerning the enhancement of sensitivity and throughput. In the project 1, an advanced optical platform is developed which relies on reference-compensated angular spectroscopy of hydrogel-guided waves. The developed optical setup provides superior refractive index resolution of 1.2×10 -7 RIU and offers an attractive platform for direct detection of small analytes which cannot be analyzed by regular SPR biosensors. The project 2 carries out theoretical study of SPR imaging with advanced lateral resolution by utilizing Bragg scattered surface plasmons (BSSPs) on sub-wavelength metallic gratings. The results reveal that the proposed concept provides better lateral resolution and fidelity of the images. This feature opens ways for high-throughput SPR biosensors with denser arrays of sensing spots. The project 3 investigates surface plasmon coupled-emission from fluorophores in the vicinity of plasmonic Bragg-gratings. The experimental results provide leads on advancing the collection efficiency of fluorescence light by controlling the directions of fluorescence emission. This functionality can directly improve the sensitivity of fluorescence-based assays. In the last project 4, a novel sensing scheme with actively tuneable plasmonic structures is developed by employing thermo-responsive hydrogel binding matrix. The hydrogel film simultaneously serves as a large capacity binding matrix and provides means for actuating of surface plasmons through reversible swelling and collapsing of the hydrogel. This characteristic is suitable for multiplexing of sensing channels in fluorescence-based biosensor scheme (author)

  3. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  4. A regenerative electrochemical biosensor for mercury(II) by using the insertion approach and dual-hairpin-based amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Jing; Ling, Yu; Gao, Zhong Feng; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dual-hairpin structure as a signal amplifier is label-free and handy. • The strategy uses the insertion approach to improve the hybridization efficiency. • This biosensor has a low detection limit (28 pM) for detection of Hg 2+ . • This biosensor can be easily regenerated by using L-cysteine. - Abstract: A simple and effective biosensor for Hg 2+ determination was investigated. The novel biosensor was prepared by the insertion approach that the moiety-labeled DNA inserted into a loosely packed cyclic-dithiothreitol (DTT) monolayer, improving the hybridization efficiency. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies of two biosensors (single-hairpin and dual-hairpin structure DNA modified electrodes) used for Hg 2+ detection indicated that the dual-hairpin modified electrode had a larger electron transfer resistance change (ΔR ct ). Consequently, the dual-hairpin structure was used as a signal amplifier for the preparation of a selective Hg 2+ biosensor. This biosensor exhibited an excellent selectivity toward Hg 2+ over Cd 2+ , Pd 2+ , Co 2+ etc. Also, a linear relation was observed between the ΔR ct and Hg 2+ concentrations in a range from 0.1 nM to 5 μM with a detection limit of 28 pM under optimum conditions. Moreover, the biosensor can be reused by using L-cysteine and successfully applied for detecting Hg 2+ in real samples

  5. Fabrication and optimisation of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme to evaluate detection of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachim, A.; Sari, A. P.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a new and simple biosensor base on alcohol oxidase (AOX)-enzyme for detecting formaldehyde in aqueous solutions has been successfully fabricated. The alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was immobilized on poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membrane containing chromoionophore. The chemical reaction between AOX and formaldehyde generates a colour change of chromoionophore detected by optical absorbance measured in UV Vis. This paper focuses on the concentration optimization of buffer phosphate solution, response time, the quantity of enzyme and the measurement of the detection range of biosensors. The result shows that the optimum concentration and pH of buffer phosphate solution is 0.05 M and pH 7, respectively. The optimum response time is 3 min, the optimum unit of enzyme for biosensor is 1 unit/sample and the detection range of biosensor is 0.264 mM with R2 = 0.9421.

  6. Novel biosensors based on flavonoid-responsive transcriptional regulators introduced into Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siedler, Solvej; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Malla, Sailesh

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the construction of two flavonoid biosensors, which can be applied for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains. The biosensors are based on transcriptional regulators combined with autofluorescent proteins. The transcriptional activator FdeR from Herbaspirillum...... and externally added flavonoid concentration. The QdoR-biosensor was successfully applied for detection of kaempferol production in vivo at the single cell level by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Furthermore, the amount of kaempferol produced highly correlated with the specific fluorescence of E. coli...... cells containing a flavonol synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana (fls1). We expect the designed biosensors to be applied for isolation of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. © 2013 The Authors....

  7. A pyranose dehydrogenase-based biosensor for kinetic analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Badino, Silke Flindt; Tokin, Radina Naytchova

    2014-01-01

    A novel electrochemical enzyme biosensor was developed for real-time detection of cellulase activity when acting on their natural insoluble substrate, cellulose. The enzyme biosensor was constructed with pyranose dehydrongease (PDH) from Agaricus meleagris that was immobilized on the surface......-biosensor was shown to be anomer unspecific and it can therefore be used in kinetic studies over broad time-scales of both retaining- and inverting cellulases (in addition to enzyme cocktails). The biosensor was used for real-time measurements of the activity of the inverting cellobiohydrolase Cel6A from Hypocrea...... equation for processive cellulases, and it was found that the turnover for HjCel6A at saturating substrate concentration (i.e. maximal apparent specific activity) was similar (0.39–0.40 s−1) for the two substrates. Conversely, the substrate load at half-saturation was much lower for BMCC compared to Avicel...

  8. Immobilization Techniques in the Fabrication of Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of 1st to 3rd generation electrochemical biosensors reflects a simplification and enhancement of the transduction pathway. However, in recent years, modification of the transducer with nanomaterials has become increasingly studied and imparts many advantages. The sensitivity and overall performance of enzymatic biosensors has improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their fabrication. Given the unique and favorable qualities of gold nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes as applied to electrochemical biosensors, a consolidated survey of the different methods of nanomaterial immobilization on transducer surfaces and enzyme immobilization on these species is beneficial and timely. This review encompasses modification of enzymatic biosensors with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene.

  9. Capability of parasulfonato calix[6]arene, as an anion dopant, and organic solvents in enhancing the sensitivity and loading of glucose oxidase (GOx) on polypyrrole film in a biosensor: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnavadeh, Vahideh; Zare, Karim; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of two solvents (acetonitrile and water) and an anion dopant (para sulfonato calix[6]arene ((C[6]S)(-6))), on the manufacturing and properties of a polypyrrole (Ppy)-based, glucose oxidase amperometric biosensor were studied. Pyrrole was polymerized using galvanostatic mode in two different solvents, and the effect of (C[6]S)(-6) was studied in aqueous solution. The morphology of the obtained polypyrrole films was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Glucose oxidase (GOx) was adsorbed on the Ppy films via cross-linking method. Then the amperometric responses of the Pt/Ppy/GOx electrodes were measured using the amperometric method at the potential of 0.7 V in steps of adding a glucose solution to a potassium phosphate buffer. We found that acetonitrile and (C[6]S)(-6) increase the sensitivity of the enzyme electrode up to 79.30 µA M(-1)cm(-2) in comparison with 31.60 μA M(-1)cm(-2) for the electrode synthesized in calixarene free aqueous solvent. Also (C[6]S)(-6) has the main role in preventing leaching the enzyme from the electrode. This fact increases loading of the enzyme and stability of the biosensor. So that the steady state current density of the aforementioned electrode increases linearly with increasing glucose concentration up to 190 mM. Whereas the linearity was observed up to 61 mM and 80 mM for the electrodes made using calixarene free acetonitrile and aqueous solutions, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric de Souza Gil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, focusing on enzymatic electrochemical sensors.Em virtude do aumento da demanda por técnicas analíticas simples e de baixo custo, os biossensores têm atraído a atenção para a análise de fármacos, medicamentos e outros analitos de interesse em controle de qualidade de medicamentos. Os biossensores permitem a quantificação não somente de princípio ativo em formulações farmacêuticas, mas também de produtos de degradação e metabólitos em fluídos biológicos, bem como análise de amostras de interesse clínico e industrial, além de possibilitar a determinação de enantiômeros. Desta forma, este artigo objetiva fazer uma breve revisão a respeito do emprego de biossensores em análise farmacêutica, com ênfase em sensores eletroquímicos enzimáticos.

  11. A low cost color-based bacterial biosensor for measuring arsenic in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Using arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater for drinking or irrigation has caused major health problems for humans around the world, raising a need to monitor As level efficiently and economically. This study developed a color-based bacterial biosensor which is easy-to-use and inexpensive for measuring As and could be complementary to current As detecting techniques. The arsR-lacZ recombinant gene cassette in nonpathogenic strain Escherichia coli DH5α was used in the color-based biosensor which could be observed by eyes or measured by spectrometer. The developed bacterial biosensor demonstrates a quantitative range from 10 to 500μgL(-1) of As in 3-h reaction time. Furthermore, the biosensor was able to successfully detect and estimate As concentration in groundwater sample by measuring optical density at 595nm (OD595). Among different storage methods used in this study, biosensor in liquid at 4°C showed the longest shelf life about 9d, and liquid storage at RT and cell pellet could also be stored for about 3-5d. In conclusion, this study showed that the As biosensor with reliable color signal and economical preservation methods is useful for rapid screening of As pollutant, providing the potential for large scale screening and better management strategies for environmental quality control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Further In-vitro Characterization of an Implantable Biosensor for Ethanol Monitoring in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Rocchitta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl alcohol may be considered one of the most widespread central nervous system (CNS depressants in Western countries. Because of its toxicological and neurobiological implications, the detection of ethanol in brain extracellular fluid (ECF is of great importance. In a previous study, we described the development and characterization of an implantable biosensor successfully used for the real-time detection of ethanol in the brain of freely-moving rats. The implanted biosensor, integrated in a low-cost telemetry system, was demonstrated to be a reliable device for the short-time monitoring of exogenous ethanol in brain ECF. In this paper we describe a further in-vitro characterization of the above-mentioned biosensor in terms of oxygen, pH and temperature dependence in order to complete its validation. With the aim of enhancing ethanol biosensor performance, different enzyme loadings were investigated in terms of apparent ethanol Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters, viz. IMAX, KM and linear region slope, as well as ascorbic acid interference shielding. The responses of biosensors were studied over a period of 28 days. The overall findings of the present study confirm the original biosensor configuration to be the best of those investigated for in-vivo applications up to one week after implantation.

  13. Micro-resonators based on integrated polymer technology for optical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Pauline; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Guendouz, Mohammed; Lorrain, Nathalie; Poffo, Luiz; Gadonna, Michel; Bosc, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Research on sensors has experienced a noticeable development over the last decades especially in label free optical biosensors. However, compact sensors without markers for rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection of various substances induce a significant research of new technological solutions. The context of this work is the development of a sensor based on easily integrated and inexpensive micro-resonator (MR) component in integrated optics, highly sensitive and selective mainly in the areas of health and food. In this work, we take advantage of our previous studies on filters based on micro-resonators (MR) to experiment a new couple of polymers in the objective to use MR as a sensing function. MRs have been fabricated by processing SU8 polymer as core and PMATRIFE polymer as cladding layer of the waveguide. The refractive index contrast reaches 0.16 @ 1550 nm. Sub-micronic ring waveguides gaps from 0.5 to 1 μm have been successfully achieved with UV (i-line) photolithography. This work confirms our forecasts, published earlier, about the resolution that can be achieved. First results show a good extinction coefficient of ~17 dB, a quality factor around 104 and a finesse of 12. These results are in concordance with the theoretical study and they allow us to validate our technology with this couple of polymers. Work is going on with others lower cladding materials that will be used to further increase refractive index contrast for sensing applications.

  14. The Scanning TMR Microscope for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal N. Vyas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR scanning microscopeset-up capable of quantitatively imaging the magnetic stray field patterns of micron-sizedelements in 3D. By incorporating an Anderson loop measurement circuit for impedancematching, we are able to detect magnetoresistance changes of as little as 0.006%/Oe. By 3Drastering a mounted TMR sensor over our magnetic barcodes, we are able to characterisethe complex domain structures by displaying the real component, the amplitude and thephase of the sensor’s impedance. The modular design, incorporating a TMR sensor withan optical microscope, renders this set-up a versatile platform for studying and imagingimmobilised magnetic carriers and barcodes currently employed in biosensor platforms,magnetotactic bacteria and other complex magnetic domain structures of micron-sizedentities. The quantitative nature of the instrument and its ability to produce vector maps ofmagnetic stray fields has the potential to provide significant advantages over other commonlyused scanning magnetometry techniques.

  15. Resonance-Based Sparse Signal Decomposition and its Application in Mechanical Fault Diagnosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; Sun, Hongjian; Wang, Weijie

    2017-06-03

    Mechanical equipment is the heart of industry. For this reason, mechanical fault diagnosis has drawn considerable attention. In terms of the rich information hidden in fault vibration signals, the processing and analysis techniques of vibration signals have become a crucial research issue in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. Based on the theory of sparse decomposition, Selesnick proposed a novel nonlinear signal processing method: resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD). Since being put forward, RSSD has become widely recognized, and many RSSD-based methods have been developed to guide mechanical fault diagnosis. This paper attempts to summarize and review the theoretical developments and application advances of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis, and to provide a more comprehensive reference for those interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis. Followed by a brief introduction of RSSD's theoretical foundation, based on different optimization directions, applications of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis are categorized into five aspects: original RSSD, parameter optimized RSSD, subband optimized RSSD, integrated optimized RSSD, and RSSD combined with other methods. On this basis, outstanding issues in current RSSD study are also pointed out, as well as corresponding instructional solutions. We hope this review will provide an insightful reference for researchers and readers who are interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis.

  16. Lower limit on the achievable temperature in resonator-based sideband cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajcar, M.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    A resonator with eigenfrequency φr can be effectively used as a cooler for another linear oscillator with a much smaller frequency φmφr. A huge cooling effect, which could be used to cool a mechanical oscillator below the energy of quantum fluctuations, has been predicted by several authors. However, here we show that there is a lower limit T^* on the achievable temperature, given by T^* = Tm; φm/ φr, that was not considered in previous work and can be higher than the quantum limit in realistic experimental realizations. We also point out that the decay rate of the resonator, which previous studies stress should be small, must be larger than the decay rate of the cooled oscillator for effective cooling. M. Grajcar, S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Lower limit on the achievable temperature in resonator-based sideband cooling, Phys. Rev. B 78, 035406 (2008). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v78/e035406

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolic profiling of dairy cows with footrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiasan; Sun, Lingwei; Shu, Shi; Zhu, Kuiling; Xu, Chuang; Wang, Junsong; Wang, Hongbin

    2016-10-01

    Footrot is a debilitating and contagious disease in dairy cows, caused by the Gram-negative anaerobe Dichelobacter nodosus. 1 H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)-based metabolomics has been previously used to understand the pathology and etiology of several diseases. The objective of this study was to characterize serum from dairy cows with footrot (n=10) using 1 H-NMR-based metabolomics and chemometric analyses. 1 H-NMR spectroscopy with multivariate pattern recognition (principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis) was performed to identify biomarkers in cows with footrot (F) and healthy controls (C). 1 H-NMR analysis facilitated the identification of 21 metabolites. Among these metabolites, 4 metabolites were higher and 17 metabolites were lower in the F group than in the C group. The serum levels of 5 metabolites were significantly different (Pcows with footrot have altered carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid and energy metabolic pathways. Metabolomic approaches are a clinically useful diagnostic tool for understanding the biochemical alterations and mechanisms of several diseases.

  18. Comparative advantages of mechanical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlett, J L; Myers, E B; Roukes, M L

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical interactions are fundamental to biology. Mechanical forces of chemical origin determine motility and adhesion on the cellular scale, and govern transport and affinity on the molecular scale. Biological sensing in the mechanical domain provides unique opportunities to measure forces, displacements and mass changes from cellular and subcellular processes. Nanomechanical systems are particularly well matched in size with molecular interactions, and provide a basis for biological probes with single-molecule sensitivity. Here we review micro- and nanoscale biosensors, with a particular focus on fast mechanical biosensing in fluid by mass- and force-based methods, and the challenges presented by non-specific interactions. We explain the general issues that will be critical to the success of any type of next-generation mechanical biosensor, such as the need to improve intrinsic device performance, fabrication reproducibility and system integration. We also discuss the need for a greater understanding of analyte-sensor interactions on the nanoscale and of stochastic processes in the sensing environment.

  19. Biosensor approach to psychopathology classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha Koshelev

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We used a multi-round, two-party exchange game in which a healthy subject played a subject diagnosed with a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistics Manual-IV disorder, and applied a Bayesian clustering approach to the behavior exhibited by the healthy subject. The goal was to characterize quantitatively the style of play elicited in the healthy subject (the proposer by their DSM-diagnosed partner (the responder. The approach exploits the dynamics of the behavior elicited in the healthy proposer as a biosensor for cognitive features that characterize the psychopathology group at the other side of the interaction. Using a large cohort of subjects (n = 574, we found statistically significant clustering of proposers' behavior overlapping with a range of DSM-IV disorders including autism spectrum disorder, borderline personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and major depressive disorder. To further validate these results, we developed a computer agent to replace the human subject in the proposer role (the biosensor and show that it can also detect these same four DSM-defined disorders. These results suggest that the highly developed social sensitivities that humans bring to a two-party social exchange can be exploited and automated to detect important psychopathologies, using an interpersonal behavioral probe not directly related to the defining diagnostic criteria.

  20. Simulation of Biosensor using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheeparamatti, B G; Hebbal, M S; Sheeparamatti, R B; Math, V B; Kadadevaramath, J S

    2006-01-01

    Bio-Micro Electro Mechanical Systems/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems include a wide variety of sensors, actuators, and complex micro/nano devices for biomedical applications. Recent advances in biosensors have shown that sensors based on bending of microfabricated cantilevers have potential advantages over earlier used detection methods. Thus, a simple cantilever beam can be used as a sensor for biomedical, chemical and environmental applications. Here, microfabricated multilayered cantilever beam is exposed to sensing environment. Lower layer being pure structural silicon or polymer and upper layer is of polymer with antigen/antibody immobilized in it. Obviously, it has an affinity towards its counterpart i.e. antibody/antigen. In the sensing environment, if counter elements exists, they get captured by this sensing beam head, and the cantilever beam deflects. This deflection can be sensed and the presence of counter elements in the environment can be predicted. In this work, a finite element model of a biosensor for sensing antibody/antigen reaction is developed and simulated using ANSYS/Multiphysics. The optimal dimensions of the microcantilever beam are selected based on permissible deflection range with the aid of MATLAB. In the model analysis, both weight and surface stress effects on the cantilever are considered. Approximate weights are taken into account because of counter elements, considering their molecular weight and possible number of elements required for sensing. The results obtained in terms of lateral deflection are presented

  1. Electroacoustic miniaturized DNA-biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamby, Jean; Lazerges, Mathieu; Pernelle, Christine; Perrot, Hubert; Girault, Hubert H; Tribollet, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    A micrometer-sized electroacoustic DNA-biosensor was developed. The device included a thin semi-crystalline polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric layer with two Ag microband electrodes on one side and a DNA thiol-labeled monolayer adsorbed on a gold surface on the other. A resonance wave was observed at 29 MHz with a network analyzer, upon AC voltage application between the two Ag electrodes, corresponding to electromechanical coupling induced by molecular dipoles of the PET polymer chain in the dielectric layer. It was found that the device size and geometry were well adapted to detect DNA hybridization, by measuring the capacity of the resonance response evolution: hybridization induced polarization of the dielectric material that affected the electromechanical coupling established in the dielectric layer. The 0.2 mm(2) sensor sensitive area allows detection in small volumes and still has higher detection levels for bioanalytical applications, the non-contact configuration adopted avoids electric faradic reactions that may damage biosensor sensitive layers, and finally, PET is a costless raw material, easy to process and well adapted for large scale production. The well-balanced technological and economic advantages of this kind of device make it a good candidate for biochip integration.

  2. Development of Galactose Biosensor Based on Functionalized ZnO Nanorods with Galactose Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of galactose biosensor based on functionalised ZnO nanorods is described. The galactose biosensor was developed by immobilizing galactose oxidase on ZnO nanorods in conjunction with glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker molecule. The IRAS study provided evidence for the interaction of galactose oxidase with the surface of ZnO nanorods. The electromotive force (EMF response of the galactose biosensor was measured by potentiometric method. We observed that the proposed biosensor has a linear detection range over a concentration range from 10 mM to 200 mM with good sensitivity of 89.10±1.23 mV/decade. In addition, the proposed biosensor has shown fast time response of less than 10 s and a good selectivity towards galactose in the presence of common interferents such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, glucose, and magnesium ions. The galactose biosensor based on galactose oxidase immobilized ZnO nanorods has a shelf life more than four weeks.

  3. Magneto-elastic biosensors: Influence of different thiols on pathogen capture efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Pozza, Márcia; Possan, André L. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Roesch-Ely, Mariana [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Missell, Frank P., E-mail: fpmissel@ucs.br [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2017-06-01

    Magneto-elastic biosensors have mass sensitivity to biological species, offering reliability and reproducibility in the detection of pathogens such as Escherichia coli. In this work, amorphous ribbons of Metglas 2826MB3 were coated with layers of Cr and Au by DC magnetron sputtering and cut to 5 mm × 1 mm. The influence of different thiols on captured pathogens was studied. The compounds cystamine (CYS), cysteamine (CYSTE) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were deposited on Au-covered surfaces, followed by antibodies. The roughness parameters Ra and Rq were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micrographs from scanning electron microscopy with a field emission gun (FESEM) were also utilized. Biosensors formed with MPA showed an increased efficiency for attracting E. coli compared to biosensors with CYS and CYSTE, but large standard deviations were observed, making reproducibility and reliability difficult for that biosensor. Sensors tested with CYSTE showed greater efficiency and a lower detection limit than sensors with CYS. The results indicated that the size of the carbon chain and the terminal grouping influence the effectiveness of immobilization on magneto-elastic biosensors. - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun (FESEM) were utilized. • Biosensor with cysteamine (CYSTE) gave lower detection limit for E.coli than mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or cystamine (CYS)

  4. Magneto-elastic biosensors: Influence of different thiols on pathogen capture efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Pozza, Márcia; Possan, André L.; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Missell, Frank P.

    2017-01-01

    Magneto-elastic biosensors have mass sensitivity to biological species, offering reliability and reproducibility in the detection of pathogens such as Escherichia coli. In this work, amorphous ribbons of Metglas 2826MB3 were coated with layers of Cr and Au by DC magnetron sputtering and cut to 5 mm × 1 mm. The influence of different thiols on captured pathogens was studied. The compounds cystamine (CYS), cysteamine (CYSTE) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were deposited on Au-covered surfaces, followed by antibodies. The roughness parameters Ra and Rq were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and micrographs from scanning electron microscopy with a field emission gun (FESEM) were also utilized. Biosensors formed with MPA showed an increased efficiency for attracting E. coli compared to biosensors with CYS and CYSTE, but large standard deviations were observed, making reproducibility and reliability difficult for that biosensor. Sensors tested with CYSTE showed greater efficiency and a lower detection limit than sensors with CYS. The results indicated that the size of the carbon chain and the terminal grouping influence the effectiveness of immobilization on magneto-elastic biosensors. - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun (FESEM) were utilized. • Biosensor with cysteamine (CYSTE) gave lower detection limit for E.coli than mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or cystamine (CYS)

  5. Detection of Benzoic Acid by an Amperometric Inhibitor Biosensor Based on Mushroom Tissue Homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kemal Sezgintürk

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An amperometric benzoic acid-sensing inhibitor biosensor was prepared by immobilizing mushroom (Agaricus bisporus tissue homogenate on a Clark-type oxygen electrode. The effects of the quantity of mushroom tissue homogenate, the quantity of gelatin and the effect of the crosslinking agent glutaraldehyde percent on the biosensor were studied. The optimum concentration of phenol used as substrate was 200 μM. The bioanalytical properties of the proposed biosensor, such as dependence of the biosensor response on the pH value and the temperature, were investigated. The biosensor responded linearly to benzoic acid in a concentration range of 25–100 μM. Standard deviation (s.d. was ±0.49 μM for 7 successive determinations at a concentration of 75 μM. The inhibitor biosensor based on mushroom tissue homogenate was applied for the determination of benzoic acid in fizzy lemonade, some fruits and groundwater samples. Results were compared to those obtained using AOAC method, showing a good agreement.

  6. Microbial Fuels Cell-Based Biosensor for Toxicity Detection: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoyu Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the unprecedented deterioration of environmental quality, rapid recognition of toxic compounds is paramount for performing in situ real-time monitoring. Although several analytical techniques based on electrochemistry or biosensors have been developed for the detection of toxic compounds, most of them are time-consuming, inaccurate, or cumbersome for practical applications. More recently, microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensors have drawn increasing interest due to their sustainability and cost-effectiveness, with applications ranging from the monitoring of anaerobic digestion process parameters (VFA to water quality detection (e.g., COD, BOD. When a MFC runs under correct conditions, the voltage generated is correlated with the amount of a given substrate. Based on this linear relationship, several studies have demonstrated that MFC-based biosensors could detect heavy metals such as copper, chromium, or zinc, as well as organic compounds, including p-nitrophenol (PNP, formaldehyde and levofloxacin. Both bacterial consortia and single strains can be used to develop MFC-based biosensors. Biosensors with single strains show several advantages over systems integrating bacterial consortia, such as selectivity and stability. One of the limitations of such sensors is that the detection range usually exceeds the actual pollution level. Therefore, improving their sensitivity is the most important for widespread application. Nonetheless, MFC-based biosensors represent a promising approach towards single pollutant detection.

  7. A Micro-Platinum Wire Biosensor for Fast and Selective Detection of Alanine Aminotransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Nguyen Thanh Thuy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a miniaturized biosensor based on permselective polymer layers (overoxidized polypyrrole (Ppy and Nafion® modified and enzyme (glutamate oxidase (GlutOx immobilized micro-platinum wire electrode for the detection of alanine aminotransferase (ALT was fabricated. The proposed ALT biosensor was measured electrochemically by constant potential amperometry at +0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The ALT biosensor provides fast response time (~5 s and superior selectivity towards ALT against both negatively and positively charged species (e.g., ascorbic acid (AA and dopamine (DA, respectively. The detection range of the ALT biosensor is found to be 10–900 U/L which covers the range of normal ALT levels presented in the serum and the detection limit and sensitivity are found to be 8.48 U/L and 0.059 nA/(U/L·mm2 (N = 10, respectively. We also found that one-day storage of the ALT biosensor at −20 °C right after the sensor being fabricated can enhance the sensor sensitivity (1.74 times higher than that of the sensor stored at 4 °C. The ALT biosensor is stable after eight weeks of storage at −20 °C. The sensor was tested in spiked ALT samples (ALT activities: 20, 200, 400, and 900 U/L and reasonable recoveries (70%~107% were obtained.

  8. Preparation of Oxygen Meter Based Biosensor for Determination of Triglyceride in Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BHAMBI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A method is described for preparation of a dissolved oxygen meter (make Aqualytic, Germany based triglyceride biosensor employing a polyvinyl chloride (PVC membrane bound lipase, glycerol kinase (GK and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase The biosensor measures dissolved O2 utilized in the oxidation of triglyceride (TG by membrane bound lipase, glycerol kinase (GK and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO, which is directly proportional to (TG concentration. The biosensor showed optimum response within 10-15 sec at pH 7.5 and 39.5 ºC. A linear relationship was obtained between the (TG concentration from 5mM to 20mM and oxygen consumed (mg/L. The biosensor was employed for determination of triglyceride in serum. The within and between batch coefficient of variation (CV were < 2.18 % and < 1.7% respectively. The minimum detection limit of the biosensor was 0.35 mM. A study of interference revealed that ascorbic acid, cholesterol and bilirubin caused 13%, 15%, and 12% interference, respectively.The biosensor is portable and can be used outside the laboratory.

  9. Prospects of conducting polymers in biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Chaubey, Asha; Singh, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Applications of conducting polymers to biosensors have recently aroused much interest. This is because these molecular electronic materials offer control of different parameters such as polymer layer thickness, electrical properties and bio-reagent loading, etc. Moreover, conducting polymer based biosensors are likely to cater to the pressing requirements such as biocompatibility, possibility of in vivo sensing, continuous monitoring of drugs or metabolites, multi-parametric assays, miniaturization and high information density. This paper deals with the emerging trends in conducting polymer based biosensors during the last about 5 years

  10. Design Strategies for Aptamer-Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Liang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Nandi

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers have been widely used as recognition elements for biosensor construction, especially in the detection of proteins or small molecule targets, and regarded as promising alternatives for antibodies in bioassay areas. In this review, we present an overview of reported design strategies for the fabrication of biosensors and classify them into four basic modes: target-induced structure switching mode, sandwich or sandwich-like mode, target-induced dissociation/displacement mode and competitive replacement mode. In view of the unprecedented advantages brought about by aptamers and smart design strategies, aptamer-based biosensors are expected to be one of the most promising devices in bioassay related applications. PMID:22399891

  11. Improved biosensor-based detection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Described is a new biosensor-based detection system for effector compounds, useful for in vivo applications in e.g. screening and selecting of cells which produce a small molecule effector compound or which take up a small molecule effector compound from its environment. The detection system...... comprises a protein or RNA-based biosensor for the effector compound which indirectly regulates the expression of a reporter gene via two hybrid proteins, providing for fewer false signals or less 'noise', tuning of sensitivity or other advantages over conventional systems where the biosensor directly...

  12. Strategies towards advanced ion track-based biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alfonta, L.; Bukelman, O.; Chandra, A.; Fahrner, W. R.; Fink, D.; Fuks, D.; Golovanov, V.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Hoppe, K.; Kiv, A.; Klinkovich, I.; Landau, M.; Morante, J.R.; Tkachenko, N.V.; Vacík, Jiří; Valden, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 164, 7-8 (2009), s. 431-437 ISSN 1042-0150. [2nd International Meeting on Recent Developments in the Study of Radiation Effects in Matters. Fodele, 07.09.2008-11.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : biosensors * etched tracks * enzymes Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2009

  13. Design and analysis of an optimal hopper for use in resonance-based locomotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ivor; Folkertsma, Gerrit Adriaan; Stramigioli, Stefano

    Quadrupedal running is an efficient form of locomotion found in nature, which serves as an inspiration for robotics. We believe that a resonance-based approach is the path towards energy-efficient legged locomotion and running robots. The first step in working towards this goal is creating an

  14. Design of a ring resonator-based optical beam forming network for phased array receive antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Klooster, J.W.J.R.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Meijerink, Arjan; Zhuang, L.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; van Etten, Wim; Heideman, Rene; Leinse, Arne; Schippers, H.; Verpoorte, J.; Wintels, M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel squint-free ring resonator-based optical beam forming network (OBFN) for phased array antennas (PAA) is proposed. It is intended to provide broadband connectivity to airborne platforms via geostationary satellites. In this paper, we present the design of the OBFN and its control system. Our

  15. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fib...

  16. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    ...). An epidermal biosensor is a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  17. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    ...) An epidermal biosensor was conceived as a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  18. PRINCIPLES OF AFFINITY-BASED BIOSENSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the amount of resources that have been invested by national and international academic, government, and commercial sectors to develop affinity-based biosensor products, little obvious success has been realized through commercialization of these devices for specific applic...

  19. Polymer Based Biosensors for Medical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherré, Solène; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    , environmental monitoring and food safety. The detected element varies from a single molecule (such as glucose), a biopolymer (such as DNA or a protein) to a whole organism (such as bacteria). Due to their easy use and possible miniaturization, biosensors have a high potential to come out of the lab...... and be available for use by everybody. To fulfil these purposes, polymers represent very appropriate materials. Many nano- and microfabrication methods for polymers are available, allowing a fast and cheap production of devices. This chapter will present the general concept of a biosensor in a first part......The objective of this chapter is to give an overview about the newest developments in biosensors made of polymers for medical applications. Biosensors are devices that can recognize and detect a target with high selectivity. They are widely used in many fields such as medical diagnostic...

  20. Biosensors in immunology: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathak, S.S.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Optical biosensors are finding a range of applications in immunology. They enable biomolecular interactions to be characterized in real time without the need to label reactants, and, because individual binding steps can be visualized, are particularly suited to complex assays

  1. Biosensors a promising future in measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device which can be used to convert the existence of a molecule or compound into a measurable and useful signal. Biosensors use stimulus to translate changes to recognisable signals and have great importance to society. Applications include diagnosis tools for diseases, security appliances, and other biomedical equipments. Biosensors can also be used in the detection of pathogens and other microbes in foodstuffs, drugs and processing industries. Enormous progress and advancement has been witnessed in this area. Research and development in micro level systems serves to interface biology with novel materials such as nanomaterial. Development of high speed and accurate electronic devices tfor use in medicine and energy storage (such as biofuel cells) is one of the target areas. This paper discusses the importance, use and current and future trend in the application of biosensors

  2. How microelectrode array-based chick forebrain neuron biosensors respond to glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor antagonist musimol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Y. Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have established a long-term, stable primary chick forebrain neuron (FBN culture on a microelectrode array platform as a biosensor system for neurotoxicant screening and for neuroelectrophysiological studies for multiple purposes. This paper reports some of our results, which characterize the biosensor pharmacologically. Dose-response experiments were conducted using NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor agonist musimol (MUS. The chick FBN biosensor (C-FBN-biosensor responds to the two agents in a pattern similar to that of rodent counterparts; the estimated EC50s (the effective concentration that causes 50% inhibition of the maximal effect are 2.3 μM and 0.25 μM, respectively. Intercultural and intracultural reproducibility and long-term reusability of the C-FBN-biosensor are addressed and discussed. A phenomenon of sensitization of the biosensor that accompanies intracultural reproducibility in paired dose-response experiments for the same agent (AP5 or MUS is reported. The potential application of the C-FBN-biosensor as an alternative to rodent biosensors in shared sensing domains (NMDA receptor and GABAA receptor is suggested. Keywords: Biosensor, Microelectrode array, Neurotoxicity, Chick forebrain neuron, AP5, Musimol

  3. Polyester Sulphonic Acid Interstitial Nanocomposite Platform for Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I. Iwuoha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel enzyme immobilization platform was prepared on a platinum disk working electrode by polymerizing aniline inside the interstitial pores of polyester sulphonic acid sodium salt (PESA. Scanning electron microscopy study showed the formation of homogeneous sulphonated polyaniline (PANI nanotubes (~90 nm and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA confirmed that the nanotubes were stable up to 230 °C. The PANI:PESA nanocomposite showed a quasi-reversible redox behaviour in phosphate buffer saline. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was immobilized on to this modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection. The biosensor gave a sensitivity of 1.33 μA (μM-1 and a detection limit of 0.185 μM for H2O2. Stability experiments showed that the biosensor retained more than 64% of its initial sensitivity over four days of storage at 4 °C.

  4. Antibody Immobilization on Conductive Polymer Coated Nonwoven Fibers for Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K. MCGRAW

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is being performed to develop rapid and novel electrochemical biosensors for foodborne pathogen detection. This research focuses on electrotextile platforms to perform both capture and sensing functions in a single component. The biosensor uses nonwoven fiber membranes coated with conductive polymer and functionalized with antibodies for biological capture. This study examines three methods for antibody immobilization: passive adsorption, glutaraldehyde cross-linking, and EDC/Sulfo-NHS cross-linking. Antibodies are immobilized onto the conductive fiber surfaces for the specific capture of a target pathogen. The immobilization and capture capabilities of each method are analyzed through the use of two different fluorescent reporters: FITC and PicoGreen DNA stain. Fluorescence is measured using a fluorescent plate reader and then imaged using a fluorescent microscope. The effect of a blocking agent on specificity is also evaluated. It is found that glutaraldehyde with blocking is the best immobilization method with PicoGreen being the best fluorescent reporter.

  5. Nanobioengineering and Characterization of a Novel Estrogen Receptor Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfrid Boireau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed an original supramolecular assembly on a surface of sensor composed of an innovative combination of an engineered cytochrome b5 and a modified nucleic acid bound to a synthetic lipid hemimembrane. The protein/DNA block, called (PDNA 2, was synthesized and purified before its immobilization onto a hybrid bilayer reconstituted on a gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and atomic force microscopy (AFM were engaged in parallel on the same substrates in order to better understand dynamic events that occur at the surface of the biosensor. Good correlations were obtained in terms of specificity and reversibility. These findings allow us to present a first application of such biosensor in the study of the interaction processes between nuclear receptor and DNA.

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GRIDINA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Performed in this paper is numerical modeling of the angular dependence for light reflectivity R(F in surface plasmon-polariton resonance (SPR realized in Kretschmann geometry when studying the interface gold/suspension of spherical particles (cells in the assumption that the dielectric permittivity of particles suspension is described by the theory of effective medium. It has been shown that availability of suspended particles in solution inevitably results in appearance of an intermediate layer with the ε gradient between gold surface and suspension bulk, as a result of which the SPR angle shifts to lower values. Near the critical angle, the first derivative dR/dF demonstrates a clearly pronounced peak, which allows determining the value for suspension bulk and the gradient in the intermediate layer. Obtained in our experiments were SPR curves for two suspensions of erythrocytes – the dense one (erythrocyte mass after centrifuging and loose solution (whole blood. In the case of erythrocyte mass, fitting the experimental and calculated curves enabled us to quantitatively determine the bulk value for this erythrocyte mass (εb =1.96, thickness of the intermediate layer dm (300…400 nm and gradient in the intermediate layer. On the contrary, the SPR curve for whole blood appeared to be close to that of pure plasma. This fact allows only estimation of the thickness dm~2000...3000 nm as well as minimum ε value in the intermediate layer, which is close to that of plasma (ε = 1.79. Also, discussed is the mechanism of influence of the cell shape near the gold surface on the SPR effect.

  7. Biosensors for cardiac biomarkers detection: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Anjum; Gürbüz, Yaşar; Gurbuz, Yasar; Kolkar Mohammed, Javed Hussain Niazi

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered as a major threat to global health. Therefore, there is a growing demand for a range of portable, rapid and low cost biosensing devices for the detection of CVD. Biosensors can play an important role in the early diagnosis of CVD without having to rely on hospital visits where expensive and time-consuming laboratory tests are recommended. Over the last decade, many biosensors have been developed to detect a wide range of cardiac marker to reduce ...

  8. Synthetic biology for microbial heavy metal biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang Jun

    2018-02-01

    Using recombinant DNA technology, various whole-cell biosensors have been developed for detection of environmental pollutants, including heavy metal ions. Whole-cell biosensors have several advantages: easy and inexpensive cultivation, multiple assays, and no requirement of any special techniques for analysis. In the era of synthetic biology, cutting-edge DNA sequencing and gene synthesis technologies have accelerated the development of cell-based biosensors. Here, we summarize current technological advances in whole-cell heavy metal biosensors, including the synthetic biological components (bioparts), sensing and reporter modules, genetic circuits, and chassis cells. We discuss several opportunities for improvement of synthetic cell-based biosensors. First, new functional modules must be discovered in genome databases, and this knowledge must be used to upgrade specific bioparts through molecular engineering. Second, modules must be assembled into functional biosystems in chassis cells. Third, heterogeneity of individual cells in the microbial population must be eliminated. In the perspectives, the development of whole-cell biosensors is also discussed in the aspects of cultivation methods and synthetic cells.

  9. Biosensors-on-chip: a topical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sensen; Shamsi, Mohtashim H

    2017-01-01

    This review will examine the integration of two fields that are currently at the forefront of science, i.e. biosensors and microfluidics. As a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, microfluidics has been enriched by the integration of various detection tools for analyte detection and quantitation. The application of such microfluidic platforms is greatly increased in the area of biosensors geared towards point-of-care diagnostics. Together, the merger of microfluidics and biosensors has generated miniaturized devices for sample processing and sensitive detection with quantitation. We believe that microfluidic biosensors (biosensors-on-chip) are essential for developing robust and cost effective point-of-care diagnostics. This review is relevant to a variety of disciplines, such as medical science, clinical diagnostics, LOC technologies including MEMs/NEMs, and analytical science. Specifically, this review will appeal to scientists working in the two overlapping fields of biosensors and microfluidics, and will also help new scientists to find their directions in developing point-of-care devices. (topical review)

  10. Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...

  11. Biosensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and an electronic component to transduce and detect the signal. A variety of .... aliphatic aldehyde as fol- lows: FMNH2 + .... microorganisms by the use of high temperature. ... ISFET. The oxidation of hypoxanthine to uric acid by xanthine.

  12. Methods of reducing non-specific adsorption in microfluidic biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seokheun; Chae, Junseok

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific adsorption (NSA) of biomolecules is a persistent challenge in microfluidic biosensors. Microfluidic biosensors often have immobilized bioreceptors such as antibodies, enzymes, DNAs, etc, via linker molecules such as SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) to enhance immobilization. However, the linker molecules are very susceptible to NSA, causing false responses and decreasing sensitivity. In this paper, we present design methods to reduce the NSA of alkanethiol SAMs, which are popular linker molecules on microfluidic biosensors. Three design parameters were studied for two different chain-length SAMs (n = 2 and 10): (i) SAM incubation time, (ii) surface roughness [0.8 nm and 4.4 nm RMS (root mean square)] and (iii) gold crystal re-growth along (1 1 1) the target orientation. NSA was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The results suggest that increased SAM incubation time reduces NSA, and that short-chain SAMs respond more favorably than the long-chain SAMs. Both SAMs were shown to be sensitive to surface roughness, and long-chain SAMs reduced NSA by 75%. Gold crystal re-growth along (1 1 1) the target orientation profoundly reduced NSA on the short-chain SAM. On a gold surface where surface roughness was 0.8 nm and there was strong directional alignment along the (1 1 1) gold crystal, final concentrations of nonspecifically bound proteins were 0.05 ng mm −2 (fibrinogen) and 0.075 ng mm −2 (lysozyme)—significantly lower than other known methods. The results show that optimizing three parameters (SAM incubation time, gold surface roughness and gold crystal orientation) improved SAM sensitivity for fibrinogen–anti-fibrinogen conjugates by a factor of 5 in 2.94 pM, suggesting that the methods are effective for reducing NSA in microfluidic biosensors.

  13. Analysis of experimental biosensor/FIA lactose measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira L.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Whey is an abundant effluent in the production of cheese and casein. The biotechnological utilization of this economically important and nutritive source is limited mainly because of the presence of high percentages of lactose. This disaccharide has poor solubility, which can cause crystallization and insufficient sweetness in dairy food; additionally, part of the adult population suffers from associated lactose intolerance diseases. There are several methods to determine lactose such as spectrophotometry, polarimetry, infrared spectroscopy, titrimetry and chromatography. However these methods are tedious and time-consuming due to long sample preparation. These disadvantages stimulated the development of an enzymatic lactose biosensor. It employs two immobilized enzymes, beta-galactosidase and glucose oxidase and the quantitative analysis of lactose is based on determination of oxygen consumption in the enzymatic reaction. The influence of temperature on the biosensor signal was experimentally studied. It was observed that a nonlinear relationship exists between the electric response of the biosensor - provided by CAFCA (Computer Assisted Flow Control & Analysis - ANASYSCON, Hannover - and lactose concentration. In this work, attempts were made to correlate these variables using a simple nonlinear model and multilayered neural networks, with the latter providing the best modeling of the experimental data.

  14. Orientation of llama antibodies strongly increases sensitivity of biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Hesselink, Thamara; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Cordewener, Jan H G; Jongsma, Maarten A; Schoffelen, Sanne; van Hest, Jan C M; Zuilhof, Han; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-10-15

    Sensitivity of biosensors depends on the orientation of bio-receptors on the sensor surface. The objective of this study was to organize bio-receptors on surfaces in a way that their analyte binding site is exposed to the analyte solution. VHH proteins recognizing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were used for making biosensors, and azides were introduced in the VHH to function as bioorthogonal reactive groups. The importance of the orientation of bio-receptors was addressed by comparing sensors with randomly oriented VHH (with multiple exposed azide groups) to sensors with uniformly oriented VHH (with only a single azide group). A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip exposing cyclooctyne was reacted to azide functionalized VHH domains, using click chemistry. Comparison between randomly and uniformly oriented bio-receptors showed up to 800-fold increase in biosensor sensitivity. This technique may increase the containment of infectious diseases such as FMDV as its strongly enhanced sensitivity may facilitate early diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-based glucose biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kros, A.; Hövell, W.F.M. van; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors for the recognition of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) were fabricated for the first time. The resulting biosensor has potential applications for long-term glucose measurements.

  16. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  17. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of Protein Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-08-01

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length

  18. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  19. Micro-resonators based on integrated polymer technology for optical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Girault , Pauline; Lemaitre , Jonathan; Guendouz , Mohammed; Lorrain , Nathalie; Poffo , Luiz; Gadonna , Michel; Bosc , Dominique

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Research on sensors has experienced a noticeable development over the last decades especially in label free optical biosensors. However, compact sensors without markers for rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection of various substances induces a significant research of new technological solutions. The context of this work is the development of a sensor based on easily integrated and inexpensive micro-resonator (MR) component in integrated optics, highly sensitive and ...

  20. Multicoil resonance-based parallel array for smart wireless power delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbozorgi, S A; Sawan, M; Gosselin, B

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel resonance-based multicoil structure as a smart power surface to wirelessly power up apparatus like mobile, animal headstage, implanted devices, etc. The proposed powering system is based on a 4-coil resonance-based inductive link, the resonance coil of which is formed by an array of several paralleled coils as a smart power transmitter. The power transmitter employs simple circuit connections and includes only one power driver circuit per multicoil resonance-based array, which enables higher power transfer efficiency and power delivery to the load. The power transmitted by the driver circuit is proportional to the load seen by the individual coil in the array. Thus, the transmitted power scales with respect to the load of the electric/electronic system to power up, and does not divide equally over every parallel coils that form the array. Instead, only the loaded coils of the parallel array transmit significant part of total transmitted power to the receiver. Such adaptive behavior enables superior power, size and cost efficiency then other solutions since it does not need to use complex detection circuitry to find the location of the load. The performance of the proposed structure is verified by measurement results. Natural load detection and covering 4 times bigger area than conventional topologies with a power transfer efficiency of 55% are the novelties of presented paper.

  1. Novel electrochemical xanthine biosensor based on chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muamer Dervisevic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the electrochemical detection of the adenosine-3-phosphate degradation product, xanthine, using a new xanthine biosensor based on a hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform which has been successfully employed in the evaluation of meat freshness. In the design of the amperometric xanthine biosensor, chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles fabricated by an in situ chemical synthesis method on a glassy carbon electrode surface was used to enhance electron transfer and to provide good enzyme affinity. Electrochemical studies were carried out by the modified electrode with immobilized xanthine oxidase on it, after which the biosensor was tested to ascertain the optimization parameters. The Biosensor exhibited a very good linear range of 1–200 μM, low detection limit of 0.25 μM, average response time of 8 seconds, and was not prone to significant interference from uric acid, ascorbic acid, glucose, and sodium benzoate. The resulting bio-nanocomposite xanthine biosensor was tested with fish, beef, and chicken real-sample measurements.

  2. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Schuster

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S- layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  3. S-Layer Protein-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard

    2018-04-11

    The present paper highlights the application of bacterial surface (S-) layer proteins as versatile components for the fabrication of biosensors. One technologically relevant feature of S-layer proteins is their ability to self-assemble on many surfaces and interfaces to form a crystalline two-dimensional (2D) protein lattice. The S-layer lattice on the surface of a biosensor becomes part of the interface architecture linking the bioreceptor to the transducer interface, which may cause signal amplification. The S-layer lattice as ultrathin, highly porous structure with functional groups in a well-defined special distribution and orientation and an overall anti-fouling characteristics can significantly raise the limit in terms of variety and the ease of bioreceptor immobilization, compactness of bioreceptor molecule arrangement, sensitivity, specificity, and detection limit for many types of biosensors. The present paper discusses and summarizes examples for the successful implementation of S-layer lattices on biosensor surfaces in order to give a comprehensive overview on the application potential of these bioinspired S-layer protein-based biosensors.

  4. Functional design of electrolytic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage Preethichandra, D. M.; Mala Ekanayake, E. M. I.; Onoda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensbased on conjugated polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on a Pt modified ITO (indium tin oxide) conductive glass substrate and their performances are described. We have presented a method of developing a highly sensitive and low-cost nano-biosensor for blood glucose measurements. The fabrication method proposed decreases the cost of production significantly as the amount of noble metals used is minimized. A nano-corrugated PPy substrate was developed through pulsed electrochemical deposition. The sensitivity achieved was 325 mA/(Mcm2) and the linear range of the developed sensor was 50-60 mmol/l. Then the application of the electrophoresis helps the glucose oxidase (GOx) on the PPy substrate. The main reason behind this high enzyme loading is the high electric field applied across the sensor surface (working electrode) and the counter electrode where that pushes the nano-scale enzyme particles floating in the phosphate buffer solution towards the substrate. The novel technique used has provided an extremely high sensitivities and very high linear ranges for enzyme (GOx) and therefore can be concluded that this is a very good technique to load enzyme onto the conducting polymer substrates.

  5. Mechanistic models for the evaluation of biocatalytic reaction conditions and biosensor design optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenova, Daria

    . In the first case study a mechanistic model was developed to describe the enzymatic reaction of glucose oxidase and glucose in the presence of catalase inside a commercial microfluidic platform with integrated oxygen sensor spots. The simplicity of the proposed model allowed an easy calibration of the reaction...... the microfluidic device. In the second case study the flexible microfluidic platform with integrated amperometric glucose biosensors was developed for continuous monitoring of glucose consumption rates. The integration of the mixing chamber inside the platform allowed performing sample dilutions which subsequently......BRs. In the third case study the mechanistic model of the cyclic voltammetry response of the first generation glucose biosensors was developed and applied for the biosensor design optimization. Furthermore the obtained qualitative and quantitative dependencies between the model output and experimental results were...

  6. Analytical Parameters of an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor for Fast Analysis in Food Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margalida Artigues

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amperometric biosensors based on the use of glucose oxidase (GOx are able to combine the robustness of electrochemical techniques with the specificity of biological recognition processes. However, very little information can be found in literature about the fundamental analytical parameters of these sensors. In this work, the analytical behavior of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of GOx using a hydrogel (Chitosan onto highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays (TiO2NTAs has been evaluated. The GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor showed a sensitivity of 5.46 μA·mM−1 with a linear range from 0.3 to 1.5 mM; its fundamental analytical parameters were studied using a commercial soft drink. The obtained results proved sufficient repeatability (RSD = 1.9%, reproducibility (RSD = 2.5%, accuracy (95–105% recovery, and robustness (RSD = 3.3%. Furthermore, no significant interferences from fructose, ascorbic acid and citric acid were obtained. In addition, the storage stability was further examined, after 30 days, the GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor retained 85% of its initial current response. Finally, the glucose content of different food samples was measured using the biosensor and compared with the respective HPLC value. In the worst scenario, a deviation smaller than 10% was obtained among the 20 samples evaluated.

  7. Electrochemical Biosensors: A Solution to Pollution Detection with Reference to Environmental Contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Vargas, Gustavo; Sosa-Hernández, Juan Eduardo; Saldarriaga-Hernandez, Sara; Villalba-Rodríguez, Angel M; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2018-03-24

    The increasing environmental pollution with particular reference to emerging contaminants, toxic heavy elements, and other hazardous agents is a serious concern worldwide. Considering this global issue, there is an urgent need to design and develop strategic measuring techniques with higher efficacy and precision to detect a broader spectrum of numerous contaminants. The development of precise instruments can further help in real-time and in-process monitoring of the generation and release of environmental pollutants from different industrial sectors. Moreover, real-time monitoring can also reduce the excessive consumption of several harsh chemicals and reagents with an added advantage of on-site determination of contaminant composition prior to discharge into the environment. With key scientific advances, electrochemical biosensors have gained considerable attention to solve this problem. Electrochemical biosensors can be an excellent fit as an analytical tool for monitoring programs to implement legislation. Herein, we reviewed the current trends in the use of electrochemical biosensors as novel tools to detect various contaminant types including toxic heavy elements. A particular emphasis was given to screen-printed electrodes, nanowire sensors, and paper-based biosensors and their role in the pollution detection processes. Towards the end, the work is wrapped up with concluding remarks and future perspectives. In summary, electrochemical biosensors and related areas such as bioelectronics, and (bio)-nanotechnology seem to be growing areas that will have a marked influence on the development of new bio-sensing strategies in future studies.

  8. Electrochemical Biosensors: A Solution to Pollution Detection with Reference to Environmental Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Hernandez-Vargas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing environmental pollution with particular reference to emerging contaminants, toxic heavy elements, and other hazardous agents is a serious concern worldwide. Considering this global issue, there is an urgent need to design and develop strategic measuring techniques with higher efficacy and precision to detect a broader spectrum of numerous contaminants. The development of precise instruments can further help in real-time and in-process monitoring of the generation and release of environmental pollutants from different industrial sectors. Moreover, real-time monitoring can also reduce the excessive consumption of several harsh chemicals and reagents with an added advantage of on-site determination of contaminant composition prior to discharge into the environment. With key scientific advances, electrochemical biosensors have gained considerable attention to solve this problem. Electrochemical biosensors can be an excellent fit as an analytical tool for monitoring programs to implement legislation. Herein, we reviewed the current trends in the use of electrochemical biosensors as novel tools to detect various contaminant types including toxic heavy elements. A particular emphasis was given to screen-printed electrodes, nanowire sensors, and paper-based biosensors and their role in the pollution detection processes. Towards the end, the work is wrapped up with concluding remarks and future perspectives. In summary, electrochemical biosensors and related areas such as bioelectronics, and (bio-nanotechnology seem to be growing areas that will have a marked influence on the development of new bio-sensing strategies in future studies.

  9. Detection of triglyceride using an iridium nano-particle catalyst based amperometric biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Yin; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Chou, Tse-Chuan

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of triglyceride (TG) using an iridium nano-particle modified carbon based biosensor was successfully carried out in this study. The detection procedures were based on the electrochemical detection of enzymatically produced NADH. TG was hydrolyzed by lipase and the glycerol produced was catalytically oxidized by NAD-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase producing NADH in a solution containing NAD(+). Glyceryl tributyrate, a short chain triglyceride, was chosen as the substrate for the evaluation of this TG biosensor in bovine serum and human serum. A linear response to glyceryl tributyrate in the concentration range of 0 to 10 mM and a sensitivity of 7.5 nA mM(-1) in bovine serum and 7.0 nA mM(-1) in human serum were observed experimentally. The potential interference of species such as uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) was assessed. The incorporation of a selected surfactant and an increase in the incubation temperature appeared to enhance the performance of this biosensor. The conditions for the determination of TG levels in bovine serum using this biosensor were optimized, with sunflower seed oil being used as an analyte to simulate the detection of TG in blood. The experimental results demonstrated that this iridium nano-particle modified working electrode based biosensor provided a relatively simple means for the accurate determination of TG in serum.

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for simultaneous measurements of two FRET biosensors in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amicia D; Bedard, Noah; Ustione, Alessandro; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Piston, David W

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are commonly used to study molecular processes in living cells. There are FP-FRET biosensors for many cellular molecules, but it remains difficult to perform simultaneous measurements of multiple biosensors. The overlapping emission spectra of the commonly used FPs, including CFP/YFP and GFP/RFP make dual FRET measurements challenging. In addition, a snapshot imaging modality is required for simultaneous imaging. The Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) is a snapshot hyperspectral imaging system that collects high resolution spectral data and can be used to overcome these challenges. We have previously demonstrated the IMS's capabilities for simultaneously imaging GFP and CFP/YFP-based biosensors in pancreatic β-cells. Here, we demonstrate a further capability of the IMS to image simultaneously two FRET biosensors with a single excitation band, one for cAMP and the other for Caspase-3. We use these measurements to measure simultaneously cAMP signaling and Caspase-3 activation in pancreatic β-cells during oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are essential components in the pathology of diabetes.

  11. A surface plasmon resonance biosensor for direct detection of the rabies virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip was constructed for detection of rabies virus. For the construction of the biosensor chip, N protein specific antibody and N protein specific antibody combined with G protein specific antibody of rabies virus were linked on two different flow cells on one CM5 chip, respectively. The chip was tested for the detection of rabies virus antigens using the crude extract of rabies virus from infected BHK cell strain culture. Tenfold serial dilutions of SRV9 strain virus-infected cell cultures were tested by the biosensor chip to establish the detection limit. The limit detection was approximately 70 pg/ml of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein. The biosensor chip developed in this study was employed for the detection of rabies virus in five suspect infectious specimens of brain tissue from guinea pigs; the results were compared by fluorescent antibody test. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip could be a useful automatic tool for prompt detection of rabies virus infection.

  12. Analytical Parameters of an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor for Fast Analysis in Food Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors based on the use of glucose oxidase (GOx) are able to combine the robustness of electrochemical techniques with the specificity of biological recognition processes. However, very little information can be found in literature about the fundamental analytical parameters of these sensors. In this work, the analytical behavior of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of GOx using a hydrogel (Chitosan) onto highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays (TiO2NTAs) has been evaluated. The GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor showed a sensitivity of 5.46 μA·mM−1 with a linear range from 0.3 to 1.5 mM; its fundamental analytical parameters were studied using a commercial soft drink. The obtained results proved sufficient repeatability (RSD = 1.9%), reproducibility (RSD = 2.5%), accuracy (95–105% recovery), and robustness (RSD = 3.3%). Furthermore, no significant interferences from fructose, ascorbic acid and citric acid were obtained. In addition, the storage stability was further examined, after 30 days, the GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor retained 85% of its initial current response. Finally, the glucose content of different food samples was measured using the biosensor and compared with the respective HPLC value. In the worst scenario, a deviation smaller than 10% was obtained among the 20 samples evaluated. PMID:29135931

  13. [Amperometric biosensor for lactate analysis in wines and grape must during fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkotova, L V; Horiushkina, T B; Slast'ia, E A; Soldatkin, O P; Tranh-Minh, S; Chovelon, J M; Dziadevych, S V

    2005-01-01

    The amperometric biosensor based on lactate oxidase for determination of lactate has been developed, and two methods of immobilization of lactate oxidase on the surface of industrial screen-printed platinum electrodes SensLab were compared. A sensor with immobilized in the Resydrol polymer lactate oxidase by the method of physical adsorption is characterized of narrow dynamic range and greater response value in comparison with a biosensor based on immobilised in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) lactate oxidase by the method of electrochemical polymerization. Operational stability of the biosensor developed was studied and it was shown, that the immobilization method does not influence their stability. The analysis of the lactate in wine and during wine fermentation has been conducted. High correlation of the data obtained by means of amperometric lactate biosensor and a standard method of an ionic chromatography has been shown. The developed biosensor could be applied in the food industry for the control and optimization of the wine fermentation process, and quality control of wine.

  14. Construction of Microbial-based Biosensor to Measure BOD of Industrial Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Mahdavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study a cell-based biosensor for measurement of BOD was designed and developed. Activated sludge collected from wastewater treatment plant of Shahinshahr was used as biological receptor and a Clark cell was used as transducer. According to the results obtained from the sensor calibration, a linear relationship between the current changes and glucose-glutamic acid (GAA standard concentrations up to 50 mg/L was observed. The BOD values of different industrial wastewaters, inlet and outlet of treatment plant of Ardineh Company (Isfahan, and also  inlet and outlet of domestic wastewater treatment plant of Shahinshahr, and outlet of treatment plant of Pegah Company (Isfahan were measured using this biosensor. Comparison of the results of this biosensor and the results of the standard BOD test (BOD5 showed that the mean percentage error measured by the sensor was +29.6%. The results concerning the stability of the designed biosensor showed a stability time of 3 days for the response of biosensor.

  15. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of parathyroid hormone using an electrochemical impedance biosensor based on PAMAM dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel hormone-based impedimetric biosensor to determine parathyroid hormone (PTH) level in serum for diagnosis and monitoring treatment of hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid cancer. The interaction between PTH and the biosensor was investigated by an electrochemical method. The biosensor was based on the gold electrode modified by 12-mercapto dodecanoic (12MDDA). Antiparathyroid hormone (anti-PTH) was covalently immobilized on to poly amidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) which was bound to a 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) couple, self-assembled monolayer structure from one of the other NH2 sites. The immobilization of anti-PTH was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscope techniques. After the optimization studies of immobilization materials such as 12MDDA, EDC-NHS, PAMAM, and glutaraldehyde, the performance of the biosensor was investigated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and reproducibility. PTH was detected within a linear range of 10-60 fg/mL. Finally the described biosensor was used to monitor PTH levels in artificial serum samples. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Analytical Parameters of an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor for Fast Analysis in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigues, Margalida; Abellà, Jordi; Colominas, Sergi

    2017-11-14

    Amperometric biosensors based on the use of glucose oxidase (GOx) are able to combine the robustness of electrochemical techniques with the specificity of biological recognition processes. However, very little information can be found in literature about the fundamental analytical parameters of these sensors. In this work, the analytical behavior of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of GOx using a hydrogel (Chitosan) onto highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays (TiO₂NTAs) has been evaluated. The GOx-Chitosan/TiO₂NTAs biosensor showed a sensitivity of 5.46 μA·mM -1 with a linear range from 0.3 to 1.5 mM; its fundamental analytical parameters were studied using a commercial soft drink. The obtained results proved sufficient repeatability (RSD = 1.9%), reproducibility (RSD = 2.5%), accuracy (95-105% recovery), and robustness (RSD = 3.3%). Furthermore, no significant interferences from fructose, ascorbic acid and citric acid were obtained. In addition, the storage stability was further examined, after 30 days, the GOx-Chitosan/TiO₂NTAs biosensor retained 85% of its initial current response. Finally, the glucose content of different food samples was measured using the biosensor and compared with the respective HPLC value. In the worst scenario, a deviation smaller than 10% was obtained among the 20 samples evaluated.

  18. Nanomolar detection of methylparaben by a cost-effective hemoglobin-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian, A; Ghodsi, J; Afraz, A; Yurchenko, O; Urban, G

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the development of a new biosensor for methylparaben determination using electrocatalytic properties of hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The voltammetric oxidation of methylparaben by the proposed biosensor in phosphate buffer (pH=7.0), a physiological pH, was studied and it was confirmed that methylparaben undergoes a one electron-one proton reaction in a diffusion-controlled process. The biosensor was fabricated by carbon paste electrode modified with hemoglobin and multiwalled carbon nanotube. Based on the excellent electrochemical properties of the modified electrode, a sensitive voltammetric method was used for determination of methylparaben within a linear range from 0.1 to 13μmolL(-1) and detection limit of 25nmolL(-1). The developed biosensor possessed accurate and rapid response to methylparaben and showed good sensitivity, stability, and repeatability. Finally, the applicability of the proposed biosensor was verified by methylparaben evaluation in various real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA, the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS. The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

  20. Development of a photoelectrochemical lactic dehydrogenase biosensor using multi-wall carbon nanotube-TiO2 nanoparticle composite as coenzyme regeneration tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yan, Rui; Zhu, Jie; Huo, Xiaohe; Wang, Xinhai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Multi-wall Carbon Nanotube-TiO 2 nanoparticle composite was synthesized by hydrothermal method •The composite was characterized by TEM, XRD, FT-IR •A photoelectrochemical (PEC) lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) biosensor was developed based on the composite •The composite acts as both coenzyme regeneration tool and immobilization material •The PEC biosensor shows superiority over the electrochemical LDH biosensors in analytical performance -- Abstract: A novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) biosensor was developed based on a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-TiO 2 nanoparticle (TNP) composite platform. This composite platform can not only aid in regeneration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) in the enzymatic cycle, but also immobilize enzymes on electrode surface. TNPs were grown on MWCNT surface through a hydrothermal method and the composite was characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The electrochemical performance of the LDH biosensors has demonstrated that the composite is a feasible immobilization matrix for LDH. The PEC experiments have confirmed that NAD + can be regenerated by the holes produced by irradiating MWCNT-TNP composite to fulfill the enzyme catalytic cycle. The analytical performance of the PEC LDH biosensor was studied by measuring its photocurrents. The dynamic range, sensitivity and limit of detection of the biosensor were estimated to be 0.5 to 120 μM, 0.0242 μA μM −1 and 0.1 μM respectively, which are superior to those of electrochemical LDH biosensors

  1. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, J R; Kim, G; Kothapalli, A; Morgan, M T; Ess, D

    2007-01-01

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 10 5 cfu/ml

  2. Piezoelectric Biosensor for a Simple Serological Diagnosis of Tularemia in Infected European Brown Hares (Lepus europaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pikula

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric biosensor was used for diagnosis of infection by Francisellatularensis subsp. holarctica in European brown hares. Two kinds of experiments wereperformed in this study. First, sera from experimentally infected European brown hares(Lepus europaeus were assayed by piezoelectric biosensor and the seventh day postinfection was found as the first one when statistically significant diagnosis of tularemia waspossible; all other sera collected from hares later than on day 7 following the infection werefound tularemia positive. Typing to classify the field strain of F. tularensis used for theexperimental infection was confirmed by proteome study. Second, sera from 35 Europeanbrown hare specimens sampled at hunting grounds and tested as tularemia positive by slowagglutination allowed diagnosis of tularemia by the piezoelectric biosensor. All these sera ofnaturally infected hares were found as tularemia positive, too. Efficacy of the piezoelectricbiosensor for the serological diagnosis of tularemia is discussed.

  3. Tailoring odorant-binding protein coatings characteristics for surface acoustic wave biosensor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pietrantonio, F., E-mail: fabio.dp@idasc.cnr.it [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Benetti, M. [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dinca, V. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Cannatà, D. [Institute of Acoustics and Sensors “O. M. Corbino”, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Verona, E. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, National Research Council of Italy, Via del Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); D’Auria, S. [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, National Research Council of Italy, Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-16, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-05-01

    In this study, wild type bovine odorant-binding proteins (wtbOBPs) were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and utilized as active material on surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to determine the chemical, morphological characteristics of the protein thin films. The FTIR data demonstrates that the functional groups of wtbOBPs do not suffer significant changes in the MAPLE-deposited films when compared to the reference one. The topographical studies show that the homogeneity, density and the roughness of the coatings are related mainly to the laser parameters (fluence and number of pulses). SAW biosensor responses to different concentrations of R-(–)-1-octen-3-ol (octenol) and R-(–)-carvone (carvone) were evaluated. The obtained sensitivities, achieved through the optimization of deposition parameters, demonstrated that MAPLE is a promising deposition technique for SAW biosensor implementation.

  4. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based plasma metabolic profiling of dairy cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L W; Zhang, H Y; Wu, L; Shu, S; Xia, C; Xu, C; Zheng, J S

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the metabolic profile of plasma samples from cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis. According to clinical signs and 3-hydroxybutyrate plasma levels, 81 multiparous Holstein cows were selected from a dairy farm 7 to 21 d after calving. The cows were divided into 3 groups: cows with clinical ketosis, cows with subclinical ketosis, and healthy control cows. (1)H-Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to assess the plasma metabolic profiles of the 3 groups. The data were analyzed by principal component analysis, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. The differences in metabolites among the 3 groups were assessed. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis model differentiated the 3 groups of plasma samples. The model predicted clinical ketosis with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100%. In the case of subclinical ketosis, the model had a sensitivity of 97.0% and specificity of 95.7%. Twenty-five metabolites, including acetoacetate, acetone, lactate, glucose, choline, glutamic acid, and glutamine, were different among the 3 groups. Among the 25 metabolites, 4 were upregulated, 7 were downregulated, and 14 were both upregulated and downregulated. The results indicated that plasma (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics, coupled with pattern recognition analytical methods, not only has the sensitivity and specificity to distinguish cows with clinical and subclinical ketosis from healthy controls, but also has the potential to be developed into a clinically useful diagnostic tool that could contribute to a further understanding of the disease mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  6. Immobilization of HRP in Mesoporous Silica and Its Application for the Construction of Polyaniline Modified Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chung Chen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline (PANI, an attractive conductive polymer, has been successfully applied in fabricating various types of enzyme-based biosensors. In this study, we have employed mesoporous silica SBA-15 to stably entrap horseradish peroxidase (HRP, and then deposited the loaded SBA-15 on the PANI modified platinum electrode to construct a GA/SBA-15(HRP/PANI/Pt biosensor. The mesoporous structures and morphologies of SBA-15 with or without HRP were characterized. Enzymatic protein assays were employed to evaluate HRP immobilization efficiency. Our results demonstrated that the constructed biosensor displayed a fine linear correlation between cathodic response and H2O2 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 18.5 mM, with enhanced sensitivity. In particular, the current approach provided the PANI modified biosensor with improved stability for multiple measurements.

  7. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors....

  8. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Adsorption in Surface-based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus

    The present Ph.D. dissertation concerns the application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which is a surface-based biosensor technology, for studies of adsorption dynamics. The thesis contains both experimental and theoretical work. In the theoretical part we develop the theory...... cell of the surface-based biosensor, in addition to the sensor surface, is investigated. In the experimental part of the thesis we use a Biacore SPR sensor to study lipase adsorption on model substrate surfaces, as well as competitive adsorption of lipase and surfactants. A part of the experimental...

  10. Mechanistic modeling of cyclic voltammetry: A helpful tool for understanding biosensor principles and supporting design optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenova, Daria; Zubov, Alexandr; Silina, Yuliya E.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Design, optimization and integration of biosensors hold a great potential for the development of cost-effective screening and point-of-care technologies. However, significant progress in this field can still be obtained on condition that sufficiently accurate mathematical models......, oxidized/reduced forms of the mediator - Prussian Blue/Prussian White). Furthermore, the developed model was applied under various operating conditions as a crucial tool for biosensor design optimization. The obtained qualitative and quantitative dependencies towards amperometric biosensors design...... optimization were independently supported by results of cyclic voltammetry and multi-analytical studies, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Remarkably, a linear...

  11. Development of miniaturized pH biosensors based on electrosynthesized polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segut, Olivier; Lakard, Boris; Herlem, Guillaume; Rauch, Jean-Yves; Jeannot, Jean-Claude; Robert, Laurent; Fahys, Bernard

    2007-08-06

    A new type of pH biosensor was developed for biological applications. This biosensor was fabricated using silicon microsystem technology and consists in two platinum microelectrodes. The first microelectrode was coated by an electrosynthesized polymer and acted as the pH sensitive electrode when the second one was coated by a silver layer and was used as the reference electrode. Then, this potentiometric pH miniaturized biosensor based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole or electrosynthesized linear polyethylenimine films was tested. The potentiometric responses appeared reversible and linear to pH changes in the range from pH 4 to 9. More, the responses were fast (less than 1 min for all sensors), they were stable in time since PPy/PEI films were stable during more than 30 days, and no interference was observed. The influence of the polymer thickness was also studied.

  12. Monitoring of monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, ethanol and glycerol during wort fermentation by biosensors, HPLC and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monošík, Rastislav; Magdolen, Peter; Stredanský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze sugar levels (namely maltose, maltotriose, glucose and fructose) and alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) during the fermentation process in wort samples by amperometric enzymatic biosensors developed by our research group for industrial application, HPLC and spectrophotometry, and to compare the suitability of the presented methods for determination of individual analytes. We can conclude that for the specific monitoring of maltose or maltotriose only the HPLC method was suitable. On the other hand, biosensors and spectrophotometry reflected a decrease in total sugar concentration better and were able to detect both glucose and fructose in the later stages of fermentation, while HPLC was not. This can be attributed to the low detection limits and good sensitivity of the proposed methods. For the ethanol and glycerol analysis all methods proved to be suitable. However, concerning the cost expenses and time analysis, biosensors represented the best option. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of a sulfite biosensor by the use of conducting polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, M.; Bahmani, B; Moztarzadeh, F.; Rabiee, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, an enzyme modified electrode has been produced during the electro polymerization of aniline through incorporation of Sulfite oxidase into a conducting polymer. Then the bioelectrochemical response of resulted sulfite biosensor was investigated at different experimental conditions. Study of the stability of the resulted sulfite biosensor revealed that formation of a passive film on the aluminum surface causes improved stability of the electro active films formed on the electrode surface. The bioelectrochemical response of the enzyme-modified electrode as a sulfite biosensor was investigated at different experimental conditions. The optimum p H and temperature were 8.5 and 35 d eg C , respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the activation energy of the enzyme catalyzed reaction were calculated

  14. DNA biosensor by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and DNA to detect riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Zhang Yunhuai, E-mail: xp2031@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Yang Tongyi [School of Life Science. NanJing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang Huai [Liming Research Institute of Chemical Industry, LuoYang, 471001 (China); Yang Yixuan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xiao Peng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The fabrication of biosensors via self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and DNA on a platinum electrode was presented in this paper. The carboxylic SWNTs were assembled on an amine-modified platinum electrode surface and followed by the assembly of NH{sub 2}-DNA with the carboxyl-amine coupling. The decorated surface was characterized by Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electrochemical experiments, which showed that the reaction of DNA-SWNTs biosensor was quasi-reversible. The mechanism of DNA and riboflavin (VB{sub 2}) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The fabricated SWNTs-reinforced biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low detection limit for the tested VB{sub 2} compared to the reported methods.

  15. Development and Electrochemical Investigations of an EIS- (Electrolyte-Insulator-Semiconductor based Biosensor for Cyanide Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Schöning

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A cyanide biosensor based on a pH-sensitive p-doped electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS structure with an immobilised enzyme (cyanidase is realised at thelaboratory scale. The immobilisation of the cyanidase is performed in two distinct steps:first, the covalent coupling of cyanidase to an N-hydroxysuccinimide- (NHS activatedSepharoseTM gel and then, the physical entrapment of NHS-activated SepharoseTM with theimmobilised cyanidase in a dialysis membrane onto the EIS structure. The immobilisationof the cyanidase to the NHS-activated SepharoseTM is studied by means of gelelectrophoresis measurements and investigations using an ammonia- (NH3 selectiveelectrode. For the electrochemical characterisation of the cyanide biosensor,capacitance/voltage and constant capacitance measurements, respectively, have beencarried out. A differential measurement procedure is presented to evaluate the cyanideconcentration-dependent biosensor signals.

  16. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif, E-mail: e.erhan@gyte.edu.tr

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44-1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N = 3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n = 7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 {mu}g/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} has been used for the first time as mediator for nitrate reductase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Better performance was obtained in comparison to other nitrate biosensor studies operated with various mediators. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical parameters were better than standard nitrate analysis methods.

  17. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44–1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N = 3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n = 7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 μg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday. - Highlights: ► K 3 Fe(CN) 6 has been used for the first time as mediator for nitrate reductase. ► Better performance was obtained in comparison to other nitrate biosensor studies operated with various mediators. ► Analytical parameters were better than standard nitrate analysis methods.

  18. Molecular structure and thermodynamic predictions to create highly sensitive microRNA biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkey, Nicholas E.; Brucks, Corinne N.; Lansing, Shan S.; Le, Sophia D.; Smith, Natasha M.; Tran, Victoria; Zhang, Lulu; Burrows, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators in a variety of intracellular molecular processes. Abnormal changes in miRNA have been associated with several diseases. However, these changes are sometimes subtle and occur at nanomolar levels or lower. Several biosensing hurdles for in situ cellular/tissue analysis of miRNA limit detection of small amounts of miRNA. Of these limitations the most challenging are selectivity and sensor degradation creating high background signals and false signals. Recently we developed a reporter+probe biosensor for let-7a that showed potential to mitigate false signal from sensor degradation. Here we designed reporter+probe biosensors for miR-26a-2-3p and miR-27a-5p to better understand the effect of thermodynamics and molecular structures of the biosensor constituents on the analytical performance. Signal changes from interactions between Cy3 and Cy5 on the reporters were used to understand structural aspects of the reporter designs. Theoretical thermodynamic values, single stranded conformations, hetero- and homodimerization structures, and equilibrium concentrations of the reporters and probes were used to interpret the experimental observations. Studies of the sensitivity and selectivity revealed 5–9 nM detection limits in the presence and absence of interfering off-analyte miRNAs. These studies will aid in determining how to rationally design reporter+probe biosensors to overcome hurdles associated with highly sensitive miRNA biosensing. - Highlights: • Challenges facing highly sensitive miRNA biosensor designs are addressed. • Thermodynamic and molecular structure design metrics for reporter+probe biosensors are proposed. • The influence of ideal and non-ideal reporter hairpin structures on reporter+probe formation and signal change are discussed. • 5–9 nM limits of detection were observed with no interference from off-analytes.

  19. Molecular structure and thermodynamic predictions to create highly sensitive microRNA biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkey, Nicholas E.; Brucks, Corinne N.; Lansing, Shan S.; Le, Sophia D.; Smith, Natasha M.; Tran, Victoria; Zhang, Lulu; Burrows, Sean M., E-mail: sean.burrows@oregonstate.edu

    2016-02-25

    Many studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators in a variety of intracellular molecular processes. Abnormal changes in miRNA have been associated with several diseases. However, these changes are sometimes subtle and occur at nanomolar levels or lower. Several biosensing hurdles for in situ cellular/tissue analysis of miRNA limit detection of small amounts of miRNA. Of these limitations the most challenging are selectivity and sensor degradation creating high background signals and false signals. Recently we developed a reporter+probe biosensor for let-7a that showed potential to mitigate false signal from sensor degradation. Here we designed reporter+probe biosensors for miR-26a-2-3p and miR-27a-5p to better understand the effect of thermodynamics and molecular structures of the biosensor constituents on the analytical performance. Signal changes from interactions between Cy3 and Cy5 on the reporters were used to understand structural aspects of the reporter designs. Theoretical thermodynamic values, single stranded conformations, hetero- and homodimerization structures, and equilibrium concentrations of the reporters and probes were used to interpret the experimental observations. Studies of the sensitivity and selectivity revealed 5–9 nM detection limits in the presence and absence of interfering off-analyte miRNAs. These studies will aid in determining how to rationally design reporter+probe biosensors to overcome hurdles associated with highly sensitive miRNA biosensing. - Highlights: • Challenges facing highly sensitive miRNA biosensor designs are addressed. • Thermodynamic and molecular structure design metrics for reporter+probe biosensors are proposed. • The influence of ideal and non-ideal reporter hairpin structures on reporter+probe formation and signal change are discussed. • 5–9 nM limits of detection were observed with no interference from off-analytes.

  20. A regenerative electrochemical biosensor for mercury(II) by using the insertion approach and dual-hairpin-based amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Jing; Ling, Yu; Gao, Zhong Feng [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Lei, Jing Lei [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Hong Qun, E-mail: luohq@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li, Nian Bing, E-mail: linb@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environments in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (Ministry of Education), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The dual-hairpin structure as a signal amplifier is label-free and handy. • The strategy uses the insertion approach to improve the hybridization efficiency. • This biosensor has a low detection limit (28 pM) for detection of Hg{sup 2+}. • This biosensor can be easily regenerated by using L-cysteine. - Abstract: A simple and effective biosensor for Hg{sup 2+} determination was investigated. The novel biosensor was prepared by the insertion approach that the moiety-labeled DNA inserted into a loosely packed cyclic-dithiothreitol (DTT) monolayer, improving the hybridization efficiency. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies of two biosensors (single-hairpin and dual-hairpin structure DNA modified electrodes) used for Hg{sup 2+} detection indicated that the dual-hairpin modified electrode had a larger electron transfer resistance change (ΔR{sub ct}). Consequently, the dual-hairpin structure was used as a signal amplifier for the preparation of a selective Hg{sup 2+} biosensor. This biosensor exhibited an excellent selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} over Cd{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} etc. Also, a linear relation was observed between the ΔR{sub ct} and Hg{sup 2+} concentrations in a range from 0.1 nM to 5 μM with a detection limit of 28 pM under optimum conditions. Moreover, the biosensor can be reused by using L-cysteine and successfully applied for detecting Hg{sup 2+} in real samples.

  1. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kee-Shyuan; Lee, Yook Heng; Musa, Ahmad; Salmah, Abdul Aziz; Zamri, Ishak

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P). The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together with ALP into a sol gel/chitosan biosensor membrane has led to the enhancement of the biosensor response, with an improved linear response range to the substrate AA2P (5-120 μM) and increased sensitivity. Using the inhibition property of the ALP, the biosensor was applied to the determination of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The use of Fe3O4 nanoparticles gives a two-fold improvement in the sensitivity towards 2,4-D, with a linear response range of 0.5-30 μgL-1. Exposure of the biosensor to other toxicants such as heavy metals demonstrated only slight interference from metals such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+ and Pb2+. The biosensor was shown to be useful for the determination of the herbicide 2, 4-D because good recovery of 95-100 percent was obtained, even though the analysis was performed in water samples with a complex matrix. Furthermore, the results from the analysis of 2,4-D in water samples using the biosensor correlated well with a HPLC method. PMID:27873839

  2. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Zamri

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P. The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together with ALP into a sol gel/chitosan biosensor membrane has led to the enhancement of the biosensor response, with an improved linear response range to the substrate AA2P (5-120 μM and increased sensitivity. Using the inhibition property of the ALP, the biosensor was applied to the determination of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. The use of Fe3O4 nanoparticles gives a two-fold improvement in the sensitivity towards 2,4-D, with a linear response range of 0.5-30 μgL-1. Exposure of the biosensor to other toxicants such as heavy metals demonstrated only slight interference from metals such as Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+ and Pb2+. The biosensor was shown to be useful for the determination of the herbicide 2, 4-D because good recovery of 95-100 percent was obtained, even though the analysis was performed in water samples with a complex matrix. Furthermore, the results from the analysis of 2,4-D in water samples using the biosensor correlated well with a HPLC method.

  3. Nanohybrid-layered double hydroxides/urease materials: Synthesis and application to urea biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, S.; Forano, C.; Shan, D.; Mousty, C.; Barhoumi, H.; Martelet, C.; Jaffrezic, N.

    2006-01-01

    Nanohybrid [ZnAl]-layered double hydroxides/urease were prepared for the first time using the coprecipitation of enzyme and inorganic matrix. By varying the respective amount of urease and LDH, we obtained hybrid materials with various amount and dispersion rate of active biomolecules. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy confirm the preservation of the structure of each partner while the morphology properties are in good agreement with the permeability study. These new nanohybrids were applied for the development of urea biosensors. Biosensor responses to urea additions were obtained using capacitance (C vs. V) measurements at urease-LDH biofilm deposited on an insulated semiconductor (IS) structure

  4. Characterization of agarose as immobilization matrix model for a microbial biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernetti Mimma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are promising tools for the detection of specific substances in different fields, such as environmental, biomedical, food or agricultural. They allow rapid measurements, no need for complex sample preparation or specialized personnel and easy handling. In order to enhance the managing, miniaturization and stability of the biosensor and to prevent cell leaching, bacteria immobilization is desirable. A systematic characterization procedure to choose a suitable immobilization method and matrix, was proposed in this study. Physical properties, storage stability mass transport phenomena and biocompatibility were evaluated, employing agarose as the model matrix. Preliminary essays with bioluminescent bacteria detecting Tributyltin were also carried out.

  5. StrigoQuant: A genetically encoded biosensor for quantifying strigolactone activity and specificity

    KAUST Repository

    Samodelov, S. L.

    2016-11-05

    Strigolactones are key regulators of plant development and interaction with symbiotic fungi; however, quantitative tools for strigolactone signaling analysis are lacking. We introduce a genetically encoded hormone biosensor used to analyze strigolactone-mediated processes, including the study of the components involved in the hormone perception/signaling complex and the structural specificity and sensitivity of natural and synthetic strigolactones in Arabidopsis, providing quantitative insights into the stereoselectivity of strigolactone perception. Given the high specificity, sensitivity, dynamic range of activity, modular construction, ease of implementation, and wide applicability, the biosensor StrigoQuant will be useful in unraveling multiple levels of strigolactone metabolic and signaling networks.

  6. Electrically tunable Fabry-Péerot resonator based on microstructured Si containing liquid crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Melnikov, Vasily; Baldycheva, Anna V.; Berwick, Kevin; Perova, Tatiana S.

    2012-01-01

    We have built Fabry-Perot resonators based on microstructured silicon and a liquid crystal. The devices exhibit tuning of the resonance peaks over a wide range, with relative spectral shifts of up to Delta lambda/lambda = 10%. In order to achieve this substantial spectral shift, cavity peaks of high order were used. Under applied voltages of up to 15 V, a variation in the refractive index of the nematic liquid crystal E7 from Delta n(LC) = 0.12 to Delta n(LC) = 0.17 was observed. These results may have practical applications in the near-, mid and far-infrared range.

  7. Mode selection in two-dimensional Bragg resonators based on planar dielectric waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V R; Ginzburg, N S; Zaslavskii, V Yu; Malkin, A M; Sergeev, A S; Thumm, M

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional Bragg resonators based on planar dielectric waveguides are analysed. It is shown that the doubly periodic corrugation deposited on the dielectric surface in the form of two gratings with translational vectors directed perpendicular to each other ensures effective selection of modes along two coordinates at large Fresnel parameters. This result is obtained both by the method of coupled waves (geometrical optics approximation) and by the direct numerical simulations. Two-dimensional Bragg resonators make it possible to fabricate two-dimensional distributed feedback lasers and to provide generation of spatially coherent radiation in large-volume active media. (waveguides)

  8. Layer-by-layer assemblies of chitosan/multi-wall carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase for amperometric glucose biosensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Baoyan; Hou Shihua; Yu Min; Qin Xia; Li, Sha; Chen Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on multilayer films containing chitosan, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) was developed. MWCNTs were solubilized in chitosan (Chit-MWCNTs) used to interact with GOD. Poly (allylamine) (PAA) and polyvinylsulfuric acid potassium salt (PVS) were alternately deposited on the cleaned Pt electrode surface ((PVS/PAA) 3 /Pt). The (PVS/PAA) 3 /Pt electrode was alternately immersed in Chit-MWCNTs and GOD to assemble different layers of multilayer films. PBS washing was applied at the end of each assembly deposition for dissociating the weak adsorption. Micrographs of MWCNTs were obtained by scanning electron microscope, and properties of the resulting biosensors were measured by electrochemical measurements. Among the resulting biosensors, the biosensor based on eight layers of multilayer films was best. The resulting biosensor was able to efficiently monitor glucose, with the response time within 8 s, a detection limit of 21 μM estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, a linear range of 1-10 mM, the sensitivity of 0.45 μA/mM, and well stability. The study can provide a feasible simple approach on developing a new immobilization matrix for biosensors and surface functionalization

  9. Spreeta-based biosensor for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; Meulenberg, E.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta¿-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  10. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  11. Microbial Biosensors for Selective Detection of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven microbial strains were screened for their ability to detect disaccharides as components of Clark-type oxygen biosensors. Sensors responded to varying degrees to maltose, cellobiose, sucrose, and melibiose, but none responded strongly to lactose. Although microbial sensors are relatively nons...

  12. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  13. Boar taint detection using parasitoid biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the potential for a non-stinging wasp to be used as a biosensor in the pig industry, we trained wasps to 3 individual chemicals associated with boar taint. Training consisted of presenting the odors to hungry wasps while they were feeding on sugar. This associates the chemical with a fo...

  14. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  15. Development and Applications of Portable Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Tung, Steve

    2015-08-01

    The significance of microfluidics-based and microelectromechanical systems-based biosensors has been widely acknowledged, and many reviews have explored their potential applications in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, global health, drug discovery, food safety, and forensics. Because health care costs are increasing, there is an increasing need to remotely monitor the health condition of patients by point-of-care-testing. The demand for biosensors for detection of biological warfare agents has increased, and research is focused on ways of producing small portable devices that would allow fast, accurate, and on-site detection. In the past decade, the demand for rapid and accurate on-site detection of plant disease diagnosis has increased due to emerging pathogens with resistance to pesticides, increased human mobility, and regulations limiting the application of toxic chemicals to prevent spread of diseases. The portability of biosensors for on-site diagnosis is limited due to various issues, including sample preparation techniques, fluid-handling techniques, the limited lifetime of biological reagents, device packaging, integrating electronics for data collection/analysis, and the requirement of external accessories and power. Many microfluidic, electronic, and biological design strategies, such as handling liquids in biosensors without pumps/valves, the application of droplet-based microfluidics, paper-based microfluidic devices, and wireless networking capabilities for data transmission, are being explored. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  16. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Meimaridou, A.; Haasnoot, W.; Meulenberg, E.; Albertus, F.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Irth, H.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two

  17. Fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor. The biosensor is particularly suitable for use in microscale work in situ. In one embodiment, the biosensor comprises a reaction chamber disposed adjacent the distal end of a waveguide and adapted to receive therein a quantity of a sample containing an analyte. Leading into the chamber is a plurality of capillary conduits suitable for introducing into the chamber antibodies or other reagents suitable for selective interaction with a predetermined analyte. Following such interaction, the contents of the chamber may be subjected to an incident energy signal for developing fluorescence within the chamber that is detectable via the optical fiber and which is representative of the presence, i.e. concentration, of the selected analyte. Regeneration of the biosensor is accomplished by replacement of the reagents and/or the analyte, or a combination of these, at least in part via one or more of the capillary conduits. The capillary conduits extend from their respective terminal ends that are in fluid communication with the chamber, away from the chamber to respective location(s) remote from the chamber thereby permitting in situ location of the chamber and remote manipulation and/or analysis of the activity with the chamber.

  18. Disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    been used due to its rapid, easy handling and cost effective responses for the toxicity assessment in real water ... in the application of DNA as biosensors as it is found ... used as a preclinical safety assessment tool to screen ... out the work.

  19. Nano technologies for Biosensor and Bio chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.M.; Park, T.J.; Paskaleva, E.E.; Sun, F.; Seo, J.W.; Mehta, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    The bio sensing devices are characterized by their biological receptors, which have specificity to their corresponding analytes. These analytes are a vast and diverse group of biological molecules, DNAs, proteins (such as antibodies), fatty acids, or entire biological systems, such as pathogenic bacteria, viruses, cancerous cells, or other living organisms. A main challenge in the development of biosensor applications is the efficient recognition of a biological signal in a low signal-to-noise ratio environment, and its transduction into an electrochemical, optical, or other signals. The advent of nano material technology greatly increased the potential for achieving exquisite sensitivity of such devises, due to the innate high surface-to-volume ratio and high reactivity of the nano material. The second major challenge facing the biosensor application, that of sca lability, is addressed by multiplexing and miniaturizing of the biosensor devises into a bio chip. In recent years, biosensor and bio chip technologies have made significant progress by taking advantages of diverse kinds of nano materials that are derived from nano technology

  20. Instrumental biosensors: new perspectives for the analysis of biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nice, E C; Catimel, B

    1999-04-01

    The use of instrumental biosensors in basic research to measure biomolecular interactions in real time is increasing exponentially. Applications include protein-protein, protein-peptide, DNA-protein, DNA-DNA, and lipid-protein interactions. Such techniques have been applied to, for example, antibody-antigen, receptor-ligand, signal transduction, and nuclear receptor studies. This review outlines the principles of two of the most commonly used instruments and highlights specific operating parameters that will assist in optimising experimental design, data generation, and analysis.

  1. A new PANI biosensor based on catalase for cyanide determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Aydin, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide is one of the most widespread of compounds measured in environmental analysis due to their toxic effects on environment and health. We report a highly sensitive, reliable, selective amperometric sensor for determination of cyanide, using a polyaniline conductive polymer. The enzyme catalase was immobilized by electropolymerization. The steps during the immobilization were controlled by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Optimum pH, temperature, aniline concentration, enzyme concentration, and the number of scans obtained during electropolymerization, were investigated. In addition, the cyanide present in artificial waste water samples was determined. In the characterization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as reproducibility and storage stability, were analyzed.

  2. BioSentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    BioSentinel is an autonomous fully self-contained science mission that will conduct the first study of the biological response to space radiation outside low Earth orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. The 4-unit (4U) BioSentinel biosensor system, is housed within a 6-Unit (6U) spacecraft, and uses yeast cells in multiple independent microfluidic cards to detect and measure DNA damage that occurs in response to ambient space radiation. Cell growth and metabolic activity will be measured using a 3-color LED detection system and a metabolic indicator dye with a dedicated thermal control system per fluidic card.

  3. Influence of different nanoparticles on electrochemical behavior of glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenkova, R. D.; Ivanov, Y. L.; Godjevargova, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of nanosized particles on the glucose oxidase loading and the performance of amperometric glucose bionsensors were studied. Four enzyme electrodes (Pt/PAN/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/MNP/GOD, Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD) were prepared by cross-linking of glucose oxidase (GOD) on nanocomposite material. Nanocomposites were prepared by entrapping nanozeolite (NZ), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film. Cyclic voltammetric kinetic studies have been carried out with the four biosensors and the surface concentration of the adsorbed electroactive species on the electrodes was estimated. The highest enzyme concentration on the electrode surface corresponded to the electrodes prepared by nanozeolite separate (Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD) and combined with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD). The sensitivity of these two biosensors was the highest and that is in accordance with the greater amount of the adsorbed electroactive species on the electrodes (0.373 mol.cm-2). This was indication that a good synergistic effect happened when MWNTs and NZ were combined and these greatly improve the electron transfer ability of the sensor interface. Amperometric measurement of the two glucose oxidase electrodes (Pt/PAN/NZ/GOD and Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD) with best results was carried out. The linear concentration interval of the Pt/PAN/NZ/MWNT/GOD biosensor was up to 3 mM, the detection limit - 0.02 mM glucose and the storage stability - 81% of its initial current response after 30 days.

  4. Electronically type-sorted carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensors with glucose oxidase and dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Hitoshi; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Nowaki, Kohei

    2015-01-14

    An electrochemical enzyme biosensor with electronically type-sorted (metallic and semiconducting) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use in aqueous media is presented. This research investigates how the electronic types of SWNTs influence the amperometric response of enzyme biosensors. To conduct a clear evaluation, a simple layer-by-layer process based on a plasma-polymerized nano thin film (PPF) was adopted because a PPF is an inactive matrix that can form a well-defined nanostructure composed of SWNTs and enzyme. For a biosensor with the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme in the presence of oxygen, the response of a metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was 2 times larger than that of a semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode. In contrast, in the absence of oxygen, the response of the semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode was retained, whereas that of the metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was significantly reduced. This indicates that direct electron transfer occurred with the semiconducting SWNT-GOx electrode, whereas the metallic SWNT-GOx electrode was dominated by a hydrogen peroxide pathway caused by an enzymatic reaction. For a biosensor with the glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; oxygen-independent catalysis) enzyme, the response of the semiconducting SWNT-GDH electrode was 4 times larger than that of the metallic SWNT-GDH electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to show that the semiconducting SWNT network has less resistance for electron transfer than the metallic SWNT network. Therefore, it was concluded that semiconducting SWNTs are more suitable than metallic SWNTs for electrochemical enzyme biosensors in terms of direct electron transfer as a detection mechanism. This study makes a valuable contribution toward the development of electrochemical biosensors that employ sorted SWNTs and various enzymes.

  5. A New, Sensitive Marine Microalgal Recombinant Biosensor Using Luminescence Monitoring for Toxicity Testing of Antifouling Biocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Leroy, Fanny; Bouget, François-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose the use of the marine green alga Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest free-living eukaryotic cell known to date, as a new luminescent biosensor for toxicity testing in the environment. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, two antifouling biocides commonly encountered in coastal waters, were chosen to test this new biosensor along with two degradation products of diuron. The effects of various concentrations of the antifoulants on four genetic constructs of O. tauri (based on genes involved in photosynthesis, cell cycle, and circadian clock) were compared using 96-well culture microplates and a luminometer to automatically measure luminescence over 3 days. This was compared to growth inhibition of O. tauri wild type under the same conditions. Luminescence appeared to be more sensitive than growth inhibition as an indicator of toxicity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA), a protein involved in the cell cycle, fused to luciferase (CDKA-Luc) was found to be the most sensitive of the biosensors, allowing an accurate determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50) after only 2 days (diuron, 5.65 ± 0.44 μg/liter; Irgarol 1015, 0.76 ± 0.10 μg/liter). The effects of the antifoulants on the CDKA-Luc biosensor were then compared to growth inhibition in natural marine phytoplankton. The effective concentrations of diuron and Irgarol 1051 were found to be similar, indicating that this biosensor would be suitable as a reliable ecotoxicological test. The advantage of this biosensor over cell growth inhibition testing is that the process can be easily automated and could provide a high-throughput laboratory approach to perform short-term toxicity tests. The ability to genetically transform and culture recombinant O. tauri gives it huge potential for screening many other toxic compounds. PMID:23144143

  6. Insights into the HyPer biosensor as molecular tool for monitoring cellular antioxidant capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hernández

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic metabolism brings inexorably the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are counterbalanced by intrinsic antioxidant defenses avoiding deleterious intracellular effects. Redox balance is the resultant of metabolic functioning under environmental inputs (i.e. diet, pollution and the activity of intrinsic antioxidant machinery. Monitoring of intracellular hydrogen peroxide has been successfully achieved by redox biosensor advent; however, to track the intrinsic disulfide bond reduction capacity represents a fundamental piece to understand better how redox homeostasis is maintained in living cells.In the present work, we compared the informative value of steady-state measurements and the kinetics of HyPer, a H2O2-sensitive fluorescent biosensor, targeted at the cytosol, mitochondrion and endoplasmic reticulum. From this set of data, biosensor signal recovery from an oxidized state raised as a suitable parameter to discriminate reducing capacity of a close environment. Biosensor recovery was pH-independent, condition demonstrated by experiments on pH-clamped cells, and sensitive to pharmacological perturbations of enzymatic disulfide reduction. Also, ten human cell lines were characterized according their H2O2-pulse responses, including their capacity to reduce disulfide bonds evaluated in terms of their migratory capacity.Finally, cellular migration experiments were conducted to study whether migratory efficiency was associated with the disulfide reduction activity. The migration efficiency of each cell type correlates with the rate of signal recovery measured from the oxidized biosensor. In addition, HyPer-expressing cells treated with N-acetyl-cysteine had accelerated recovery rates and major migratory capacities, both reversible effects upon treatment removal. Our data demonstrate that the HyPer signal recovery offers a novel methodological tool to track the cellular impact of redox active biomolecules. Keywords: Antioxidant

  7. Impedimetric microbial biosensor based on single wall carbon nanotube modified microelectrodes for trichloroethylene detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnaien, M.; Bourigua, S.; Bessueille, F.; Bausells, J.; Errachid, A.; Lagarde, F.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose an impedimetric microbial biosensor for trichloroethylene detection. ► A new transducer modified with carbon nanotubes and Pseudomonas putida is evaluated. ► Functionalization steps are controlled by impedance spectroscopy and AFM. ► The biosensor offers good sensitivity, selectivity, linear range and stability. ► The biosensor is successfully applied to spiked natural water samples. - Abstract: Contamination of soils and groundwaters with persistent organic pollutants is a matter of increasing concern. The most common organic pollutants are chlorinated hydrocarbons such as perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene (TCE). In this study, we developed a bacterial impedimetric biosensor for TCE detection, based on the immobilization of Pseudomonas putida F1 strain on gold microelectrodes functionalized with single wall carbon nanotubes covalently linked to anti-Pseudomonas antibodies. The different steps of microelectrodes functionalization were characterized by electrochemical impedance and atomic force spectroscopies, and analytical performances of the developed microbial biosensor were determined. The impedimetric biosensor response was linear with TCE concentration up to 150 μg L −1 and a low limit of detection (20 μg L −1 ) was achieved. No significant loss of signal was observed after 4 weeks of storage at 4 °C in phosphate buffer saline pH 7 (three to four measurements a week). After 5 weeks, 90% of the initial value still remained. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene and vinylchloride, the main TCE degradation products, did not significantly interfere with TCE. The microbial sensor was finally applied to the determination of TCE in natural water samples spiked at the 30, 50 and 75 μg L −1 levels. Recoveries were very good, ranging from 100 to 103%.

  8. Mining the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to develop FRET biosensors for sugars, dicarboxylates and cyclic polyols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bourdès

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensors are powerful tools to detect biologically important ligands in real time. Currently FRET bisosensors are available for twenty-two compounds distributed in eight classes of chemicals (two pentoses, two hexoses, two disaccharides, four amino acids, one nucleobase, two nucleotides, six ions and three phytoestrogens. To expand the number of available FRET biosensors we used the induction profile of the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to systematically screen for new FRET biosensors.Two new vectors were developed for cloning genes for solute-binding proteins (SBPs between those encoding FRET partner fluorescent proteins. In addition to a vector with the widely used cyan and yellow fluorescent protein FRET partners, we developed a vector using orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 FRET partners. From the sixty-nine SBPs tested, seven gave a detectable FRET signal change on binding substrate, resulting in biosensors for D-quinic acid, myo-inositol, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, β-diglucosides (cellobiose and gentiobiose, D-galactose and C4-dicarboxylates (malate, succinate, oxaloacetate and fumarate. To our knowledge, we describe the first two FRET biosensor constructs based on SBPs from Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP transport systems.FRET based on orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 partners allows the use of longer wavelength light, enabling deeper penetration of samples at lower energy and increased resolution with reduced back-ground auto-fluorescence. The FRET biosensors described in this paper for four new classes of compounds; (i cyclic polyols, (ii L-deoxy sugars, (iii β-linked disaccharides and (iv C4-dicarboxylates could be developed to study metabolism in vivo.

  9. Determination of uric acid level by polyaniline and poly (allylamine: Based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrul Wathoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The uric acid biosensor has been much developed by immobilizing uricase enzyme into the membrane of conductive polymer and the membrane of polyelectrolyte such as polyaniline (PANI and poly (allylamine (PAA respectively. The purpose of this research was to create a new amperometric uric acid biosensor by immobilization of uricase in combination between PANI and PAA membranes. The working electrode was Pt plate (0.5 mm. The auxiliary and the reference electrode were Pt wire 0.4 mm and Ag/AgCl respectively. Uricase, uric acid, PAA, pyrrole and glutaraldehyde were supplied from Sigma. All other chemical was obtained from Merck. The biosensor was created by immobilizing of uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on PANI composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode while the polyelectrolyte layer of PAA were prepared via layer-by-layer assembly on the electrode, functioning as H 2 O 2 -selective film. Standard of deviation, coefficient of variation (CV and coefficient of correlation (r analysis were used in this study. The biosensor had a good linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and it could be used up to 27 times with the CV value of 3.97%. The presence of other compounds such as glucose and ascorbic acid gave 1.3 ± 1.13% and 3.27 ± 2.29% respectively on the interference effect toward the current response of uric acid biosensor. The polymer combination of PANI and PAA can be used as a selective matrix of uric acid biosensor.

  10. Carbohydrate-based electrochemical biosensor for detection of a cancer biomarker in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, Marion; Ahmad, Lama; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa; Salmon, Laurent

    2017-10-15

    Autocrine motility factor (AMF) is a tumor-secreted cytokine that stimulates tumor cell motility in vitro and metastasis in vivo. AMF could be detected in serum or urine of cancer patients with worse prognosis. Reported as a cancer biomarker, AMF secretion into body fluids might be closely related to metastases formation. In this study, a sensitive and specific carbohydrate-based electrochemical biosensor was designed for the detection and quantification of a protein model of AMF, namely phosphoglucose isomerase from rabbit muscle (RmPGI). Indeed, RmPGI displays high homology with AMF and has been shown to have AMF activity. The biosensor was constructed by covalent binding of the enzyme substrate d-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). Immobilization was achieved on a gold surface electrode following a bottom-up approach through an aminated surface obtained by electrochemical patterning of ethylene diamine and terminal amine polyethylene glycol chain to prevent non-specific interactions. Carbohydrate-protein interactions were quantified in a range of 10 fM to 100nM. Complex formation was analyzed through monitoring of the redox couple Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and square wave voltammetry. The F6P-biosensor demonstrates a detection limit of 6.6 fM and high selectivity when compared to other non-specific glycolytic proteins such as d-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Detection of protein in spiked plasma was demonstrated and accuracy of 95% is obtained compared to result obtained in PBS (phosphate buffered saline). F6P-biosensor is a very promising proof of concept required for the design of a carbohydrate-based electrochemical biosensor using the enzyme substrate as bioreceptor. Such biosensor could be generalized to detect other protein biomarkers of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nano-particle enhanced impedimetric biosensor for detection of foodborne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G; Om, A S; Mun, J H

    2007-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness have been increased the need for rapid and sensitive methods for detection of these pathogens. Conventional methods for pathogens detection and identification involve prolonged multiple enrichment steps. Even though some immunological rapid assays are available, these assays still need enrichment steps result in delayed detection. Biosensors have shown great potential for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. They are capable of direct monitoring the antigen-antibody reactions in real time. Among the biosensors, impedimetric biosensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions because of their high sensitivity and reagentless operation. In this study a nanoparticle-enhanced impedimetric biosensor for Salmonella enteritidis detection was developed which detected impedance changes caused by the attachment of the cells to the anti-Salmonella antibodies immobilized on interdigitated gold electrodes. Successive immobilization of neutravidin followed by anti-Salmonella antibodies was performed to the sensing area to create a biological detection surface. To enhance the impedance responses generated by antigen-antibody reactions, anti-Salmonella antibody conjugated nanoparticles were introduced on the sensing area. Using a portable impedance analyzer, the impedance across the interdigital electrodes was measured after the series of antigen-antibody bindings. Bacteria cells present in solution attached to capture antibodies and became tethered to the sensor surface. Attached bacteria cells changed the dielectric constant of the media between the electrodes thereby causing a change in measured impedance. Optimum input frequency was determined by analyzing frequency characteristics of the biosensor over ranges of applied frequencies from 10 Hz to 400 Hz. At 100 Hz of input frequency, the biosensor was most sensitive to the changes of the bacteria concentration and this frequency

  12. Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson, Vânia da Silva; Duran, Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  13. Future of biosensors: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Frieder W; Yarman, Aysu; Bachmann, Till; Hirsch, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan; Renneberg, Reinhard; Schumacher, Soeren; Wollenberger, Ulla; Teller, Carsten; Bier, Frank F

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors representing the technological counterpart of living senses have found routine application in amperometric enzyme electrodes for decentralized blood glucose measurement, interaction analysis by surface plasmon resonance in drug development, and to some extent DNA chips for expression analysis and enzyme polymorphisms. These technologies have already reached a highly advanced level and need minor improvement at most. The dream of the "100-dollar" personal genome may come true in the next few years provided that the technological hurdles of nanopore technology or of polymerase-based single molecule sequencing can be overcome. Tailor-made recognition elements for biosensors including membrane-bound enzymes and receptors will be prepared by cell-free protein synthesis. As alternatives for biological recognition elements, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been created. They have the potential to substitute antibodies in biosensors and biochips for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances, proteins, viruses, and living cells. They are more stable than proteins and can be produced in large amounts by chemical synthesis. Integration of nanomaterials, especially of graphene, could lead to new miniaturized biosensors with high sensitivity and ultrafast response. In the future individual therapy will include genetic profiling of isoenzymes and polymorphic forms of drug-metabolizing enzymes especially of the cytochrome P450 family. For defining the pharmacokinetics including the clearance of a given genotype enzyme electrodes will be a useful tool. For decentralized online patient control or the integration into everyday "consumables" such as drinking water, foods, hygienic articles, clothing, or for control of air conditioners in buildings and cars and swimming pools, a new generation of "autonomous" biosensors will emerge.

  14. System-level integration of active silicon photonic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplatine, L.; Al'Mrayat, O.; Luan, E.; Fang, C.; Rezaiezadeh, S.; Ratner, D. M.; Cheung, K.; Dattner, Y.; Chrostowski, L.

    2017-02-01

    Biosensors based on silicon photonic integrated circuits have attracted a growing interest in recent years. The use of sub-micron silicon waveguides to propagate near-infrared light allows for the drastic reduction of the optical system size, while increasing its complexity and sensitivity. Using silicon as the propagating medium also leverages the fabrication capabilities of CMOS foundries, which offer low-cost mass production. Researchers have deeply investigated photonic sensor devices, such as ring resonators, interferometers and photonic crystals, but the practical integration of silicon photonic biochips as part of a complete system has received less attention. Herein, we present a practical system-level architecture which can be employed to integrate the aforementioned photonic biosensors. We describe a system based on 1 mm2 dies that integrate germanium photodetectors and a single light coupling device. The die are embedded into a 16x16 mm2 epoxy package to enable microfluidic and electrical integration. First, we demonstrate a simple process to mimic Fan-Out Wafer-level-Packaging, which enables low-cost mass production. We then characterize the photodetectors in the photovoltaic mode, which exhibit high sensitivity at low optical power. Finally, we present a new grating coupler concept to relax the lateral alignment tolerance down to +/- 50 μm at 1-dB (80%) power penalty, which should permit non-experts to use the biochips in a"plug-and-play" style. The system-level integration demonstrated in this study paves the way towards the mass production of low-cost and highly sensitive biosensors, and can facilitate their wide adoption for biomedical and agro-environmental applications.

  15. Nano-yarn carbon nanotube fiber based enzymatic glucose biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhigang; Burugapalli, Krishna; Moussy, Francis; Song, Wenhui; Li Yali; Zhong Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    A novel brush-like electrode based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nano-yarn fiber has been designed for electrochemical biosensor applications and its efficacy as an enzymatic glucose biosensor demonstrated. The CNT nano-yarn fiber was spun directly from a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) gas flow reaction using a mixture of ethanol and acetone as the carbon source and an iron nano-catalyst. The fiber, 28 μm in diameter, was made of bundles of double walled CNTs (DWNTs) concentrically compacted into multiple layers forming a nano-porous network structure. Cyclic voltammetry study revealed a superior electrocatalytic activity for CNT fiber compared to the traditional Pt-Ir coil electrode. The electrode end tip of the CNT fiber was freeze-fractured to obtain a unique brush-like nano-structure resembling a scale-down electrical 'flex', where glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was immobilized using glutaraldehyde crosslinking in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). An outer epoxy-polyurethane (EPU) layer was used as semi-permeable membrane. The sensor function was tested against a standard reference electrode. The sensitivities, linear detection range and linearity for detecting glucose for the miniature CNT fiber electrode were better than that reported for a Pt-Ir coil electrode. Thermal annealing of the CNT fiber at 250 deg. C for 30 min prior to fabrication of the sensor resulted in a 7.5 fold increase in glucose sensitivity. The as-spun CNT fiber based glucose biosensor was shown to be stable for up to 70 days. In addition, gold coating of the electrode connecting end of the CNT fiber resulted in extending the glucose detection limit to 25 μM. To conclude, superior efficiency of CNT fiber for glucose biosensing was demonstrated compared to a traditional Pt-Ir sensor.

  16. Nano-yarn carbon nanotube fiber based enzymatic glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Song, Wenhui; Burugapalli, Krishna; Moussy, Francis; Li, Ya-Li; Zhong, Xiao-Hua

    2010-04-01

    A novel brush-like electrode based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nano-yarn fiber has been designed for electrochemical biosensor applications and its efficacy as an enzymatic glucose biosensor demonstrated. The CNT nano-yarn fiber was spun directly from a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) gas flow reaction using a mixture of ethanol and acetone as the carbon source and an iron nano-catalyst. The fiber, 28 µm in diameter, was made of bundles of double walled CNTs (DWNTs) concentrically compacted into multiple layers forming a nano-porous network structure. Cyclic voltammetry study revealed a superior electrocatalytic activity for CNT fiber compared to the traditional Pt-Ir coil electrode. The electrode end tip of the CNT fiber was freeze-fractured to obtain a unique brush-like nano-structure resembling a scale-down electrical 'flex', where glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was immobilized using glutaraldehyde crosslinking in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). An outer epoxy-polyurethane (EPU) layer was used as semi-permeable membrane. The sensor function was tested against a standard reference electrode. The sensitivities, linear detection range and linearity for detecting glucose for the miniature CNT fiber electrode were better than that reported for a Pt-Ir coil electrode. Thermal annealing of the CNT fiber at 250 °C for 30 min prior to fabrication of the sensor resulted in a 7.5 fold increase in glucose sensitivity. The as-spun CNT fiber based glucose biosensor was shown to be stable for up to 70 days. In addition, gold coating of the electrode connecting end of the CNT fiber resulted in extending the glucose detection limit to 25 µM. To conclude, superior efficiency of CNT fiber for glucose biosensing was demonstrated compared to a traditional Pt-Ir sensor.

  17. Design and optimization of resonance-based efficient wireless power delivery systems for biomedical implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramrakhyani, A K; Mirabbasi, S; Mu Chiao

    2011-02-01

    Resonance-based wireless power delivery is an efficient technique to transfer power over a relatively long distance. This technique typically uses four coils as opposed to two coils used in conventional inductive links. In the four-coil system, the adverse effects of a low coupling coefficient between primary and secondary coils are compensated by using high-quality (Q) factor coils, and the efficiency of the system is improved. Unlike its two-coil counterpart, the efficiency profile of the power transfer is not a monotonically decreasing function of the operating distance and is less sensitive to changes in the distance between the primary and secondary coils. A four-coil energy transfer system can be optimized to provide maximum efficiency at a given operating distance. We have analyzed the four-coil energy transfer systems and outlined the effect of design parameters on power-transfer efficiency. Design steps to obtain the efficient power-transfer system are presented and a design example is provided. A proof-of-concept prototype system is implemented and confirms the validity of the proposed analysis and design techniques. In the prototype system, for a power-link frequency of 700 kHz and a coil distance range of 10 to 20 mm, using a 22-mm diameter implantable coil resonance-based system shows a power-transfer efficiency of more than 80% with an enhanced operating range compared to ~40% efficiency achieved by a conventional two-coil system.

  18. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part II: technical development and proof of concept of the biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Thomas; Thouand, Gerald [UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, CBAC, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Campus de la Courtaisiere-IUT, La Roche-sur-Yon cedex (France); Chapeau, Cyrille [Biolumine, Biokar Diagnostic, Rue des Quarante Mines ZAC de Ther-Allonne, Beauvais Cedex (France); Bendria, Loubna; Daniel, Philippe [UMR CNRS 6087 LPEC, Universite du Maine, Av Olivier Messiaen, Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Picart, Pascal [UMR CNRS 6613 IAM-LAUM, Ecole Nationale des Ingenieurs du Mans, Universite du Maine, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This research study deals with the on-line detection of heavy metals and toxicity within the context of environmental pollution monitoring. It describes the construction and the proof of concept of a multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor in immobilized phase: Lumisens3. This new versatile device, designed for the non-stop analysis of water pollution, enables the insertion of any bioluminescent strains (inducible or constitutive), immobilized in a multi-well removable card. The technical design of Lumisens3 has benefited from both a classical and a robust approach and includes four main parts: (1) a dedicated removable card contains 64 wells, 3 mm in depth, arranged in eight grooves within which bacteria are immobilized, (2) this card is incubated on a Pelletier block with a CCD cooled camera on top for bioluminescence monitoring, (3) a fluidic network feeds the card with the sample to be analyzed and finally (4) a dedicated computer interface, BIOLUX 1.0, controls all the elements of the biosensor, allowing it to operate autonomously. The proof of concept of this biosensor was performed using a set of four bioluminescent bacteria (Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, pBcoplux, and E. coli XL1 pBfiluxCDABE) in the on-line detection of CdCl{sub 2} 0.5 {mu}M and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 5 {mu}M from an influent. When considering metals individually, the ''fingerprints'' from the biosensor were as expected. However, when metals were mixed together, cross reaction and synergistic effects were detected. This biosensor allowed us to demonstrate the simultaneous on-line cross detection of one or several heavy metals as well as the measurement of the overall toxicity of the sample. (orig.)

  19. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Changwu; Li, Peng [School of Physical Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Jia, Zhenhong, E-mail: jzhh@xju.edu.cn; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Lv, Xiaoyi [College of Information Science and Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-03-07

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  20. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  1. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  2. Fundamental Design Principles for Transcription-Factor-Based Metabolite Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ahmad A; Liu, Di; Zhang, Fuzhong; Oyarzún, Diego A

    2017-10-20

    Metabolite biosensors are central to current efforts toward precision engineering of metabolism. Although most research has focused on building new biosensors, their tunability remains poorly understood and is fundamental for their broad applicability. Here we asked how genetic modifications shape the dose-response curve of biosensors based on metabolite-responsive transcription factors. Using the lac system in Escherichia coli as a model system, we built promoter libraries with variable operator sites that reveal interdependencies between biosensor dynamic range and response threshold. We developed a phenomenological theory to quantify such design constraints in biosensors with various architectures and tunable parameters. Our theory reveals a maximal achievable dynamic range and exposes tunable parameters for orthogonal control of dynamic range and response threshold. Our work sheds light on fundamental limits of synthetic biology designs and provides quantitative guidelines for biosensor design in applications such as dynamic pathway control, strain optimization, and real-time monitoring of metabolism.

  3. Impedimetric biosensors for medical applications current progress and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Rushworth, Jo V; Goode, Jack A; Pike, Douglas J; Ahmed, Asif; Millner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors discuss the current progress in the medical application of impedimetric biosensors, along with the key challenges in the field. First, a general overview of biosensor development, structure and function is presented, followed by a detailed discussion of impedimetric biosensors and the principles of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Next, the current state-of-the art in terms of the science and technology underpinning impedance-based biosensors is reviewed in detail. The layer-by-layer construction of impedimetric sensors is described, including the design of electrodes, their nano-modification, transducer surface functionalization and the attachment of different bioreceptors. The current challenges of translating lab-based biosensor platforms into commercially-available devices that function with real patient samples at the POC are presented; this includes a consideration of systems integration, microfluidics and biosensor regeneration. The final section of this monograph ...

  4. Microbial Biosensor for the Detection of Protease-Virulent Factors from Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    pathogen signalling molecules. With that goal in mind , researchers have developed various types of biosensors that detect infectious determinants...life to boost their capability for rapid determination of clean water sources during field deployment. Despite the promising results of these studies

  5. Increasing amperometric biosensor sensitivity by length fractionated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Federico; Gorton, Lo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion...

  6. A new self-assembled layer-by-layer glucose biosensor based on chitosan biopolymer entrapped enzyme with nitrogen doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsan, Madalina M; David, Melinda; Florescu, Monica; Ţugulea, Laura; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-10-01

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has been used for the construction of a new enzyme biosensor. Multilayer films containing glucose oxidase, GOx, and nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) dispersed in the biocompatible positively-charged polymer chitosan (chit(+)(NG+GOx)), together with the negatively charged polymer poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS(-), were assembled by alternately immersing a gold electrode substrate in chit(+)(NG+GOx) and PSS(-) solutions. Gravimetric monitoring during LbL assembly by an electrochemical quartz microbalance enabled investigation of the adsorption mechanism and deposited mass for each monolayer. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the LbL modified electrodes, in order to establish the contribution of each monolayer to the overall electrochemical properties of the biosensor. The importance of NG in the biosensor architecture was evaluated by undertaking a comparative study without NG in the chit layer. The GOx biosensor's analytical properties were evaluated by fixed potential chronoamperometry and compared with similar reported biosensors. The biosensor operates at a low potential of -0.2V vs., Ag/AgCl, exhibiting a high sensitivity of 10.5 μA cm(-2) mM(-1), and a detection limit of 64 μM. This study shows a simple approach in developing new biosensor architectures, combining the advantages of nitrogen-doped graphene with the LbL technique for enzyme immobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    OpenAIRE

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Sapsford, Kim E.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensor...

  8. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the BDD nanograss array electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huali; Wei, Min; Wang, Jinshui

    2013-04-10

    The development of DNA biosensor has attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications, including gene analysis, clinical diagnostics, forensic study and more medical applications. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry in this study. Electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed based on the BDD film electrode (fBDD) and BDD nanograss array electrode (nBDD). In comparison with fBDD and AuNPs/CA/fBDD electrode, the lower semicircle diameter of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy obtained on nBDD and AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode indicated that the presence of nanograss array improved the reactive site, reduced the interfacial resistance, and made the electron transfer easier. Using electroactive daunomycin as an indicator, the hybridization detection was measured by differential pulse voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrated that the prepared AuNPs/CA/nBDD electrode was suitable for DNA hybridization with favorable performance of faster response, higher sensitivity, lower detection limit and satisfactory selectivity, reproducibility and stability.

  9. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  10. Biosensors for security and bioterrorism applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of biomarker/biosensor interactions for the rapid detection of weapons of bioterrorism, as well as current research trends and future developments and applications. It will be useful to researchers in this field who are interested in new developments in the early detection of such. The authors have collected very valuable and, in some aspects indispensable experience in the area i.e. in the development and application of portable biosensors for the detection of potential hazards. Most efforts are centered on the development of immunochemical assays including flow-lateral systems and engineered antibodies and their fragments. In addition, new approaches to the detection of enzyme inhibitors, direct enzymatic and microbial detection of metabolites and nutrients are elaborated. Some realized prototypes and concept devices applicable for the further use as a basis for the cooperation programs are also discussed. There is a particular focus on electrochemical and optical det...

  11. Poly(neutral red) based hydrogen peroxide biosensor for chromium determination by inhibition measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Aisha; Emilia Ghica, M; Amine, Aziz; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-08-30

    Amperometric hydrogen peroxide enzyme inhibition biosensors based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on electropolymerised neutral red (NR) or directly on the surface of carbon film electrodes (CFE) have been successfully applied to the determination of toxic Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Parameters influencing the performance of the biosensor including the enzyme immobilisation method, the amount of hydrogen peroxide, applied potential and electrolyte pH were optimised. The inhibition of horseradish peroxidase by the chromium species was studied under the optimised conditions. Results from the quantitative analysis of chromium ions are discussed in terms of detection limit, linear range and sensitivity. The HRP kinetic interactions reveal mixed binding of Cr(III) with I50=3.8μM and inhibition binding constant Ki=11.3μM at HRP/PNR/CFE biosensors and uncompetitive binding of Cr(VI) with I50=3.9μM and Ki=0.78μM at HRP/CFE biosensors in the presence of H2O2 substrate. Interferences from other heavy metal ions were studied and the inhibition show very good selectivity towards Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bioelectrochemical biosensor for water toxicity detection: generation of dual signals for electrochemical assay confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Wang, Yan-Zhai; Fang, Zhen; Yu, Yang-Yang; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Toxicity assessment of water is of great important to the safety of human health and to social security because of more and more toxic compounds that are spilled into the aquatic environment. Therefore, the development of fast and reliable toxicity assessment methods is of great interest and attracts much attention. In this study, by using the electrochemical activity of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells as the toxicity indicator, 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) as the model toxic compound, a new biosensor for water toxicity assessment was developed. Strikingly, the presence of DCP in the water significantly inhibited the maximum current output of the S. oneidensis MR-1 in a three-electrode system and also retarded the current evolution by the cells. Under the optimized conditions, the maximum current output of the biosensor was proportional to the concentration of DCP up to 30 mg/L. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of DCP determined by this biosensor is about 14.5 mg/L. Furthermore, simultaneous monitoring of the retarded time (Δt) for current generation allowed the identification of another biosensor signal in response to DCP which could be employed to verify the electrochemical result by dual confirmation. Thus, the present study has provided a reliable and promising approach for water quality assessment and risk warning of water toxicity.

  13. 3-Coil resonance-based wireless power transfer system for implantable electronic

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a 3-coil resonance-based wireless power transfer (R-WPT) system using a single layer of inductor coil windings, in a pancake configuration, in order to obtain a compact system for implantable electronic applications. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements in terms of quality factor Q and power transfer efficiency (PTE), was done. Our proposed 3-coil scheme can achieve a high PTE with a resonance frequency of 2.46 MHz over a transfer distance of up to 30 mm, by using two 15-mm radius implant coils. The achieved experimental PTE is more than 85%at a 5 mm separation distance, and about 50% PTE at a distance of 20 mm. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. 3-Coil resonance-based wireless power transfer system for implantable electronic

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying; Buttner, Ulrich; Fan, Yiqiang; Foulds, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a 3-coil resonance-based wireless power transfer (R-WPT) system using a single layer of inductor coil windings, in a pancake configuration, in order to obtain a compact system for implantable electronic applications. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements in terms of quality factor Q and power transfer efficiency (PTE), was done. Our proposed 3-coil scheme can achieve a high PTE with a resonance frequency of 2.46 MHz over a transfer distance of up to 30 mm, by using two 15-mm radius implant coils. The achieved experimental PTE is more than 85%at a 5 mm separation distance, and about 50% PTE at a distance of 20 mm. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. Integrated phononic crystal resonators based on adiabatically-terminated phononic crystal waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Dehghannasiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we demonstrate a new design for integrated phononic crystal (PnC resonators based on confining acoustic waves in a heterogeneous waveguide-based PnC structure. In this architecture, a PnC waveguide that supports a single mode at the desired resonance frequencies is terminated by two waveguide sections with no propagating mode at those frequencies (i.e., have mode gap. The proposed PnC resonators are designed through combining the spatial-domain and the spatial-frequency domain (i.e., the k-domain analysis to achieve a smooth mode envelope. This design approach can benefit both membrane-based and surface-acoustic-wave-based architectures by confining the mode spreading in k-domain that leads to improved electromechanical excitation/detection coupling and reduced loss through propagating bulk modes.

  16. Improved sensitivity of a graphene FET biosensor using porphyrin linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Takuya; Ono, Takao; Kanai, Yasushi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2018-06-01

    Graphene FET (G-FET) biosensors have considerable potential due to the superior characteristics of graphene. Realizing this potential requires judicious choice of the linker molecule connecting the target-specific receptor molecule to the graphene surface, yet there are few reports comparing linker molecules for G-FET biosensors. In this study, tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP) was used as a linker for surface modification of a G-FET and the properties of the device were compared to those of a G-FET device modified with the conventional linker 1-pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester (PBASE). TCPP modification resulted in a higher density of receptor immunoglobulin E (IgE) aptamer molecules on the G-FET. The detection limit of the target IgE was enhanced from 13 nM for the PBASE-modified G-FET to 2.2 nM for the TCPP-modified G-FET, suggesting that the TCPP linker is a powerful candidate for G-FET modification.

  17. Preparation of Electrochemical Biosensor for Detection of Organophosphorus Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Gothwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl chloride (PVC can be used to develop reaction beaker which acts as electrochemical cell for the measurement of OP pesticides. Being chemically inert, corrosion resistant, and easy in molding to various shapes and size, PVC can be used for the immobilization of enzyme. Organophosphorus hydrolase was immobilized covalently onto the chemically activated inner surface of PVC beaker by using glutaraldehyde as a coupling agent. The carbon nanotubes paste working electrode was constructed for amperometric measurement at a potential of +0.8 V. The biosensor showed optimum response at pH 8.0 with incubation temperature of 40°C. Km and Imax for substrate (methyl parathion were 322.58 µM and 1.1 µA, respectively. Evaluation study showed a correlation of 0.985, which was in agreement with the standard method. The OPH biosensor lost 50% of its initial activity after its regular use for 25 times over a period of 50 days when stored in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 8.0 at 4°C. No interference was observed by interfering species.

  18. Trends in Biosensors for HPV: Identification and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac A. M. Frías

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional methodologies used for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV present actually robust and reproducible advantages. However, at the same time, they involve complex protocols that sometimes are difficult to popularize. Over the first half of XX century, the adequate treatment of complex and delicate processes from a simple instrumental base seemed a fundamental and intrinsic contradiction. However, interdisciplinary trends have allowed the manipulation of tissues, proteins, and nucleic acids through innovative increasingly smaller devices. The proper diagnosis of HPV has seen great advances since biosensor researchers are employing its virus strains as models to study the interactions between the biorecognition element and the transducer. Additionally, all recent improvements and trends that material sciences, biotechnology, and data processing scientists excel for biosensors can be applied for the HPV detection platforms. In this review, we highlight the recent trends on materials, nanomaterials, and transducers for the specific detection and differentiation of HPV strains. The most influential methods for the detection and identification of these papillomaviruses include optical, electrochemical, and piezoelectric transducers; we will visit their sensibility and advantages. Additionally, we highlight the factors that contributed to the increasing importance of these biodevices as potential substitutes to conventional diagnostic methods.

  19. Fast detection of atrazine in corn using thermometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Zhiwei; Ning, Baoan; Liu, Ming; Bai, Jialei; Peng, Yuan; Song, Nan; Lv, Zhiqiang; Wang, Ying; Sun, Siming; Su, Xuan; Zhang, Yihong; Gao, Zhixian

    2013-09-07

    Fast detection is important in screening large-scale samples. This study establishes a direct competitive ELISA method (dcTELISA) based on an enzyme thermistor for fast atrazine (ATZ) detection. ATZ competes with β-lactamase-labeled ATZ (ATZ-E) for the binding sites on anti-ATZ monoclonal antibody (mAb). The mAb are covalently bound to Controlled Pore Glass (CPG) in an immunoreactor to form immunocomplexes with ATZ and ATZ-E. Several parameters of biosensor performance were optimized, such as the ATZ-E concentration, concentration and nature of the substrate, flow rate, and effect of temperature on the sensor response. After optimization, the assay time for a single sample was 12 min. The work process and result were compared with those of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The detection results exhibited a recovery rate of 88% to 107% in ATZ-spiked fresh cut corn stalks and silage samples. The results obtained via dcTELISA had good correlation with that of HPLC, and the biosensor response was reproducible and stable even when used continuously for over 4 months. All these properties suggested that the fast detection method, dcTELISA, may be used to detect pesticide residue in large-scale samples.

  20. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM. The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA, due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  1. Sensitivity analysis for improving nanomechanical photonic transducers biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariña, D; Álvarez, M; Márquez, S; Lechuga, L M; Dominguez, C

    2015-01-01

    The achievement of high sensitivity and highly integrated transducers is one of the main challenges in the development of high-throughput biosensors. The aim of this study is to improve the final sensitivity of an opto-mechanical device to be used as a reliable biosensor. We report the analysis of the mechanical and optical properties of optical waveguide microcantilever transducers, and their dependency on device design and dimensions. The selected layout (geometry) based on two butt-coupled misaligned waveguides displays better sensitivities than an aligned one. With this configuration, we find that an optimal microcantilever thickness range between 150 nm and 400 nm would increase both microcantilever bending during the biorecognition process and increase optical sensitivity to 4.8   ×   10 −2  nm −1 , an order of magnitude higher than other similar opto-mechanical devices. Moreover, the analysis shows that a single mode behaviour of the propagating radiation is required to avoid modal interference that could misinterpret the readout signal. (paper)

  2. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, Gerardo R.; Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds

  3. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Gerardo R; Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-10-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds.

  4. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  5. A New Laccase Biosensor For Polyphenols Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J.F. Rebelo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of polyphenols in human health is a well known fact. Prompted by that, a very intensive research has been directed to get a method to detect them, wich will improve the current ones. Laccase (p-diphenol:dioxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.10.3.2 is a multi-copper oxidase, wich couples catalytic oxidation of phenolic substrates with four electron reduction of dioxygen to water [1]. A maximum catalytic response in oxigenated electrolyte was observed between 4.5 and 5.5 [2], while for pH > 6.9 the laccase was found to be inactive [3]. We prepared a biosensor with laccase immobilised on a polyether sulphone membrane, at pH 4.5, wich was applied at Universal Sensors base electrode. Reduction of the product of oxidation of several polyphenols, catalysed by laccase, was done at a potential for wich the polyphenol of interest was found to respond. Reduction of catechol was found to occur at a potential of -200mV, wich is often referred to in the literature for polyphenolic biosensors. However other polyphenols did not respond at that potential. It was observed that (+- catechin produced a very large cathodic current when +100mV were applied to the laccase biosensor, both in aqueous acetate and 12% ethanol acetate buffer, whereas caffeic acid responded at -50mV. Other polyphenols tested were gallic acid, malvidin, quercetin, rutin, trans-resveratrol

  6. L-arginine biosensors: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Verma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arginine has been considered as the most potent nutraceutics discovered ever, due to its powerful healing property, and it's been known to scientists as the Miracle Molecule. Arginine detection in fermented food products is necessary because, high level of arginine in foods forms ethyl carbamate (EC during the fermentation process. Therefore, L-arginine detection in fermented food products is very important as a control measure for quality of fermented foods, food supplements and beverages including wine. In clinical analysis arginine detection is important due to their enormous inherent versatility in various metabolic pathways, topmost in the synthesis of Nitric oxide (NO and tumor growth. A number of methods are being used for arginine detection, but biosensors technique holds prime position due to rapid response, high sensitivity and high specificity. However, there are many problems still to be addressed, including selectivity, real time analysis and interference of urea presence in the sample. In the present review we aim to emphasize the significant role of arginine in human physiology and foods. A small attempt has been made to discuss the various techniques used for development of arginine biosensor and how these techniques affect their performance. The choice of transducers for arginine biosensor ranges from optical, pH sensing, ammonia gas sensing, ammonium ion-selective, conductometric and amperometric electrodes because ammonia is formed as a final product.

  7. Design of nanostructured-based glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komirisetty, Archana; Williams, Frances; Pradhan, Aswini; Konda, Rajini B.; Dondapati, Hareesh; Samantaray, Diptirani

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the design of glucose sensors that will be integrated with advanced nano-materials, bio-coatings and electronics to create novel devices that are highly sensitive, inexpensive, accurate, and reliable. In the work presented, a glucose biosensor and its fabrication process flow have been designed. The device is based on electrochemical sensing using a working electrode with bio-functionalized zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-rods. Among all metal oxide nanostructures, ZnO nano-materials play a significant role as a sensing element in biosensors due to their properties such as high isoelectric point (IEP), fast electron transfer, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and chemical stability which are very crucial parameters to achieve high sensitivity. Amperometric enzyme electrodes based on glucose oxidase (GOx) are used due to their stability and high selectivity to glucose. The device also consists of silicon dioxide and titanium layers as well as platinum working and counter electrodes and a silver/silver chloride reference electrode. Currently, the biosensors are being fabricated using the process flow developed. Once completed, the sensors will be bio-functionalized and tested to characterize their performance, including their sensitivity and stability.

  8. A glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase immobilized on three-dimensional porous carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyi; Zhu, Rong; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Man; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Min; Wang, Li; Song, Yonghai

    2015-08-21

    A novel glucose biosensor was developed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) on a three-dimensional (3D) porous kenaf stem-derived carbon (3D-KSC) which was firstly proposed as a novel supporting material to load biomolecules for electrochemical biosensing. Here, an integrated 3D-KSC electrode was prepared by using a whole piece of 3D-KSC to load the GOD molecules for glucose biosensing. The morphologies of integrated 3D-KSC and 3D-KSC/GOD electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SEM results revealed a 3D honeycomb macroporous structure of the integrated 3D-KSC electrode. The TEM results showed some microporosities and defects in the 3D-KSC electrode. The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalytic performance of the integrated 3D-KSC/GOD electrode were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effects of pH and scan rates on the electrochemical response of the biosensor have been studied in detail. The glucose biosensor showed a wide linear range from 0.1 mM to 14.0 mM with a high sensitivity of 1.73 μA mM(-1) and a low detection limit of 50.75 μM. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor exhibited high selectivity, good repeatability and reproducibility, and good stability.

  9. Titanium dioxide–cellulose hybrid nanocomposite and its glucose biosensor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammad; Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Jaehwan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was fabricated by blending TiO 2 nanoparticles and cellulose solution. ► The hybrid nanocomposite has advantages of biodegradability and bio-compatibility of cellulose and physical properties of TiO 2 . ► Enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized into the hybrid nanocomposite and covalent bonding between TiO 2 and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. ► Linear response of the glucose biosensor was obtained in the range of 1–10 mM. - Abstract: This paper investigates the fabrication of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 )–cellulose hybrid nanocomposite and its possibility for a conductometric glucose biosensor. TiO 2 nanoparticles were blended with cellulose solution prepared by dissolving cotton pulp with lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent to fabricate TiO 2 –cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. The enzyme, glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized into this hybrid nanocomposite by physical adsorption method. The successful immobilization of glucose oxidase into TiO 2 –cellulose hybrid nanocomposite via covalent bonding between TiO 2 and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. The linear response of the glucose biosensor is obtained in the range of 1–10 mM. This study demonstrates that TiO 2 –cellulose hybrid nanocomposite can be a potential candidate for an inexpensive, flexible and disposable glucose biosensor.

  10. An ATP sensitive light addressable biosensor for extracellular monitoring of single taste receptor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is considered as the key neurotransmitter in taste buds for taste signal transmission and processing. Measurements of ATP secreted from single taste receptor cell (TRC) with high sensitivity and specificity are essential for investigating mechanisms underlying taste cell-to-cell communications. In this study, we presented an aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of ATP locally secreted from single TRC. ATP sensitive DNA aptamer was used as recognition element and its DNA competitor was served as signal transduction element that was covalently immobilized on the surface of light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). Due to the light addressable capability of LAPS, local ATP secretion from single TRC can be detected by monitoring the working potential shifts of LAPS. The results show this biosensor can detect ATP with high sensitivity and specificity. It is demonstrated this biosensor can effectively detect the local ATP secretion from single TRC responding to tastant mixture. This biosensor could provide a promising new tool for the research of taste cell-to-cell communications as well as for the detection of local ATP secretion from other types of ATP secreting individual cells.

  11. Enzymatic biosensors based on ingá-cipó peroxidase immobilised on sepiolite for TBHQ quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina de Oliveira, Tássia; Grawe, Gregory Ferreira; Moccelini, Sally Katiuce; Terezo, Ailton J; Castilho, Marilza

    2014-05-07

    Sepiolite clay mineral was used as a support for the immobilisation of the peroxidase enzyme from ingá-cipó (Inga edulis Mart.) and was used with graphite powder, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), mineral oil, and nafion 0.5% (v/v) in the development of a new biosensor for the determination of the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) by square-wave voltammetry (SWV). For the optimisation and application of the biosensor, several parameters were investigated to determine the optimum experimental conditions using SWV. The best performance was obtained using a 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.0), 4.0 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) hydrogen peroxide, a frequency of 50 Hz, a pulse amplitude of 60 mV, and a scan increment of 6 mV. The biosensor showed good repeatability and reproducibility and remained stable for a period of 20 weeks. The analytical curve revealed a linear response range of 1.65 to 9.82 mg L(-1) (r = 0.994) with detection and quantification limits of 0.41 and 1.25 mg L(-1). A recovery study of TBHQ in salad dressing samples yielded values from 99.6-104.8%. The proposed biosensor was successfully used for the determination of TBHQ in commercial salad dressing samples, giving a relative error of 5.4% in relation to the comparative method (chromatographic).

  12. Biosensors and their applications in detection of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Shokoufeh; Momtaz, Saeideh; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Maghsoudi, Armin Salek; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses the past and recent advancements of biosensors focusing on detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) due to their exceptional use during the last decades. Apart from agricultural benefits, OPs also impose adverse toxicological effects on animal and human population. Conventional approaches such as chromatographic techniques used for pesticide detection are associated with several limitations. A biosensor technology is unique due to the detection sensitivity, selectivity, remarkable performance capabilities, simplicity and on-site operation, fabrication and incorporation with nanomaterials. This study also provided specifications of the most OPs biosensors reported until today based on their transducer system. In addition, we highlighted the application of advanced complementary materials and analysis techniques in OPs detection systems. The availability of these new materials associated with new sensing techniques has led to introduction of easy-to-use analytical tools of high sensitivity and specificity in the design and construction of OPs biosensors. In this review, we elaborated the achievements in sensing systems concerning innovative nanomaterials and analytical techniques with emphasis on OPs.

  13. Biosensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Radiation-Induced Biologic Effects in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R.; Balogh, Lajos; Majoros, Istvan; Keszler, Balazs; Myc, Andrzej; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta; Norris, Theodore; delaiglesia, Felix; Beeson, Nicholas W. (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    This work seeks to develop cellular biosensors based on dendritic polymers. Nanoscale polymer structures less than 20 nm in diameter will be used as the basis of the biosensors. The structures will be designed to target into specific cells of an astronaut and be able to monitor health issues such as exposure to radiation. Multiple components can be assembled on the polymers including target directors, analytical devices (such as molecular probes), and reporting agents. The reporting will be accomplished through fluorescence signal monitoring, with the use of multispectral analysis for signal interpretation. These nanosensors could facilitate the success and increase the safety of extended space flight. The design and assembly of these devices has been pioneered at the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology in the University of Michigan. This period, synthesis of the test-bed biosensors continued. Studies were performed on the candidate fluorescent dyes to determine which might be suitable for the biosensor under development. Development continued on producing an artificial capillary bed as a tool for the use in the production of the fluorescence signal monitor. Work was also done on the in vitro multispectral analysis system, which uses the robotic microscope.

  14. Biosensors for the Detection of Antibiotics in Poultry Industry—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungroo, Nawfal Adam; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Each of these techniques has its benefits as well as drawbacks. This review aims to evaluate different biosensing techniques and their working principles in order to accurately, quickly and practically detect antibiotics in chicken muscle and blood serum. The review is divided into three main sections, namely: a biosensors overview, a section on biosensor recognition and a section on biosensor transducing elements. The first segment provides a detailed overview on the different techniques available and their respective advantages and disadvantages. The second section consists of an evaluation of several analyte systems and their mechanisms. The last section of this review studies the working principles of biosensing transducing elements, focusing mainly on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology and its applications in industries. PMID:25587435

  15. Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on Spinach Using Phage-Based Magnetoelastic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengen Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Phage-based magnetoelastic (ME biosensors have been studied as an in-situ, real-time, wireless, direct detection method of foodborne pathogens in recent years. This paper investigates an ME biosensor method for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. A procedure to obtain a concentrated suspension of Salmonella from contaminated spinach leaves is described that is based on methods outlined in the U.S. FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual for the detection of Salmonella on leafy green vegetables. The effects of an alternative pre-enrichment broth (LB broth vs. lactose broth, incubation time on the detection performance and negative control were investigated. In addition, different blocking agents (BSA, Casein, and Superblock were evaluated to minimize the effect of nonspecific binding. None of the blocking agents was found to be superior to the others, or even better than none. Unblocked ME biosensors were placed directly in a concentrated suspension and allowed to bind with Salmonella cells for 30 min before measuring the resonant frequency using a surface-scanning coil detector. It was found that 7 h incubation at 37 °C in LB broth was necessary to detect an initial spike of 100 cfu/25 g S. Typhimurium on spinach leaves with a confidence level of difference greater than 95% (p < 0.05. Thus, the ME biosensor method, on both partly and fully detection, was demonstrated to be a robust and competitive method for foodborne pathogens on fresh products.

  16. Activity and Stability of Biofilm Uricase of Lactobacillus plantarum for Uric Acid Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswantini, Dyah; Rachmatia, Rescy; Diana, Novita Rose; Nurhidayat, Novik; Akhiruddin; Saprudin, Deden

    2016-01-01

    Research of uric acid biosensor used a Lactobacillus plantarum was successfully conducted. Lactobacillus plantarum could produce uricase that could be used as uric acid biosensor. Therefore, lifetime of bacteria were quite short that caused the bacteria could not detect uric acid for a long time. To avoid this problem, development of biofilm for uric acid biosensor is important. Biofilms is a structured community of bacterial cells, stick together and are able to maintain a bacteria in an extreme environments. The purpose of present study was to determine and compare the activity of uricase produced by L. plantarum, deposited whithin biofilm and planktonic bacteria on glassy carbon electrode (GCEb & GCE), also to determine the stability of biofilm. The optimization process was conducted by using temperature, pH, and substrate concentration as the parameters. It showed that the activity of uricase within biofilm was able to increase the oxidation current. GCEb and GCE yielded the oxidation current in the amount of 47.24 μA and 23.04 μA, respectively, under the same condition. Results indicated that the optimum condition for uric acid biosensor using biofilm were pH 10, temperature of 40 oC, and uric acid concentration of 5 mM. The stability of GCEb decreased after 10 hours used, with decreasing percentage over 86.33%. This low stability probably caused by the unprotected active site of the enzyme that the enzyme is easier to experience the denaturation.

  17. Biosensors for the Detection of Antibiotics in Poultry Industry—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawfal Adam Mungroo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Each of these techniques has its benefits as well as drawbacks. This review aims to evaluate different biosensing techniques and their working principles in order to accurately, quickly and practically detect antibiotics in chicken muscle and blood serum. The review is divided into three main sections, namely: a biosensors overview, a section on biosensor recognition and a section on biosensor transducing elements. The first segment provides a detailed overview on the different techniques available and their respective advantages and disadvantages. The second section consists of an evaluation of several analyte systems and their mechanisms. The last section of this review studies the working principles of biosensing transducing elements, focusing mainly on surface plasmon resonance (SPR technology and its applications in industries.

  18. Portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor for highly sensitive detection of Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Rong, Zhen; Long, Feng; Liu, Qiqi

    2014-11-01

    A portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor was developed to achieve the rapid and highly sensitive detection of Shigella. In this study, a DNA probe was covalently immobilized onto fiber-optic biosensors that can hybridize with a fluorescently labeled complementary DNA. The sensitivity of detection for synthesized oligonucleotides can reach 10-10 M. The surface of the sensor can be regenerated with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution (pH 1.9) for over 30 times without significant deterioration of performance. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the time for measurement and surface regeneration, was less than 6 min. We employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared the results of both methods to investigate the actual Shigella DNA detection capability of the fiber-optic biosensor. The fiber-optic biosensor could detect as low as 102 colony-forming unit/mL Shigella. This finding was comparable with that by real-time PCR, which suggests that this method is a potential alternative to existing detection methods.

  19. A hydrogel biosensor for high selective and sensitive detection of amyloid-beta oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Zhong, Yong; Gui, Jie; Wang, Xianwu; Zhuang, Xiaorong; Weng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and memory impairment. It is the most common neurological disease that causes dementia. Soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (AβO) in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are the pathogenic biomarker correlated with AD. A simple electrochemical biosensor using graphene oxide/gold nanoparticles (GNPs) hydrogel electrode was developed in this study. Thiolated cellular prion protein (PrP C ) peptide probe was immobilized on GNPs of the hydrogel electrode to construct an AβO biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized for AβO analysis. The specific binding between AβO and PrP C probes on the hydrogel electrode resulted in an increase in the electron-transfer resistance. The biosensor showed high specificity and sensitivity for AβO detection. It could selectively differentiate AβO from amyloid-beta (Aβ) monomers or fibrils. Meanwhile, it was highly sensitive to detect as low as 0.1 pM AβO in artificial CSF or blood plasma. The linear range for AβO detection is from 0.1 pM to 10 nM. This biosensor could be used as a cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of AD due to its high electrochemical performance and bionic structure.

  20. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, Christian; Fernández-Piñas, F

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differe......A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts...... for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability...... illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition...

  1. Towards a subcutaneous optical biosensor based on thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wing Yin; Sweetman, Martin J; Marzouk, Ezzat R; Fraser, Cara; Kuchel, Tim; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-01-01

    Advanced biosensors in future medicine hinge on the evolvement of biomaterials. Porous silicon (pSi), a generally biodegradable and biocompatible material that can be fabricated to include environment-responsive optical characteristics, is an excellent candidate for in vivo biosensors. However, the feasibility of using this material as a subcutaneously implanted optical biosensor has never been demonstrated. Here, we investigated the stability and biocompatibility of a thermally-hydrocarbonised (THC) pSi optical rugate filter, and demonstrated its optical functionality in vitro and in vivo. We first compared pSi films with different surface chemistries and observed that the material was cytotoxic despite the outstanding stability of the THC pSi films. We then showed that the cytotoxicity correlates with reactive oxygen species levels, which could be mitigated by pre-incubation of THC pSi (PITHC pSi). PITHC pSi facilitates normal cellular phenotypes and is biocompatible in vivo. Importantly, the material also possesses optical properties capable of responding to microenvironmental changes that are readable non-invasively in cell culture and subcutaneous settings. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that PITHC pSi rugate filters are both biocompatible and optically functional for lab-on-a-chip and subcutaneous biosensing scenarios. We believe that this study will deepen our understanding of cell-pSi interactions and foster the development of implantable biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stimuli-Responsive Nanodiamond-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Metastatic Tumor Site Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Mengjie; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Nurrul Lissa Binti; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Metastasis is often critical to cancer progression and linked to poor survival and drug resistance. Early detection of metastasis, as well as identification of metastatic tumor sites, can improve cancer patient survival. Thus, developing technology to improve the detection of cancer metastasis biomarkers can improve both diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we investigated the use of nanodiamonds to develop a stimuli-responsive metastasis detection complex that utilizes matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as a metastasis biomarker, as MMP9 increased expression has been shown to be indicative of metastasis. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor complex consists of nanodiamonds functionalized with MMP9-specific fluorescent-labeled substrate peptides. Using this design, protease activity of MMP9 can be accurately measured and correlated to MMP9 expression. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor also demonstrated an enhanced ability to protect the base sensor peptide from nonspecific serum protease cleavage. This enhanced peptide stability, combined with a quantitative stimuli-responsive output function, provides strong evidence for the further development of a nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor for metastasis site detection. More importantly, this work provides the foundation for use of nanodiamonds as a platform for stimuli-responsive biosensors and theranostic complexes that can be implemented across a wide range of biomedical applications.

  3. Magnetic Resonance-Based Treatment Planning for Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Creation of Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lili; Nguyen, Thai-Binh; Jones, Elan; Chen Zuoqun; Luo Wei; Wang Lu; Price, Robert A.; Pollack, Alan; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique to create magnetic resonance (MR)-based digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) for initial patient setup for routine clinical applications of MR-based treatment planning for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients' computed tomography (CT) and MR images were used for the study. Computed tomography and MR images were fused. The pelvic bony structures, including femoral heads, pubic rami, ischium, and ischial tuberosity, that are relevant for routine clinical patient setup were manually contoured on axial MR images. The contoured bony structures were then assigned a bulk density of 2.0 g/cm 3 . The MR-based DRRs were generated. The accuracy of the MR-based DDRs was quantitatively evaluated by comparing MR-based DRRs with CT-based DRRs for these patients. For each patient, eight measuring points on both coronal and sagittal DRRs were used for quantitative evaluation. Results: The maximum difference in the mean values of these measurement points was 1.3 ± 1.6 mm, and the maximum difference in absolute positions was within 3 mm for the 20 patients investigated. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance-based DRRs are comparable to CT-based DRRs for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and can be used for patient treatment setup when MR-based treatment planning is applied clinically

  4. A novel C-shaped, gold nanoparticle coated, embedded polymer waveguide for localized surface plasmon resonance based detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Amit; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2010-12-21

    In this study, a novel embedded optical waveguide based sensor which utilizes localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles coated on a C-shaped polymer waveguide is being reported. The sensor, as designed, can be used as an analysis chip for detection of minor variations in the refractive index of its microenvironment, which makes it suitable for wide scale use as an affinity biosensor. The C-shaped waveguide coupled with microfluidic channel was fabricated by single step patterning of SU8 on an oxidized silicon wafer. The absorbance due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of SU8 waveguide bound gold nano particle (GNP) was found to be linear with refractive index changes between 1.33 and 1.37. A GNP coated C-bent waveguide of 200 μ width with a bend radius of 1 mm gave rise to a sensitivity of ~5 ΔA/RIU at 530 nm as compared to the ~2.5 ΔA/RIU (refractive index units) of the same dimension bare C-bend SU8 waveguide. The resolution of the sensor probe was ~2 × 10(-4) RIU.

  5. Investigation of Optical Properties of Biomolecular Materials for Developing a Novel Fiber Optic Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Harry Hong

    1995-01-01

    Recently considerable efforts have been devoted to the development of optical biosensors for applications such as environmental monitoring and biomedical technology. The research described in this thesis focuses on the development of a novel fiber optic biosensor system for pesticide detection based on enzyme catalyzed chemiluminescence. To optimize the collection efficiency, the tapering effect of a fiber tip has been studied in different cases of light source distribution utilizing fluorescence technique. Our results indicate that a continuously tapered tip with the largest tapering angle is the most efficient configuration when the light source is in a "thick" layer ({> }1 μm) while a combination tapered tip is the best configuration when the light source is either in a thin layer ({offers the flexibility of controlling the number of enzymes on a fiber surface. Multilayer of alkaline phosphatase have been characterized using various techniques including chemiluminescence, ellipsometry and surface plasma resonance. The results indicated that at least 3 layers of enzyme can be assembled on a fiber surface. With this approach, it is possible to immobilize different kinds of enzyme on a fiber surface for biosensors based on a multi-enzyme system. Based on the studies of tapered tip and immobilization schemes, a novel fiber optic biosensor system for the detection of organophosphorous-based pesticide has been developed. The detection mechanism is pesticide inhibition of alkaline phosphatase catalyzed chemiluminescence. Paraoxon with concentration as low as 167 ppb has been detected. This is the first fiber optic chemiluminescence-based biosensor utilizing tapered tips with enzyme immobilized on the fiber surface and a cooled CCD array detector.

  6. Cytochrome c biosensor for determination of trace levels of cyanide and arsenic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuku, Xolile; Iftikar, Faiza; Hess, Euodia; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Baker, Priscilla

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cytochrome c biosensor for detection of KCN, As 2 O 3 and Fe 2 K (CN) was constructed. ► Detection limits in the range of 4.3–9.1 μM for the analytes were obtained using CV, SWV and EIS. ► The detection limits for the biosensor were significantly lower than current EPA and WHO guidelines. - Abstract: An electrochemical method based on a cytochrome c biosensor was developed, for the detection of selected arsenic and cyanide compounds. Boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode was used as a transducer, onto which cytochrome c was immobilised and used for direct determination of Prussian blue, potassium cyanide and arsenic trioxide. The sensitivity as calculated from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV), for each analyte in phosphate buffer (pH = 7) was found to be in the range of (1.1–4.5) × 10 −8 A μM −1 and the detection limits ranged from 4.3 to 9.1 μM. The biosensor is therefore able to measure significantly lower than current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines, for these types of analytes. The protein binding was monitored as a decrease in biosensor peak currents by SWV and as an increase in biosensor charge transfer resistance by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS provided evidence that the electrocatalytic advantage of BDD electrode was not lost upon immobilisation of cytochrome c. The interfacial kinetics of the biosensor was modelled as equivalent electrical circuit based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data. UV–vis spectroscopy was used to confirm the binding of the protein in solution by monitoring the intensity of the soret bands and the Q bands. FTIR was used to characterise the protein in the immobilised state and to confirm that the protein was not denatured upon binding to the pre-treated bare BDD electrode. SNFTIR of cyt c immobilised at platinum electrode, was used to study the effect of oxidation state on the surface bond

  7. Highly sensitive amperometric biosensor based on electrochemically-reduced graphene oxide-chitosan/hemoglobin nanocomposite for nitromethane determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yunping; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-05-15

    Nitromethane (CH3NO2) is an important organic chemical raw material with a wide variety of applications as well as one of the most common pollutants. Therefore it is pretty important to establish a simple and sensitive detection method for CH3NO2. In our study, a novel amperometric biosensor for nitromethane (CH3NO2) based on immobilization of electrochemically-reduced graphene oxide (rGO), chitosan (CS) and hemoglobin (Hb) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was constructed. Scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the Hb-CS/rGO-CS composite film. The effects of scan rate and pH of phosphate buffer on the biosensor have been studied in detail and optimized. Due to the graphene and chitosan nanocomposite, the developed biosensor demonstrating direct electrochemistry with faster electron-transfer rate (6.48s(-1)) and excellent catalytic activity towards CH3NO2. Under optimal conditions, the proposed biosensor exhibited fast amperometric response (<5s) to CH3NO2 with a wide linear range of 5 μM~1.46 mM (R=0.999) and a low detection limit of 1.5 μM (S/N=3). In addition, the biosensor had high selectivity, reproducibility and stability, providing the possibility for monitoring CH3NO2 in complex real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  9. In vitro evaluation of fluorescence glucose biosensor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Sapsford, Kim E

    2014-07-08

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  10. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated (paper)

  11. Biosensors engineered from conditionally stable ligand-binding domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Feng, Justin; Mandell, Daniel J.; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Jester, Benjamin Ward; Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2017-09-19

    Disclosed is a biosensor engineered to conditionally respond to the presence of specific small molecules, the biosensors including conditionally stable ligand-binding domains (LBDs) which respond to the presence of specific small molecules, wherein readout of binding is provided by reporter genes or transcription factors (TFs) fused to the LBDs.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  13. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    OpenAIRE

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-01-01

    Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. H...

  14. A biosensor device and a method of manufacturing the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2017-01-01

    A biosensor device (100) for detecting biological particles, the biosensor device (100) comprising a substrate (102), a regular pattern of pores (104) formed in the substrate (102), and a plurality of sensor active structures (106) each of which being arranged on a surface of a corresponding one of

  15. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  16. A biosensor device and a method of manufacturing the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A biosensor device (100) for detecting biological particles, the biosensor device (100) comprising a substrate (102), a regular pattern of pores (104) formed in the substrate (102), and a plurality of sensor active structures (106) each of which being arranged on a surface of a corresponding one of

  17. Insights into the HyPer biosensor as molecular tool for monitoring cellular antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Helen; Parra, Alejandra; Tobar, Nicolas; Molina, Jessica; Kallens, Violeta; Hidalgo, Miltha; Varela, Diego; Martínez, Jorge; Porras, Omar

    2018-06-01

    Aerobic metabolism brings inexorably the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are counterbalanced by intrinsic antioxidant defenses avoiding deleterious intracellular effects. Redox balance is the resultant of metabolic functioning under environmental inputs (i.e. diet, pollution) and the activity of intrinsic antioxidant machinery. Monitoring of intracellular hydrogen peroxide has been successfully achieved by redox biosensor advent; however, to track the intrinsic disulfide bond reduction capacity represents a fundamental piece to understand better how redox homeostasis is maintained in living cells. In the present work, we compared the informative value of steady-state measurements and the kinetics of HyPer, a H 2 O 2 -sensitive fluorescent biosensor, targeted at the cytosol, mitochondrion and endoplasmic reticulum. From this set of data, biosensor signal recovery from an oxidized state raised as a suitable parameter to discriminate reducing capacity of a close environment. Biosensor recovery was pH-independent, condition demonstrated by experiments on pH-clamped cells, and sensitive to pharmacological perturbations of enzymatic disulfide reduction. Also, ten human cell lines were characterized according their H 2 O 2 -pulse responses, including their capacity to reduce disulfide bonds evaluated in terms of their migratory capacity. Finally, cellular migration experiments were conducted to study whether migratory efficiency was associated with the disulfide reduction activity. The migration efficiency of each cell type correlates with the rate of signal recovery measured from the oxidized biosensor. In addition, HyPer-expressing cells treated with N-acetyl-cysteine had accelerated recovery rates and major migratory capacities, both reversible effects upon treatment removal. Our data demonstrate that the HyPer signal recovery offers a novel methodological tool to track the cellular impact of redox active biomolecules. Copyright © 2018 The Authors

  18. A DNA biosensor for molecular diagnosis of Aeromonas hydrophila using zinc sulfide nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Negahdary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, identification of pathogenic bacteria using modern and accurate methods is inevitable. Integration in electrochemical measurements with nanotechnology has led to the design of efficient and sensitive DNA biosensors against bacterial agents. Here, efforts were made to detect Aeromonas hydrophila using aptamers as probes and zinc sulfide (ZnS nanospheres as signal enhancers and electron transfer facilitators. After modification of the working electrode area (in a screen-printed electrode with ZnS nanospheres through electrodeposition, the coated surface of a modified electrode with ZnS nanospheres was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The size of synthesized ZnS nanospheres was estimated at about 20–50 nm and their shape was in the form of porous plates in microscopic observations. All electrochemical measurements were performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and constant potential amperometry (CPA techniques. The designed DNA biosensor was able to detect deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of Aeromonas hydrophila in the range 1.0  ×  10−4 to 1.0  ×  10−9 mol L−1; the limit of detection (LOD in this study was 1  ×  10−13 mol L−1. This DNA biosensor showed satisfactory thermal and pH stability. Reproducibility for this DNA biosensor was measured and the relative standard deviation (RSD of the performance of this DNA biosensor was calculated as 5 % during 42 days.

  19. A hydrogel biosensor for high selective and sensitive detection of amyloid-beta oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun LP

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liping Sun,1 Yong Zhong,1 Jie Gui,1 Xianwu Wang,1 Xiaorong Zhuang,2 Jian Weng1 1Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering of Xiamen, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, 2Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and memory impairment. It is the most common neurological disease that causes dementia. Soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (AβO in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are the pathogenic biomarker correlated with AD. Methods: A simple electrochemical biosensor using graphene oxide/gold nanoparticles (GNPs hydrogel electrode was developed in this study. Thiolated cellular prion protein (PrPC peptide probe was immobilized on GNPs of the hydrogel electrode to construct an AβO biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized for AβO analysis. Results: The specific binding between AβO and PrPC probes on the hydrogel electrode resulted in an increase in the electron-transfer resistance. The biosensor showed high specificity and sensitivity for AβO detection. It could selectively differentiate AβO from amyloid-beta (Aβ monomers or fibrils. Meanwhile, it was highly sensitive to detect as low as 0.1 pM AβO in artificial CSF or blood plasma. The linear range for AβO detection is from 0.1 pM to 10 nM. Conclusion: This biosensor could be used as a cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of AD due to its high electrochemical performance and bionic structure. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-beta oligomer, graphene, gold nanoparticles, biosensor

  20. A novel pungency biosensor prepared with fixing taste-bud tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lixin; Jiao, Lihua; Pang, Guangchang; Xie, Junbo

    2015-06-15

    A novel taste biosensor based on ligand-receptor interaction was developed through fixing taste-bud tissues of SD rats to a glassy carbon electrode. Using the sodium alginate-starch gel as a fixing agent, taste-bud tissues of SD rats were fixed between two nuclear microporous membranes to make a sandwich-type sensing membrane. With the taste biosensor, the response current induced by capsaicin and gingerol stimulating the corresponding receptors was measured. The results showed that the lowest limit of detection of this biosensor to capsaicin was 1×10(-13) mol/L and the change rate of response current was the highest at the concentration of 9×10(-13) mol/L, indicating that the capsaicin receptor was saturated at this point. The lowest limit of detection of this biosensor to gingerol was 1×10(-12) mol/L, and the gingerol receptor was saturated when the concentration of gingerol was 3×10(-11) mol/L. It was demonstrated that the interaction curves of capsaicin and gingerol with their respective receptors exhibited high correlation (R(2): 0.9841 and 0.9904). The binding constant and dissociation constant of gingerol with its receptor were 1.564×10(-11) and 1.815×10(-11) respectively, which were all higher than those of capsaicin with its receptor (1.249×10(-12) and 2.078×10(-12)). This study, for the first time, made it possible to quantitatively determine the interaction of the taste receptor and pungent substances with a new biosensor, thus providing a simple approach for monitoring pungent substances and investigating the mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel amperometric biosensor based on banana peel (Musa cavendish) tissue homogenate for determination of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Hakki Mevlut; Sagiroglu, Ayten

    2010-08-01

    In this study the biosensor was constructed by immobilizing tissue homogenate of banana peel onto a glassy carbon electrode surface. Effects of immobilization materials amounts, effects of pH, buffer concentration and temperature on biosensor response were studied. In addition, the detection ranges of 13 phenolic compounds were obtained with the help of the calibration graphs. Storage stability, repeatability of the biosensor, inhibitory effect and sample applications were also investigated. A typical calibration curve for the sensor revealed a linear range of 10-80 microM catechol. In reproducibility studies, variation coefficient and standard deviation were calculated as 2.69%, 1.44 x 10(-3) microM, respectively.

  2. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  3. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Xu, Jin; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Bin

    2017-10-17

    Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  4. DNA Nanotechnology-Enabled Interfacial Engineering for Biosensor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dekai; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai

    2018-06-12

    Biosensors represent biomimetic analytical tools for addressing increasing needs in medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, security, and biodefense. Nevertheless, widespread real-world applications of biosensors remain challenging due to limitations of performance, including sensitivity, specificity, speed, and reproducibility. In this review, we present a DNA nanotechnology-enabled interfacial engineering approach for improving the performance of biosensors. We first introduce the main challenges of the biosensing interfaces, especially under the context of controlling the DNA interfacial assembly. We then summarize recent progress in DNA nanotechnology and efforts to harness DNA nanostructures to engineer various biological interfaces, with a particular focus on the use of framework nucleic acids. We also discuss the implementation of biosensors to detect physiologically relevant nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules, ions, and other biomarkers. This review highlights promising applications of DNA nanotechnology in interfacial engineering for biosensors and related areas.

  5. Emerging synergy between nanotechnology and implantable biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Tomazos, Ioannis; Burgess, Diane J; Jain, Faquir C; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2010-03-15

    The development of implantable biosensors for continuous monitoring of metabolites is an area of sustained scientific and technological interests. On the other hand, nanotechnology, a discipline which deals with the properties of materials at the nanoscale, is developing as a potent tool to enhance the performance of these biosensors. This article reviews the current state of implantable biosensors, highlighting the synergy between nanotechnology and sensor performance. Emphasis is placed on the electrochemical method of detection in light of its widespread usage and substantial nanotechnology based improvements in various aspects of electrochemical biosensor performance. Finally, issues regarding toxicity and biocompatibility of nanomaterials, along with future prospects for the application of nanotechnology in implantable biosensors, are discussed. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong [Knoxville, TN; Wang, Xiaoling [San Jose, CA

    2012-04-17

    A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins comprises the steps of providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  7. Review of Micro/Nanotechnologies for Microbial Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won eLim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A microbial biosensor is an analytical device with a biologically integrated transducer that generates a measurable signal indicating the analyte concentration. This method is ideally suited for the analysis of extracellular chemicals and the environment, and for metabolic sensory-regulation. Although microbial biosensors show promise for application in various detection fields, some limitations still remain such as poor selectivity, low sensitivity, and impractical portability. To overcome such limitations, microbial biosensors have been integrated with many recently developed micro/nanotechnologies and applied to a wide range of detection purposes. This review article discusses micro/nanotechnologies that have been integrated with microbial biosensors and summarizes recent advances and the applications achieved through such novel integration. Future perspectives on the combination of micro/nanotechnologies and microbial biosensors will be discussed, and the necessary developments and improvements will be strategically deliberated.

  8. Towards a Uniform Metrological Assessment of Grating-Based Optical Fiber Sensors: From Refractometers to Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Gouveia, Carlos A J; Jorge, Pedro A S; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-06-21

    A metrological assessment of grating-based optical fiber sensors is proposed with the aim of providing an objective evaluation of the performance of this sensor category. Attention was focused on the most common parameters, used to describe the performance of both optical refractometers and biosensors, which encompassed sensitivity, with a distinction between volume or bulk sensitivity and surface sensitivity, resolution, response time, limit of detection, specificity (or selectivity), reusability (or regenerability) and some other parameters of generic interest, such as measurement uncertainty, accuracy, precision, stability, drift, repeatability and reproducibility. Clearly, the concepts discussed here can also be applied to any resonance-based sensor, thus providing the basis for an easier and direct performance comparison of a great number of sensors published in the literature up to now. In addition, common mistakes present in the literature made for the evaluation of sensor performance are highlighted, and lastly a uniform performance assessment is discussed and provided. Finally, some design strategies will be proposed to develop a grating-based optical fiber sensing scheme with improved performance.

  9. On-Line Monitoring the Growth of E. coli or HeLa Cells Using an Annular Microelectrode Piezoelectric Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Tong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological information is obtained from the interaction between the series detection electrode and the organism or the physical field of biological cultures in the non-mass responsive piezoelectric biosensor. Therefore, electric parameter of the electrode will affect the biosensor signal. The electric field distribution of the microelectrode used in this study was simulated using the COMSOL Multiphysics analytical tool. This process showed that the electric field spatial distribution is affected by the width of the electrode finger or the space between the electrodes. In addition, the characteristic response of the piezoelectric sensor constructed serially with an annular microelectrode was tested and applied for the continuous detection of Escherichia coli culture or HeLa cell culture. Results indicated that the piezoelectric biosensor with an annular microelectrode meets the requirements for the real-time detection of E. coli or HeLa cells in culture. Moreover, this kind of piezoelectric biosensor is more sensitive than the sensor with an interdigital microelectrode. Thus, the piezoelectric biosensor acts as an effective analysis tool for acquiring online cell or microbial culture information.

  10. Preparation and electrochemical application of rutin biosensor for differential pulse voltammetric determination of NADH in the presence of acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAMID R. ZARE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic behavior of reduced nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide (NADH was studied at the surface of a rutin biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. According to the results, the rutin biosensor had a strongly electrocatalytic effect on the oxidation of NADH with the overpotential being decreased by about 450 mV as compared to the process at a bare glassy carbon electrode, GCE. This value is significantly greater than the value of 220 mV that was reported for rutin embedded in a lipid-cast film. The kinetic parameters of the electron transfer coefficient, a, and the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant, kh, for the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH at the rutin biosensor were estimated. Furthermore, the linear dynamic range; sensitivity and limit of detection for NADH were evaluated using the differential pulse voltammetry method. The advantages of this biosensor for the determination of NADH are excellent catalytic activity and reproducibility, good detection limit and high exchange current density. The rutin biosensor could separate the oxidation peak potentials of NADH and acetaminophen present in the same solution while at a bare GCE, the peak potentials were indistinguishable.

  11. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A; Ramirez Silva, M T; Palomar Pardave, M E

    2010-01-01

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10 -6 M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  12. Application of a luminescence-based biosensor for assessing naphthalene biodegradation in soils from a manufactured gas plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paton, G.I.; Reid, B.J.; Semple, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Despite numerous reviews suggesting that microbial biosensors could be used in many environmental applications, in reality they have failed to be used for which they were designed. In part this is because most of these sensors perform in an aqueous phase and a buffered medium, which is in contrast to the nature of genuine environmental systems. In this study, a range of non-exhaustive extraction techniques (NEETs) were assessed for (i) compatibility with a naphthalene responsive biosensor and (ii) correlation with naphthalene biodegradation. The NEETs removed a portion of the total soil naphthalene in the order of methanol > HPCD > βCD > water. To place the biosensor performance to NEETs in context, a biodegradation experiment was carried out using historically contaminated soils. By coupling the HPCD extraction with the biosensor, it was possible to assess the fraction of the naphthalene capable of undergoing microbial degradation in soil. - Exposure of microbial biosensors to cyclodextrin solutions allows the assessment of the degradable fraction of contaminants in soil.

  13. Stable and sensitive flow-through monitoring of phenol using a carbon nanotube based screen printed biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, G; Guix, M; Ambrosi, A; Merkoci, A [Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Ramirez Silva, M T [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico); Palomar Pardave, M E, E-mail: arben.merkoci.icn@uab.es [Departamento de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Azcapotzalco, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2010-06-18

    A stable and sensitive biosensor for phenol detection based on a screen printed electrode modified with tyrosinase, multiwall carbon nanotubes and glutaraldehyde is designed and applied in a flow injection analytical system. The proposed carbon nanotube matrix is easy to prepare and ensures a very good entrapment environment for the enzyme, being simpler and cheaper than other reported strategies. In addition, the proposed matrix allows for a very fast operation of the enzyme, that leads to a response time of 15 s. Several parameters such as the working potential, pH of the measuring solution, biosensor response time, detection limit, linear range of response and sensitivity are studied. The obtained detection limit for phenol was 0.14 x 10{sup -6} M. The biosensor keeps its activity during continuous FIA measurements at room temperature, showing a stable response (RSD 5%) within a two week working period at room temperature. The developed biosensor is being applied for phenol detection in seawater samples and seems to be a promising alternative for automatic control of seawater contamination. The developed detection system can be extended to other enzyme biosensors with interest for several other applications.

  14. On-Line Monitoring the Growth of E. coli or HeLa Cells Using an Annular Microelectrode Piezoelectric Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Feifei; Lian, Yan; Han, Junliang

    2016-12-18

    Biological information is obtained from the interaction between the series detection electrode and the organism or the physical field of biological cultures in the non-mass responsive piezoelectric biosensor. Therefore, electric parameter of the electrode will affect the biosensor signal. The electric field distribution of the microelectrode used in this study was simulated using the COMSOL Multiphysics analytical tool. This process showed that the electric field spatial distribution is affected by the width of the electrode finger or the space between the electrodes. In addition, the characteristic response of the piezoelectric sensor constructed serially with an annular microelectrode was tested and applied for the continuous detection of Escherichia coli culture or HeLa cell culture. Results indicated that the piezoelectric biosensor with an annular microelectrode meets the requirements for the real-time detection of E. coli or HeLa cells in culture. Moreover, this kind of piezoelectric biosensor is more sensitive than the sensor with an interdigital microelectrode. Thus, the piezoelectric biosensor acts as an effective analysis tool for acquiring online cell or microbial culture information.

  15. Construction and application of a zinc-specific biosensor for assessing the immobilization and bioavailability of zinc in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pulin; Huang Qiaoyun; Chen Wenli

    2012-01-01

    The inducibility and specificity of different czcRS operons in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied by lacZ gene fusions. The data of β-glycosidase activity confirmed that the czcR3 promoter responded quantitatively to zinc. A zinc-specific biosensor, P. putida X4 (pczcR3GFP), was constructed by fusing a promoterless enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) gene with the czcR3 promoter in the chromosome of P. putida X4. In water extracts of four different soils amended with zinc, the reporter strain detected about 90% of the zinc content of the samples. Both the bioavailability assessment and the sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the immobilization of zinc was highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of soils. The results also showed that the lability of zinc decreased over time. It is concluded that the biosensor constitutes an alternative system for the convenient evaluation of zinc toxicity in the environment. - Highlights: ► A zinc-specific bacterial biosensor was developed. ► Four spiked soils were used to test the application of this biosensor. ► The bioavailable zinc in soil-water extracts decreased due to aging. ► The immobilization and speciation of zinc were highly dependent on the soil type. - The immobilization and bioavailability of zinc in soil were investigated as a function of soil type and aging by a newly constructed zinc-specific biosensor coupled with chemical analysis.

  16. A scheme to expand the delay-bandwidth product in the resonator-based delay lines by optical OFDM technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangbo; Tao, Li; Zhang, Ziran

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme to expand the inherent limit in the product of the optical delay and the transmission bandwidth in resonator-based delay lines, with the optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) technique. The optical group delay properties of a single ring resonator we...

  17. Novel ring resonator-based integrated photonic beamformer for broadband phased array receive antennas - part 2: experimental prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Meijerink, Arjan; Burla, M.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Leinse, Arne; Hoekman, M.; Heideman, Rene; van Etten, Wim

    2010-01-01

    An experimental prototype is presented that illustrates the implementation aspects and feasibility of the novel ring resonator-based optical beamformer concept that has been developed and analyzed in Part I of this paper . This concept can be used for seamless control of the reception angle in

  18. Novel ring resonator-based integrated photonic beamformer for broadband phased array receive antennas - part 1: design and performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Arjan; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Meijerink, Roland; Zhuang, L.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Burla, M.; Verpoorte, Jaco; Jorna, Pieter; Huizinga, Adriaan; van Etten, Wim

    2010-01-01

    A novel optical beamformer concept is introduced that can be used for seamless control of the reception angle in broadband wireless receivers employing a large phased array antenna (PAA). The core of this beamformer is an optical beamforming network (OBFN), using ring resonator-based broadband

  19. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Haasnoot, Willem; Norde, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  20. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging surface Plasmon Resonance-Based immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Haasnoot, W.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  1. Recent progress in 'bioelectronics' research. Part 4. ; Recent trends in biosensor research and development. Baioerekutoronikusu eno michi (shorai wa saibogu mo). 4. ; Baiosensa gijutsu saizensen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karube, I. (The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology)

    1994-02-20

    Biosensors are structured basing on a variety of principles. The latest trend of the research and development of biosensors is introduced to explain how the five senses such as taste sense and olfactory sense are detected. A biosensor is structured by combining biological element with a transducer which converts the result measured by the said element into electrical signal. Enzyme is most widely used at present. The enzyme recognizes a chemical substance very closely, and has a feature of promoting its reaction only. Chemical substances, therefore, can be distinguished if this enzyme is used. The principle of the biosensor is explained quoting the enzyme sensor as an example. Immune reaction and microbe reaction can be monitored by the similar principle to the above-mentioned principle. Sensors for measuring substances which are the bases of taste have been developed. Studies on smell sensors are also actively carried on, and the quartz oscillator is used mainly. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of microparticles based on poly-methacrylic acid with glucose oxidase for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás Pérez, J P; López-Ruiz, B; López-Cabarcos, E

    2016-01-01

    In the line of the applicability of biocompatible monomers pH and temperature dependent, we assayed poly-methacrylic acid (p-MAA) microparticles as immobilization system in the design of enzymatic biosensors. Glucose oxidase was used as enzyme model for the study of microparticles as immobilization matrices and as biological material in the performance of glucose biosensors. The enzyme immobilization method was optimized by investigating the influence of monomer concentration and cross-linker content (N',N'-methylenebisacrylamide), used in the preparation of the microparticles in the response of the biosensors. The kinetics of the polymerization and the effects of the temperature were studied, also the conversion of the polymerization was determinates by a weight method. The structure of the obtained p-MAA microparticles were studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning microscopy (DSC). The particle size measurements were performed with a Galai-Cis 1 particle analyzer system. Furthermore, the influence of the swelling behavior of hydrogel matrix as a function of pH and temperature were studied. Analytical properties such as sensitivity, linear range, response time and detection limit were studied for the glucose biosensors. The sensitivity for glucose detection obtained with poly-methacrylic acid (p-MAA) microparticles was 11.98mAM(-1)cm(-2) and 10μM of detection limit. A Nafion® layer was used to eliminate common interferents of the human serum such as uric and ascorbic acids. The biosensors were used to determine glucose in human serum samples with satisfactory results. When stored in a frozen phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) at -4°C, the useful lifetime of all biosensors was at least 550 days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimal Design of a Resonance-Based Voltage Boosting Rectifier for Wireless Power Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jaemyung; Lee, Byunghun; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the design procedure for a new multi-cycle resonance-based voltage boosting rectifier (MCRR) capable of delivering a desired amount of power to the load (PDL) at a designated high voltage (HV) through a loosely-coupled inductive link. This is achieved by shorting the receiver (Rx) LC-tank for several cycles to harvest and accumulate the wireless energy in the RX inductor before boosting the voltage by breaking the loop and transferring the energy to the load in a quarter cycle. By optimizing the geometries of the transmitter (Tx) and Rx coils and the number of cycles, N , for energy harvesting, through an iterative design procedure, the MCRR can achieve the highest PDL under a given set of design constraints. Governing equations in the MCRR operation are derived to identify key specifications and the design guidelines. Using an exemplary set of specs, the optimized MCRR was able to generate 20.9 V DC across a 100 kΩ load from a 1.8 V p , 6.78 MHz sinusoid input in the ISM-band at a Tx/Rx coil separation of 1.3 cm, power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 2.2%, and N = 9 cycles. At the same coil distance and loading, coils optimized for a conventional half-wave rectifier (CHWR) were able to reach only 13.6 V DC from the same source.

  4. Characterization of micro-resonator based on enhanced metal insulator semiconductor capacitor for glucose recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Rajendra; Kim, E S; Jo, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Young

    2017-03-01

    We present a concept for the characterization of micro-fabricated based resonator incorporating air-bridge metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor to continuously monitor an individual's state of glucose levels based on frequency variation. The investigation revealed that, the micro-resonator based on MIS capacitor holds considerable promise for implementation and recognition as a glucose sensor for human serum. The discrepancy in complex permittivity as a result of enhanced capacitor was achieved for the detection and determination of random glucose concentration levels using a unique variation of capacitor that indeed results in an adequate variation of the resonance frequency. Moreover, the design and development of micro-resonator with enhanced MIS capacitor generate a resolution of 112.38 × 10 -3 pF/mg/dl, minimum detectable glucose level of 7.45mg/dl, and a limit of quantification of 22.58mg/dl. Additionally, this unique approach offers long-term reliability for mediator-free glucose sensing with a relative standard deviation of less than 0.5%. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Biochemical component identification by plasmonic improved whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins, microelements, antibiotic of different generation etc. in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration analyzed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor are represented. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using developed fluidic sensor cell with fixed in adhesive layer dielectric microspheres and data processing. Biochemical component identification has been performed by developed network analysis techniques. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis. Novel technique based on optical resonance on microring structures, plasmon resonance and identification tools has been developed. To improve a sensitivity of microring structures microspheres fixed by adhesive had been treated previously by gold nanoparticle solution. Another technique used thin film gold layers deposited on the substrate below adhesive. Both biomolecule and nanoparticle injections caused considerable changes of optical resonance spectra. Plasmonic gold layers under optimized thickness also improve parameters of optical resonance spectra. Biochemical component identification has been also performed by developed network analysis techniques both for single and for multi component solution. So advantages of plasmon enhancing optical microcavity resonance with multiparameter identification tools is used for development of a new platform for ultra sensitive label-free biomedical sensor.

  6. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  7. Biosensors and invasive monitoring in clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Córcoles, Emma P

    2013-01-01

    This volume examines the advances of invasive monitoring by means of biosensors and microdialysis. Physical and physiological parameters are commonly monitored in clinical settings using invasive techniques due to their positive outcome in patients’ diagnosis and treatment. Biochemical parameters, however, still rely on off-line measurements and require large pieces of equipment. Biosensing and sampling devices present excellent capabilities for their use in continuous monitoring of patients’ biochemical parameters. However, certain issues remain to be solved in order to ensure a more widespread use of these techniques in today’s medical practices.

  8. More About Thin-Membrane Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, George D.; Worley, Jennings F., III

    1994-01-01

    Report presents additional information about device described in "Thin-Membrane Sensor With Biochemical Switch" (MFS-26121). Device is modular sensor that puts out electrical signal indicative of chemical or biological agent. Signal produced as membrane-crossing ion current triggered by chemical reaction between agent and recognition protein conjugated to channel blocker. Prototype of biosensor useful in numerous laboratory, industrial, or field applications; such as to detect bacterial toxins in food, to screen for disease-producing micro-organisms, or to warn of toxins or pollutants in air.

  9. Optical Biosensors to Explore Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Andersen, Nils H. Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    their capability to work in biosensor devices. For example, Raman spectroscopy can be non-invasive and can provide 1 μm of spatial resolution in 1 second of collection time, well suited for sensing. Moreover, it may give information at the single cell and even approaching the single molecule scale. Here we present...... protein may be used as an efficient sensor in an organic environment via a biomimetic membrane model. The combination of both biomimetic membranes and protein membranes as a signal transduction medium has interesting applications in biology and medicine. It is crucial that the matrix where a protein...

  10. Determination of ethanol in acetic acid-containing samples by a biosensor based on immobilized Gluconobacter cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA A. KRATASYUK

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reshetilov AN, Kitova AE, Arkhipova AV, Kratasyuk VA, Rai MK. 2012. Determination of ethanol in acetic acid containing samples by a biosensor based on immobilized Gluconobacter cells. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 97-100. A biosensor based on Gluconobacter oxydans VKM B-1280 bacteria was used for detection of ethanol in the presence of acetic acid. It was assumed that this assay could be useful for controlling acetic acid production from ethanol and determining the final stage of the fermentation process. Measurements were made using a Clark electrode-based amperometric biosensor. The effect of pH of the medium on the sensor signal and the analytical parameters of the sensor (detection range, sensitivity were investigated. The residual content of ethanol in acetic acid samples was analyzed. The results of the study are important for monitoring the acetic acid production process, as they represent a method of tracking its stages

  11. Real-time detection of TDP1 activity using a fluorophore-quencher coupled DNA-biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Wrensted; Falconi, Mattia; Kristoffersen, Emil Laust

    2013-01-01

    structure of the biosensor. The specific action of TDP1 removes the quencher, thereby enabling optical detection of the fluorophore. Since the enzymatic action of TDP1 is the only “signal amplification” the increase in fluorescence may easily be followed in real-time and allows quantitative analyses of TDP1......Real-time detection of enzyme activities may present the easiest and most reliable way of obtaining quantitative analyses in biological samples. We present a new DNA-biosensor capable of detecting the activity of the potential anticancer drug target tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in a very...... simple, high throughput, and real-time format. The biosensor is specific for Tdp1 even in complex biological samples, such as human cell extracts, and may consequently find future use in fundamental studies as well as a cancer predictive tool allowing fast analyses of diagnostic cell samples...

  12. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hien Vu, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Quyen Dong, Van; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin-streptavidin-biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of poly aniline for electrochemical biosensor construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Gleice S.L.; Southgate, Erica F.; Alhadeff, Eliana M.; Guimaraes, Maria Jose O.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conductors polymers have many attractive interests to the industry due their highly technological applications. This work treats specially of polyaniline because it's large electrical conductivity, electrochemical properties, associate to the chemical stability in environmental conditions and synthesis facility. The main of this work is the application in a construction of an electrochemical biosensor for ethanol detection and quantification. Different conditions of synthesis of the conductor emeraldine polyaniline form were studied, investigated the influence of the dopant agent and the reactional environment conditions temperature on the reaction yield and conductivities. The polyaniline that showed the best conductivity were characterized by differential and thermal gravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, and cycle voltammetry, comparing with the commercial polyaniline. (author)

  14. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A., E-mail: osadik@binghamton.ed [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2010-05-30

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  15. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina: A Versatile Platform for Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA has become one of the most promising nanomaterials in optical biosensing as a result of its unique physical and chemical properties. Many studies have demonstrated the outstanding capabilities of NAA for developing optical biosensors in combination with different optical techniques. These results reveal that NAA is a promising alternative to other widely explored nanoporous platforms, such as porous silicon. This review is aimed at reporting on the recent advances and current stage of development of NAA-based optical biosensing devices. The different optical detection techniques, principles and concepts are described in detail along with relevant examples of optical biosensing devices using NAA sensing platforms. Furthermore, we summarise the performance of these devices and provide a future perspective on this promising research field.

  16. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin

    2010-01-01

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  17. Detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in vitro using a hippocampal neuronal network-based biosensor with extracellular potential analysis of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Qin; Qin, Zhen; Su, Kaiqi; Huang, Liquan; Hu, Ning; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-15

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter in regulating emotions and related behaviors in mammals. To detect and monitor the 5-HT, effective and convenient methods are demanded in investigation of neuronal network. In this study, hippocampal neuronal networks (HNNs) endogenously expressing 5-HT receptors were employed as sensing elements to build an in vitro neuronal network-based biosensor. The electrophysiological characteristics were analyzed in both neuron and network levels. The firing rates and amplitudes were derived from signal to determine the biosensor response characteristics. The experimental results demonstrate a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of 5-HT on hippocampal neuron activities, indicating the effectiveness of this hybrid biosensor in detecting 5-HT with a response range from 0.01μmol/L to 10μmol/L. In addition, the cross-correlation analysis of HNNs activities suggests 5-HT could weaken HNN connectivity reversibly, providing more specificity of this biosensor in detecting 5-HT. Moreover, 5-HT induced spatiotemporal firing pattern alterations could be monitored in neuron and network levels simultaneously by this hybrid biosensor in a convenient and direct way. With those merits, this neuronal network-based biosensor will be promising to be a valuable and utility platform for the study of neurotransmitter in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultra-sensitive "turn-on" detection method for Hg(2+) based on mispairing biosensor and emulsion PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengyu; Tian, Wenying; Cheng, Nan; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Sensor-based detection methods have inspired the idea that chemical or physical signals could be converted to nucleic acid signals to be quantitatively detected using a combination of appropriate detection tools. To achieve ultra-sensitive and absolute quantitative detection of mercury ion (Hg(2+)), we have combined a mispairing biosensor for Hg(2+) and emulsion PCR. The parameters that might influence the biosensor step, such as the duration of isothermal amplification and the concentration of the sensor oligonucleotide, have been firstly optimized in our study to achieve the most efficient biosensor detection. The evaluation results of secondary structures between the biosensors with different number of T-Hg-T structures achieved by Circular Dichroism have indicated that the secondary hairpin structure would be varied according to the change of number of T-Hg-T structures, which could influence the quantitative detection results. Further optimization of number of T-Hg-T within the biosensor sequences showed that 5 T-Hg-T structures could generate the most efficient amplification. After the above optimizations, the emulsion PCR has been employed to achieve the absolute quantitation of nucleic acid signals. The final results have shown that the limit of quantitation (LOQ) in our study was as low as 40fmol, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 10fmol. The practical detection tests showed that the quantitative results were stable and accurate for all substrates. In conclusion, by combining a mispairing biosensor with emulsion PCR, we developed a flexible and stable quantitative "turn-on" detection method with ultra-sensitivity that can detect trace amounts Hg(2+) within different substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cholesterol biosensor based on a plastic optical fibre with sol-gel: structural analysis and sensing properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo-Medina, D. A.; Trejo-Durán, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we report the design and characterization of an optical fibre cholesterol biosensor by using sol-gel immobilization technique. The cholesterol enzyme is encapsulated inside of the sol-gel film onto an end of a plastic optical fibre. Two film deposition methods (Dip-Coating and Immersion) were studied. The morphology analysis and sensing properties permit us to determine the best film deposition to sense cholesterol concentration. The range of measured is 4.4-5.2 mM in real time and our results were validated by comparing them with other previously published results. The biosensor is portable, simple cheap, and easy to use.

  20. Use of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Biosensor Response to the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Kee-Shyuan; Lee, Yook Heng; Musa, Ahmad; Salmah, Abdul Aziz; Zamri, Ishak

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of 5.48 ±1.37 nm. An electrochemical biosensor based on immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles was studied. The amperometric biosensor was based on the reaction of ALP with the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P). The incorporation of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles together wit...

  1. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prachi, E-mail: prachi.singh@st.niituniversity.in; Rathore, Deepshikha, E-mail: deep.nano@gmail.com [NIIT University, Neemrana, NH-8, Alwar, Rajasthan, India, 301705 (India)

    2016-05-06

    NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  2. Innovations in biomedical nanoengineering: nanowell array biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, YoungTae; Jeong, Sunil; Lee, JuKyung; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, HeaYeon

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured biosensors have pioneered biomedical engineering by providing highly sensitive analyses of biomolecules. The nanowell array (NWA)-based biosensing platform is particularly innovative, where the small size of NWs within the array permits extremely profound sensing of a small quantity of biomolecules. Undoubtedly, the NWA geometry of a gently-sloped vertical wall is critical for selective docking of specific proteins without capillary resistances, and nanoprocessing has contributed to the fabrication of NWA electrodes on gold substrate such as molding process, e-beam lithography, and krypton-fluoride (KrF) stepper semiconductor method. The Lee group at the Mara Nanotech has established this NW-based biosensing technology during the past two decades by engineering highly sensitive electrochemical sensors and providing a broad range of detection methods from large molecules (e.g., cells or proteins) to small molecules (e.g., DNA and RNA). Nanosized gold dots in the NWA enhance the detection of electrochemical biosensing to the range of zeptomoles in precision against the complementary target DNA molecules. In this review, we discuss recent innovations in biomedical nanoengineering with a specific focus on novel NWA-based biosensors. We also describe our continuous efforts in achieving a label-free detection without non-specific binding while maintaining the activity and stability of immobilized biomolecules. This research can lay the foundation of a new platform for biomedical nanoengineering systems.

  3. Interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavering, Thomas A.; Meller, Scott A.; Evans, Mishell K.; Pennington, Charles; Jones, Mark E.; VanTassell, Roger; Murphy, Kent A.; Velander, William H.; Valdes, E.

    2000-12-01

    With the proliferation of biological weapons, the outbreak of food poisoning occurrences, and the spread of antibiotic resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria, the demand has arisen for portable systems capable of rapid, specific, and quantitative target detection. The ability to detect minute quantities of targets will provide the means to quickly assess a health hazardous situation so that the appropriate response can be orchestrated. Conventional test results generally require hours or even several days to be reported, and there is no change for real-time feedback. An interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor has successfully demonstrated real time detection of target molecules. The microcantilever biosensor effectively combines advanced technology from silicon micromachining, optical fiber sensor, and biochemistry to create a novel detection device. This approach utilizes affinity coatings on micromachiend cantilever beams to attract target molecules. The presence of the target molecule causes bending in the cantilever beam, which is monitored using an optical displacement system. Dose-response trials have shown measured responses at nanogram/ml concentrations of target molecules. Sensitivity is expected to extend from the nanogram to the picogram range of total captured mass as the microcantilever sensors are optimized.

  4. Diabetes mellitus: biosensors for research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A P; Pickup, J C

    1985-01-01

    The condition of diabetes mellitus is described with particular reference to the parameters that it would be desirable to monitor in order to improve management and understanding of the disease. Previous attention has largely focused on analysis of glucose, but many other intermediates of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism are deranged in diabetes and may be alternative measures of control. The need for laboratory analysers, self-monitoring, closed-loop devices and alarms are detailed and the problems associated with implantable sensors discussed. Progress in the development of biosensors is reviewed using glucose sensors as the main example. Electrochemical, optoelectronic and calorimetric approaches to sensing are considered and it is concluded that configurations based either on hydrogen peroxide detection or on mediated electron transfer are most likely to provide a raid route to in vivo monitoring. The extension of biosensor technology to tackle other important substrates is discussed, the principal hurdle to success being seen as the lack of long-term stability of the biological component.

  5. Recent Advances in Magnetic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Giouroudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of portable biosening devices for the detection of biological entities such as biomolecules, pathogens, and cells has become extremely significant over the past years. Scientific research, driven by the promise for miniaturization and integration of complex laboratory equipment on inexpensive, reliable, and accurate devices, has successfully shifted several analytical and diagnostic methods to the submillimeter scale. The miniaturization process was made possible with the birth of microfluidics, a technology that could confine, manipulate, and mix very small volumes of liquids on devices integrated on standard silicon technology chips. Such devices are then directly translating the presence of these entities into an electronic signal that can be read out with a portable instrumentation. For the aforementioned tasks, the use of magnetic markers (magnetic particles—MPs—functionalized with ligands in combination with the application of magnetic fields is being strongly investigated by research groups worldwide. The greatest merits of using magnetic fields are that they can be applied either externally or from integrated microconductors and they can be well-tuned by adjusting the applied current on the microconductors. Moreover, the magnetic markers can be manipulated inside microfluidic channels by high gradient magnetic fields that can in turn be detected by magnetic sensors. All the above make this technology an ideal candidate for the development of such microfluidic biosensors. In this review, focus is given only to very recent advances in biosensors that use microfluidics in combination with magnetic sensors and magnetic markers/nanoparticles.

  6. Development of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Agmatine Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gilbertsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is an important intermediary in polyamine production for many prokaryotes, but serves higher functions in eukaryotes such as nitric oxide inhibition and roles in neurotransmission. Pseudomonas aeruginosa relies on the arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase pathways to convert arginine into putrescine. One of the two known agmatine deiminase operons, aguBA, contains an agmatine sensitive TetR promoter controlled by AguR. We have discovered that this promoter element can produce a titratable induction of its gene products in response to agmatine, and utilized this discovery to make a luminescent agmatine biosensor in P. aeruginosa. The genome of the P. aeruginosa lab strain UCBPP-PA14 was altered to remove both its ability to synthesize or destroy agmatine, and insertion of the luminescent reporter construct allows it to produce light in proportion to the amount of exogenous agmatine applied from ~100 nM to 1mM. Furthermore it does not respond to related compounds including arginine or putrescine. To demonstrate potential applications the biosensor was used to detect agmatine in spent supernatants, to monitor the development of arginine decarboxylase over time, and to detect agmatine in the spinal cords of live mice.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing palladium supported zinc oxide multilayers and their nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-02-10

    We analyze surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor for sensing of small concentrations of hydrogen gas in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. One of the two probes considered has multilayers of zinc oxide (ZnO) and palladium (Pd) while the other has layer of their composite over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber. The analysis is carried out for different volume fractions of palladium nanoparticles dispersed in zinc oxide host material in the nanocomposite layer. For the analysis, a Maxwell-Garnett model is adopted for calculating the dielectric function of a ZnO:Pd nanocomposite having nanoparticles of dimensions smaller than the wavelength of radiation used. The effects of the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the nanocomposite and the thickness of the nanocomposite layer on the figure of merit of the sensor have been studied. The film thickness of the layer and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the ZnO:Pd nanocomposite layer have been optimized to achieve the maximum value of the figure of merit of the sensor. It has been found that the figure of merit of the sensing probe coated with ZnO:Pd nanocomposite is more than twofold of the sensing probe coated with multilayers of Pd and ZnO over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber; hence, the sensor with a nanocomposite layer works better than that with multilayers of zinc oxide and palladium. The sensor can be used for online monitoring and remote sensing of hydrogen gas.

  8. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-01

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR 0 161, DR 0 589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection

  9. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-15

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR{sub 0}161, DR{sub 0}589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection.

  10. A proof of concept of a BioMEMS glucose biosensor using microfabricated SU-8 films

    OpenAIRE

    Psoma, Sotiria D.

    2009-01-01

    The present project investigated and proved the concept of developing a novel BioMEMS glucose micro-biosensor using a simple one-step microfabrication process of the widely used SU-8 polymer. More specifically, the study focused on the investigation of the suitability of the SU-8 polymer as a matrix for enzyme immobilisation that is carried out during the microfabrication process. A comparative study between commercially available SU-8 and “customised” SU-8 solutions showed tha...

  11. Nanohybrids Near-Field Optical Microscopy: From Image Shift to Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayla El-Kork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-Field Optical Microscopy is a valuable tool for the optical and topographic study of objects at a nanometric scale. Nanoparticles constitute important candidates for such type of investigations, as they bear an important weight for medical, biomedical, and biosensing applications. One, however, has to be careful as artifacts can be easily reproduced. In this study, we examined hybrid nanoparticles (or nanohybrids in the near-field, while in solution and attached to gold nanoplots. We found out that they can be used for wavelength modulable near-field biosensors within conditions of artifact free imaging. In detail, we refer to the use of topographic/optical image shift and the imaging of Local Surface Plasmon hot spots to validate the genuineness of the obtained images. In summary, this study demonstrates a new way of using simple easily achievable comparative methods to prove the authenticity of near-field images and presents nanohybrid biosensors as an application.

  12. RF-to-RF Characterization of a Phased Array Receive Antenna Steering System Using a Novel Ring Resonator-Based Integrated Photonic Beamformer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Burla, M.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Meijerink, Arjan; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Khan, M.R.H.; van Etten, Wim; Leinse, Arne; Hoekman, M.; Heideman, Rene

    2009-01-01

    A novel ring resonator-based photonic beamformer has been developed for continuous and squint-free control of the reception angle of broadband phased array antenna systems. The core of the system is a ring resonator based optical beamforming network (OBFN) used for delay synchronization and coherent

  13. A Non-invasive and Real-time Monitoring of the Regulation of Photosynthetic Metabolism Biosensor Based on Measurement of Delayed Fluorescence in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new principle biosensor for non-invasive monitoring of theregulation of photosynthetic metabolism based on quantitative measurement of delayedfluorescence (DF is developed. The biosensor, which uses light-emitting diode lattice asexcitation light source and a compact Single Photon Counting Module to collect DF signal,is portable and can evaluate plant photosynthesis capacity in vivo. Compared with itsprimary version in our previous report, the biosensor can better control environmentalfactors. Moreover, the improved biosensor can automatically complete the measurements oflight and CO2 response curves of DF intensity. In the experimental study, the testing of theimproved biosensor has been made in soybean (Glycine max Zaoshu No. 18 seedlingstreated with NaHSO3 to induce changes in seedlings growth and photosynthetic metabolism.Contrast evaluations of seedlings photosynthesis were made from measurements of netphotosynthesis rate (Pn based on consumption of CO2 in tested plants. Current testingresults have demonstrated that the improved biosensor can accurately determine theregulatory effects of NaHSO3 on photosynthetic metabolism. Therefore, the biosensorpresented here could be potential useful for real-time monitoring the regulatory effects ofplant growth regulators (PGRs and other exogenous chemical factors on plant growth andphotosynthetic metabolism.

  14. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoyan; Hou, Shihua; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Cong; Ji, Yanhong

    2015-09-18

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and glucose oxidase (GOD) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD)₄/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01-8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  15. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembling Gold Nanorods and Glucose Oxidase onto Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized Sol-Gel Matrix for an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel amperometric glucose biosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of gold nanorods (AuNRs and glucose oxidase (GOD onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-functionalized three-dimensional sol-gel matrix. A thiolated aqueous silica sol containing SWCNTs was first assembled on the surface of a cleaned Au electrode, and then the alternate self-assembly of AuNRs and GOD were repeated to assemble multilayer films of AuNRs-GOD onto SWCNTs-functionalized silica gel for optimizing the biosensor. Among the resulting glucose biosensors, the four layers of AuNRs-GOD-modified electrode showed the best performance. The sol-SWCNTs-(AuNRs- GOD4/Au biosensor exhibited a good linear range of 0.01–8 mM glucose, high sensitivity of 1.08 μA/mM, and fast amperometric response within 4 s. The good performance of the proposed glucose biosensor could be mainly attributed to the advantages of the three-dimensional sol-gel matrix and stereo self-assembly films, and the natural features of one-dimensional nanostructure SWCNTs and AuNRs. This study may provide a new facile way to fabricate the enzyme-based biosensor with high performance.

  16. Fabrication of microband glucose biosensors using a screen-printing water-based carbon ink and their application in serum analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, R M; Pittson, R; Biddle, N; Hart, J P

    2009-01-01

    Microband glucose biosensors were fabricated by screen-printing a water-based carbon ink formulation containing cobalt phthalocyanine redox mediator and glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme, then insulating and sectioning through the thick (20mum) film to expose a 3mm-long working electrode edge. The performance of these biosensors for glucose analysis was investigated at 25 degrees C. Voltammetry in glucose-containing buffer solutions established that an operating potential of +0.4V vs. Ag/AgCl was suitable for analysis under both stirring and quiescent conditions. The influence of pH on biosensor performance was established and an operational pH of 8.0 was selected. Steady-state responses were obtained under quiescent conditions, suggesting a mixed mechanism predominated by radial diffusion, indicative of microelectrode behaviour. Calibration studies obtained with these biosensors showed steady-state currents that were linearly dependent on glucose concentration from the limit of detection (0.27mM) up to 2.0mM, with a precision for replicate biosensors of 6.2-10.7%. When applied to the determination of glucose in human serum, the concentration compared favourably to that determined by a spectroscopic method. These results have demonstrated a simple means of fabricating biosensors for glucose measurement and determination in situations where low-current real-time monitoring under quiescent conditions would be desirable.

  17. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD + -glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 0.3µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and 30µm MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Signal amelioration of electrophoretically deposited whole-cell biosensors using external electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Amzel, Tal [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Belkin, Shimshon [Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Rubin, Adi [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > We present an electrochemical whole-cell biochip that can apply electric fields. > We examine the integration of cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition. > The effect of electric fields on the whole-cell biosensor has been demonstrated. > Relatively short DC electric pulse improves the performance of whole-cell biosensors. > Prolonged AC electric fields deteriorated the whole-cell biosensor performance. - Abstract: This paper presents an integrated whole-cell biochip system where functioning cells are deposited on the solid micro-machined surfaces while specially designed indium tin oxide electrodes that can be used to apply controllable electric fields during various stages; for example during cell deposition. The electrodes can be used also for sensing currents associated with the sensing mechanisms of electrochemical whole-cell biosensors. In this work a new approach integrating live bacterial cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition is presented. The biomaterial deposition technique was characterized under various driving potentials and chamber configurations. An analytical model of the electrophoretic deposition kinetics was developed and presented here. The deposited biomass included genetically engineered bacterial cells that may respond to toxic material exposure by expressing proteins that react with specific analytes generating electrochemically active byproducts. In this study the effect of external electric fields on the whole-cell biochips has been successfully developed and tested. The research hypothesis was that by applying electric fields on bacterial whole-cells, their permeability to the penetration of external analytes can be increased. This effect was tested and the results are shown here. The effect of prolonged and short external electric fields on the bioelectrochemical signal generated by sessile bacterial whole-cells in response to the presence of toxins was studied. It was demonstrated that relatively

  19. Signal amelioration of electrophoretically deposited whole-cell biosensors using external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Amzel, Tal; Sternheim, Marek; Belkin, Shimshon; Rubin, Adi; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Freeman, Amihay

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We present an electrochemical whole-cell biochip that can apply electric fields. → We examine the integration of cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition. → The effect of electric fields on the whole-cell biosensor has been demonstrated. → Relatively short DC electric pulse improves the performance of whole-cell biosensors. → Prolonged AC electric fields deteriorated the whole-cell biosensor performance. - Abstract: This paper presents an integrated whole-cell biochip system where functioning cells are deposited on the solid micro-machined surfaces while specially designed indium tin oxide electrodes that can be used to apply controllable electric fields during various stages; for example during cell deposition. The electrodes can be used also for sensing currents associated with the sensing mechanisms of electrochemical whole-cell biosensors. In this work a new approach integrating live bacterial cells on a biochip using electrophoretic deposition is presented. The biomaterial deposition technique was characterized under various driving potentials and chamber configurations. An analytical model of the electrophoretic deposition kinetics was developed and presented here. The deposited biomass included genetically engineered bacterial cells that may respond to toxic material exposure by expressing proteins that react with specific analytes generating electrochemically active byproducts. In this study the effect of external electric fields on the whole-cell biochips has been successfully developed and tested. The research hypothesis was that by applying electric fields on bacterial whole-cells, their permeability to the penetration of external analytes can be increased. This effect was tested and the results are shown here. The effect of prolonged and short external electric fields on the bioelectrochemical signal generated by sessile bacterial whole-cells in response to the presence of toxins was studied. It was demonstrated that

  20. F F1-ATPase as biosensor to detect single virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, XiaoLong; Zhang, Yun; Yue, JiaChang; Jiang, PeiDong; Zhang, ZhenXi

    2006-01-01

    F F 1 -ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a biosensor (immuno-rotary biosensor) for the purpose of capturing single virus. Capture of virus was based on antibody-antigen reaction. The detection of virus based on proton flux change driven by ATP-synthesis of F F 1 -ATPase, which was indicated by F1300, was directly observed by a fluorescence microscope. The results demonstrate that the biosensor loading of virus particles has remarkable signal-to-noise ratio (3.8:1) compared to its control at single molecular level, and will be convenient, quick, and even super-sensitive for detecting virus particles

  1. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal-clad...... waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Development of biosensors and their application in metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jie; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay

    2015-01-01

    and ease of implementation with high-throughput analysis. Here we describe recent progress in biosensor development and their applications in a metabolic engineering context. We also highlight examples of how biosensors can be integrated with synthetic circuits to exert feedback regulation...... for the desired phenotypes. However, methods available for microbial genome diversification far exceed our ability to screen and select for those variants with optimal performance. Genetically encoded biosensors have shown the potential to address this gap, given their ability to respond to small molecule binding...

  3. Microfluidic biosensor for β-Hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) determination of subclinical ketosis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xuan; Zhao, Wenting; Neethirajan, Suresh; Duffield, Todd

    2015-02-12

    Determination of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) is a gold standard for diagnosis of Subclinical Ketosis (SCK), a common disease in dairy cows that causes significant economic loss. Early detection of SCK can help reduce the risk of the disease progressing into clinical stage, thus minimizing economic losses on dairy cattle. Conventional laboratory methods are time consuming and labor-intensive, requiring expensive and bulky equipment. Development of portable and robust devices for rapid on-site SCK diagnosis is an effective way to prevent and control ketosis and can significantly aid in the management of dairy animal health. Microfluidic technology provides a rapid, cost-effective way to develop handheld devices for on-farm detection of sub-clinical ketosis. In this study, a highly sensitive microfluidics-based biosensor for on-site SCK diagnosis has been developed. A rapid, low-cost microfluidic biosensor with high sensitivity and specificity was developed for SCK diagnosis. Determination of βHBA was employed as the indicator in the diagnosis of SCK. On-chip detection using miniaturized and cost-effective optical sensor can be finished in 1 minute with a detection limit of 0.05 mM concentration. Developed microfluidic biosensor was successfully tested with the serum samples from dairy cows affected by SCK. The results of the developed biosensor agreed well with two other laboratory methods. The biosensor was characterized by high sensitivity and specificity towards βHBA with a detection limit of 0.05 mM. The developed microfluidic biosensor provides a promising prototype for a cost-effective handheld meter for on-site SCK diagnosis. By using microfluidic method, the detection time is significantly decreased compared to other laboratory methods. Here, we demonstrate a field-deployable device to precisely identify and measure subclinical ketosis by specific labeling and quantification of β-hydroxybutyate in cow blood samples. A real-time on-site detection system will

  4. Piezoelectric tuning fork biosensors for the quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Maria Benito, Angel; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Pérez-García, Lluïsa

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions is of great interest in molecular biology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proved its capacity to act as a biosensor and determine the affinity between biomolecules of interest. Nevertheless, the detection scheme presents certain limitations when it comes to developing a compact biosensor. Recently, piezoelectric quartz tuning forks (QTFs) have been used as laser-free detection sensors for AFM. However, only a few studies along these lines have considered soft biological samples, and even fewer constitute quantified molecular recognition experiments. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of QTF probes to perform specific interaction measurements between biotin–streptavidin complexes in buffer solution. We propose in this paper a variant of dynamic force spectroscopy based on representing adhesion energies E (aJ) against pulling rates v (nm s"–"1). Our results are compared with conventional AFM measurements and show the great potential of these sensors in molecular interaction studies. (paper)

  5. Redox-flexible NADH oxidase biosensor: A platform for various dehydrogenase bioassays and biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Simona; El Murr, Nabil

    2006-01-01

    A generic amperometric bioassay based on the enzymatic oxidation catalysed by the stable NADH oxidase (NAox) from Thermus thermophilus has been developed for NADH measurements. The NAox uses O 2 as its natural electron acceptor and produces H 2 O 2 in a two-electron process. Electrochemical and spectrophotometric experiments showed that the NAox used in this work, presents a very good activity towards its substrate and, in contrary to previously mentioned NADH oxidases, does not require the addition of any exogenous flavin cofactor neither to promote nor to maintain its activity. In addition, the NAox used also works with artificial electron acceptors like ferrocene derivatives. O 2 was successfully replaced by redox mediators such as hydroxymethyl ferrocene (FcCH 2 OH) for the regeneration of the active enzyme. Combining the NAox with the mediator and the horseradish peroxidase we developed an original, high sensitive 'redox-flexible' NADH amperometric bioassay working in a large window of applied potentials in both oxidation and reduction modes. The biosensor has a continuous and complementary linearity range permitting to measure NADH concentrations starting from 5 x 10 -6 M in reduction until 2 x 10 3 M in oxidation. This redox-flexibility allows choosing the applied potential in order to avoid electrochemical interferences. The association of the 'redox-flexible' concept with NADH dependent enzymes opens a novel strategy for dehydrogenases based bioassays and biosensors. The great number of dehydrogenases available makes the concept applicable for numerous substrates to analyse. Moreover it allows the development of a wide range of biosensors on the basis of a generic platform. This gives several advantages over the previous manufacturing techniques and offers a general and flexible scheme for the fabrication of biosensors presenting high sensitivities, wide calibration ranges and less affected by electrochemical interferences

  6. Design and optimization of a 3-coil resonance-based wireless power transfer system for biomedical implants

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a resonance-based wireless power transfer system using a single layer of inductor coil windings, in a pancake configuration, in order to obtain a compact system for implantable electronic applications. We theoretically analyzed the system and characterized it by measuring its inductance, self-resonant frequency, and quality factor Q. In our resonance-based wireless power transfer prototype, we proposed a 3-coil system, using two 15-mm radius implantable coils, with a resonance frequency of 6.76MHz. This system can effectively transfer power for a distance of up to 50mm. Moreover, our proposed 3-coil system can achieve a high Q-factor and has a comparable power transfer efficiency (PTE) to previously reported works about 3-coil and 4-coil systems. The experimental PTE can achieve 82.4% at a separation distance of 20mm and more than 10% PTE at a distance of 40mm.

  7. Design and optimization of a 3-coil resonance-based wireless power transfer system for biomedical implants

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying; Buttner, Ulrich; Fan, Yiqiang; Foulds, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a resonance-based wireless power transfer system using a single layer of inductor coil windings, in a pancake configuration, in order to obtain a compact system for implantable electronic applications. We theoretically analyzed the system and characterized it by measuring its inductance, self-resonant frequency, and quality factor Q. In our resonance-based wireless power transfer prototype, we proposed a 3-coil system, using two 15-mm radius implantable coils, with a resonance frequency of 6.76MHz. This system can effectively transfer power for a distance of up to 50mm. Moreover, our proposed 3-coil system can achieve a high Q-factor and has a comparable power transfer efficiency (PTE) to previously reported works about 3-coil and 4-coil systems. The experimental PTE can achieve 82.4% at a separation distance of 20mm and more than 10% PTE at a distance of 40mm.

  8. Harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator as a sustainable power source and a self-powered active vibration sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Bai, Peng; Yang, Ya; Hou, Te-Chien; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-13

    A harmonic-resonator-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is presented as a sustainable power source and an active vibration sensor. It can effectively respond to vibration frequencies ranging from 2 to 200 Hz with a considerably wide working bandwidth of 13.4 Hz. This work not only presents a new principle in the field of vibration energy harvesting but also greatly expands the applicability of TENGs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kerman, Kagan

    2001-01-01

    The utility and advantages of an indicator free and MB based sequence specific DNA hybridization biosensor based on guanine and adenine oxidation signals and MB reduction signals have been demonstrated...

  10. Modelling of Amperometric Biosensor Used for Synergistic Substrates Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainius Simelevicius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operation of an amperometric biosensor producing a chemically amplified signal is modelled numerically. The chemical amplification is achieved by using synergistic substrates. The model is based on non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on the electrode surface, a dialysis membrane covering the enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer which is modelled by the Nernst approach. The equation system is solved numerically by using the finite difference technique. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by altering the model parameters influencing the enzyme kinetics as well as the mass transport by diffusion. The biosensor action was analyzed with a special emphasis to the effect of the chemical amplification. The simulation results qualitatively explain and confirm the experimentally observed effect of the synergistic substrates conversion on the biosensor response.

  11. Integration of Fractal Biosensor in a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    KAUST Repository

    Mashraei, Yousof; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Buttner, Ulrich; Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-01-01

    fractal electrode biosensor that is used for both droplet actuation and sensing C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration levels to assess cardiac disease risk. Our proposed electrode is the first two-terminal electrode design to be integrated into DMF

  12. Biosensors for detection of mercury in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontidean, Ibolya; Mortari, Alessia; Leth, Suzanne; Brown, Nigel L.; Karlson, Ulrich; Larsen, Martin M.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Corbisier, Philippe; Csoeregi, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Biosensors based on whole bacterial cells and on bacterial heavy metal binding protein were used to determine the mercury concentration in soil. The soil samples were collected in a vegetable garden accidentally contaminated with elemental mercury 25 years earlier. Bioavailable mercury was measured using different sensors: a protein-based biosensor, a whole bacterial cell based biosensor, and a plant sensor, i.e. morphological and biochemical responses in primary leaves and roots of bean seedlings grown in the mercury-contaminated soil. For comparison the total mercury concentration of the soil samples was determined by AAS. Whole bacterial cell and protein-based biosensors gave accurate responses proportional to the total amount of mercury in the soil samples. On the contrary, plant sensors were found to be less useful indicators of soil mercury contamination, as determined by plant biomass, mercury content of primary leaves and enzyme activities

  13. Enzymatic biosensors based on the use of metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xinhao; Gu, Wei; Li, Bingyu; Chen, Ningning; Zhao, Kai; Xian, Yuezhong

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, various techniques have been developed to obtain materials at a nanoscale level to design biosensors with high sensitivity, selectivity and efficiency. Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are of particular interests and have received much attention because of their unique physical, chemical and catalytic properties. This review summarizes the progress made in enzymatic biosensors based on the use of MONPs. Synthetic methods, strategies for immobilization, and the functions of MONPs in enzymatic biosensing systems are reviewed and discussed. The article is subdivided into sections on enzymatic biosensors based on (a) zinc oxide nanoparticles, (b) titanium oxide nanoparticles, (c) iron oxide nanoparticles, and (d) other metal oxide nanoparticles. While substantial advances have been made in MONPs-based enzymatic biosensors, their applications to real samples still lie ahead because issues such as reproducibility and sensor stability have to be solved. (author)

  14. Development of FRET biosensors for mammalian and plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, D.; van Voorst Vader, L.; Borst, J.W.; Goedhart, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors are increasingly used in visualising signalling processes in different organisms. Sensors based on green fluorescent protein technology are providing a great opportunity for using Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a tool that allows for monitoring dynamic

  15. Interdigitated electrodes as impedance and capacitance biosensors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, N. S.; Ramli, M. M.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Halin, D. S. C.; Isa, S. S. M.; Talip, L. F. A.; Danial, N. S.; Murad, S. A. Z.

    2017-09-01

    Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) are made of two individually addressable interdigitated comb-like electrode structures. IDEs are one of the most favored transducers, widely utilized in technological applications especially in the field of biological and chemical sensors due to their inexpensive, ease of fabrication process and high sensitivity. In order to detect and analyze a biochemical molecule or analyte, the impedance and capacitance signal need to be obtained. This paper investigates the working principle and influencer of the impedance and capacitance biosensors. The impedance biosensor depends on the resistance and capacitance while the capacitance biosensor influenced by the dielectric permittivity. However, the geometry and structures of the interdigitated electrodes affect both impedance and capacitance biosensor. The details have been discussed in this paper.

  16. Plasmon based biosensor for distinguishing different peptides mutation states

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind; Chirumamilla, Manohar; Toma, Andrea; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Alabastri, Alessandro; Leoncini, Marco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    of the cuboid nanostructures. The electric field distribution for the nanocuboids with varying matrix dimensions/inter-particle gap was also investigated. These SERS devices were employed as biosensors through the investigation of both myoglobin and wild

  17. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan sensitivitas biosensor urea berbasis membran khitin adalah 19,11 mV/dekade, trayek pengukuran 10-4 – 10-8 M, limit deteksi 10-8 M, waktu respon 3,10–6,02 menit, dengan urutan kekuatan ion penggangu: NH4Cl > NaCl > CH3COONa > campuran garam > KCl > CaCl2 > asam askorbat. Kata kunci: biosensor, immobilisasi, khitin, urea

  18. CMOS Electrochemical Instrumentation for Biosensor Microsystems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern biosensors play a critical role in healthcare and have a quickly growing commercial market. Compared to traditional optical-based sensing, electrochemical biosensors are attractive due to superior performance in response time, cost, complexity and potential for miniaturization. To address the shortcomings of traditional benchtop electrochemical instruments, in recent years, many complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS instrumentation circuits have been reported for electrochemical biosensors. This paper provides a review and analysis of CMOS electrochemical instrumentation circuits. First, important concepts in electrochemical sensing are presented from an instrumentation point of view. Then, electrochemical instrumentation circuits are organized into functional classes, and reported CMOS circuits are reviewed and analyzed to illuminate design options and performance tradeoffs. Finally, recent trends and challenges toward on-CMOS sensor integration that could enable highly miniaturized electrochemical biosensor microsystems are discussed. The information in the paper can guide next generation electrochemical sensor design.

  19. Covalent Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Hybrid Membranes for the Construction of Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov Yotova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to covalently immobilize horse radish peroxidase (HRP onto new hybrid membranes synthesized by the sol-gel method based on silica precursors, dendrimers and cellulose derivatives. This new system will be used for designing biosensor. For investigation of the properties of membranes, HRP was used as a modeling enzyme. Kinetic parameters, pH and temperature optimum were determined, and the structure of the membranes surface was examined. Results showed higher relative and residual activity of HRP immobilized onto membranes with cellulose acetate butyrate with high molecular weight CAB/H. This novel biosensor could offer a simple, cheap and rapid tool with enhanced sensing performance as well as having potentials to find application in medicine, pharmacy, food and process control and environmental monitoring.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles Composite Film for the Construction of a Novel Amperometric Choline Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a facile method to fabricate a novel choline biosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Chitosan, a natural biocompatible polymer, was used to solubilize MWCNTs for constructing the aqueous Chit-MWCNTs solution. Then Chit-MWCNTs were first dropped on the surface of a cleaned platinum electrode. Finally, a thiolated silica sol containing AuNPs and choline oxidase (ChOx was immobilized on the surface of the Chit-MWCNTs-modified electrode. The MWCNTs/AuNPs/Pt electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for choline. The resulting choline biosensor showed high sensitivity of choline (3.56 μA/mM, and wide linear range from 0.05 to 0.8 mM with the detection limit of 15 μM. In addition, good reproducibility and stability were obtained.

  1. Enzyme-based Colorimetric and Potentiometric Biosensor for Detecting Pb (II Ions in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Kaur

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study a simple colorimetric and potentiometric biosensor based on urease inhibition by Pb (II ions for its estimation in milk samples. Urease immobilized on nylon membrane by hydrosol gel method was used as the biocomponent to demonstrate the metal effect on the enzyme activity using phenol red as the pH indicator. A lower limit detection of 38.6µm was achieved in the milk and the enzyme membranes were stable for more than two months at 4ºC. In potentiometric approach, response of an ion selective electrode (ISE to changing ammonium ion concentration as a consequence of urease inhibition by Pb (II ions was explored to achieve a detection limit of 9.66 µm. Lead specificity was attained by means of masking agents 1,10 - phenanthroline and sodium potassium tartarate. Validation of the developed biosensors was carried out with spiked milk samples.

  2. Application of a mer-lux biosensor for estimating bioavailable mercury in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.; Turner, R. R.

    2000-01-01

    A previously described bioassay using a mer-lux gene fusion for detection of bioavailable mercury was applied for the estimation of the bioavailable fraction of mercury in soil. The bioavailable fraction is defined here as being part of the water leachable fraction. Due to masking of light emission...... responses. The utility of the mer-lux biosensor assay was tested by relating measurements of bioavailable and total mercury to the response of the soil microbial community to mercury exposure. Two different soil types (an agricultural and a beech forest soil) were spiked with 2.5 µg Hg(II) g-1 in microcosms...... in resistance or diversity. This study showed that the bioassay using the mer-lux biosensor is a useful and sensitive tool for estimation of bioavailable mercury in soil....

  3. Thermoresponsive Magnetic Nano-Biosensors for Rapid Measurements of Inorganic Arsenic and Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein-tagged sensor proteins, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, have been produced as biosensors for simple and low-cost quantification of As(III or Cd(II. In this study, the sensor protein-promoter DNA complexes were reconstructed on the surfaces of magnetic particles of different sizes. After the surface modification all the particles could be attracted by magnets, and released different amounts of GFP-tagged protein, according to the metal concentrations within 5 min, which caused significant increases in fluorescence. A detection limit of 1 µg/L for As(III and Cd(II in purified water was obtained only with the nanoparticles exhibiting enough magnetization after heat treatment for 1 min. Therefore, thermoresponsive magnetic nano-biosensors offer great advantages of rapidity and sensitivity for the measurement of the toxic metals in drinking water.

  4. Thermoresponsive magnetic nano-biosensors for rapid measurements of inorganic arsenic and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Shimoaoki, Shun; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2012-10-18

    Green fluorescent protein-tagged sensor proteins, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, have been produced as biosensors for simple and low-cost quantification of As(III) or Cd(II). In this study, the sensor protein-promoter DNA complexes were reconstructed on the surfaces of magnetic particles of different sizes. After the surface modification all the particles could be attracted by magnets, and released different amounts of GFP-tagged protein, according to the metal concentrations within 5 min, which caused significant increases in fluorescence. A detection limit of 1 µg/L for As(III) and Cd(II) in purified water was obtained only with the nanoparticles exhibiting enough magnetization after heat treatment for 1 min. Therefore, thermoresponsive magnetic nano-biosensors offer great advantages of rapidity and sensitivity for the measurement of the toxic metals in drinking water.

  5. microRNA biosensors: Opportunities and challenges among conventional and commercially available techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Tugba; Erdem, Arzum; Ozsoz, Mehmet; Carrara, Sandro

    2018-01-15

    As being the most extensively studied, non-coding, evolutionary conserved, post-transcriptional gene regulators of genome, microRNAs (miRNAs) have taken great attention among various disciplines due to their important roles in biological processes and link with cancer. Due to their diagnostic value, there have been many conventional methods used in detection of miRNAs including northern blotting, quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and microarray technology besides novel techniques based on various nanotechnology approaches and molecular biology tools including miRNA biosensors. The aim of this review is to explain the importance of miRNAs in biomedical field with an emphasis on early cancer diagnosis by overviewing both research based and commercially available miRNA detection methods in the last decade considering their strengths and weakness with an emphasis on miRNA biosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A technology roadmap of smart biosensors from conventional glucose monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Pravin; Sahu, Pratiksha; Gaud, Ram

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this review article is to focus on technology roadmap of smart biosensors from a conventional glucose monitoring system. The estimation of glucose with commercially available devices involves analysis of blood samples that are obtained by pricking finger or extracting blood from the forearm. Since pain and discomfort are associated with invasive methods, the non-invasive measurement techniques have been investigated. The non-invasive methods show advantages like non-exposure to sharp objects such as needles and syringes, due to which there is an increase in testing frequency, improved control of glucose concentration and absence of pain and biohazard materials. This review study is aimed to describe recent invasive techniques and major noninvasive techniques, viz. biosensors, optical techniques and sensor-embedded contact lenses for glucose estimation.

  7. Characterization of immobilization methods of antiviral antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Tran Quang, E-mail: huytq@nihe.org.vn [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No1 Yersin St., Hanoi (Viet Nam); International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van Chung, Pham; Anh, Dang Duc; Nga, Phan Thi [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No1 Yersin St., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tuan, Mai Anh, E-mail: tuanma-itims@mail.hut.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we describes different methods to immobilize Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antibodies in human serum onto the interdigitated surface of a microelectrode sensor for optimizing electrochemical detection: (1) direct covalent binding to the silanized surface, (2) binding to the silanized surface via a cross-linker of glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via goat anti-human IgG polyclonal antibody and (4) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via protein A (PrA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy are used to verify the characteristics of antibodies on the interdigitated surface after the serum antibodies immobilization. The analyzed results indicate that the use of protein A is an effective choice for immobilization and orientation of antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors. This study provides an advantageous immobilization method of serum containing antiviral antibodies to develop electrochemical biosensors for preliminary screening of viruses in clinical samples from outbreaks.

  8. An Amperometric Biosensor for Uric Acid Determination Prepared From Uricase Immobilized in Polyaniline-Polypyrrole Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Arslan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new amperometric uric acid biosensor was developed by immobilizing uricase by a glutaraldehyde crosslinking procedure on polyaniline-polypyrrole (pani-ppy composite film on the surface of a platinum electrode. Determination of uric acid was performed by the oxidation of enzymatically generated H2O2 at 0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The linear working range of the biosensor was 2.5×10-6 – 8.5×10-5 M and the response time was about 70 s. The effects of pH, temperature were investigated and optimum parameters were found to be 9.0, 55 oC, respectively. The stability and reproducibility of the enzyme electrode have been also studied.

  9. Highly sensitive voltammetric biosensor for nitric oxide based on its high affinity with hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Chunhai; Liu Xinjian; Pang Jiantao; Li Genxi; Scheer, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Although heme protein-based, amperometric nitric oxide (NO) biosensors have been well documented in previous studies, most have been conducted in anaerobic conditions. Herein we report a novel hemoglobin-based NO biosensor that is not only very sensitive but also usable in air. The heme protein was entrapped in a sodium montmorillonite film, which was immobilized at a pyrolytic graphite electrode surface. Film-entrapped hemoglobin can directly exchange electrons with the electrode, and this process has proven to favor the catalytic reduction of oxygen. In addition, NO induced a cathodic potential shift of the catalytic reduction peak of oxygen. This potential shift was proportional to the logarithm of NO concentration ranging from 4.0 x 10 -11 to 5.0 x 10 -6 mol/L. The detection limit has been estimated to be 20 pM, approximately four orders lower than previously reported amperometric detectors

  10. Graphene–gold nanoparticle composite: Application as a good scaffold for construction of glucose oxidase biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabury, Sina [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, Sayed Habib, E-mail: habibkazemi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharif, Farhad [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we report a facile method for fabrication of glucose oxidase immobilized on the partially reduced graphene–gold nanocomposite (PRGO–AuNPs/GOx) as a novel biosensor for determination of glucose concentration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the morphology of PRGO and PRGO–AuNPs. Also, fast Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV–Vis spectroscopy were used to confirm formation of graphene and graphene–gold composite. Then, the electrochemical behavior of PRGO–AuNPs/GOx modified electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Our electrochemical studies, especially chronoamperometry (CA), showed that the PRGO–AuNPs/GOx modified electrode has excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the glucose. The limit of detection and sensitivity towards glucose were estimated as 0.06 μM and 15.04 mA mM{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • PGRO–AuNPs modified electrode employed as a reliable scaffold for GODx immobilization. • AuNPs prevent stacking PRGO layers, thus improve the electrochemical behavior of biosensor. • GODx electron transfer was improved because of good interaction with PRGO–AuNP scaffold. • PRGO–AuNP/GODx modified biosensor showed excellent sensitivity towards glucose.

  11. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  12. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  13. A new method for wideband characterization of resonator-based sensing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, Farasat; Wathen, Adam; Hunt, William D.

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to the electronic instrumentation for extracting data from resonator-based sensing devices (e.g., microelectromechanical, piezoelectric, electrochemical, and acoustic) is suggested and demonstrated here. Traditionally, oscillator-based circuitry is employed to monitor shift in the resonance frequency of the resonator. These circuits give a single point measurement at the frequency where the oscillation criterion is met. However, the resonator response itself is broadband and contains much more information than a single point measurement. Here, we present a method for the broadband characterization of a resonator using white noise as an excitation signal. The resonator is used in a two-port filter configuration, and the resonator output is subjected to frequency spectrum analysis. The result is a wideband spectral map analogous to the magnitude of the S21 parameters of a conventional filter. Compared to other sources for broadband excitation (e.g., frequency chirp, multisine, or narrow time domain pulse), the white noise source requires no design of the input signal and is readily available for very wide bandwidths (1 MHz-3 GHz). Moreover, it offers simplicity in circuit design as it does not require precise impedance matching; whereas such requirements are very strict for oscillator-based circuit systems, and can be difficult to fulfill. This results in a measurement system that does not require calibration, which is a significant advantage over oscillator circuits. Simulation results are first presented for verification of the proposed system, followed by measurement results with a prototype implementation. A 434 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator and a 5 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) are measured using the proposed method, and the results are compared to measurements taken by a conventional bench-top network analyzer. Maximum relative differences in the measured resonance frequencies of the SAW and QCM resonators are 0.0004% and 0

  14. Innovative configurations of electrochemical DNA biosensors (a review)

    OpenAIRE

    Girousi, Stella; Karastogianni, Sofia; Serpi, Constantina

    2011-01-01

    In the field of electrochemical biosensing, transition metal complexes achieved a significant importance as hybridization indicators or electroactive markers of DNA. Their incorporation in electro-chemical DNA biosensors enables to offer a promising perspective in understanding of the biological activity of some chemical compounds. In this context, the development of innovative configurations of electrochemical DNA biosensors applied to life sciences during the last years were reviewed ...

  15. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-02-24

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies.

  16. Ring-Interferometric Sol-Gel Bio-Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory (Inventor); Cohen, David (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A biosensor embodying the invention includes a sensing volume having an array of pores sized for immobilizing a first biological entity tending to bind to a second biological entity in such a manner as to change an index of refraction of the sensing volume. The biosensor further includes a ring interferometer, one volumetric section of the ring interferometer being the sensing volume, a laser for supplying light to the ring interferometer, and a photodetector for receiving light from the interferometer.

  17. Engineering prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise; Snoek, Tim; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin

    2016-01-01

    ,cis-muconic acid at different levels, and found that reporter gene output correlated with production. The transplantation of prokaryotic transcriptional activators into the eukaryotic chassis illustrates the potential of a hitherto untapped biosensor resource useful for biotechnological applications....... real-time monitoring of production has attracted attention. Here we applied systematic engineering of multiple parameters to search for a general biosensor design in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on small-molecule binding transcriptional activators from the prokaryote superfamily...

  18. Detection of foodborne pathogens using surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubová, Vendula; Brynda, Eduard; Krasová, B.; Škvor, J.; Homola, Jiří; Dostálek, Jakub; Tobiška, Petr; Rošický, Jiří

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 100-105 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optical sensors * surface plasmon resonance * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  19. Biosensor Applications of MAPLE Deposited Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Califano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE is a thin film deposition technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD for deposition of delicate (polymers, complex biological molecules, etc. materials in undamaged form. The main difference of MAPLE technique with respect to PLD is the target: it is a frozen solution or suspension of the (guest molecules to be deposited in a volatile substance (matrix. Since laser beam energy is mainly absorbed by the matrix, damages to the delicate guest molecules are avoided, or at least reduced. Lipase, an enzyme catalyzing reactions borne by triglycerides, has been used in biosensors for detection of β-hydroxyacid esters and triglycerides in blood serum. Enzymes immobilization on a substrate is therefore required. In this paper we show that it is possible, using MAPLE technique, to deposit lipase on a substrate, as shown by AFM observation, preserving its conformational structure, as shown by FTIR analysis.

  20. Silica suspended waveguide splitter-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. C.; Hawk, R. M.; Armani, A. M.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, a novel integrated optical waveguide 50/50 splitter was developed. It is fabricated using standard lithographic methods, a pair of etching steps and a laser reflow step. However, unlike other integrated waveguide splitters, the waveguide is elevated off of the silicon substrate, improving its interaction with biomolecules in solution and in a flow field. Additionally, because it is fabricated from silica, it has very low optical loss, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio, making it ideal for biosensing. By functionalizing the device using an epoxy-silane method using small samples and confining the protein solutions to the device, we enable highly efficient detection of CREB with only 1 μL of solution. Therefore, the waveguide coupler sensor is representative of the next generation of ultra-sensitive optical biosensors, and, when combined with microfluidic capabilities, it will be an ideal candidate for a more fully-realized lab-on-a-chip device.

  1. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uichi Akiba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements.

  2. Aptamer Based Microsphere Biosensor for Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Fan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optical microsphere resonator biosensor using aptamer asreceptor for the measurement of the important biomolecule thrombin. The sphere surface ismodified with anti-thrombin aptamer, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivityfor thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the sphere surface is monitored by the spectralposition of the microsphere’s whispering gallery mode resonances. A detection limit on theorder of 1 NIH Unit/mL is demonstrated. Control experiments with non-aptameroligonucleotide and BSA are also carried out to confirm the specific binding betweenaptamer and thrombin. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development ofhighly sensitive biomarker sensors based on aptamer with lower cost and higher throughputthan current technology.

  3. Miniature Biosensor with Health Risk Assessment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea; Downs, Meghan; Kalogera, Kent; Buxton, Roxanne; Cooper, Tommy; Cooper, Alan; Cooper, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) monitoring is a medical requirement during exercise on the International Space Station (ISS), fitness tests, and extravehicular activity (EVA); however, NASA does not currently have the technology to consistently and accurately monitor HR and other physiological data during these activities. Performance of currently available HR monitor technologies is dependent on uninterrupted contact with the torso and are prone to data drop-out and motion artifact. Here, we seek an alternative to the chest strap and electrode based sensors currently in use on ISS today. This project aims to develop a high performance, robust earbud based biosensor with focused efforts on improved HR data quality during exercise or EVA. A health risk assessment algorithm will further advance the goals of autonomous crew health care for exploration missions.

  4. Surface Patterning and Nanowire Biosensor Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    surface. A central limitation to this biosensor principle is the screening of analyte charge by mobile ions in electrolytes with physiological ionic strength. To overcome this problem, we propose to use as capture agents proteins which undergo large conformational changes. Using structure based protein...... charge prediction, we show how ligand induced changes in conformation of two model proteins, both being ligand binding domains from glutamate receptors, can lead to changes in electrostatic potential predicted to be sufficient for NW sensing. Finally we, demonstrate how InAs nanowires can....... In part I - “Surface Patterning” - glass and gold surfaces serve as spatially encoded immobilization supports for patterning of recombinant proteins and organic monolayers. First, we combine micro-contact printing with a reactive SNAP-tag protein to establish a general platform for templated protein...

  5. Effect of surface roughness on performance of magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Possan, A.L. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Menti, C. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Beltrami, M. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Santos, A.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Roesch-Ely, M. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Missell, F.P., E-mail: fmissell@yahoo.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli are bacteria that must be controlled in the food industry and the hospital sector. Magnetoelastic biosensors offer the promise of rapid identification of these and other harmful antigens. In this work, strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3 were cut to size (5 mm × 1 mm) with a microdicing saw and were then coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Several sensor surfaces were studied: 1) as-cast strip, wheel side; 2) as-cast strip, free surface; and 3) thinned and polished surface. A layer of cystamine was applied to the Au-covered magnetoelastic substrate, forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), followed by antibodies, using a modified Hermanson protocol. The cystamine layer growth was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biosensors were exposed to solutions of bacteria and the resonant frequency of the sensors was measured with an impedance analyzer for times up to 100 min. Reductions in the resonant frequency, corresponding to bacteria capture, were measured after optimizing the signal amplitude. For times up to 40 min, high capture rates were observed and thereafter saturation occurred. Saturation values of the frequency shifts were compared with the number of bacteria observed on the sensor using fluorescence microscopy. Parameters associated with capture kinetics were studied for different sensor surfaces. The rough surfaces were found to show a faster response, while the thinned and polished sensors showed the largest frequency shift. - Highlights: • Magnetoelastic biosensors to capture Escherichia coli were produced. • Surface roughness of biosensors was varied in the range R{sub a} = 0.3–0.52 μm. • Rough surfaces show faster response, polished surfaces have larger frequency shift.

  6. Effect of surface roughness on performance of magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possan, A.L.; Menti, C.; Beltrami, M.; Santos, A.D.; Roesch-Ely, M.; Missell, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli are bacteria that must be controlled in the food industry and the hospital sector. Magnetoelastic biosensors offer the promise of rapid identification of these and other harmful antigens. In this work, strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3 were cut to size (5 mm × 1 mm) with a microdicing saw and were then coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Several sensor surfaces were studied: 1) as-cast strip, wheel side; 2) as-cast strip, free surface; and 3) thinned and polished surface. A layer of cystamine was applied to the Au-covered magnetoelastic substrate, forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), followed by antibodies, using a modified Hermanson protocol. The cystamine layer growth was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biosensors were exposed to solutions of bacteria and the resonant frequency of the sensors was measured with an impedance analyzer for times up to 100 min. Reductions in the resonant frequency, corresponding to bacteria capture, were measured after optimizing the signal amplitude. For times up to 40 min, high capture rates were observed and thereafter saturation occurred. Saturation values of the frequency shifts were compared with the number of bacteria observed on the sensor using fluorescence microscopy. Parameters associated with capture kinetics were studied for different sensor surfaces. The rough surfaces were found to show a faster response, while the thinned and polished sensors showed the largest frequency shift. - Highlights: • Magnetoelastic biosensors to capture Escherichia coli were produced. • Surface roughness of biosensors was varied in the range R a = 0.3–0.52 μm. • Rough surfaces show faster response, polished surfaces have larger frequency shift.

  7. Assessing the bioavailability of organic contaminants using a novel bioluminescent biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, A.; Phoenix, P.; Lau, P.C.K.; Ghoshal, S.

    2002-01-01

    The limited rate and extent of biodegradation in contaminated soils is often attributed to a lack of bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds. To date, the majority of studies aimed at assessing bioavailability and modes of bacterial uptake have relied upon quantification of microbial degradation rates in comparison to rates of dissolution or desorption in corresponding abiotic systems. Several studies have indicated the possibility of a direct uptake mechanism for sorbed or separate phase compounds. However, there is a lack of direct evidence to support these claims. To address the need for a direct measurement technique for microbial bioavailability, we have constructed a whole-cell bioluminescent biosensor, Pseudomonas putida F1G4 (PpF1G4), by fusing lux genes that encode for bioluminescence to the solvent efflux pump (sep) promoter element in PpF1G4, which is induced by the presence of target organic compounds. When the biosensor microorganism is exposed to an inducing compound, the bioluminescence system is activated and the cell produces an intensity of visible light (λ = 495 nm) that is directly related to the level of exposure to the contaminant. Batch experiments were carried out to assess whether the biosensor is able to sense the presence of toluene, a representative target compound, contained in a NAPL. Preliminary results show that while PpF1G4 responds to toluene in the aqueous phase, the biosensor does not appear to emit a significant bioluminescence signal in response to the toluene present in the NAPL. Ongoing research is focusing on optimizing the experimental procedure to fully explore this issue. (author)

  8. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  9. Novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on MXene nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Rakhi, R. B.

    2016-11-10

    A biosensor platform based on Au/MXene nanocomposite for sensitive enzymatic glucose detection is reported. The biosensor leverages the unique electrocatalytic properties and synergistic effects between Au nanoparticles and MXene sheets. An amperometric glucose biosensor is fabricated by the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on Nafion solubilized Au/ MXene nanocomposite over glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The biomediated Au nanoparticles play a significant role in facilitating the electron exchange between the electroactive center of GOx and the electrode. The GOx/Au/MXene/Nafion/GCE biosensor electrode displayed a linear amperometric response in the glucose concentration range from 0.1 to 18 mM with a relatively high sensitivity of 4.2 μAmM−1 cm−2 and a detection limit of 5.9 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the biosensor exhibited excellent stability, reproducibility and repeatability. Therefore, the Au/MXene nanocomposite reported in this work is a potential candidate as an electrochemical transducer in electrochemical biosensors.

  10. Novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on MXene nanocomposite

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan; Nayuk, Pranati; Xia, Chuan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2016-01-01

    A biosensor platform based on Au/MXene nanocomposite for sensitive enzymatic glucose detection is reported. The biosensor leverages the unique electrocatalytic properties and synergistic effects between Au nanoparticles and MXene sheets. An amperometric glucose biosensor is fabricated by the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on Nafion solubilized Au/ MXene nanocomposite over glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The biomediated Au nanoparticles play a significant role in facilitating the electron exchange between the electroactive center of GOx and the electrode. The GOx/Au/MXene/Nafion/GCE biosensor electrode displayed a linear amperometric response in the glucose concentration range from 0.1 to 18 mM with a relatively high sensitivity of 4.2 μAmM−1 cm−2 and a detection limit of 5.9 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the biosensor exhibited excellent stability, reproducibility and repeatability. Therefore, the Au/MXene nanocomposite reported in this work is a potential candidate as an electrochemical transducer in electrochemical biosensors.

  11. A potentiometric biosensor for the detection of notch 3 using functionalized ZnO nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibupoto, Z H; Khun, K; Liu, X; Willander, M

    2014-09-01

    The notch signalling plays a vital and radical role for the activity of cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this study, for the first time a particular biosensor is developed for the detection of notch 3. ZnO nanorods were fabricated on the gold coated glass substrate by hydrothermal method and afterwards were decorated with the gold nanoparticles by electrodepositing technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has shown the perpendicular to the substrate growth pattern of ZnO nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed the c-axis oriented growth direction with wurtzite crystal structure of ZnO nanorods. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques have shown the presence of Zn, O and Au atoms in the prepared functional material. Furthermore, the anti-notch 3 was physically adsorbed on the gold nanoparticles functionalized ZnO nanorods. The developed potentiometric immunosensor has shown response to the wide range of notch 3 molecules. The detected range included 1.00 x 10(-5)-1.50 x 10(0 ) μg/mL with a sensitivity of 23.15 ± 0.31 mV/decade. The analytical parameters including reproducibility, stability, and selectivity were also investigated and the observed results indicate the acceptable performance of the notch 3 biosensor. Moreover, the proposed notch 3 biosensor exhibited a fast response time of 10 s.

  12. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  13. Comparison between a Conductometric Biosensor and ELISA in the Evaluation of Johne’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Okafor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease (JD, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, is an important gastrointestinal disease of cattle worldwide because of the economic losses encountered in JD-affected herds. These losses include reduction in milk yield in cows, premature culling and reduced carcass weight of culled diseased animals. In the U.S. dairy industry, economic losses from reduced productivity associated with JD are estimated to cost between $200 and $250 million annually. The development of non-laboratory-based assays would support more frequent testing of animals for JD and could improve its control. Conductometric biosensors combine immunomigration technology with electronic signal detection and have been adapted for the detection of IgG antibody against MAP. In the present study, a capture membrane with limited variability in the immunomigration channel and an optimal concentration of the secondary anti-bovine antibody used in a previously developed conductometric biosensor were compared with a commercially available antibody detection ELISA in their evaluation of JD, using samples of serum from cattle whose JD status where unknown. There was a moderate strength of agreement (kappa = 0.41 between the two assays. Findings from this preliminary study support the continued development of conductometric biosensors for use in the diagnosis of JD.

  14. Highly sensitive uric acid biosensor based on individual zinc oxide micro/nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yanguang; Yan, Xiaoqin; Kang, Zhuo; Lin, Pei; Fang, Xiaofei; Lei, Yang; Ma, Siwei; Zhang, Yue

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of individual zinc oxide (ZnO) micro/nanowires in an electrochemical biosensor for uric acid. The wires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and possess uniform morphology and high crystallinity as revealed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence studies. The enzyme uricase was then immobilized on the surface of the ZnO micro/nanowires by physical adsorption, and this was proven by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The resulting uric acid biosensor undergoes fast electron transfer between the active site of the enzyme and the surface of the electrode. It displays high sensitivity (89.74 μA cm −2 mM −1 ) and a wide linear analytical range (between 0.1 mM and 0.59 mM concentrations of uric acid). This study also demonstrates the potential of the use of individual ZnO micro/nanowires for the construction of highly sensitive nano-sized biosensors. (author)

  15. Optimization of sol-gel medium for entrapment of acetylcholinesterase enzyme in biosensor for pesticide detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, S. D.; Rahayu, F. S.; Widyaningsih, T. D.

    2018-03-01

    Pesticides are chemical substances used to kill and control pests or diseases that can damage crops. The use of pesticides should be done precisely because the accumulation of chemicals contained in pesticides can cause various health effects. Therefore, detection of pesticide residues on plants is important to reduce the risk of poisoning due to pesticide residues. Some of the conventional methods that have been done to detect pesticide residues have weaknesses among expensive tools, takes a long time, and are generally performed by trained laboratory technicians. Biosensors are analytical devices that can measure the quantitative or semi-quantitative targets of analyte by utilizing a bioreceptor such as enzyme. Several studies have shown that enzyme-based acetylcholinesterase-based biosensors can be used to detect pesticide residues in vegetable samples. The objective of this research was to get a proper silica based sol-gel formulation with molar ratio of H2O:TEOS and NaOH concentration as immobilization medium of acetylcholinesterase enzyme for biosensor application. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was used in order to determine the interaction between the parameters studied and resulting responses which were amount and activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. Based on the research, the best result for immobilized enzyme activity was shown by molar ratio (H2O: TEOS) 1: 8 and 4 mM NaOH treatment.

  16. Label-free detection of sex determining region Y (SRY) via capacitive biosensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we present for the first time, the use of a simple fractal capacitive biosensor for the quantification and detection of sex-determining region Y (SRY) genes. This section of genetic code, which is found on the Y chromosome, finds importance for study as it causes fetuses to develop characteristics of male sex-like gonads when a mutation occurs. It is also an important genetic code in men, and disorders involving the SRY gene can cause infertility and sexual malfunction that lead to a variety of gene mutational disorders. We have therefore designed silicon-based, label-free fractal capacitive biosensors to quantify various proteins and genes. We take advantage of a good dielectric material, Parylene C for enhancing the performance of the sensors. We have integrated these sensors with a simple microchannel for easy handling of fluids on the detection area. The read-out value of an Agilent LCR meter used to measure capacitance of the sensor at a frequency of 1 MHz determined gene specificity and gene quantification. These data revealed that the capacitance measurement of the capacitive biosensor for the SRY gene depended on both the target and the concentration of DNA. The experimental outcomes in the present study can be used to detect DNA and its variations in crucial fields that have a great impact on our daily lives, such as clinical and veterinary diagnostics, industrial and environmental testing and forensic sciences.

  17. Titanium dioxide-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite and its glucose biosensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammad; Jang, Sang-Dong [Center for EAPap Actuator, Department of Mechanical Engineering, INHA University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaehwan, E-mail: jaehwan@inha.ac.kr [Center for EAPap Actuator, Department of Mechanical Engineering, INHA University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was fabricated by blending TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and cellulose solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hybrid nanocomposite has advantages of biodegradability and bio-compatibility of cellulose and physical properties of TiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized into the hybrid nanocomposite and covalent bonding between TiO{sub 2} and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear response of the glucose biosensor was obtained in the range of 1-10 mM. - Abstract: This paper investigates the fabrication of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite and its possibility for a conductometric glucose biosensor. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were blended with cellulose solution prepared by dissolving cotton pulp with lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent to fabricate TiO{sub 2}-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite. The enzyme, glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized into this hybrid nanocomposite by physical adsorption method. The successful immobilization of glucose oxidase into TiO{sub 2}-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite via covalent bonding between TiO{sub 2} and GOx was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron analysis. The linear response of the glucose biosensor is obtained in the range of 1-10 mM. This study demonstrates that TiO{sub 2}-cellulose hybrid nanocomposite can be a potential candidate for an inexpensive, flexible and disposable glucose biosensor.

  18. A novel fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection and tyrosinase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Shasha

    2018-04-17

    In this work, a novel simple fluorescent biosensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of adrenaline was established. Firstly, water-soluble CuInS 2 quantum dots (QDs) capped by L-Cys were synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the positively charged adrenaline was assembled on the surface of CuInS 2 QDs due to the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, which led to the formation of adrenaline-CuInS 2 QD (Adr-CuInS 2 QD) electrostatic complexes. Tyrosinase (TYR) can catalyze adrenaline to generate H 2 O 2 , and additionally oxidize the adrenaline to adrenaline quinone. Both the H 2 O 2 and the adrenaline quinone can quench the fluorescence of the CuInS 2 QDs through the electron transfer (ET) process. Thus, the determination of adrenaline could be facilely achieved by taking advantage of the fluorescence "turn off" feature of CuInS 2 QDs. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence quenching ratio I f /I f0 (I f and I f0 were the fluorescence intensity of Adr-CuInS 2 QDs in the presence and absence of TYR, respectively) was proportional to the logarithm of adrenaline concentration in the range of 1 × 10 -8 -1 × 10 -4  mol L -1 with the detection limit of 3.6 nmol L -1 . The feasibility of the proposed biosensor in real sample assay was also studied and satisfactory results were obtained. Significantly, the proposed fluorescent biosensor can also be utilized to screen TYR inhibitors. Graphical abstract Schematic illustration of the fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection (A) and tyrosinase inhibitor screening (B).

  19. Design Optimization of Structural Parameters for Highly Sensitive Photonic Crystal Label-Free Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-ah Han

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV, full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1 the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2 the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3 the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU−1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm.

  20. Design optimization of structural parameters for highly sensitive photonic crystal label-free biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jonghyun; Han, Yun-ah; Kim, Seok-min

    2013-03-07

    The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC) label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV), full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1) the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2) the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3) the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU-1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm.