WorldWideScience

Sample records for resonance residual states

  1. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus and boron in coals and combustion residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchill, P.; Howarth, O.W.; Richards, D.G.; Sword, B.J. (British Coal Corporation, Stoke Orchard (UK). Coal Research Establishment)

    1990-04-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with magic angle spinning (MAS-n.m.r.) was used to study the occurrence of phosphorus and boron in coal, and their fate on combustion. These elements are only minor components of coal, but may significantly influence the utilization properties. {sup 31} P MAS-n.m.r. spectroscopy has confirmed that phosphorus is present in coal predominantly as apatite. This mineral is thermally stable under oxidizing conditions, and survives largely unaltered in high temperature ashes. However, under the semi-reducing bed conditions of certain stoker-fired boilers, it may be decomposed, volatilizing the phosphorus. The {sup 31}P MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show phosphorus in a markedly different coordination environment to that in apatite, the chemical shift suggesting aluminium phosphate or boron phosphate. {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of coals exhibit resonances due to both trigonal and tetrahedrally coordinated boron. Trigonal boron is probably present as tourmaline, but the nature of the tetrahedral boron is less certain; it may be held in tetrahedral sites within certain clay minerals. In common with phosphorus, boron may be volatilized during combustion. The {sup 11}B MAS-n.m.r. spectra of bonded deposits show a tetrahedral resonance with a chemical shift quite consistent with that of boron phosphate. 39 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  3. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  4. Identifying inter-residue resonances in crowded 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra of membrane proteins by solid-state MAS NMR difference spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Yimin; Cross, Timothy A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fu Riqiang, E-mail: rfu@magnet.fsu.edu [National High Magnet Field Lab (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The feasibility of using difference spectroscopy, i.e. subtraction of two correlation spectra at different mixing times, for substantially enhanced resolution in crowded two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra is presented. With the analyses of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin diffusion in simple spin systems, difference spectroscopy is proposed to partially separate the spin diffusion resonances of relatively short intra-residue distances from the longer inter-residue distances, leading to a better identification of the inter-residue resonances. Here solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra of the full length M2 protein embedded in synthetic lipid bilayers have been used to illustrate the resolution enhancement in the difference spectra. The integral membrane M2 protein of Influenza A virus assembles as a tetrameric bundle to form a proton-conducting channel that is activated by low pH and is essential for the viral lifecycle. Based on known amino acid resonance assignments from amino acid specific labeled samples of truncated M2 sequences or from time-consuming 3D experiments of uniformly labeled samples, some inter-residue resonances of the full length M2 protein can be identified in the difference spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C labeled protein that are consistent with the high resolution structure of the M2 (22-62) protein (Sharma et al., Science 330(6003):509-512, 2010)

  5. Resonant state expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.)

  6. Method to obtain resonances and virtual states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Fonseca, A.C.; Tomio, L.

    1982-01-01

    A naive method is proposed for the calculation of resonance position and-residue at low energies and of virtual states localized in the non-physical sheet associated to the lowest threshold of two body breaking. This method is applied to the study of some virtual states of the few nucleon system. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Separable expansions for virtual states and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Fonseca, A.C.; Tomio, L.

    1983-01-01

    Finite rank expansions for two- and three-body t matrices are analytically continued to the unphysical sheet of the complex energy plane associated with the lowest two-body scattering threshold in order to obtain the position and residue of the virtual state and resonance poles. The present method is applied to study the 1 S 0 virtual state of two nucleons, the Efimov virtual states of three identical bosons, and the doublet virtual state of three nucleons

  8. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M A; Hatcher, P G

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studied by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing /sup 13/C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  10. Probabilistic interpretation of resonant states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper reviews the basic definition of the resonant state in quantum ... We show that particles leak from the central region in the resonant state. The ..... The basic idea is as follows (figure 4): Consider a resonant eigenstate. Φn(x ...

  11. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  12. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  13. Polaronic and dressed molecular states in orbital Feshbach resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junjun; Qi, Ran

    2018-04-01

    We consider the impurity problem in an orbital Feshbach resonance (OFR), with a single excited clock state | e ↑⟩ atom immersed in a Fermi sea of electronic ground state | g ↓⟩. We calculate the polaron effective mass and quasi-particle residue, as well as the polaron to molecule transition. By including one particle-hole excitation in the molecular state, we find significant correction to the transition point. This transition point moves toward the BCS side for increasing particle densities, which suggests that the corresponding many-body physics is similar to a narrow resonance.

  14. Resonant power processors. I - State plane analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, R.; Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    State-plane techniques in conjunction with piecewise-linear analysis is employed to study the steady-state and transient characteristics of a series resonant converter. With the direct viewing of the resonant tank energy and the device switching instants, the state portrayal provides unique insights into the complex behavior of the converter. Operation of the converter under both continuous and discontinuous current modes and at frequencies both below and above resonant frequency are discussed.

  15. Scalar resonances as two-quark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    On the base of the theory with U(3)xU(3) symmetric chiral Lagrangian the properties of the two-quark scalar mesons are considered. It is shown, that the scalar resonances delta (980) and K(1240) may be treated as the p-wave states of anti qq system. The properties of the isovector and strange scalar mesons, obtained as a propetrties of the two-quark states, turn out to be very close to the properties of the isovector scalar resonance delta (980) and strange resonance K(1240)

  16. Parent di-nuclear quasimolecular states as exotic resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, N.

    2002-01-01

    It in shown that the parent di-nuclear quasimolecular state is an exotic resonant state that corresponds to a S-matrix pole in the neighbourhood of an attractor in the k-plane. The properties of the parent quasimolecular states i.e. energy, widths, deviation from the linear dependence of the energy on l(l + 1) doorway character and criteria for observability, result naturally from the general properties of the exotic resonant states. (author)

  17. Giant dipole resonances built on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of giant dipole resonances built on excited nuclear states are reviewed, with emphasis on recent results. Nonstatistical (p,γ) reactions in light nuclei, and statistical complex-particle reactions in light and heavy nuclei are discussed. 27 references

  18. Alpha Resonant States in 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Souza, M. A.; Miyake, H.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Ukita, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The 9 Be( 6 Li,d) 13 C reaction was used to investigate alpha resonant states in 13 C up to 15 MeV of excitation. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. An energy resolution of 50 keV was obtained. Several narrow alpha resonant states not previously measured were detected, in particular the one at the (3α+n) threshold populated by an L = 2 transfer, revealing a 9 Be+α component for the 1/2 - cluster state candidate at this threshold. Experimental angular distributions are presented in comparison with DWBA predictions.

  19. Corn Residue Use by Livestock in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty R. Schmer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corn ( L. residue grazing or harvest provides a simple and economical practice to integrate crops and livestock, but limited information is available on how widespread corn residue utilization is practiced by US producers. In 2010, the USDA Economic Research Service surveyed producers from 19 states on corn grain and residue management practices. Total corn residue grazed or harvested was 4.87 million ha. Approximately 4.06 million ha was grazed by 11.7 million livestock (primarily cattle in 2010. The majority of grazed corn residue occurred in Nebraska (1.91 million ha, Iowa (385,000 ha, South Dakota (361,000 ha, and Kansas (344,000 ha. Average grazing days ranged from 10 to 73 d (mean = 40 d. Corn residue harvests predominantly occurred in the central and northern Corn Belt, with an estimated 2.9 Tg of corn residue harvested across the 19 states. This survey highlights the importance of corn residue for US livestock, particularly in the western Corn Belt.

  20. Dry cleaning of fluorocarbon residues by low-power electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, S H; Yuh, H K; Yoon Eui Joon; Lee, S I

    1988-01-01

    A low-power ( 50 W) electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma cleaning process was demonstrated for the removal of fluorocarbon residue layers formed by reactive ion etching of silicon dioxide. The absence of residue layers was confirmed by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The ECR hydrogen plasma cleaning was applied to contact cleaning of a contact string structure, resulting in comparable contact resistance arising during by a conventional contact cleaning procedure. Ion-assisted chemical reaction involving reactive atomic hydrogen species generated in the plasma is attributed for the removal of fluorocarbon residue layers.

  1. Residue-specific membrane location of peptides and proteins using specifically and extensively deuterated lipids and {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Residue-specific location of peptides in the hydrophobic core of membranes was examined using {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H REDOR and samples in which the lipids were selectively deuterated. The transmembrane topology of the KALP peptide was validated with this approach with substantial dephasing observed for deuteration in the bilayer center and reduced or no dephasing for deuteration closer to the headgroups. Insertion of {beta} sheet HIV and helical and {beta} sheet influenza virus fusion peptides into the hydrophobic core of the membrane was validated in samples with extensively deuterated lipids.

  2. Effect of annealing induced residual stress on the resonance frequency of SiO2 microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, effect of residual stress, induced due to annealing of SiO2 microcantilevers (MCs) on their resonance frequency is studied. SiO2MCs of various dimensions were fabricated using direct laser writer & wet chemical etching method and were annealed at 800 °C in oxygen environment, post release. The residual stress was estimated from the deflection profile of the MCs measured using 3D optical microscope, before and after annealing. Resonance frequency of the MCs was measured using nano-vibration analyzer and was found to change after annealing. Further the frequency shift was found to depend on the MC dimensions. This is attributed to the large stress gradients induced by annealing and associated stiffness changes.

  3. Modeling of residual stress state in turning of 304L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiorgue, F.; Rech, J.; Bergheau, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Research presented in this paper aims to link machining parameters to residual stress state and helps understanding mechanisms responsible of machined surface properties modifications. The first presented works are based on an experimental campaign. They reproduce the finishing turning operation of 304L and allow observing the residual stress state evolution at the work piece surface and for an affected depth of 0.2 mm for such processes. Then, the finishing turning operation is simulated numerically in order to realize the same sensitivity study to cutting parameters. This simulation is based on an hybrid approach mixing experimental data and numerical simulation. This method allows getting round the classical difficulties of turning simulation by applying equivalent thermo mechanical loadings onto the work piece surface without modeling the material separation phenomena. Moreover the numerical model uses an hardening law taking into account dynamic recrystallization phenomena. (authors)

  4. State of the art magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    In less than a decade Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has evolved from a laboratory demonstration to a safe and effective technique for clinical diagnosis. This evolutionary process continues. At this time 2-D and 3-D imaging of the head and body is firmly established in clinical use. Surface coil imaging, two-component chemical shift imaging, in-vivo spectroscopy and flow imaging are currently in various stages of development. The present state of the art of MRI is a function of an array of technologies: magnet, Rf coil, Rf pulse amplifier, gradient coil and driver, pulse programmer, A/D converter, computer system architecture, array processors and mass storage (both magnetic and optical). The overall product design is the result of a complex process which balances the advantages and disadvantages of each component for optimal system performance and flexibility. The author discusses the organization of a state-of-the-art MRI system. Several examples of the kinds of system interactions affecting design choices are given. (Auth.)

  5. Protein-protein docking with dynamic residue protonation states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Praneeth Kilambi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions depend on a host of environmental factors. Local pH conditions influence the interactions through the protonation states of the ionizable residues that can change upon binding. In this work, we present a pH-sensitive docking approach, pHDock, that can sample side-chain protonation states of five ionizable residues (Asp, Glu, His, Tyr, Lys on-the-fly during the docking simulation. pHDock produces successful local docking funnels in approximately half (79/161 the protein complexes, including 19 cases where standard RosettaDock fails. pHDock also performs better than the two control cases comprising docking at pH 7.0 or using fixed, predetermined protonation states. On average, the top-ranked pHDock structures have lower interface RMSDs and recover more native interface residue-residue contacts and hydrogen bonds compared to RosettaDock. Addition of backbone flexibility using a computationally-generated conformational ensemble further improves native contact and hydrogen bond recovery in the top-ranked structures. Although pHDock is designed to improve docking, it also successfully predicts a large pH-dependent binding affinity change in the Fc-FcRn complex, suggesting that it can be exploited to improve affinity predictions. The approaches in the study contribute to the goal of structural simulations of whole-cell protein-protein interactions including all the environmental factors, and they can be further expanded for pH-sensitive protein design.

  6. Determination of Activated Carbon Residual Life using a Microwave Cavity Resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, A; Wylie, S; Shaw, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Thomas, A; Keele, H

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the continuation of work conducted jointly between Dstl and LJMU. This unique body of work has been, largely, concerned with detecting the residual life of high performance filter materials using electromagnetic (EM) waves within a resonant cavity. Past work has considered both HEPA [1] and ASZM-TEDA[2] activated carbon filter materials. This paper continues the later work, considering the response of ASZM-TEDA activated carbon through the co-ageing of two distinct batches of the material. The paper briefly introduces activated carbon, discusses theory relevant to the work and the methodology used for investigation. A comprehensive set of results is included which seek to validate this technique for determining the residual lifespan of activated carbon.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Grossman, W.E.L.; Killough, P.M

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene (DPB) in its ground state and the resonance Raman spectrum (RRS) of DPB in its short-lived electronically excited triplet state are reported. Transient spectra were obtained by a pump-probe technique using two pulsed lasers...

  9. Magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging differentiates acute recurrent ipsilateral deep vein thrombosis from residual thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Melanie; Mol, Gerben C; van Rooden, Cornelis J; Klok, Frederikus A; Westerbeek, Robin E; Iglesias Del Sol, Antonio; van de Ree, Marcel A; de Roos, Albert; Huisman, Menno V

    2014-07-24

    Accurate diagnostic assessment of suspected ipsilateral recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major clinical challenge because differentiating between acute recurrent thrombosis and residual thrombosis is difficult with compression ultrasonography (CUS). We evaluated noninvasive magnetic resonance direct thrombus imaging (MRDTI) in a prospective study of 39 patients with symptomatic recurrent ipsilateral DVT (incompressibility of a different proximal venous segment than at the prior DVT) and 42 asymptomatic patients with at least 6-month-old chronic residual thrombi and normal D-dimer levels. All patients were subjected to MRDTI. MRDTI images were judged by 2 independent radiologists blinded for the presence of acute DVT and a third in case of disagreement. The sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver reliability of MRDTI were determined. MRDTI demonstrated acute recurrent ipsilateral DVT in 37 of 39 patients and was normal in all 42 patients without symptomatic recurrent disease for a sensitivity of 95% (95% CI, 83% to 99%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 92% to 100%). Interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98). MRDTI images were adequate for interpretation in 95% of the cases. MRDTI is a sensitive and reproducible method for distinguishing acute ipsilateral recurrent DVT from 6-month-old chronic residual thrombi in the leg veins. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and isotopic analysis of carbonized residues from subarctic Canadian prehistoric pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherriff, B.L.; Tisdale, M.A.; Sayer, B.G.; Schwarcz, H.P.; Knyf, M.

    1995-01-01

    Late prehistoric pottery is found in abundance at archaeological sites around Southern Indian Lake. Black residues, found on the two dominant vessel forms, flat plates and round pots, are presumed to be the remains of prehistoric meals. 13 C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CPMAS NMR) and 13 C and 15 N isotopic ratios and C/N ratios are used to reconstruct prehistoric diet and to shed light on possible uses for the plates. Samples of foods were cooked in clay pots, on a wood fire, to simulate the conditions of burning that could have produced the residue. Decomposition of carbohydrates, protein, and fat during cooking is studied with 13 C CPMAS NMR, and the effect of cooking on isotopic and C/N ratios documented. Predominantly fish and fat were cooked in the pots, whereas the residues from plates contain a greater proportion of fat and could have been used as frying pans or possibly as fat-burning lamps placed on the ashes of a wood fire. (Author)

  11. Correlated ground state and E2 giant resonance built on it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    1995-01-01

    Taking 16 O as an example of realistic nuclei, we demonstrate that a correlated ground state can be obtained as a long time solution of a time-dependent density-matrix formalism (TDDM) when the residual interaction is adiabatically treated. We also study in TDDM the E2 giant resonance of 16 O built on the correlated ground state and compare it with that built on the Hartree-Fock ground state. It is found that a spurious mixing of low frequency components seen in the latter is eliminated by using the correlated ground state. (author)

  12. On the convergence of quantum resonant-state expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J. M.; Bahl, A.; Jakobsen, P.; Moloney, J. V.; Kolesik, M.

    2016-01-01

    Completeness of the system of Stark resonant states is investigated for a one-dimensional quantum particle with the Dirac-delta potential exposed to an external homogeneous field. It is shown that the resonant series representation of a given wavefunction converges on the negative real axis while the series diverges on the positive axis. Despite the divergent nature of the resonant expansion, good approximations can be obtained in a compact spatial domain.

  13. On the convergence of quantum resonant-state expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J. M.; Bahl, A. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 East University Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Jakobsen, P. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Moloney, J. V.; Kolesik, M. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 East University Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Arizona Center for Mathematical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Completeness of the system of Stark resonant states is investigated for a one-dimensional quantum particle with the Dirac-delta potential exposed to an external homogeneous field. It is shown that the resonant series representation of a given wavefunction converges on the negative real axis while the series diverges on the positive axis. Despite the divergent nature of the resonant expansion, good approximations can be obtained in a compact spatial domain.

  14. On resonances and bound states of Smilansky Hamiltonian

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Lotoreichik, Vladimir; Tater, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2016), s. 789-802 ISSN 2220-8054 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Smilansky Hamiltonian * resonances * resonance free region * weak coupling asymptotics * Riemann surface * bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  15. Detection of Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Residuals in Pork Liver Using a Customized Surface Plasmon Resonance Bioanalyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiandong; Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Shun; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Jianwei; Hu, Xinran; Liang, Hao; Zhu, Juanhua; Sun, Xiaohui; Ma, Liuzheng; Jiang, Min

    2015-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay with an immobilization of self-assembled molecular identification membrane for the detection of residual Clenbuterol Hydrochloride (CLB) in pork liver was systematically investigated and experimentally validated for its high performance. SPR immunoassay with a regular competitive inhibition assay cannot be directly verified to detect CLB residuals. In this study, the binding of Au film with mercaptopropionic acid was investigated using the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. After that, the immunoglobulin IgG of swine (SwIgG-CLB) was bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. The modified comprehensive analysis of how the membrane structure works was introduced together with the customized SPR bioanalyzer. In order to evaluate the performance of this biomembrane structure, the concentrations of CLB-contained solutions of 0 ng•mL-1, 10 ng•mL-1, 20 ng•mL-1, 33.3 ng•mL-1, and 40 ng•mL-1 were prepared by adding CLB reagents into the solutions of CLB antibody (Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Antibody, CLB-Ab), successively and then the response unit (RU) was measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the fitting curve was established with the R-Square value of 0.9929. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 88.48% to 103.21% was experimented and the limit of detection of CLB in 1.26 ng•mL-1 was obtained efficiently. It was concluded that the detection method associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to the determination of residual CLB in pork liver quantitatively by using the customized SPR bioanalyzer. PMID:25799327

  16. Detection of clenbuterol hydrochloride residuals in pork liver using a customized surface plasmon resonance bioanalyzer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Hu

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunoassay with an immobilization of self-assembled molecular identification membrane for the detection of residual Clenbuterol Hydrochloride (CLB in pork liver was systematically investigated and experimentally validated for its high performance. SPR immunoassay with a regular competitive inhibition assay cannot be directly verified to detect CLB residuals. In this study, the binding of Au film with mercaptopropionic acid was investigated using the known form of the strong S-Au covalent bonds formed by the chemical radical of the mercaptopropionic acid and the Au film. After that, the immunoglobulin IgG of swine (SwIgG-CLB was bonded with the mercaptopropionic acid by covalent -CO-NH- amide bonding. The modified comprehensive analysis of how the membrane structure works was introduced together with the customized SPR bioanalyzer. In order to evaluate the performance of this biomembrane structure, the concentrations of CLB-contained solutions of 0 ng · mL(-1, 10 ng · mL(-1, 20 ng · mL(-1, 33.3 ng · mL(-1, and 40 ng · mL(-1 were prepared by adding CLB reagents into the solutions of CLB antibody (Clenbuterol Hydrochloride Antibody, CLB-Ab, successively and then the response unit (RU was measured individually. Using the data collected from the linear CCD array, the fitting curve was established with the R-Square value of 0.9929. Correspondingly, the recovery rate ranged from 88.48% to 103.21% was experimented and the limit of detection of CLB in 1.26 ng · mL(-1 was obtained efficiently. It was concluded that the detection method associated with biomembrane properties is expected to contribute much to the determination of residual CLB in pork liver quantitatively by using the customized SPR bioanalyzer.

  17. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi; Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  18. Electronically excited negative ion resonant states in chloroethylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, O.G., E-mail: khv@mail.ru; Lukin, V.G.; Tuimedov, G.M.; Khatymova, L.Z.; Kinzyabulatov, R.R.; Tseplin, E.E.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Several novel dissociative negative ion channels were revealed in chloroethylenes. • The electronically excited resonant states were recorded in all chloroethylenes under study. • The states were assigned to the inter-shell types, but not to the core-excited Feshbach one. - Abstract: The negative ion mass spectra of the resonant electron capture by molecules of 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene-cis, 1,2-dichloroethylene-trans, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene have been recorded in the 0–12 eV range of the captured electron energy using static magnetic sector mass spectrometer modified for operation in the resonant electron capture regime. As a result, several novel low-intensive dissociation channels were revealed in the compounds under study. Additionally, the negative ion resonant states were recorded at approximately 3–12 eV, mostly for the first time. These resonant states were assigned to the electronically excited resonances of the inter-shell type by comparing their energies with those of the parent neutral molecules triplet and singlet electronically excited states known from the energy-loss spectra obtained by previous studies.

  19. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Puppo, Carine [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Manneville, Stéphanie [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Gontero, Brigitte [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brechot@inserm.fr [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France)

    2016-08-12

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  20. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick; Puppo, Carine; Manneville, Stéphanie; Gontero, Brigitte; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  1. Operation States Analysis of the Series-Parallel resonant Converter Working Above Resonance Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dzurko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Operation states analysis of a series-parallel converter working above resonance frequency is described in the paper. Principal equations are derived for individual operation states. On the basis of them the diagrams are made out. The diagrams give the complex image of the converter behaviour for individual circuit parameters. The waveforms may be utilised at designing the inverter individual parts.

  2. Resonances in the potential scattering and decay of metastable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsch, J.

    1975-04-01

    The analytic properties of the S-matrix in the complex energy plane are reviewed for potential scattering with particular attention to resonance scattering and decay of metastable states. For a one dimensional model potential with a potential barrier and a repulsive core exact formulas are derived for the energy and width of a resonance in terms of the scattering amplitudes of the barrier and the repulsive core alone. For narrow resonances simple and intuitive results are obtained, which are applied to semiclassical cases where the WKB approximation is valid. (orig.) [de

  3. Fluid dynamics of giant resonances on high spin states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Nardo, M.; Di Toro, M.; Giansiracusa, G.; Lombardo, U.; Russo, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe giant resonances built on high spin states along the yrast line as scaling solutions of a linearized Vlasov equation in a rotating frame obtained from a TDHF theory in phase space. For oblate cranked solutions we get a shift and a splitting of the isoscalar giant resonances in terms of the angular velocity. Results are shown for 40 Ca and 168 Er. The relative CM strengths are also calculated. (orig.)

  4. State-plane analysis of parallel resonant converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, R.; Lee, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analyzing the complex operation of a parallel resonant converter is developed, utilizing graphical state-plane techniques. The comprehensive mode analysis uncovers, for the first time, the presence of other complex modes besides the continuous conduction mode and the discontinuous conduction mode and determines their theoretical boundaries. Based on the insight gained from the analysis, a novel, high-frequency resonant buck converter is proposed. The voltage conversion ratio of the new converter is almost independent of load.

  5. Direct surface plasmon resonance immunosensing of pyraclostrobin residues in untreated fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriz, E; García-Fernández, C; Mercader, J V; Abad-Fuentes, A; Escuela, A M; Lechuga, L M

    2012-12-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay for on-line detection of the strobilurin fungicide pyraclostrobin in untreated fruit juices is presented. The analysis of pyraclostrobin residues is accomplished in apple, grape, and cranberry samples by monitoring the recognition events occurring separately in a two-channel home-made SPR biosensor. Covalent coupling of the analyte derivative results in a reversible method, enabling more than 80 measurements on the same sensor surface. Optimization of the immunoassay conditions provides limits of detection as low as 0.16 μg L(-1). The selectivity and reproducibility of the analysis is ensured by studying both non-specific interactions with unrelated compounds and inter-assay coefficients of variation. Excellent recovery ranging from 98 to 103% was achieved by a simple 1:5 dilution of fruit juice with assay buffer before the analysis. The lack of previous cleaning and homogenization procedures reduces the analysis time of a single food sample to only 25 min, including the regeneration cycle.

  6. Modelling of the Residual Stress State in a new Type of Residual Stress Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2014-01-01

    forms the experimental case which is analysed. A FE model of the specimen is used for analysing the curing history and the residual stress build up. The model is validated against experimental strain data which are recorded by a Fibre Brag Grating sensor and good agreement has been achieved.......The paper presents a study on a new type residual stress specimen which is proposed as a simple way to conduct experimental validation for model predictions. A specimen comprising of a steel plate with circular hole embedded into a stack of CSM glass fibre and further infused with an epoxy resin...

  7. Driving a mechanical resonator into coherent states via random measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ll; Wu, L-A; Chhajlany, R W; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    We propose dynamical schemes to engineer coherent states of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled to an ancillary, superconducting flux qubit. The flux qubit, when repeatedly projected on to its ground state, drives the MR into a coherent state in probabilistic, albeit heralded fashion. Assuming no operations on the state of the MR during the protocol, coherent states are successfully generated only up to a certain value of the displacement parameter. This restriction can be overcome at the cost of a one-time operation on the initial state of the MR. We discuss the possibility of experimental realization of the presented schemes. (paper)

  8. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of proximal histidyl residues in human normal and abnormal hemoglobins: a probe for the heme pocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.; Lin, A.K.L.; Ho, C.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 250 MHz has been used to investigate the conformations of proximal histidyl residues of human normal adult hemoglobin, hemoglobin Kempsey [K145(HC2) Tyr #betta# Asp], and hemoglobin McKees Rocks [K145(HC2) Tyr #betta# Term] around neutral pH in H 2 O at 27 0 C, all in the deoxy form. Two resonances that occur between 58 and 76 ppm downfield from the water proton signal have been assigned to the hyperfine shifted proximal histidyl NH-exchangeable protons of the J and K-chains of deoxyhemoglobin. These two resonances are sensitive to the quaternary state of hemoglobin, amino acid substitutions in the J 1 K 2 -subunit interface and in the carboxy-terminal region of the K-chain, and the addition of organic phosphates. The experimental results show that there are differences in the heme pockets among these four hemoglobins studied. The structural and dynamic information derived from the hyperfine shifted proximal histidyl NH-exchangeable proton resonances complement that obtained from the ferrous hyperfine shifted and exchangeable proton resonances of deoxyhemoglobin over the spectral region from 5 to 20 ppm downfield from H 2 O. The relationship between these findings and Perutz's stereochemical mechanism for the cooperative oxygenation of hemoglobin is discussed

  9. Design of high power solid-state pulsed laser resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narro, R.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.

    2009-01-01

    Methods and configurations for the design of high power solid-state pulsed laser resonators, operating in free running, are presented. For fundamental mode high power resonators, a method is proposed for the design of a resonator with joined stability zones. In the case of multimode resonators, two configurations are introduced for maximizing the laser overall efficiency due to the compensation of the astigmatism induced by the excitation. The first configuration consists in a triangular ring resonator. The results for this configuration are discussed theoretically, showing that it is possible to compensate the astigmatism of the thermal lens virtually in a 100%; however this is only possible for a specific pumping power. The second configuration proposes a dual-active medium resonator, rotated 90 degree one from the other around the optical axis, where each active medium acts as an astigmatic lens of the same dioptric power. The reliability of this configuration is corroborated experimentally using a Nd:YAG dual-active medium resonator. It is found that in the pumping power range where the astigmatism compensation is possible, the overall efficiency is constant, even when increasing the excitation power with the consequent increase of the thermal lens dioptric power. (Author)

  10. Analysis of residual stress state in sheet metal parts processed by single point incremental forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, F.; Gies, S.; Dobecki, M.; Brömmelhoff, K.; Tekkaya, A. E.; Reimers, W.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanical properties of formed metal components are highly affected by the prevailing residual stress state. A selective induction of residual compressive stresses in the component, can improve the product properties such as the fatigue strength. By means of single point incremental forming (SPIF), the residual stress state can be influenced by adjusting the process parameters during the manufacturing process. To achieve a fundamental understanding of the residual stress formation caused by the SPIF process, a valid numerical process model is essential. Within the scope of this paper the significance of kinematic hardening effects on the determined residual stress state is presented based on numerical simulations. The effect of the unclamping step after the manufacturing process is also analyzed. An average deviation of the residual stress amplitudes in the clamped and unclamped condition of 18 % reveals, that the unclamping step needs to be considered to reach a high numerical prediction quality.

  11. Effect of metal coating and residual stress on the resonant frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CranesSci MEMS Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian. Institute of ... Finally, it is found that the analytical models give an error of ... As a resonator, the most important characteristics are the resonant frequency and.

  12. Three-photon resonances due to autoionizing states in calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka, A.; Dygdala, R.S.; Raczynski, A.; Zaremba, J.; Kobus, J. [Instytut Fizyki, Uniwersytet M Kopernika w Toruniu, Torun (Poland)

    2002-04-28

    In the present study we have investigated three-photon ionization in Ca in which autoionizing states are engaged. The two-photon resonant process (from the Ca ground state 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) occurred through or at least in the vicinity of one of the following states: 4s4d {sup 1}D{sub 2}, 4p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 2}, 4s6s {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 4p{sup 2} {sup 1}D{sub 2} and 4p{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}, with the third photon either reaching the continuum directly or one of the autoionizing states. The three-photon resonant transitions to 3dmp, mf: {sup 1}P{sub 1}, {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 3}D{sub 1} autoionizing states for m up to 21 have been observed. Some of the autoionizing resonances which we have found had not been observed before in a high-resolution one-photon absorption experiment (for J=1) and in multiphoton experiments (for J=3). We have compared the ionization signal as a function of the laser detuning and the laser intensity with theoretical curves obtained within a simple model (three-level atom + one-mode laser field). This gives information about the order of magnitude of the three-photon ionization probability through autoionizing states. (author)

  13. Fundamentals of metasurface lasers based on resonant dark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droulias, Sotiris; Technology - Hellas; Jain, Aditya; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Technology - Hellas; Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    2017-01-01

    Recently, our group proposed a metamaterial laser design based on explicitly coupled dark resonant states in low-loss dielectrics, which conceptually separates the gain-coupled resonant photonic state responsible for macroscopic stimulated emission from the coupling to specific free-space propagating modes, allowing independent adjustment of the lasing state and its coherent radiation output. Due to this functionality, it is now possible to make lasers that can overcome the trade-off between system dimensions and Q factor, especially for surface emitting lasers with deeply subwavelength thickness. In this paper, we give a detailed discussion of the key functionality and benefits of this design, such as radiation damping tunability, directionality, subwavelength integration, and simple layer-by-layer fabrication. Finally, we examine in detail the fundamental design tradeoffs that establish the principle of operation and must be taken into account and give guidance for realistic implementations.

  14. Observation of the resonant character of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Resonant structures in $B^0\\to\\psi'\\pi^-K^+$ decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using $pp$ collision data corresponding to $\\rm 3 fb^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with $K^+\\pi^-$ resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant $Z(4430)^-\\to\\psi'\\pi^-$ component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the $Z(4430)^-$ amplitude with the $\\psi'\\pi^-$ mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin-parity is determined unambiguously to be $1^+$.

  15. Unsynchronized resonance of covalent bonds in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Marconi B.S.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; Pavao, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    Daft calculations performed on different cluster models of cuprates (LaBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.7 , La 1.85 Sr 0.15 CuO 4 , YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , TlBa 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 8.78 , HgBa 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 8.27 ), metallic systems (Nb 3 Ge, MgB 2 ) and the pnictide LaO 0.92 F 0.08 FeAs made evident the occurrence of un synchronized resonance of covalent bonds in the superconducting state, as predicted by Paling's resonating valence bond Rb) theory. For cuprates, the un synchronized resonance involves electron transfer between Cu atoms accompanied by a decrease in the charge of the La, Sr, Y and Ca atoms. For MgB 2 , electron transfer occurs in the Mg layer, while the B layer behaves as charge reservoir. For Nb 3 Ge, unsynchronized resonance occurs among the Ge atoms, which should be responsible for charge transfer. For LaO 0.92 F 0.08 FeAs, the results suggest that both La-O and Fe-As layers are involved in the mechanism of superconductivity. The identification of unsynchronized resonances in these systems provides evidence which supports RVB as a suitable theory for high-temperature superconductivity (high-TC). (author)

  16. Resonant States in High-Temperature Superconductors with Impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacevic, Z L; Hayn, R

    2002-01-01

    A microscopic theory of resonant states for the Zn-doped CuO_2 plane in superconducting phase is formulated within the effective t-J model. In the model derived from the original p-d model Zn impurities are considered as vacancies for the d states on Cu sites. In the superconducting phase in addition to the local static perturbation induced by the vacancy a dynamical perturbation appears which results in frequency-dependent perturbation matrix. By employing the T-matrix formalism for the Green functions in terms of the Hubbard operators the local density of electronic states with d-, p- and s-symmetry is calculated.

  17. Programmable quantum-state discriminator by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, T.; Das, Ranabir; Kumar, Anil

    2005-01-01

    A programmable quantum-state discriminator is implemented by using nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a two-qubit spin-1/2 system, one for the data qubit and one for the ancilla (program) qubit. This device does the unambiguous (error-free) discrimination of a pair of states of the data qubit that are symmetrically located about a fixed state. The device is used to discriminate both linearly polarized states and elliptically polarized states. The maximum probability of successful discrimination is achieved by suitably preparing the ancilla qubit. It is also shown that the probability of discrimination depends on the angle of the unitary operator of the protocol and ellipticity of the data qubit state

  18. On the role of the residual stress state in product manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, G.; Groen, M.; Post, J.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the effect of the residual stress state during product manufacturing of AISI 420 steel on the final shape of the product. The work includes Finite Element (FE) calculations of the distribution of the residual stresses after metal forming and a heat treatment. The evolution

  19. Bound and resonant states in Coulomb-like potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Z.

    1985-12-01

    The potential separable expansion method was generalized for calculating bound and resonant states in Coulomb-like potentials. The complete set of Coulomb-Sturmian functions was taken as the basis to expand the short-range potential. On this basis the matrix elements of the Coulomb-Green functions were given in closed form as functions of the (complex) energy. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by a numerical example. (author)

  20. On the quark structure of resonance states in dual models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.V.; Zheltukhin, A.A.; Pashnev, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown using as an example the Veneziano dual model, that each particular dual model already contains a certain latent quark structure unambiauously determined by internal properties of the dual model. To prove this degeneration of the resonance state spectrum is studied by introducing an additional disturbing interaction into the model being considered. Induced transitions of particles into a vacuum act as such an additional disturbance. This method complements the known factorization method of Fubini, Gordon and Veneziano and turns out to be free from an essential limitation of the latter connected with implicit assumption about the basence of internal additive laws of conservation in the model. By using the method of induced transitions of particles into a vacuum it has been possible to show that the resonance state spectrum is indeed more degenerated than it should be expected from the factorization theorem, and that the supplementary degeneration corresponds to the quark model with an infinite number of quarks of the increasing mass. Structures of some terms of the dual amplitude expansion over the degrees of the constant of the induced transition of particles to vacuum are considered; it is shown that the summation of this expansion may be reduced to a solution of a certain integral equation. On the basis of the integral equation obtained an integral representation ofr dual amplitudes is established. The problems related with degeneration of resonance states and with determination of additive quantum numbers leading to the quark interpretation of the degeneration being considered are discussed

  1. Determination of the decay parameters of resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.

    1975-01-01

    The partial decay proton widths and the relative phases of six of the resonances in 29 P from excitation energies 5.7 to 7.1 MeV were determined. For this determination the angular distributions of protons scattered inelastically from the first 2 + excited state in 28 Si have been measured at 88 energies between E/sub p/ = 3.0 to 5.2 MeV. The coefficients describing the angular distributions were extracted from the experimental data and plotted as a function of C.M. bombarding energy over the resonance region. In addition triple angular correlations in the spin-flip geometry of the inelastically scattered protons from the 2 + first excited state of 28 Si with the γ-rays resulted from the de-excitation of 28 Si to its ground state were performed over the energy region E/sub p/ = 3.0 to 4.7 MeV. The coefficients describing these triple angular correlations were extracted and plotted versus C.M. bombarding energy. To aid in the analysis the experimental data of another triple angular correlation in the Goldfarb-Seyler geometry between the two radiations as in the spin flip angular correlation were used. Further analysis of the experimental data for the extraction of the partial decay widths and phases proceeded by calculating the theoretical expressions of the coefficients versus energy, using a Breit-Wigner formalism including interference between the resonances. The calculated theoretical coefficients were compared with the experimental ones through an on-line interactive program which permitted visual comparisons of the theoretically calculated coefficients to the experimental coefficients. The partial decay proton widths and the relative phases for six of the resonances will be presented in this dissertation

  2. Clinical value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for differentiating recurrent or residual brain tumor from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, June S.; Langston, James W.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Kingsley, Peter B.; Ogg, Robert J.; Pui, Margaret H.; Kun, Larry E.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Gang, Chen; Ochs, Judith J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Heideman, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed cerebral necrosis (DN) is a significant risk for brain tumor patients treated with high-dose irradiation. Although differentiating DN from tumor progression is an important clinical question, the distinction cannot be made reliably by conventional imaging techniques. We undertook a pilot study to assess the ability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) to differentiate prospectively between DN or recurrent/residual tumor in a series of children treated for primary brain tumors with high-dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twelve children (ages 3-16 years), who had clinical and MR imaging (MRI) changes that suggested a diagnosis of either DN or progressive/recurrent brain tumor, underwent localized 1 H MRS prior to planned biopsy, resection, or other confirmatory histological procedure. Prospective 1 H MRS interpretations were based on comparison of spectral peak patterns and quantitative peak area values from normalized spectra: a marked depression of the intracellular metabolite peaks from choline, creatine, and N-acetyl compounds was hypothesized to indicate DN, and median-to-high choline with easily visible creatine metabolite peaks was labeled progressive/recurrent tumor. Subsequent histological studies identified the brain lesion as DN or recurrent/residual tumor. Results: The patient series included five cases of DN and seven recurrent/residual tumor cases, based on histology. The MRS criteria prospectively identified five out of seven patients with active tumor, and four out of five patients with histologically proven DN correctly. Discriminant analysis suggested that the primary diagnostic information for differentiating DN from tumor lay in the normalized MRS peak areas for choline and creatine compounds. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows promising sensitivity and selectivity for differentiating DN from recurrent/progressive brain tumor. A novel diagnostic index based on peak areas for choline and

  3. Opportunities and Barriers to Resource Recovery and Recycling from Shredder Residue in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Naren; Apelian, Diran

    2014-11-01

    Shredder residue is the by-product remaining after ferrous and nonferrous metals have been recovered from the processing of vehicles, white goods, and peddler scrap. Shredder residue consists of glass, plastics, rubber, dirt, and small amounts of metal. It is estimated that 5-7 million tons of this shredder residue are landfilled each year in the United States. Technical advancements, coupled with European Union directives and the economic climate, have transformed the recycling of shredder residue in Europe. In the United States, however, regulatory controls and the cheap cost of landfill have worked against the advancement of recycling and recovery of this resource. The Argonne National Laboratory, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, has investigated the effectiveness of recycling shredder residue into polymers. Other research has examined the use of shredder residue in waste-to-energy applications. To improve our ability to process and recycle shredder residue, an investigation of the regulatory, economic, and technological challenges was undertaken. The objective was to conduct a comprehensive review of work done to date, to document the composition of typical shredder output and to identify potential recoverable items (residual metals, plastics, rubber, foam, etc.). Along with uncovering potential new markets, the research would identify the technical, regulatory, and economic barriers to developing those markets.

  4. Search for heavy resonances in diboson final states at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    With Run 2 of the LHC in full swing, and very successful data collection at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the large dataset collected so far provides a significantly improved sensitivity for discovery of new physics with respect to Run 1. Searches for new resonances in di-boson final states (HH, VH, VV, where V = W, Z) with the CMS detector are presented, including new results. The analyses are optimised for high sensitivity over a large range in resonance mass and consider different spin hypotheses. The performance of jet substructure techniques which are used to identify hadronic decays of highly-boosted W, Z, and H are also discussed.

  5. Energy and raw material potentials of wood residue in the Pacific Coast States: a summary of a preliminary feasibility investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Grantham; Eldon Estep; John M. Pierovich; Harold Tarkow; Thomas C. Adams

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of a preliminary investigation of feasibility of using wood residue to meet energy and raw material needs in the Pacific Coast States. Magnitude of needs was examined and volume of logging-residue and unused mill residue was estimated. Costs of obtaining and preprocessing logging residue for energy and pulp and particle board raw material were...

  6. Electron-nuclear magnetic resonance in the inverted state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatchenko, V.A.; Tsifrinovich, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The paper considers the susceptibility of the electron-nucleus system of a ferromagnet when nuclear magnetization is inverted with respect to the hyperfine field direction. The inverted state is a situation in which nuclear magnetization is turned through π relative to its equilibrium orientation, whereas electron magnetization is in an equilibrium state with respect to an external magnetic field. The consideration is carried out for a thin plate magnetized in its plane. Amplification of a weak radiofrequency signal can be attained under the fulfilment of an additional inequality relating the interaction frequency with electron and nuclear relaxation parameters. The gain may exceed the gain for an inverted nuclear system in magnetically disordered substances. In the range of strong interaction between the frequencies of ferromagnetic (FMR) and nuclear magnetic (NMR) resonances the electron-nuclear magnetic resonance (ENMR) spectrum possesses a fine structure which is inverse to that obtained for the ENMR spectrum in a normal state. The inverted state ENMR line shape is analysed in detail for the case of so weak HF fields that the relaxation conditions may be regarded as stationary. The initial (linear) stages of a forced transient process arising in an electron-nuclear system under the effect of a strong HF field are briefly analysed

  7. Driving Calmodulin Protein towards Conformational Shift by Changing Ionization States of Select Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, Sunita; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are complex systems made up of many conformational sub-states which are mainly determined by the folded structure. External factors such as solvent type, temperature, pH and ionic strength play a very important role in the conformations sampled by proteins. Here we study the conformational multiplicity of calmodulin (CaM) which is a protein that plays an important role in calcium signaling pathways in the eukaryotic cells. CaM can bind to a variety of other proteins or small organic compounds, and mediates different physiological processes by activating various enzymes. Binding of calcium ions and proteins or small organic molecules to CaM induces large conformational changes that are distinct to each interacting partner. In particular, we discuss the effect of pH variation on the conformations of CaM. By using the pKa values of the charged residues as a basis to assign protonation states, the conformational changes induced in CaM by reducing the pH are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Our current view suggests that at high pH, barrier crossing to the compact form is prevented by repulsive electrostatic interactions between the two lobes. At reduced pH, not only is barrier crossing facilitated by protonation of residues, but also conformations which are on average more compact are attained. The latter are in accordance with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment results of other workers. The key events leading to the conformational change from the open to the compact conformation are (i) formation of a salt bridge between the N-lobe and the linker, stabilizing their relative motions, (ii) bending of the C-lobe towards the N-lobe, leading to a lowering of the interaction energy between the two-lobes, (iii) formation of a hydrophobic patch between the two lobes, further stabilizing the bent conformation by reducing the entropic cost of the compact form, (iv) sharing of a Ca +2 ion between the two lobes.

  8. Driving Calmodulin Protein towards Conformational Shift by Changing Ionization States of Select Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Sunita; Rana Atilgan, Ali; Atilgan, Canan

    2012-12-01

    Proteins are complex systems made up of many conformational sub-states which are mainly determined by the folded structure. External factors such as solvent type, temperature, pH and ionic strength play a very important role in the conformations sampled by proteins. Here we study the conformational multiplicity of calmodulin (CaM) which is a protein that plays an important role in calcium signaling pathways in the eukaryotic cells. CaM can bind to a variety of other proteins or small organic compounds, and mediates different physiological processes by activating various enzymes. Binding of calcium ions and proteins or small organic molecules to CaM induces large conformational changes that are distinct to each interacting partner. In particular, we discuss the effect of pH variation on the conformations of CaM. By using the pKa values of the charged residues as a basis to assign protonation states, the conformational changes induced in CaM by reducing the pH are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Our current view suggests that at high pH, barrier crossing to the compact form is prevented by repulsive electrostatic interactions between the two lobes. At reduced pH, not only is barrier crossing facilitated by protonation of residues, but also conformations which are on average more compact are attained. The latter are in accordance with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment results of other workers. The key events leading to the conformational change from the open to the compact conformation are (i) formation of a salt bridge between the N-lobe and the linker, stabilizing their relative motions, (ii) bending of the C-lobe towards the N-lobe, leading to a lowering of the interaction energy between the two-lobes, (iii) formation of a hydrophobic patch between the two lobes, further stabilizing the bent conformation by reducing the entropic cost of the compact form, (iv) sharing of a Ca+2 ion between the two lobes.

  9. Relativistic resonances as non-orthogonal states in Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, W

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the energy-momentum properties of relativistic short-lived particles with the result that they are characterized by two 4-vectors: in addition to the familiar energy-momentum vector (timelike) there is an energy-momentum 'spread vector' (spacelike). The wave functions in space and time for unstable particles are constructed. For the relativistic properties of unstable states we refer to Wigner's method of Poincare group representations that are induced by representations of the space-time translation and rotation groups. If stable particles, unstable particles and resonances are treated as elementary objects that are not fundamentally different one has to take into account that they will not generally be orthogonal to each other in their state space. The scalar product between a stable and an unstable state with otherwise identical properties is calculated in a particular Lorentz frame. The spin of an unstable particle is not infinitely sharp but has a 'spin spread' giving rise to 'spin neighbors'....

  10. Excited-state structure and electronic dephasing time of Nile blue from absolute resonance Raman intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Mary K.; Mathies, Richard A.

    1992-06-01

    Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are measured for Nile blue 690 perchlorate dissolved in ethylene glycol with excitation at 514, 531, and 568 nm. These values and the absorption spectrum are modeled using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. The excited-state equilibrium geometry changes are quantitated for 40 resonance Raman active modes, seven of which (590, 1141, 1351, 1429, 1492, 1544, and 1640 cm-1 ) carry 70% of the total resonance Raman intensity. This demonstrates that in addition to the prominent 590 and 1640 cm-1 modes, a large number of vibrational degrees of freedom are Franck-Condon coupled to the electronic transition. After exposure of the explicit vibrational progressions, the residual absorption linewidth is separated into its homogeneous [350 cm-1 half-width at half-maximum (HWHM)] and inhomogeneous (313 cm-1 HWHM) components through an analysis of the absolute Raman cross sections. The value of the electronic dephasing time derived from this study (25 fs) compares well to previously published results. These data should be valuable in multimode modeling of femtosecond experiments on Nile blue.

  11. Search for high mass resonances in dielectron final state

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search for high mass resonances in the dielectron final state is performed using proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2017. The integrated luminosity corresponds to $41~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. No evidence for a significant deviation from standard model expectation is observed. The sensitivity of the search is increased by combining these data with a previously analysed set of data obtained in 2016 and corresponding to a luminosity of $36~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Upper bounds are set on the masses of hypothetical particles that arise in new-physics scenarios.

  12. Dibaryon resonances as rotational excitations of six-quark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Martem'yanov, B.V.; Shchepkin, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Using the model of streched rotating (stringlike) bags with spin-orbit interaction of quarks the properties of nonstrange dibaryon spectrum are considered. The resonance d'(T=0, J P =2 - ) near the πNN threshold with the mass 1.95+2.05 GeV is predicted. Two other members of this family in spin-orbit are also predicted: d''(1 - ) and d'''(0 - ) (δE ls =30-40 MeV). Possible exostence of narrow dibaryon states with isospin T=1 and 2 is doscussed

  13. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinathan J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  14. Quantification of entanglement entropies for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Yew Kam; Lin, Chien-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the quantum entanglement for doubly excited resonance states in two-electron atomic systems such as the H - and Ps - ions and the He atom by using highly correlated Hylleraas type functions The resonance states are determined by calculation of density of resonance states with the stabilization method. The spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement entropies (linear and von Neumann) for the low-lying doubly excited states are quantified using the Schmidt-Slater decomposition method. (paper)

  15. Conduction in Carbon Nanotubes Through Metastable Resonant States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengfan; Chandrasekhar, Venkat; Dikin, Dmitriy A.; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2004-03-01

    We have made transport measurements on individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes [1]. The measurements show that the presence or movement of impurities or defects in the carbon nanotube can radically change its low temperature transport characteristics. The low temperature conductance can either decrease monotonically with decreasing temperature, or show a sudden increase at very low temperatures, sometimes in the same sample. This unusual behavior of the temperature dependence of the conductance is correlated with large variations in the differential conductance as a function of the dc voltage across the wire. The effect is well described as arising from quantum interference of conduction channels corresponding to direct transmission through the nanotube and resonant transmission through a discrete electron state, the so-called Fano resonance. We thank the group of R. P. H. Chang for providing us the nanotubes used in these experiments. Funding for this work was provided by a NASA/MSFC Phase II SBIR, Contract No. NAS8-02102, through a subcontract from Lytec, LLC. [1] Z. Zhang et al., cond-mat/0311360.

  16. Resonance X(5568) as an exotic axial-vector state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agaev, S.S. [Baku State University, Institute for Physical Problems, Baku (Azerbaijan); Azizi, K. [Dogus University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Barsbay, B.; Sundu, H. [Kocaeli University, Department of Physics, Izmit (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    The mass and meson-current coupling constant of the resonance X(5568), as well as the width of the decay X(5568) → B{sub s}{sup *}π are calculated by modeling the exotic X(5568) resonance as a diquark-antidiquark state X{sub b} = [su][bd] with quantum numbers J{sup P} = 1{sup +}. The calculations are made employing QCD two-point sum rule method, where the quark, gluon and mixed vacuum condensates up to dimension eight are taken into account. The sum rule approach on the light-cone in its soft-meson approximation is used to explore the vertex X{sub b}B{sub s}{sup *}π and extract the strong coupling g{sub X{sub bB{sub s{sup *}π}}}, which is a necessary ingredient to find the width of the X{sub b} → B{sub s}{sup *}π{sup +} decay process. The obtained predictions are compared with the experimental data of the D0 Collaboration, and results of other theoretical works. (orig.)

  17. Residual stress state in pipe cut ring specimens for fracture toughness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damjanovic, Darko [J.J. Strossmayer Univ. of Osijek, Slavonski Brod (Croatia). Mechanical Engineering Faculty; Kozak, Drazan [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. for Mechanical Design; Marsoner, Stefan [Materials Center, Leoben (Austria).; Gubeljak, Nenad [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia). Chair of Mechanics

    2017-07-01

    Thin-walled pipes are not suitable for measuring fracture toughness parameters of vital importance because longitudinal crack failure is the most common failure mode in pipes. This is due to the impossibility to manufacture standard specimens for measuring fracture toughness, such as SENB or CT specimens, from the thin wall of the pipe. Previous works noticed this problem, but until now, a good and convenient solution has not been found or developed. To overcome this problem, very good alternative solution was proposed, the so-called pipe ring notched bend specimen (PRNB) [1-5]. Until now, only the idealized geometry PRNB specimen is analyzed, i. e., a specimen which is not cut out from an actual pipe but produced from steel plate. Based on that, residual stresses are neglected along with the imperfections in geometry (elliptical and eccentricity). The aim of this research is to estimate the residual stress state(s) in real pipes used in the boiler industry produced by hot rolling technique. These types of pipes are delivered only in normalized condition, but not stress relieved. Therefore, there are residual stresses present due to the manufacturing technique, but also due to uneven cooling after the production process. Within this paper, residual stresses are estimated by three methods: the incremental hole drilling method (IHMD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the splitting method (SM). Knowing the residual stress state in the ring specimen, it is possible to assess their impact on fracture toughness measured on the corresponding PRNB specimen(s).

  18. Residual stress state in pipe cut ring specimens for fracture toughness testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damjanovic, Darko; Kozak, Drazan; Marsoner, Stefan; Gubeljak, Nenad

    2017-01-01

    Thin-walled pipes are not suitable for measuring fracture toughness parameters of vital importance because longitudinal crack failure is the most common failure mode in pipes. This is due to the impossibility to manufacture standard specimens for measuring fracture toughness, such as SENB or CT specimens, from the thin wall of the pipe. Previous works noticed this problem, but until now, a good and convenient solution has not been found or developed. To overcome this problem, very good alternative solution was proposed, the so-called pipe ring notched bend specimen (PRNB) [1-5]. Until now, only the idealized geometry PRNB specimen is analyzed, i. e., a specimen which is not cut out from an actual pipe but produced from steel plate. Based on that, residual stresses are neglected along with the imperfections in geometry (elliptical and eccentricity). The aim of this research is to estimate the residual stress state(s) in real pipes used in the boiler industry produced by hot rolling technique. These types of pipes are delivered only in normalized condition, but not stress relieved. Therefore, there are residual stresses present due to the manufacturing technique, but also due to uneven cooling after the production process. Within this paper, residual stresses are estimated by three methods: the incremental hole drilling method (IHMD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the splitting method (SM). Knowing the residual stress state in the ring specimen, it is possible to assess their impact on fracture toughness measured on the corresponding PRNB specimen(s).

  19. Strong reflection and periodic resonant transmission of helical edge states in topological-insulator stub-like resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The helical edge states of two-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) experience appreciable quantum mechanical scattering in narrow channels when the width changes abruptly. The interference of the geometry scattering in narrow-wide-narrow waveguide structures is shown to give rise to the strong suppression of transmission when the incident energy is barely above the propagation threshold. Periodic resonant transmission takes place in this high reflection regime while the length of the wide section is varied. The resonance condition is governed by the transverse confinement in the wide section, where the form of quantization is manifested to differ for the two orthogonal directions. The confined energy levels in TI quantum dots are derived based on this observation. In addition, the off-diagonal spin-orbit term is found to produce an anomalous resonance state, which merges with the bottom ordinary resonance state to annihilate

  20. Multinuclear solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of inorganic materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, Kenneth J D

    2002-01-01

    Techniques of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are constantly being extended to a more diverse range of materials, pressing into service an ever-expanding range of nuclides including some previously considered too intractable to provide usable results. At the same time, new developments in both hardware and software are being introduced and refined. This book covers the most important of these new developments. With sections addressed to non-specialist researchers (providing accessible answers to the most common questions about the theory and practice of NMR asked by novices) as well as a more specialised and up-to-date treatment of the most important areas of inorganic materials research to which NMR has application, this book should be useful to NMR users whatever their level of expertise and whatever inorganic materials they wish to study.

  1. Single-Residue Sensitivity in Neutron Reflectivity and Resonant X-ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers of Synthetic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, Joseph; Satija, Sushil; Dimasi, Elaine; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Gog, Thomas; Blasie, J. Kent

    2004-03-01

    Labeling groups with ^2H to distinguish them in the scattering length density (SLD) profile constitutes the chief advantage of neutron reflectivity (NR) in studying Langmuir monolayers (LM) of lipids and proteins. Solid phase synthesis (SPPS) permits the labeling of a single residue in a peptide. Recent work demonstrates the sensitivity of NR to single ^2H-labeled residues in LM of vectorially oriented α -helical bundle peptides. NR requires comparison of isomorphic samples of all-^1H and ^2H-labeled peptides. Alternately, resonant x-ray reflectivity (RXR) uses only one sample. RXR exploits energy-dependent changes in the scattering factor from heavy atoms to distinguish them within the SLD profile. Peptides may be labeled by SPPS (e.g. Br-Phe), or may have inherent labels (e.g. Fe in heme proteins). As test cases, we studied LM of Br-labeled lipids and peptides with RXR. Both approaches require a model-independent means of obtaining SLD profiles from the reflectivity data. We have applied box-refinement to obtain the gradient SLD profile. This is fit uniquely with a sum of Gaussians and integrated analytically [Blasie et al., PRB 67 224201 (2003)] to provide the SLD profile. Label positions can then be determined to sub-Ångstrom accuracy. This work supported by the NIH (GM55876).

  2. Investigation of the Residual Stress State in an Epoxy Based Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Process induced residual stresses may play an important role under service loading conditions for fiber reinforced composite. They may initiate premature cracks and alter the internal stress level. Therefore, the developed numerical models have to be validated with the experimental...... observations. In the present work, the formation of the residual stresses/strains are captured from experimental measurements and numerical models. An epoxy/steel based sample configuration is considered which creates an in-plane biaxial stress state during curing of the resin. A hole drilling process...... material models, i.e. cure kinetics, elastic modulus, CTE, chemical shrinkage, etc. together with the drilling process using the finite element method. The measured and predicted in-plane residual strain states are compared for the epoxy/metal biaxial stress specimen....

  3. Coupled superconducting qudit-resonator system: Energy spectrum, state population, and state transition under microwave drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Y.; Xu, H. K.; Su, F. F.; Li, Z. Y.; Tian, Ye; Han, Siyuan; Zhao, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    Superconducting quantum multilevel systems coupled to resonators have recently been considered in some applications such as microwave lasing and high-fidelity quantum logical gates. In this work, using an rf-SQUID type phase qudit coupled to a microwave coplanar waveguide resonator, we study both theoretically and experimentally the energy spectrum of the system when the qudit level spacings are varied around the resonator frequency by changing the magnetic flux applied to the qudit loop. We show that the experimental result can be well described by a theoretical model that extends from the usual two-level Jaynes-Cummings system to the present four-level system. It is also shown that due to the small anharmonicity of the phase device a simplified model capturing the leading state interactions fits the experimental spectra very well. Furthermore we use the Lindblad master equation containing various relaxation and dephasing processes to calculate the level populations in the simpler qutrit-resonator system, which allows a clear understanding of the dynamics of the system under the microwave drive. Our results help to better understand and perform the experiments of coupled multilevel and resonator systems and can be applied in the case of transmon or Xmon qudits having similar anharmonicity to the present phase device.

  4. Woody residues and solid waste wood available for recovery in the United States, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. McKeever; Robert H. Falk

    2004-01-01

    Large amounts of woody residues and solid wood waste are generated annually in the United States from the extraction of timber from forests, from forestry cultural operations, in the conversion of forest land to nonforest uses, in the initial processing of roundwood timber into usable products, in the construction and demolition of buildings and structures, and in the...

  5. Inventories of woody residues and solid wood waste in the United States, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. McKeever

    2004-01-01

    Large amounts of woody residues and wood waste are generated annually in the United States. In 2002, an estimated 240 million metric tons was generated during the extraction of timber from the Nation’s forests, from forestry cultural operations, in the conversion of forest land to nonforest uses, in the initial processing of roundwood timber into usable products, in...

  6. Resonant tunneling via spin-polarized barrier states in a magnetic tunnel junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Resonant tunneling through states in the barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction has been analyzed theoretically for the case of a spin-polarized density of barrier states. It is shown that for highly spin-polarized barrier states, the magnetoresistance due to resonant tunneling is enhanced compared

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance detection of carotenoid triplet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.A.; Bolt, J.D.; deCosta, S.M.; Sauer, K.

    1980-01-01

    Triplet states of carotenoids have been detected by X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and are reported here for the first time. The systems in which carotenoid triplets are observed include cells of photosynthetic bacteria, isolated bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes, and detergent micelles which contain β-carotene. It is well known that if electron transfer is blocked following the initial acceptor in the bacterial photochemical reaction center, back reaction of the primary radical pair produces a bacteriochlorophyll dimer triplet. Previous optical studies have shown that in reaction centers containing carotenoids the bacteriochlorophyll dimer triplet sensitizes the carotenoid triplet. We have observed this carotenoid triplet state by EPR in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides, strain 2.4.1 (wild type), which contain the carotenoid spheroidene. The zero-field splitting parameters of the triplet spectrum are /D/ = 0.0290 +- 0.0005 cm -1 and /E/ = 0.0044 +-0.0006 cm -1 , in contrast with the parameters of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer triplet, which are /D/ = 0.0189 +- 0.0004 cm -1 and /E/ = 0.0032 +- 0.004 cm -1 . Bacteriochlorophyll in a light harvesting protein complex from Rps. sphaeroides, wild type, also sensitizes carotenoid triplet formation. In whole cells the EPR spectra vary with temperature between 100 and 10 K. Carotenoid triplets also have been observed by EPR in whole cells of Rps. sphaeroides and cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum which contain the carotenoid spirilloxanthin. Attempts to observe the triplet state EPR spectrum of β-carotene in numerous organic solvents failed. However, in nonionic detergent micelles and in phospholipid bilayer vesicles β-carotene gives a triplet state spectrum with /D/ = 0.0333 +- 0.0010 cm -1 and /E/ = 0.0037 +- 0.0010 cm -1 . 6 figures, 1 table

  8. Doubly excited 3Pe resonance states of two-electron positive ions in Debye plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Yang; Kar, Sabyasachi; Jiang, Zishi; Jiang, Pinghui

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the doubly excited 3 P e resonance states of two-electron positive ions Li + , Be 2+ , B 3+ , and C 4+ by employing correlated exponential wave functions. In the framework of the stabilization method, we calculate two series (3pnp and 3dnd) of 3 P e resonances below the N = 3 threshold. The 3 P e resonance parameters (resonance energies and widths) are reported for the first time as a function of the screening parameter. For free-atomic cases, comparisons are made with the reported results and few resonance states are reported for the first time

  9. Screening and confirmation criteria for hormone residue analysis using liquid chromatography accurate mass time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Engelen, M.C. van; Zuiderent, R.; Ramaker, R.

    2007-01-01

    An emerging trend is recognised in hormone and veterinary drug residue analysis from liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) based screening and confirmation towards accurate mass alternatives such as LC coupled with time-of-flight (TOF), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance

  10. Polar drug residues in sewage and natural waters in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, M; Ternes, T A; Wilken, R D; Rodrigues, S V; Baumann, W

    1999-01-12

    The drug residues of lipid regulators, anti-inflammatories and some drug metabolites have been detected in raw sewage, treated waste water and river water in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. These residues are mainly derived from humans via excretion. The median concentrations in the effluents of sewage treatment plants (STPs) of most drugs investigated in this study ranged from 0.1 to 1 microgram/l. The removal rates of individual drugs during passage through a Brazilian STP varied from 12 to 90%. As a consequence of the incomplete removal of these residues during passage through a STP, rivers were also found to be contaminated. Median concentrations ranged from between 0.02 and 0.04 microgram/l in river water, whereas the maximum values were observed to be up to 0.5 microgram/l.

  11. Decolorization of textile industry wastewater in solid state fermentation with Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes) residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicatto, J A; Rainert, K T; Gonçalves, M J; Helm, C V; Altmajer-Vaz, D; Tavares, L B B

    2018-02-15

    In this work we have assessed the decolorization of textile effluents throughout their treatment in a solid-state fermentation (SSF) system. SSF assays were conducted with peach-palm (Bactris gasipaes) residue using the white rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum EF 31. The influence of the dye concentration and of the amounts of peach-palm residue and liquid phase on both the discoloration efficiency and enzyme production was studied. According to our results, independently of experimental conditions employed, laccase was the main ligninolytic enzyme produced by G. lucidum. The highest laccase activity was obtained at very low effluent concentrations, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory effect of higher concentrations on fungal metabolism. The highest percentage of color removal was reached when 10 grams of peach palm residue was moistened with 60 mL of the final effluent. In control tests carried out with the synthetic dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) decolorization efficiencies about 20% higher than that achieved with the industrial effluent were achieved. The adsorption of RBBR on peach-palm residue was also investigated. Equilibrium tests showed that the adsorption of this dye followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Hence, our experimental results indicate that peach-palm residue is suitable substrate for both laccase production and color removal in industrial effluents.

  12. Decolorization of textile industry wastewater in solid state fermentation with Peach-Palm (Bactris gasipaes residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Chicatto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work we have assessed the decolorization of textile effluents throughout their treatment in a solid-state fermentation (SSF system. SSF assays were conducted with peach-palm (Bactris gasipaes residue using the white rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum EF 31. The influence of the dye concentration and of the amounts of peach-palm residue and liquid phase on both the discoloration efficiency and enzyme production was studied. According to our results, independently of experimental conditions employed, laccase was the main ligninolytic enzyme produced by G. lucidum. The highest laccase activity was obtained at very low effluent concentrations, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory effect of higher concentrations on fungal metabolism. The highest percentage of color removal was reached when 10 grams of peach palm residue was moistened with 60 mL of the final effluent. In control tests carried out with the synthetic dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR decolorization efficiencies about 20% higher than that achieved with the industrial effluent were achieved. The adsorption of RBBR on peach-palm residue was also investigated. Equilibrium tests showed that the adsorption of this dye followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Hence, our experimental results indicate that peach-palm residue is suitable substrate for both laccase production and color removal in industrial effluents.

  13. Roles of the β 146 histidyl residue in the molecular basis of the Bohr Effect of hemoglobin: A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, M.R.; Mace, J.E.; Ho, N.T.; Ho, Chien

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of the roles of the carboxyl-terminal β146 histidyl residues in the alkaline Bohr effect in human and normal adult hemoglobin by high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy requires assignment of the resonances corresponding to these residues. By a careful spectroscopic study of human normal adult hemoglobin, enzymatically prepared des(His146β)-hemoglobin, and the mutant hemoglobins Cowtown (β146His → Leu) and York (β146His → Pro), the authors have resolved some of these conflicting results. By a close incremental variation of pH over a wide range in chloride-free 0.1 M N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid buffer, a single resonance has been found to be consistently missing in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these hemoglobin variants. The results indicate that the contribution of the β146 histidyl residues is 0.52 H + /hemoglobin tetramer at pH 7.6, markedly less than 0.8 H + /hemoglobin tetramer estimated by study of the mutant hemoglobin Cowtown (β146His → Leu) by Shih and Perutz. They have found that at least two histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of this mutant have pK values that are perturbed, and they suggest that these pK differences may in part account for this discrepancy. The results show that the pK values of β146 histidyl residues in the carbonmonoxy form of hemoglobin are substantially affected by the presence of chloride and other anions in the solvent, and thus, the contribution of this amino acid residue to the alkaline Bohr effect can be shown to vary widely in magnitude, depending on the solvent composition. These results demonstrate that the detailed molecular mechanisms of the alkaline Bohr effect are not unique but are affected both by the hemoglobin structure and by the interactions with the solvent components in which the hemoglobin molecule resides

  14. Multiple-state Feshbach resonances mediated by high-order couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemming, Christopher J.; Krems, Roman V.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of multistate Feshbach resonances mediated by high-order couplings. Our analysis focuses on a system with one open scattering state and multiple bound states. The scattering state is coupled to one off-resonant bound state and multiple Feshbach resonances are induced by a sequence of indirect couplings between the closed channels. We derive a general recursive expression that can be used to fit the experimental data on multistate Feshbach resonances involving one continuum state and several bound states and present numerical solutions for several model systems. Our results elucidate general features of multistate Feshbach resonances induced by high-order couplings and suggest mechanisms for controlling collisions of ultracold atoms and molecules with external fields

  15. Unified description of bound, resonant and scattering states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konya, B.; Levai, G.; Papp, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Recently we have introduced a general method for calculating the discrete Hilbert-space basis representation of the Green's operators of those Hamiltonians which have infinite symmetric tridiagonal matrix forms. The elements of this matrix are used in the calculation of the Green's matrix in terms of a three-term recurrence relation and continued fractions. We specified our general approach to the case of the Coulomb problem and the Coulomb-Sturmian basis associated with it. As a further step, we can combine this new way of calculating the Coulomb-Green's matrix with a technique of solving integral equations in discrete Hilbert-space-basis representations. This provides us with a quantum mechanical approximation method which is rather general in the sense that it is equally applicable to solving bound-, resonant- and scattering-state problems with practically any potential of physical relevance. The method is especially suited to problems where Coulomb-like asymptotics have to be treated, but the formalism also contains the case of the free Green's operator as a special case. (author)

  16. A resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging study of concussion in collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniak, Suzanne M; Sikoglu, Elif M; Liso Navarro, Ana A; McCafferty, Joseph; Eisenstock, Jordan; Stevenson, J Herbert; King, Jean A; Moore, Constance M

    2015-06-01

    Sports-related concussions are currently diagnosed through multi-domain assessment by a medical professional and may utilize neurocognitive testing as an aid. However, these tests have only been able to detect differences in the days to week post-concussion. Here, we investigate a measure of brain function, namely resting state functional connectivity, which may detect residual brain differences in the weeks to months after concussion. Twenty-one student athletes (9 concussed within 6 months of enrollment; 12 non-concussed; between ages 18 and 22 years) were recruited for this study. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task and the Color-Word Interference Test. Neuroimaging data, specifically resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data, were acquired to examine resting state functional connectivity. Two sample t-tests were used to compare the neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity patterns among concussed and non-concussed participants. Correlations between neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity measures were also determined across all subjects. There were no significant differences in neurocognitive performance between concussed and non-concussed groups. Concussed subjects had significantly increased connections between areas of the brain that underlie executive function. Across all subjects, better neurocognitive performance corresponded to stronger brain connectivity. Even at rest, brains of concussed athletes may have to 'work harder' than their healthy peers to achieve similar neurocognitive results. Resting state brain connectivity may be able to detect prolonged brain differences in concussed athletes in a more quantitative manner than neurocognitive test scores.

  17. Doubly excited P-wave resonance states of H− in Debye plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, L. G.; Ho, Y. K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the doubly excited P-wave resonance states of H − system in Debye plasmas modeled by static screened Coulomb potentials. The screening effects of the plasma environment on resonance parameters (energy and width) are investigated by employing the complex-scaling method with Hylleraas-type wave functions for both the shape and Feshbach resonances associated with the H(N = 2 to 6) thresholds. Under the screening conditions, the H(N) threshold states are no longer l degenerate, and all the H − resonance energy levels are shifted away from their unscreened values toward the continuum. The influence of Debye plasmas on resonance widths has also been investigated. The shape resonance widths are broadened with increasing plasma screening strength, whereas the Feshbach resonance widths would generally decrease. Our results associated with the H(N = 2) and H(N = 3) thresholds are compared with others in the literature

  18. Deterministic transfer of an unknown qutrit state assisted by the low-Q microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-Shui, E-mail: quaninformation@sina.com; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • We propose a scheme to achieve an unknown quantum state transfer between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. • Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. - Abstract: Qutrits (i.e., three-level quantum systems) can be used to achieve many quantum information and communication tasks due to their large Hilbert spaces. In this work, we propose a scheme to transfer an unknown quantum state between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, our approach can be adapted to other solid-state qutrits coupled to circuit resonators. Numerical simulations show that the high-fidelity transfer of quantum state between the two qutrits is feasible with current circuit QED technology.

  19. Deterministic transfer of an unknown qutrit state assisted by the low-Q microwave resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a scheme to achieve an unknown quantum state transfer between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. • Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. - Abstract: Qutrits (i.e., three-level quantum systems) can be used to achieve many quantum information and communication tasks due to their large Hilbert spaces. In this work, we propose a scheme to transfer an unknown quantum state between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, our approach can be adapted to other solid-state qutrits coupled to circuit resonators. Numerical simulations show that the high-fidelity transfer of quantum state between the two qutrits is feasible with current circuit QED technology.

  20. Systematic assignment of Feshbach resonances via an asymptotic bound state model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, M.; Kokkelmans, SJ.J.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    We present an Asymptotic Bound state Model (ABM), which is useful to predict Feshbach resonances. The model utilizes asymptotic properties of the interaction potentials to represent coupled molecular wavefunctions. The bound states of this system give rise to Feshbach resonances, localized at the

  1. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  2. A nonlinear plasmonic resonator for three-state all-optical switching

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear plasmonic resonator design is proposed for three-state all-optical switching at frequencies including near infrared and lower red parts of the spectrum. The tri-stable response required for three-state operation is obtained by enhancing nonlinearities of a Kerr medium through multiple (higher order) plasmons excited on resonator\\'s metallic surfaces. Indeed, simulations demonstrate that exploitation of multiple plasmons equips the proposed resonator with a multi-band tri-stable response, which cannot be obtained using existing nonlinear plasmonic devices that make use of single mode Lorentzian resonances. Multi-band three-state optical switching that can be realized using the proposed resonator has potential applications in optical communications and computing. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  3. Typical Mexican agroindustrial residues as supports for solid-state fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Maltos, Dulce A.; Mussatto, Solange Ines; Contreras Esquivel, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    . These biological wastes can be used as support-substrates in Solid-State Fermentation (SSF) to produce industrially relevant metabolites with great economical advantage. In addition, it is an environment friendly method of waste management. In this study were analyzed six different Mexican agro industrial residues...... process. The results provided important knowledge about the characteristics of these materials revealing their potential for use in fermentation processes....

  4. Assignment of methyl NMR resonances of a 52 kDa protein with residue-specific 4D correlation maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Subrata H.; Frueh, Dominique P.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl groups have become key probes for structural and functional studies by nuclear magnetic resonance. However, their NMR signals cluster in a small spectral region and assigning their resonances can be a tedious process. Here, we present a method that facilitates assignment of methyl resonances from assigned amide groups. Calculating the covariance between sensitive methyl and amide 3D spectra, each providing correlations to C α and C β separately, produces 4D correlation maps directly correlating methyl groups to amide groups. Optimal correlation maps are obtained by extracting residue-specific regions, applying derivative to the dimensions subject to covariance, and multiplying 4D maps stemming from different 3D spectra. The latter procedure rescues weak signals that may be missed in traditional assignment procedures. Using these covariance correlation maps, nearly all assigned isoleucine, leucine, and valine amide resonances of a 52 kDa nonribosomal peptide synthetase cyclization domain were paired with their corresponding methyl groups

  5. Muonic-hydrogen molecular bound states, quasibound states, and resonances in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used as an exploratory tool to study bound states, quasibound states, and scattering resonances in muon (μ)--hydrogen (x)--hydrogen (y) molecular ions. Our purpose is to comment on the existence and nature of the narrow states reported in three-body calculations, for L=0 and 1, at approximately 55 eV above threshold and the family of states in the same partial waves reported about 1.9 keV above threshold. We first discuss the motivation for study of excited states beyond the well-known and well-studied bound states. Then we reproduce the energies and other properties of these well-known states to show that, despite the relatively large muon mass, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation gives a good, semiquantitative description containing all the essential physics. Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the s- and p-wave scattering of d-(dμ), d-(tμ), and t-(tμ) are compared with the accurate three-body results, again with general success. The places of disagreement are understood in terms of the differences in location of slightly bound (or unbound) states in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation compared to the accurate three-body calculations

  6. Ensemble Kalman Filtering with Residual Nudging: An Extension to State Estimation Problems with Nonlinear Observation Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is an efficient algorithm for many data assimilation problems. In certain circumstances, however, divergence of the EnKF might be spotted. In previous studies, the authors proposed an observation-space-based strategy, called residual nudging, to improve the stability of the EnKF when dealing with linear observation operators. The main idea behind residual nudging is to monitor and, if necessary, adjust the distances (misfits) between the real observations and the simulated ones of the state estimates, in the hope that by doing so one may be able to obtain better estimation accuracy. In the present study, residual nudging is extended and modified in order to handle nonlinear observation operators. Such extension and modification result in an iterative filtering framework that, under suitable conditions, is able to achieve the objective of residual nudging for data assimilation problems with nonlinear observation operators. The 40-dimensional Lorenz-96 model is used to illustrate the performance of the iterative filter. Numerical results show that, while a normal EnKF may diverge with nonlinear observation operators, the proposed iterative filter remains stable and leads to reasonable estimation accuracy under various experimental settings.

  7. Application of laser interferometry for assessment of surface residual stress by determination of stress-free state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Won; Kwon, Dong Il; Lee, Nak Kyu; Choi, Tae Hoon; Na, Kyoung Hoan

    2003-01-01

    The total relaxed stress in annealing and the thermal strain/stress were obtained from the identification of the residual stress-free state using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI). The residual stress fields in case of both single and film/substrate systems were modeled using the thermo-elastic theory and the relationship between relaxed stresses and displacements. We mapped the surface residual stress fields on the indented bulk Cu and the 0.5 μm Au film by ESPI. In indented Cu, the normal and shear residual stress are distributed over -1.7 GPa to 700 MPa and -800 GPa to 600 MPa respectively around the indented point and in deposited Au film on Si wafer, the tensile residual stress is uniformly distributed on the Au film from 500 MPa to 800 MPa. Also we measured the residual stress by the X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) for the verification of above residual stress results by ESPI

  8. State-Trajectory Analysis and Control of LLC Resonant Converters

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Weiyi

    2013-01-01

    With the fast development of communication systems, computers and consumer electronics, the power supplies for telecoms, servers, desktops, laptops, flat-panel TVs, LED lighting, etc. are required for more power delivery with smaller spaces. The LLC resonant converter has been widely adopted for these applications due to the advantages in high efficiency, high power density and holdup time operation capability.However, unlike PWM converters, the control of the LLC resonant converter is much m...

  9. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-01-01

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  10. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-21

    with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

  11. The improved flotation of gold from the residues of Orange Free State ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabassi, P.A.J.; Loveday, B.K.; Wilkinson, M.J.; Radcliffe, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    The recovery of gold, uranium, and pyrite from accumalated residues at mines in the Orange Free State is adversely affected by the presence of pyrophyllite, which is naturally floatable and must be prevented from floating with the desired constituents by the use of a mica depressant, and of thucholite (uraniferous kerogen), which contains significant quantities of uranium and gold but does not float readily in the presence of a mica depressant. In laboratory tests on these residues, the use of a mixture of MIBC (methyl isobutyl carbinol) and paraffin in addition to the suite of reagents normally used was found to increase the gold recovery substantially, but the sulphur grade was lower. The recovery of thucholite also increased considerably, but the proportion of uranium, associated with this mineral was small. Plant trials, which are continuing, have been encouraging, indicating an increase in the gold recovery of 4,6 per cent

  12. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  13. Chemical composition and mixing-state of ice residuals sampled within mixed phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, M.; Worringen, A.; Benker, N.; Mertes, S.; Weingartner, E.; Weinbruch, S.

    2010-10-01

    During an intensive campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, in February/March 2006 ice particle residuals within mixed-phase clouds were sampled using the Ice-counterflow virtual impactor (Ice-CVI). Size, morphology, chemical composition, mineralogy and mixing state of the ice residual and the interstitial (i.e., non-activated) aerosol particles were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ice nuclei (IN) were identified from the significant enrichment of particle groups in the ice residual (IR) samples relative to the interstitial aerosol. In terms of number lead-bearing particles are enriched by a factor of approximately 25, complex internal mixtures with silicates or metal oxides as major components by a factor of 11, and mixtures of secondary aerosol and soot (C-O-S particles) by a factor of 2. Other particle groups (sulfates, sea salt, Ca-rich particles, external silicates) observed in the ice-residual samples cannot be assigned unambiguously as IN. Between 9 and 24% of all IR are Pb-bearing particles. Pb was found as major component in around 10% of these particles (PbO, PbCl2). In the other particles, Pb was found as some 100 nm sized agglomerates consisting of 3-8 nm sized primary particles (PbS, elemental Pb). C-O-S particles are present in the IR at an abundance of 17-27%. The soot component within these particles is strongly aged. Complex internal mixtures occur in the IR at an abundance of 9-15%. Most IN identified at the Jungfraujoch station are internal mixtures containing anthropogenic components (either as main or minor constituent), and it is concluded that admixture of the anthropogenic component is responsible for the increased IN efficiency within mixed phase clouds. The mixing state appears to be a key parameter for the ice nucleation behaviour that cannot be predicted from the separate components contained within the individual particles.

  14. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  15. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  16. Quantum and classical control of single photon states via a mechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Myers, Casey R; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, G J

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical systems typically use light to control the quantum state of a mechanical resonator. In this paper, we propose a scheme for controlling the quantum state of light using the mechanical degree of freedom as a controlled beam splitter. Preparing the mechanical resonator in non-classical states enables an optomechanical Stern–Gerlach interferometer. When the mechanical resonator has a small coherent amplitude it acts as a quantum control, entangling the optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. As the coherent amplitude of the resonator increases, we recover single photon and two-photon interference via a classically controlled beam splitter. The visibility of the two-photon interference is particularly sensitive to coherent excitations in the mechanical resonator and this could form the basis of an optically transduced weak-force sensor. (paper)

  17. A nonlinear plasmonic resonator for three-state all-optical switching

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear plasmonic resonator design is proposed for three-state all-optical switching at frequencies including near infrared and lower red parts of the spectrum. The tri-stable response required for three-state operation is obtained by enhancing nonlinearities of a Kerr medium through multiple (higher order) plasmons excited on resonator's metallic surfaces. Indeed, simulations demonstrate that exploitation of multiple plasmons equips the proposed resonator with a multi-band tri-stable response, which cannot be obtained using existing nonlinear plasmonic devices that make use of single mode Lorentzian resonances. Multi-band three-state optical switching that can be realized using the proposed resonator has potential applications in optical communications and computing. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  18. State-plane analysis of zero-voltage-switching resonant dc/dc power converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K.; Morse, William D.

    The state-plane analysis technique for the zero-voltage-switching resonant dc/dc power converter family of topologies, namely the buck, boost, buck-boost, and Cuk converters is established. The state plane provides a compression of information that allows the designer to uniquely examine the nonlinear dynamics of resonant converter operation. Utilizing the state plane, resonant converter modes of operation are examined and the switching frequencies are derived for the boundaries between these modes, including the boundary of energy conversion.

  19. Orbital State Manipulation of a Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Using a Mechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. Y.; MacQuarrie, E. R.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2018-04-01

    We study the resonant optical transitions of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center that is coherently dressed by a strong mechanical drive. Using a gigahertz-frequency diamond mechanical resonator that is strain coupled to a NV center's orbital states, we demonstrate coherent Raman sidebands out to the ninth order and orbital-phonon interactions that mix the two excited-state orbital branches. These interactions are spectroscopically revealed through a multiphonon Rabi splitting of the orbital branches which scales as a function of resonator driving amplitude and is successfully reproduced in a quantum model. Finally, we discuss the application of mechanical driving to engineering NV-center orbital states.

  20. Quantum Entanglement and Shannon Information Entropy for the Doubly Excited Resonance State in Positronium Negative Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hao Lin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report an investigation on quantum entanglement in the doubly excited 2s2 1Se resonance state of the positronium negative ion by using highly correlated Hylleraas type wave functions, determined by calculation of the density of resonance states with the stabilization method. Once the resonance wave function is obtained, the spatial (electron-electron orbital entanglement entropies (von Neumann and linear can be quantified using the Schmidt decomposition method. Furthermore, Shannon entropy in position space, a measure for localization (or delocalization for such a doubly excited state, is also calculated.

  1. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, S. Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT F o − F c and 2F o − F c neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α 1 β 1 heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpK a between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure

  2. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

    2011-02-22

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these

  3. Giant resonance and dipolar states of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.

    1965-01-01

    Cross-section for (γ,n) reactions on C 12 ,, O 10 , Mg 24 and Ca 40 have been measured using 'monochromatic' gamma rays of variable energy obtained from the annihilation in flight of fast positrons. We compare the observed structure with the shell model of nucleus, including residual interaction between nucleons by 'hole particle' techniques. (author) [fr

  4. Solid state NMR sequential resonance assignments and conformational analysis of the 2x10.4 kDa dimeric form of the Bacillus subtilis protein Crh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeckmann, Anja [Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines, C.N.R.S UMR 5086 (France)], E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr; Lange, Adam [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Solid-state NMR (Germany); Galinier, Anne [Institut de Biologie Structurale et Microbiologie, C.N.R.S UPR 9043 (France); Luca, Sorin [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Solid-state NMR (Germany); Giraud, Nicolas; Juy, Michel [Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines, C.N.R.S UMR 5086 (France); Heise, Henrike [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Solid-state NMR (Germany); Montserret, Roland; Penin, Francois [Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines, C.N.R.S UMR 5086 (France); Baldus, Marc [Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Solid-state NMR (Germany)], E-mail: maba@mpibpc.mpg.de

    2003-12-15

    Solid state NMR sample preparation and resonance assignments of the U-[{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N] 2x10.4 kDa dimeric form of the regulatory protein Crh in microcrystalline, PEG precipitated form are presented. Intra- and interresidue correlations using dipolar polarization transfer methods led to nearly complete sequential assignments of the protein, and to 88% of all {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C chemical shifts. For several residues, the resonance assignments differ significantly from those reported for the monomeric form analyzed by solution state NMR. Dihedral angles obtained from a TALOS-based statistical analysis suggest that the microcrystalline arrangement of Crh must be similar to the domain-swapped dimeric structure of a single crystal form recently solved using X-ray crystallography. For a limited number of protein residues, a remarkable doubling of the observed NMR resonances is observed indicative of local static or dynamic conformational disorder. Our study reports resonance assignments for the largest protein investigated by solid state NMR so far and describes the conformational dimeric variant of Crh with previously unknown chemical shifts.

  5. Resonant transducers for solid-state plasma density modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, Gary A., E-mail: hallock@ece.utexas.edu [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78701 (United States); Meier, Mark A., E-mail: mark.a.meier@exxonmobil.com [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77389 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have developed transducers capable of modulating the plasma density and plasma density gradients in indium antimonide. These transducers make use of piezoelectric drivers to excite acoustic pressure resonance at 3λ/2, generating large amplitude standing waves and plasma density modulations. The plasma density has been directly measured using a laser diagnostic. A layered media model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  6. Modelling of different enzyme productions by solid-state fermentation on several agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ana Belen; Blandino, Ana; Webb, Colin; Caro, Ildefonso

    2016-11-01

    A simple kinetic model, with only three fitting parameters, for several enzyme productions in Petri dishes by solid-state fermentation is proposed in this paper, which may be a valuable tool for simulation of this type of processes. Basically, the model is able to predict temporal fungal enzyme production by solid-state fermentation on complex substrates, maximum enzyme activity expected and time at which these maxima are reached. In this work, several fermentations in solid state were performed in Petri dishes, using four filamentous fungi grown on different agro-industrial residues, measuring xylanase, exo-polygalacturonase, cellulose and laccase activities over time. Regression coefficients after fitting experimental data to the proposed model turned out to be quite high in all cases. In fact, these results are very interesting considering, on the one hand, the simplicity of the model and, on the other hand, that enzyme activities correspond to different enzymes, produced by different fungi on different substrates.

  7. Utilization of agroindustrial residues for lipase production by solid-state fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Damaso, M?nica Caramez Triches; Passianoto, Mois?s Augusto; de Freitas, Sidin?a Cordeiro; Freire, Denise Maria Guimar?es; Lago, Regina Celi Araujo; Couri, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to produce lipases by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using, as substrate, agroindustrial residue supplemented with by-products from corn oil refining process or olive oil. For a group of ten fungi strains selected in the first steps, the lipase activity obtained by SSF varied from 7.7 to 58.6 U/g of dry substrate (gds). Among the evaluated strains, the Aspergillus niger mutant 11T53A14 was selected by presenting the best enzymatic production. For the fermentation test...

  8. Report on residual radioactive materials on public or acquired lands of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    This report identifies sites located on public or acquired lands of the United States containing residual radioactive materials and other radioactive waste (excluding waste resulting from the production of electric energy) and was developed in accordance with the provisions of Section 114(b) of Public Law 95-604, "Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978," enacted on November 8, 1978. Additionally, the report specifies which Federal agency has jurisdiction over such sites and, where appropriate data were available, provides a description of the radiological status of each of the sites reported. For purpose of providing a timely report t o t h e Congress, a termination date of May 31, 1979 was established for the receipt, correlation, and analysis of the input data. As of this date, residual radioactive materials and other radioactive waste have been identified by six Federal agencies at 48 sites throughout the United States. Table 1 on page vi provides a summary listing of the number of sites under the jurisdiction of each of these reporting agencies. A cross listing in tabular form by affected state is presented in Table 2 on page viii. Of the 48 sites reported, 36 are located i n three western states - Colorado (27 sites), Wyoming (5 sites), and Utah (4 sites). Based upon t h e data submitted, the sites were categorized into three broad radiological status categories -- controlled, unstabilized, and risk to the public. At controlled sites, the residue is stabilized, access t o t h e site is controlled, the s i t e is well monitored, and does not currently constitute a risk to the public. At sites in the unstabilized category, a probability exists for the spread of contamination. Sites in the risk category contain residue which represents a long-term risk to the public under present conditions. Of the 48 reported sites,. 9 (approximately 19%) could be classified in the controlled category; 38 (approximately 79%) were in the unstabilized category and

  9. Joint quantum state tomography of an entangled qubit–resonator hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LinPeng, X Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, K; Li, C Y; Zhong, Y P; Wang, Z L; Wang, H; Xie, Q W

    2013-01-01

    The integration of superconducting qubits and resonators in one circuit offers a promising solution for quantum information processing (QIP), which also realizes the on-chip analogue of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), known as circuit QED. In most prototype circuit designs, qubits are active processing elements and resonators are peripherals. As resonators typically have better coherence performance and more accessible energy levels, it is proposed that the entangled qubit–resonator hybrid can be used as a processing element. To achieve such a goal, an accurate measurement of the hybrid is first necessary. Here we demonstrate a joint quantum state tomography (QST) technique to fully characterize an entangled qubit–resonator hybrid. We benchmarked our QST technique by generating and accurately characterizing multiple states, e.g. |gN〉 + |e(N − 1)〉 where (|g〉 and |e〉) are the ground and excited states of the qubit and (|0〉,…,|N〉) are Fock states of the resonator. We further provided a numerical method to improve the QST efficiency and measured the decoherence dynamics of the bipartite hybrid, witnessing dissipation coming from both the qubit and the N-photon Fock state. As such, the joint QST presents an important step toward actively using the qubit–resonator element for QIP in hybrid quantum devices and for studying circuit QED. (paper)

  10. Rotational characteristics in the resonance state of the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morii, Y.; Sukedai, M. [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Ohashi, S., E-mail: ohashi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The hybrid magnetic bearing has been developed. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller. Influence of the vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state is large. The resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system. The hybrid magnetic bearing using permanent magnets and the high-Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) has been developed. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced to increase the load weight of the magnetic bearing. Effect of the hybrid system has been shown. In this paper, influence of the hybrid system on the dynamic characteristics of the rotor is studied. The rotational characteristics in the mechanical resonance state are studied, and the equivalent magnetic spring coefficient is estimated from the experimental results of the load weight. The resonance frequency is measured by the rotation experiments. The rotor achieves stable levitation even in the resonance state. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller than that of the lateral force generated by the repulsive force between the two permanent magnets at the smaller air gap. Thus influence of the lateral vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state becomes larger at a smaller air gap. The equivalent magnetic spring coefficient becomes also small, and the resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system.

  11. Two-protons' entanglement of the diproton emission from 17Ne halo resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carballo Perez, Brenda; Guzman Martinez, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Fingerprints of entangled states of the two protons, from the decay of halo resonant states of 17 Ne has been studied. This study makes possible a way to discern the diproton emission from the others two proton emission mechanisms. Specially we calculate the energy (E 1 =10.87 MeV) and the width (Γ 1 =3.82 MeV) of the first halo resonant state, which can also emits diproton. For this purpose, the diproton was considered as a resonant state and its width (Γ s =4.049 MeV) was estimated. An analytic expression for the angular proton-proton distribution was found in agreement with experimental results. We conclude that the first 17 Ne excited state can not emit diproton. We also arrive at the conclusion that there are few 17 Ne excited states, having halo properties which can emit diproton. (Full Text)

  12. Chemical composition and mixing-state of ice residuals sampled within mixed phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ebert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During an intensive campaign at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, in February/March 2006 ice particle residuals within mixed-phase clouds were sampled using the Ice-counterflow virtual impactor (Ice-CVI. Size, morphology, chemical composition, mineralogy and mixing state of the ice residual and the interstitial (i.e., non-activated aerosol particles were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ice nuclei (IN were identified from the significant enrichment of particle groups in the ice residual (IR samples relative to the interstitial aerosol. In terms of number lead-bearing particles are enriched by a factor of approximately 25, complex internal mixtures with silicates or metal oxides as major components by a factor of 11, and mixtures of secondary aerosol and carbonaceous material (C-O-S particles by a factor of 2. Other particle groups (sulfates, sea salt, Ca-rich particles, external silicates observed in the ice-residual samples cannot be assigned unambiguously as IN. Between 9 and 24% of all IR are Pb-bearing particles. Pb was found as major component in around 10% of these particles (PbO, PbCl2. In the other particles, Pb was found as some 100 nm sized agglomerates consisting of 3–8 nm sized primary particles (PbS, elemental Pb. C-O-S particles are present in the IR at an abundance of 17–27%. The soot component within these particles is strongly aged. Complex internal mixtures occur in the IR at an abundance of 9–15%. Most IN identified at the Jungfraujoch station are internal mixtures containing anthropogenic components (either as main or minor constituent, and it is concluded that admixture of the anthropogenic component is responsible for the increased IN efficiency within mixed phase clouds. The mixing state appears to be a key parameter for the ice nucleation behaviour that cannot be predicted from the sole knowledge of the main component of an individual particle.

  13. Some properties of the resonant state in quantum mechanics and its computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Naomichi; Sasada, Keita; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Petrosky, Tomio

    2007-08-01

    The resonant state of the open quantum system is studied from the viewpoint of the outgoing momentum flux. We show that the number of particles is conserved for a resonant state, it we use an expanding volume of integration in order to take account of the outgoing momentum flux; the number of particles would decay exponentially in a fixed volume of integration. Moreover, we introduce new numerical methods of treating the resonant state with the use of the effective potential. We first give a numerical method of finding a resonance pole in the complex energy plane. The method seeks an energy eigenvalue iteratively. We found that our method leads to a super-convergence, the convergence exponential with respect to the iteration step. The present method is completely independent of commonly used complex scaling. We also give a numerical trick for computing the time evolution of the resonant state in limited spatial area. Since the wave function of the resonant state is diverging away from the scattering potential, it has been previously difficult to follow its time evolution numerically in a finite area. (author)

  14. Quasi-bound states, resonance tunnelling, and tunnelling times ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    analysis of bound states below the threshold energy E = 0 and continuum above the threshold .... p are time reversal states of each other. Similarly, the ... are occurring at above-barrier energies and we do not treat them as QB states. They can ...

  15. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation.

  16. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  17. Immunologic determination of chloramphenicol residue in commercial birds at Nsukka, Enugu State, Southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekene Vivienne Ezenduka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to determine the presence and prevalence of chloramphenicol (CAP, a drug which was banned for use in food-producing animals due to many side effects residue in commercial birds slaughtered at Ikpa abattoir and its awareness and usage in farms at Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was done with the use of a questionnaire on usage and awareness of CAP and screening for its presence in commercial poultry in the study area. The questionnaire was supplied to 35 commercial farms, and liver samples from 300 commercial broilers were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique; the prevalence was then determined. Results: Of the 35 farms evaluated, 33 (94% responded. In the management practice, 57.6% of the farms use intensive deep litter, 18.2% intensive battery cage, and 24.2% extensive farming system. 19 (69.7% farms rear only broilers, 12.1% layers, and 15.1% both. The feeding management showed that 21.1% of farmers produce their own feed with inclusion of antibiotics while 78.8% use commercial feed, of which 11.5% incorporate antibiotics. The findings also showed that 54.4% of the respondents use CAP and only 30.3% are aware of the consequences of antimicrobial residue in food and have knowledge of the legislation on the prudent use of antimicrobials in food animals. Of the 300 samples screened for CAP residue, 18.7% were positive with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 6.2 parts per billion. Conclusion: CAP is still very much in use in the study area, despite the ban, and it is present in the tissues of commercial birds meant for human consumption.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance phenomenon of the insulating state polyaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umiati, Ngurah Ayu Ketut, E-mail: ngurahayuketutumiati@gmail.com [Jurusan Fisika FMIPA UGM, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Jurusan Fisika FMIPA Universitas Diponegoro, Jalan Prof. Soedarto, SH Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia); Triyana, Kuwat; Kamsul [Jurusan Fisika FMIPA UGM, Sekip Utara Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) phenomenon of the insulating polyaniline (PANI) is has been observed. Surface Plasmon (SP) is the traveled electromagnetic wave that passes through the interface of dielectric metal and excited by attenuated total reflection (ATR) method in Kretschmannn configuration (Au-PANI prism). The resonance condition is observed through the angle of SPR in such condition that SP wave is coupled by the evanescent constant of laser beam. In this research, the laser beam was generated by He–Ne and its wavelength (λ) was 632,8 nm. SPR curve is obtained through observation of incidence angles of the laser beam in prism. SPR phenomenon at the boundary between Au – PANI layer has showed by reflection dip when the laser beam passes through the prism. In this early study, the observation was carried out through simulation Winspall 3.02 software and preliminary compared with some experimental data reported in other referred literatures. The results shows that the optimum layer of Au and polyaniline are 50 and 1,5 nm thick respectively. Our own near future experimental work would be further performed and reported elsewhere.

  19. Realization of quantum state privacy amplification in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Chuan; Long, Gui Lu

    2010-01-01

    Quantum state privacy amplification (QSPA) is the quantum analogue of classical privacy amplification. If the state information of a series of single-particle states has some leakage, QSPA reduces this leakage by condensing the state information of two particles into the state of one particle. Recursive applications of the operations will eliminate the quantum state information leakage to a required minimum level. In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of a quantum state privacy amplification protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrices of the states are constructed in the experiment, and the experimental results agree well with theory.

  20. Are the new resonances superexotic or collapsed han nambu states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    Possible descriptions of the psi states as unorthodox color octet states in the Han-Nambu model are discussed. Simple quark-antiquark configurations are unbound in the static colored gluon exchange model. More complicated states having indefinite numbers of quark-antiquark pairs, or ''collapsed configurations'' might be bound. Their radiative decays would be suppressed by the small overlap with conventional states. The unexplained spin dependence of both conventional and new meson spectra is pointed out. The rho-π mass difference is about half the rho-f splitting, while the B-f splitting is small. New particles have low-lying vectors and no trace of pseudo-scalars. A link between these spectra is suggested by the observation that precisely these features follow from adding a repulsive core to the colored gluon exchange potential in the color singlet spin triplet state which also reverses sign in the color octet states. (author)

  1. State dependent pseudo-resonances and excess noise

    OpenAIRE

    Papoff, F.; D'Alessandro, G.; Oppo, G.Luca

    2008-01-01

    We show that strong response to nonresonant modulations and excess noise are state dependent in generic nonlinear systems; i.e., they affect some output states but are absent from others. This is demonstrated in complex Swift-Hohenberg models relevant to optics, where it is caused by the non-normality of the linearized stability operators around selected output states, even though the cavity modes are orthogonal. In particular, we find the effective parameters that control excess noise and th...

  2. Long-term decomposition of sugarcane harvest residues in Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, Caio; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Vitti, Andre Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Crop residues returned to the soil are important to preserve fertility and sustainability. This research addressed the long-term decomposition of sugarcane post-harvest residues (trash) under reduced tillage, therefore field renewal was performed with herbicide followed by subsoiling and ratoons were deprived of interrow scarification. The trial was conducted in the northern Sao Paulo State, Brazil during four consecutive crops (2005–2008) where litter bags containing 15 N-labeled trash were disposed in the field attempting to simulate two distinct situations: the previous crop trash (PCT) or residues incorporated in the field after tillage, and post-harvest trash (PHT) or the remains of plant-cane harvest. Decomposition rates regarding dry matter (DM), carbon (C), root growth, plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg and S), lignin (LIG) cellulose (CEL) and hemicellulose (HCEL) contents were assessed for PCT (2005 ndash;2008) and for PHT (2006–2008). There were significant reductions on DM and C:N ratio due to C losses and root growth within the litter bags over time. The DM from PCT and PHT decreased 96% and 73% after four and three crops, respectively, and the higher nutrients release were found for K, Ca and N. The LIG, CEL and HCEL concentrations in PCT decreased 60%, 29%, 70% after four crops and 47%, 35%, 70% from PHT after three crops, respectively. Trash decomposition was driven mainly by residues biochemical composition, root growth within the trash blanket and the climatic conditions during the crop cycles. -- Highlights: ► Degradation of sugarcane previous or post-harvest trash (PCT or PHT) was evaluated. ► Dry matter and C decreased due to microbial and root growth within trash blankets. ► C:N ratio of PCT linearly decreased 23% per year during four consecutive crops. ► Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose concentration averagely declined 54, 41 and 70%. ► PCT and PHT are long-term sources of C, K, Ca and N to the soil-plant system.

  3. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Olufemi Olatoye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. Materials and Methods: The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara, and 90 fermented milk (nono from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi® test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Results: Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. Conclusion: The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers

  4. Enhanced extraction of phenolic compounds from coffee industry’s residues through solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Rossana PALOMINO García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of agroindustrial residues is an economical solution to industrial biotechnology. Coffee husk and pulp are abounding residues from coffee industry which can be used as substrates in solid state fermentation process, thus allowing a liberation and increase in the phenolic compound content with high added value. By employing statistical design, initial moisture content, pH value in the medium, and the incubation temperature were evaluated, in order to increase the polyphenol content in a process of solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum. The main phenolic compounds identified through HPLC in fermented coffee residue were chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin. Data obtained through HPLC with the radical absorbance capacity assay suggest the fermented coffee husk and pulp extracts potential as a source of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Results showed good perspectives when using P. purpurogenum strain to enhance the liberation of phenolic compounds in coffee residues.

  5. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelson, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Principles of solid state NMR; Relaxation processes: Introduction to pulse sequences; Quantitative analysis; Removal of artifacts from CPMAS FT experiments; Line broadening mechanisms; Resolution enhancement of solid state NMR spectra; and /sup 13/C CPMAS NMR of fossil fuels--general applications

  6. Fundamental and Subharmonic Resonances of Harmonically Oscillation with Time Delay State Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. EL-Bassiouny

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Time delays occur in many physical systems. In particular, when automatic control is used with structural or mechanical systems, there exists a delay between measurement of the system state and corrective action. The concept of an equivalent damping related to the delay feedback is proposed and the appropriate choice of the feedback gains and the time delay is discussed from the viewpoint of vibration control. We investigate the fundamental resonance and subharmonic resonance of order one-half of a harmonically oscillation under state feedback control with a time delay. By using the multiple scale perturbation technique, the first order approximation of the resonances are derived and the effect of time delay on the resonances is investigated. The fixed points correspond to a periodic motion for the starting system and we show the external excitation-response and frequency-response curves. We analyze the effect of time delay and the other different parameters on these oscillations.

  7. Does the ground-state resonance of 10Li overlap neutron threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVoy, K.W.; Van Isacker, P.

    1994-01-01

    Recent measurements suggest that the ground state of 10 Li is a resonance which may well be wide enough to overlap the (n + 9 Li) threshold. In this context we recall some of the curious properties of resonances located near threshold and entered from a non-decay channel, including their asymmetry and the fact that the peak observed in the cross section occurs at neither the R-matrix nor the S-matrix energy, but rather between the two. Because of these and other complications, it does not seem likely that either the l-value of the resonance or the energy of the corresponding state can accurately be determined form the shape of the resonance peak alone. (authors). 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry for the measurement of a resonator's state using a qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Sergey; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-01

    We consider theoretically a superconducting qubit - nanomechanical resonator system, which was realized recently by LaHaye et al. [Nature 459, 960 (2009)]. We formulate and solve the inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg problem, where we assume the driven qubit's state to be known (i.e. measured by some other device) and aim to find the parameters of the qubit's Hamiltonian. In particular, for our system the qubit's bias is defined by the nanomechanical resonator's displacement. This may provide a tool for monitoring the nanomechanical resonator 's position. [S. N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. B 85, 094502 (2012).

  9. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources ? crop residue, wood, and solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A. P.; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2017-01-01

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combusti...

  10. Coupling effects of resonant and discretized non-resonant continuum states in 4He+6Li scattering at 10 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, T.; Kanungo, R.; Samanta, C.; Ghosh, S.; Basu, P.; Rebel, H.

    1996-01-01

    Alpha- particle scattering from the resonant (3 + 1 ) and non-resonant continuum states of 6 Li is studied at incident energy 10 MeV/A. The α+d breakup continuum part within the excitation energy E ex = 1.475-2.475 MeV is discretized in two energy bins. Unlike the results at higher incident energies, here the coupled-channel calculations show significant breakup continuum coupling effects on the elastic and inelastic scattering. It is shown that even when the continuum-continuum coupling effects are strong, the experimental data of the ground state and the resonant as well as discretized non-resonant continuum states impose stringent constraint on the coupling strengths of the non-resonant continuum states. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Beneficial uses of paper mill residuals for New York State`s recycled-paper mills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This report evaluates the New York paper mill industry in terms of the productive management and treatment of solid wastes. It identifies current efforts by recycling mills to beneficially use paper mill residuals (often called sludge) and suggests additional options that should be considered by the industry in general and individual mills in particular. It also examines the regulations and economics affecting the mills and suggests actions that could improve the industry`s ability to convert wastes to value-added products. The report recommends that the mills should continue measures to reduce fiber and filler clay losses, promote the transfer of usable fiber and clay to mills able to use them, upgrade sludge dewatering capabilities, and take a more regional approach to solid waste disposal problems. State agencies are urged to support these efforts, encourage the development and commercialization of new beneficial use technologies, and reduce regulatory barriers whenever possible.

  12. Circuit QED: generation of two-transmon-qutrit entangled states via resonant interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xi-Mei; Zheng, Zhen-Fei; Lu, Dao-Ming; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2018-04-01

    We present a way to create entangled states of two superconducting transmon qutrits based on circuit QED. Here, a qutrit refers to a three-level quantum system. Since only resonant interaction is employed, the entanglement creation can be completed within a short time. The degree of entanglement for the prepared entangled state can be controlled by varying the weight factors of the initial state of one qutrit, which allows the prepared entangled state to change from a partially entangled state to a maximally entangled state. Because a single cavity is used, only resonant interaction is employed, and none of identical qutrit-cavity coupling constant, measurement, and auxiliary qutrit is needed, this proposal is easy to implement in experiments. The proposal is quite general and can be applied to prepare a two-qutrit partially or maximally entangled state with two natural or artificial atoms of a ladder-type level structure, coupled to an optical or microwave cavity.

  13. The Over-Barrier Resonant States and Multi-Channel Scattering in Multiple Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Polupanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an explicit numerical method for accurate calculation of the scattering matrix and its poles, and apply this method to describe the multi-channel scattering in the multiple quantum-wells structures. The S-matrix is continued analytically to the unphysical region of complex energy values. Results of calculations show that there exist one or more S-matrix poles, corresponding to the over-barrier resonant states critical for the effect of the absolute reflection of holes in the energy range where only the heavy ones may propagate over barriers in a structure. Light- and heavy-hole states are described by the Luttinger Hamiltonian matrix. In contrast to the single quantum-well case, at some parameters of a multiple quantum-wells structure the number of S-matrix poles may exceed that of the absolute reflection peaks, and at different values of parameters the absolute reflection peak corresponds to different resonant states. The imaginary parts of the S-matrix poles and hence the lifetimes of resonant states as well as the widths of resonant peaks of absolute reflection depend drastically on the quantum-well potential depth. In the case of shallow quantum wells there is in fact a long-living over-barrier resonant hole state.

  14. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Huang, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye. (paper)

  15. Resonant excitation and the decay of autoionization states in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, A.I.; Kazakov, A.E.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms involving resonant excitation of the auto-ionization state is studied. The evolution of the total ionization probability, its dependence on the frequency of the resonance radiation and also the photoelectron energy spectrum are investigated. It is shown that the energy of the final state of the system may be localized either in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α), where Esub(α) is the auto-ionization energy, or in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω where h/2πω is the quantum energy of the resonance radiation. The photoelectron specturum in the region E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω as a whole is similar to the electron spectrum on photoionization of atoms involving resonance excitation of the bound state. A strong effect on the photoelectron spectrum in the region E approximately Esub(α) is exerted by interference of various decay channels of the ground state in the resonance field which leads to the appearance in the spectrum of a characteristic structure of the Fano type. Interence also affects the widths of the two spectral curves, the relatve amount of electrons in the two energy ranges and also other characteristics of the ionization process. It is shown that the presence of a noninterfering photoionization channel of the autoionization state ensures the finiteness of the swidths and heights of the spectral curves and the absence of complete ''coherency merging''

  16. Parametric resonant states of charged fermions in the magnetar's crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian

    2013-06-01

    We have presently derived the positive-energy solutions to the Dirac equation minimally coupled to a depth-dependent spatially harmonic tangential magnetostatic field to the magnetar crust, similar to the one proposed by Wareing and Hollerbach. It turns out that, for ultra-relativistic fermions and time-intervals much less the characteristic time (comparable to the average Ohmic timescale in the crust), the corresponding linearly independent modes get their depth-dependent amplitudes expressed in terms of Mathieu's functions and therefore, non-trivial resonances arise, leading to instabilities in the system, for computable ranges of the model parameters. In order to detail these features, we have also discussed the current density components, pointing out the regions for which the particle density has a double bounded modulation. Finally as the magnetic field induction is increasing, the instability range gets larger triggering the exponential growth of the amplitudes, once the imaginary part of the Mathieu Characteristic Exponent becomes more and more dominant.

  17. Coherent secondary emission from resonantly excited two-exciton states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan

    2000-01-01

    The coherent interaction of light and the electronic states of semiconductors near the fundamental bandgap has been a very active topic of research since the advent of ultrafast lasers. While many of the ultrafast nonlinear properties of semiconductors have been well explained within mean field...

  18. Decay of giant resonances states in radiative pion capture by 1p shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogotar, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of the giant resonance states excited in tthe radiative pion capture on the 9 Be, 11 B, 13 C and 14 N nuclei is considered in the shell model with intermediate coupling. It is shown that the excited states in the daughter nuclei (A-1, Z-1) are mainly populated by intermediate states with spin by two units larger than the spin of the target nuclei. Selected coincidence experiments are proposed

  19. Examination of excited state populations in sputtering using Multiphoton Resonance Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimock, F.M.; Baxter, J.P.; Pappas, D.L.; Kobrin, P.H.; Winograd, N.

    1984-01-01

    Multiphoton Resonance Ionization has been employed to study the populations of excited state atoms ejected from ion bombarded metal surfaces. Preliminary investigations have focused on three model systems: aluminum, indium and cobalt. In this paper the authors examine the effect of primary ion energy (2 to 12 keV Ar + ) on excited state yields for these three systems. The influence of the sample matrix on excited state populations of sputtered atoms is also discussed

  20. Examination of excited state populations in sputtering using multiphoton resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimock, F.M.; Baxter, J.P.; Pappas, D.L.; Kobrin, P.H.; Winograd, N.

    1984-01-01

    Multiphoton Resonance Ionization has been employed to study the populations of excited state atoms ejected from ion bombarded metal surfaces. Preliminary investigations have focused on three model systems: aluminum, indium and cobalt. In this paper we examine the effect of primary ion energy (2 to 12 keV Ar + ) on excited state yields for these three systems. The influence of the sample matrix on excited state populations of sputtered atoms is also discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs

  1. Gaussian basis sets for highly excited and resonance states of helium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Šmydke, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 2 (2013), 024105 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : approximation theory * Gaussian processes * ground states * helium neutral atoms * optimisation * resonant states * Rydberg states Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2013

  2. Ground-state magneto-optical resonances in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Petrov, L.; Slavov, D.; Atvars, A.; Auzinsh, M.; Blush, K.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are presented related to the ground-state magneto-optical resonance observed in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell (ETC), with thickness equal to the wavelength of the irradiating light. It is shown that utilization of the ETC allows one to examine the formation of a magneto-optical resonance on the individual hyperfine transitions, thus distinguishing processes resulting in dark (reduced absorption) or bright (enhanced absorption) resonance formation. We report experimental evidence of bright magneto-optical resonance sign reversal in Cs atoms confined in an ETC. A theoretical model is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations that involves the elastic interaction processes of atoms in the ETC with its walls, resulting in depolarization of the Cs excited state, which is polarized by the exciting radiation. This depolarization leads to the sign reversal of the bright resonance. Using the proposed model, the magneto-optical resonance amplitude and width as a function of laser power are calculated and compared with the experimental ones. The numerical results are in good agreement with those of experiment

  3. Impact of agriculture crop residue burning on atmospheric aerosol loading – a study over Punjab State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshan Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the impact of agriculture crop residue burning on aerosol properties during October 2006 and 2007 over Punjab State, India using ground based measurements and multi-satellite data. Spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD and Ångström exponent (α values exhibited larger day to day variation during crop residue burning period. The monthly mean Ångström exponent "α" and turbidity parameter "β" values during October 2007 were 1.31±0.31 and 0.36±0.21, respectively. The higher values of "α" and "β" suggest turbid atmospheric conditions with increase in fine mode aerosols over the region during crop residue burning period. AURA-OMI derived Aerosol Index (AI and Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 showed higher values over the study region during October 2007 compared to October 2006 suggesting enhanced atmospheric pollution associated with agriculture crop residue burning.

  4. Measurement of conformational constraints in an elastin-mimetic protein by residue-pair selected solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu; McMillan, R. Andrew; Conticello, Vincent P. [Emory University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2002-02-15

    We introduce a solid-state NMR technique for selective detection of a residue pair in multiply labeled proteins to obtain site-specific structural constraints. The method exploits the frequency-offset dependence of cross polarization to achieve {sup 13}CO{sub i} {sup {yields}} {sup 15}N{sub i} {sup {yields}} {sup 13}C{alpha}{sub i} transfer between two residues. A {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-labeled elastin mimetic protein (VPGVG){sub n} is used to demonstrate the method. The technique selected the Gly3 C{alpha} signal while suppressing the Gly5 C{alpha} signal, and allowed the measurement of the Gly3 C{alpha} chemical shift anisotropy to derive information on the protein conformation. This residue-pair selection technique should simplify the study of protein structure at specific residues.

  5. Measurement of conformational constraints in an elastin-mimetic protein by residue-pair selected solid-state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Mei; McMillan, R. Andrew; Conticello, Vincent P.

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a solid-state NMR technique for selective detection of a residue pair in multiply labeled proteins to obtain site-specific structural constraints. The method exploits the frequency-offset dependence of cross polarization to achieve 13 CO i → 15 N i → 13 Cα i transfer between two residues. A 13 C, 15 N-labeled elastin mimetic protein (VPGVG) n is used to demonstrate the method. The technique selected the Gly3 Cα signal while suppressing the Gly5 Cα signal, and allowed the measurement of the Gly3 Cα chemical shift anisotropy to derive information on the protein conformation. This residue-pair selection technique should simplify the study of protein structure at specific residues

  6. Construction of rigged Hilbert spaces to describe resonances and virtual states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadella, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the present communication we present a mathematical formalism for the description of resonances and virtual states. We start by constructing rigged Hilbert spaces of Hardy class functions restricted to the positive half of the real line. Then resonances and virtual states can be written as generalized eigenvectors of the total Hamiltonian. We also define time evolution on functionals. We see that the time evolution group U(t) splits into two semigroups, one for t > 0 and the other for t < 0, hence showing the irreversibility of the decaying process

  7. Construction of rigged Hilbert spaces to describe resonances and virtual states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadella, M.

    1984-01-01

    In the present communication we present a mathematical formalism for the description of resonances and virtual states. We start by constructing rigged Hilbert spaces of Hardy class functions restricted to the positive half of the real line. Then resonances and virtual states can be written as generalized eigenvectors of the total Hamiltonian. We also define time evolution on functionals. We see that the time evolution group U(t) splits into two semigroups, one for t>0 and the other for t<0, hence showing the irreversibility of the decaying process. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of the residual structure in the unfolded state of the Delta 131 Delta fragment of staphylococcal nuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, C. J.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    dynamics simulations to characterise the residual structure of the 131 fragment of staphylococcal nuclease under physiological conditions. Our findings indicate that 131 under these conditions shows a tendency to form transiently hydrophobic clusters similar to those present in the native state of wild......The determination of the conformational preferences in unfolded states of proteins constitutes an important challenge in structural biology. We use inter-residue distances estimated from site-directed spin-labeling NMR experimental measurements as ensemble-averaged restraints in all-atom molecular...

  9. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Haasnoot, Willem; Norde, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  10. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging surface Plasmon Resonance-Based immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Haasnoot, W.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  11. LHC vector resonance searches in the tt̄Z final state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backović, Mihailo [Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology - CP3,Universite Catholique de Louvain,Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Flacke, Thomas [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS),Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Korea University,Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Jain, Bithika [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung J. [Department of Physics, Korea University,Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-23

    LHC searches for BSM resonances in l{sup +}l{sup −}, jj, tt̄,γγ and VV final states have so far not resulted in discovery of new physics. Current results set lower limits on mass scales of new physics resonances well into the O(1) TeV range, assuming that the new resonance decays dominantly to a pair of Standard Model particles. While the SM pair searches are a vital probe of possible new physics, it is important to re-examine the scope of new physics scenarios probed with such final states. Scenarios where new resonances decay dominantly to final states other than SM pairs, even though well theoretically motivated, lie beyond the scope of SM pair searches. In this paper we argue that LHC searches for (vector) resonances beyond two particle final states would be useful complementary probes of new physics scenarios. As an example, we consider a class of composite Higgs models, and identify specific model parameter points where the color singlet, electrically neutral vector resonance ρ{sub 0} decays dominantly not to a pair of SM particles, but to a fermionic top partner T{sub f1} and a top quark, with T{sub f1}→tZ. We show that dominant decays of ρ{sub 0}→T{sub f1}t in the context of Composite Higgs models are possible even when the decay channel to a pair of T{sub f1} is kinematically open. Our analysis deals with scenarios where both m{sub ρ} and m{sub T{sub f{sub 1}}} are of O(1) TeV, leading to highly boosted tt̄Z final state topologies. We show that the particular composite Higgs scenario we consider is discoverable at the LHC13 with as little as 30 fb{sup −1}, while being allowed by other existing experimental constraints.

  12. Collisional approach to dynamics of resonance atomic states in an external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urnov, A.M.; Uskov, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    The following aspects of the dynamics of an atomic state in an external stationary field are assessed: (i) the rearrangement problem; (ii) the description of the appropriate final-channel wavefunctions; (iii) the analytical properties of the transition amplitude into the continuum. The rearrangement problem was solved by the introduction of the effective Hamiltonian, the eigenstates of which include both the initial state and final states ('modified states of continuum spectrum' MSCS) which describe the potential part of the exact wavefunction of the scattering problem. It is shown that the amplitude of decay and transition into MSCS as functions of time have an exact representation as a sum of resonance terms defined by a set of resonance states and the matrix elements of the shift R-matrix operator. (author)

  13. Stating of cervical carcinoma using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleaga, L.; Vela, M. C.; Grande, J.; Cura del, J. L.; Grande, D.

    1999-01-01

    The infiltration of the parametrium represents one of the most important factors that determine the prediction and treatment of cervical carcinoma. Our objective is to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the staging of cervical carcinomas, to establish the reliability of this technique and to carry out a comparative study of the sequences used to demonstrate the parametrial invasion. We have carried out a retrospective study on 44 patients diagnosed with cervix neoplasia, using clinical exploration and performing a biopsy. the MRI studies have been carried out using a 1 Tesla magnet and the sequences used have been SE T1, Se proton density (PD) and T2 and dynamic GRE after administering gadolinium intravenously in the axial and sagital projections. The stages determined by MRI have been compared to the anatomo-pathological stages of the surgical specimens in cases where surgery was carried out and with the clinical stage in cases where no radical surgery was carried out. A diagnosis value of MRI has been determined to demonstrate the parametrial invasion, comparing the SE T2 sequence with the dynamic GE sequence with gadolinium. We calculate the volume of the tumour in the MRI studies to evaluate the difference of the volume between patients with tumoral stages that are clinically surgical and not surgical. MRI determines the invasion of the parametrium with a sensitivity of 88.8%, a specificity of 80% a positive value of 76.1%, a negative predictive value of 90.9% and a reliability of 83.7%. For the SE T2 sequences the sensitivity was 86.6%, the specifity 80%, the posistive predictive value 81.25%, the negative predictive value 85.7% and the reliability 83.3%. For the dynamic GE sequence with intravenous gadolinium the sensitivity was 86.6%, the specificity 86.6%, the positive predictive value 86.6%, the negative predictive value 86.6% and the reliability 86.6%. The use of the dynamic GE sequence after the intravenous administration of

  14. Multi-Resonant-Activation for a System Only Driven by Multi-State Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinghui

    2010-01-01

    We consider the escape of the particles over fluctuating potential barrier for a system only driven by a multi-state noise. It is shown that, the noise can make the particles escape over the fluctuating potential barrier in some circumstances; but in other circumstances, it can not. If the noise can make the particle escape over the fluctuating potential barrier, the mean first passage time (MFPT) can display the phenomenon of multi-resonant-activation. For this phenomenon, there are two kinds of resonant activation to appear. One is resonant activation for the MFPTs as the function of the flipping rates of the fluctuating potential barrier; the other is that for the MFPTs as the functions of the transition rates of the multi-state noise. (general)

  15. Effects of Dirac Sea on Giant Resonance States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2004-01-01

    There are two approximations in relativistic models which keep the continuity equation of the baryon current without renormalization of the divergence. One is the no-free-term approximation (NFA) which neglects the divergent terms, but keeps the Pauli blocking terms coming from nucleon-antinucleon excitations in the RPA correlation functions. The other is the no-sea approximation (NSA) where antiparticle states are assumed to be empty with negative energies. It is shown that both approximations formally satisfy the Ikeda sum rule and the RPA theorem for the β - and β + transition strengths also, but that the NFA requires negative strengths in the positive excitation energy region, while the NSA requires positive strengths in the negative excitation energy region, as a price of neglecting the renormalization of the divergence

  16. Determination of the torsion angles of alanine and glycine residues of model compounds of spider silk (AGG){sub 10} using solid-state NMR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashida, Jun; Ohgo, Kosuke; Komatsu, Kohei; Kubota, Ayumi; Asakura, Tetsuo [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Biotechnology (Japan)], E-mail: asakura@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2003-02-15

    Spiders synthesize several kinds of silk fibers. In the primary structure of spider silk, one of the major ampullate (dragline, frame) silks, spidroin 1, and flagelliform silk (core fibers of adhesive spiral), there are common repeated X-Gly-Gly (X = Ala, Leu, Pro, Tyr, Glu, and Arg) sequences, which are considered to be related to the elastic character of these fibers. In this paper, two dimensional spin diffusion solid-state NMR under off magic angle spinning (OMAS), {sup 13}C chemical shift contour plots, and Rotational Echo DOuble Resonance (REDOR) were applied to determine the torsion angles of one Ala and two kinds of Gly residues in the Ala-Gly-Gly sequence of {sup 13}C=O isotope-labeled (Ala-Gly-Gly){sub 10}. The torsion angles were determined to be ({phi}, {psi}) = (-90 deg., 150 deg.) within an experimental error of {+-}10 deg. for each residue. This conformation is characterized as 3{sub 1} helix which is in agreement with the structure proposed from the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of poly(Ala-Gly-Gly). The 3{sub 1} helix of (Ala-Gly-Gly){sub 10} does not change by formic acid treatment although (Ala-Gly){sub 15} easily changes from the silk I conformation (the structure of Bombyx mori silk fibroin before spinning in the solid state) to silk II conformation (the structure of the silk fiber after spinning) by such treatment. Thus, the 3{sub 1} helix conformation of (Ala-Gly-Gly){sub 10} is considered very stable. Furthermore, the torsion angles of the 16th Leu residue of (Leu-Gly-Gly){sub 10} were also determined as ({phi}, {psi}) = (-90 deg., 150 deg.) and this peptide is also considered to take 3{sub 1} helix conformation.

  17. Changes in volatile profile of soybean residue (okara) upon solid-state fermentation by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vong, Weng Chan; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Soybean residue (okara), a by-product of soymilk, is produced in large volumes by the soy food industry and is often discarded due to its undesirable flavour. As it contains a considerable amount of protein and fats, biotransformation of okara to improve its flavour presents an opportunity for alternative utilisation. This paper evaluated 10 yeasts in the solid-state fermentation of okara based on their volatile profiles as analysed with HS-SPME GC-MS/FID. Four 'dairy yeasts' (Geotrichum candidum, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii and Kluyveromyces lactis) and six 'wine yeasts' (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Williopsis saturnus) were studied. The main off-odourants in okara, hexanal and trans-2-hexenal, significantly decreased after fermentation due to their bioconversion into methyl ketones and/or esters. The okara fermented by dairy yeasts contained greater proportions of methyl ketones, while that by wine yeasts contained more ethyl and acetyl esters. Notably, the okara fermented by W. saturnus contained 13 esters and the total GC-FID peak area of esters was about 380 times that in fresh okara, leading to a perceptible fruity note. Okara can be exploited as an inexpensive substrate for bioflavour extraction and/or a more pleasant food ingredient via yeast fermentation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Decay rates of resonance states at high level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Gorin, T.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1996-05-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation of an open quantum mechanical system is solved by using the stationary bi-orthogonal eigenfunctions of the non-Hermitean time independent Hamilton operator. We calculate the decay rates at low and high level density in two different formalism. The rates are, generally, time dependent and oscillate around an average value due to the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions. The decay law is studied disregarding the oscillations. In the one-channel case, it is proportional to t -b with b∼3/2 in all cases considered, including the critical region of overlapping where the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions is large. Starting from the shell model, we get b∼2 for 2 and 4 open decay channels and all coupling strengths to the continuum. When the closed system is described by a random matrix, b∼1+K/2 for K=2 and 4 channels. This law holds in a limited time interval. The distribution of the widths is different in the two models when more than one channel are open. This leads to the different exponents b in the power law. Our calculations are performed with 190 and 130 states, respectively, most of them in the critical region. The theoretical results should be proven experimentally by measuring the time behaviour of de-excitation of a realistic quantum system. (orig.)

  19. Ensemble Kalman Filtering with Residual Nudging: An Extension to State Estimation Problems with Nonlinear Observation Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaodong; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    -space-based strategy, called residual nudging, to improve the stability of the EnKF when dealing with linear observation operators. The main idea behind residual nudging is to monitor and, if necessary, adjust the distances (misfits) between the real observations

  20. Fluctuation effects on average cross sections in compound, direct and doorway state resonance reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the effects of S-matrix flucturations on average cross sections are reviewed with emphasis on recent developments on the enhancement of small cross sections and cross sections between directly coupled channels. Examples are given in which the effect can distort the shape of a doorway state resonance so as to reduce its observed width. 4 figures

  1. Efficient Computation of Transition State Resonances and Reaction Rates from a Quantum Normal Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Roman; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent formulation of transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed provides an algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and the associated Gamov-Siegert resonances with very high accuracy. The algorithm is especially efficient for

  2. Interference effect as resonance killer of newly observed charmoniumlike states Y(4320) and Y(4390)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dian-Yong [Southeast University, School of Physics, Nanjing (China); Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou (China); Matsuki, Takayuki [Tokyo Kasei University, Tokyo (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Theoretical Research Division, Saitama (Japan)

    2018-02-15

    In this letter, we decode the newly observed charmoniumlike states, Y(4320) and Y(4390), by introducing interference effect between ψ(4160) and ψ(4415), which plays a role of resonance killer for Y(4320) and Y(4390). It means that two newly reported charmoniumlike states are not genuine resonances, according to which we can naturally explain why two well-established charmonia ψ(4160) and ψ(4415) are missing in the cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -} → π{sup +}π{sup -}J/ψ and π{sup +}π{sup -}h{sub c} simultaneously. To well describe the detailed data of these cross sections around √(s) = 4.2 GeV, our study further illustrates that a charmoniumlike structure Y(4220) must be introduced. As a charmonium, Y(4220) should dominantly decay into its open-charm channel e{sup +}e{sup -} → D{sup 0}π{sup +}D{sup *-}, which provides an extra support to ψ(4S) assignment to Y(4220). In fact, this interference effect introduced to explain Y(4320) and Y(4390) gives a typical example of non-resonant explanations to the observed XYZ states, which should be paid more attention especially before identifying the observed XYZ states as genuine resonances. (orig.)

  3. Resonating-valence-bond superconductors with fermionic projected entangled pair states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poilblanc, D.; Corboz, P.; Schuch, N.; Cirac, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a family of simple fermionic projected entangled pair states (fPEPS) on the square lattice with bond dimension D=3 which are exactly hole-doped resonating valence bond (RVB) wave functions with short-range singlet bonds. Under doping the insulating RVB spin liquid evolves immediately

  4. Time of acquisition and network stability in pediatric resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.H. White (Tonya); R.L. Muetzel (Ryan); M. Schmidt (Marcus); S.J.E. Langeslag (Sandra); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been shown to elucidate reliable patterns of brain networks in both children and adults. Studies in adults have shown that rs-fMRI acquisition times of ∼5 to 6 min provide adequate sampling to produce stable spatial maps

  5. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hawley, Marilyn E [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I [Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution.

  6. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Gennady P; Bishop, Alan R; Chernobrod, Boris M; Hawley, Marilyn E; Brown, Geoffrey W; Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution

  7. States in [sup 12]B and primordial nucleosynthesis. Pt. 2; Resonance properties and astrophysical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Z Q [Dept. of Physics, Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Vogelaar, R B [Dept. of Physics, Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Champagne, A E [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) Triangle Univs. Nuclear Lab., Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Blackmon, J C [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) Triangle Univs. Nuclear Lab., Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Das, R K [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) Triangle Univs. Nuclear Lab., Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Hahn, K I [A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Lab., Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Yuan, J [Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1994-01-10

    The [sup 9]Be([alpha],p)[sup 12]B has been used to populate states which could correspond to astrophysically significant resonances in the [sup 8]Li([alpha],n)[sup 11]B reaction. The branching ratios for neutron decays have been measured and the neutron angular distributions have been used to determine J[sup [pi

  8. Forest worker exposure to airborne herbicide residues in smoke from prescribed fires in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon; Parshall B. Bush

    1992-01-01

    Occupational safety and health concerns have been raised in a number of southern states by workers conducting prescribed burns on forested lands treated with herbicides. Modeling assessments coupled with laboratory experiments have shown that the risk of airborne herbicide residues to workers is insignificant, even if the fire occurs immediately after herbicide...

  9. Quantum ground state and single-phonon control of a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, A D; Hofheinz, M; Ansmann, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2010-04-01

    Quantum mechanics provides a highly accurate description of a wide variety of physical systems. However, a demonstration that quantum mechanics applies equally to macroscopic mechanical systems has been a long-standing challenge, hindered by the difficulty of cooling a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state. The temperatures required are typically far below those attainable with standard cryogenic methods, so significant effort has been devoted to developing alternative cooling techniques. Once in the ground state, quantum-limited measurements must then be demonstrated. Here, using conventional cryogenic refrigeration, we show that we can cool a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state by using a microwave-frequency mechanical oscillator-a 'quantum drum'-coupled to a quantum bit, which is used to measure the quantum state of the resonator. We further show that we can controllably create single quantum excitations (phonons) in the resonator, thus taking the first steps to complete quantum control of a mechanical system.

  10. Pesticide residues in orange fruit from citrus orchards in Nuevo Leon State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Jacobo, Angela; Alcantar-Rosales, Victor Manuel; Alonso-Segura, Diana; Heras-Ramírez, Maria; Elizarragaz-De La Rosa, Dalau; Lugo-Melchor, Ofelia; Gaspar-Ramirez, Octavio

    2017-09-01

    Some international organisations established maximum residue limits (MRLs) in food to protect human health. Mexico lacks regulations in this matter, affecting national and international trade from agroindustry. The aim of this study was to diagnose pesticide residues in oranges from Nuevo Leon, México, in citrus orchards. In May 2014, 100 orange fruit samples were taken randomly from orchards and subjected to analysis for 93 pesticides at residual level by GC/QQQ-MS and LCQ-TOF-MS. Results showed the presence of 15 pesticide residues in the samples. The comparison of the residual levels of pesticides found in orange samples among the MRLs allowed by USA, EU and Japanese regulations demonstrated that all samples were below MRLs issued by USA and Japan. Some orange samples were above MRLs issued by the EU. This provides a basis to establish strategies in order to satisfy International Standards to protect human health and encourage Food Safety in Mexico.

  11. Advances in gamma ray resonant scattering and absorption long-lived isomeric nuclear states

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and advanced topics of research of gamma ray physics. It describes measuring of  Fermi surfaces with gamma resonance spectroscopy and the theory of angular distributions of resonantly scattered gamma rays. The dependence of excited-nuclei average lifetime on the shape of the exciting-radiation spectrum and electron binding energies in the spectra of scattered gamma rays is described. Resonant excitation by gamma rays of nuclear isomeric states with long lifetime leads to the emission and absorption lines. In the book, a new gamma spectroscopic method, gravitational gamma spectrometry, is developed. It has a resolution hundred million times higher than the usual Mössbauer spectrometer. Another important topic of this book is resonant scattering of annihilation quanta by nuclei with excited states in connection with positron annihilation. The application of the methods described is to explain the phenomenon of Coulomb fragmentation of gamma-source molecules and resonant scatt...

  12. Solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Hammel, P. C.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two-qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1 K. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwen eSong; Zhiling eZou; Juan eKou; Yang eLiu; LiZhuang eYang; Anna ezilverstand; Federicod’Oleire eUquillas; Xiaochu eZhang; Xiaochu eZhang; Xiaochu eZhang

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state...

  14. Prevalence of antimicrobial residues in eggs, tissue and feed samples in the State of Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alomirah, H.; Al-Mazeedi, H.; Al-Zenki, S.; Al-Faili, B.; Al-Foudary, M.; Abuzid, A.; Al-Sayed, I.; Sidhu, J.

    2007-01-01

    A total of 238 locally produced and imported eggs, tissue (meat, poultry and aquacultured fish) and feed and feedstuffs samples were collected at different seasonal periods from different farms and retail outlets in Kuwait and screened for presence of beta-lactams, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, streptomycin, macrolides and chloramphenicol (799 tests) using Charm II system. The results indicated that all of the 222 tests performed on table egg samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues indicating adherence to the guidelines for microbial use and withdrawal. Similarly, all of the 268 tests performed on tissue samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues except for chloramphenicol. These chloramphenicol positive samples, all of the 66 tests performed were negative for beta-lactams residues. Out of the 79 feed and feedstuff samples analyzed for teracyclines residues, broiler diet and concentrate samples (5%) were above the tetracyclines MRL (100 ppb.). On the other hands, results have revealed a widespread of sulfonamide residues and to a less extent chloramphenicol in tested feed and feedstuff samples. The Charm II system was reliable for rapid screening of antimicrobial residues. In general, results obtained in our study necessitate more effective and well planned national antimicrobial residues surveillance programs focusing particularly on samples imported from highly risk sources. (author)

  15. Resonant Ion Pair Formation in Electron Collisions with Ground State Molecular Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong, W.; Dunn, G.H.; Djuric, N.; Greene, C.H.; Neau, A.; Zong, W.; Larsson, M.; Al-Khalili, A.; Neau, A.; Derkatch, A.M.; Vikor, L.; Shi, W.; Rosen, S.; Le Padellec, A.; Danared, H.; Ugglas, M. af

    1999-01-01

    Resonant ion pair formation from collisions of electrons with ground state diatomic molecular ions has been observed and absolute cross sections measured. The cross section for HD + is characterized by an abrupt threshold at 1.9thinspthinspeV and 14 resolved peaks in the range of energies 0≤E≤14 eV . The dominant mechanism responsible for the structures appears to be resonant capture and stabilization, modified by two-channel quantum interference. Data on HF + show structure correlated with photoionization of HF and with dissociative recombination of electrons with this ion. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  16. Λ(1405) resonance in baryon-meson scattering with a bound state embedded in the continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Shimizu, Kiyotaka

    2009-01-01

    We investigate Λ(1405) as a resonance in a coupled-channels baryon-meson (Σπ-NK-Λη) scattering with a 'bound state embedded in the continuum' (BSEC). For this purpose, we solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation including a BSEC with the semirelativistic kinematics in the momentum space. This BSEC is introduced by hand, as a state not originated from a simple baryon-meson system. We assume it comes from the three-quark state. There appears a resonance in the Σπ scattering below the NK threshold without introducing a BSEC when the NK channel has a strong attraction, just like the chiral unitary approach. Even if the baryon-meson interaction is weakened by using a lower-momentum cut-off parameter, a resonance also appears around 1405 MeV when a BSEC is introduced. The corresponding peak also has a large width, and the NK scattering length is well reproduced. The interaction whose channel dependence is the same as the one originated from the color-magnetic interaction, where no NK attraction exists, also gives a broad peak with help of a BSEC. In order to reproduce the observed NK scattering length, the calculation including a BSEC seems to be preferable. Our calculation gives an appropriate NK scattering length when the BSEC contribution to the resonance is roughly half that of the NK channel.

  17. Multichannel calculation of Ds* vector states and the DsJ+(2632) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George

    2004-01-01

    We study bound states below threshold and resonances above threshold in the D 0 K + and D s + η systems, using a many-coupled-channel model for nonexotic meson-meson scattering applied to states with the quantum numbers of cs-bar quark-antiquark vector mesons. We fit the ground state at 2.112 GeV, whence the lowest resonances in D 0 K + come out at 2.61, 2.72, 3.03, and 3.08 GeV. The resonance at 2.61 GeV acquires a width of about 8 MeV, while its partial P wave cross section is up to 6 times larger in D s η than in D 0 K + , provided a mechanism accounting for Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden decays is included. The latter finding is in agreement with the observations of the SELEX Collaboration with respect to the recently reported D sJ + (2632) resonance. Therefore, we conclude that the D sJ + (2632) is probably the first recurrence of the D s *(2112) meson

  18. Teleportation of two-atom entangled state in resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao

    2007-01-01

    An alternative scheme is presented for teleportation of a two-atom entangled state in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is based on the resonant atom-cavity field interaction. In the scheme, only one cavity is involved, and the number of the atoms needed to be detected is decreased compared with the previous scheme. Since the resonant atom-cavity field interaction greatly reduces the interaction time, the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed during the teleportation process. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed. The scheme can easily be generalized to the teleportation of N-atom Greeninger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states. The number of atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in the GHZ state increases.

  19. On the Floquet–Magnus expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane, E-mail: emananga@gradcenter.cuny.edu [Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Charpentier, Thibault, E-mail: thibault.charpentier@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, IRAMIS, Service interdisciplinaire sur les systèmes moléculaires et matériaux, CEA/CNRS UMR 3299, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-01-22

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Floquet–Magnus expansion that is helpful to describe the time evolution of the spin system at all times in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics, based on promising and useful theory of Floquet–Magnus expansion. This theory provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Major applications of the Floquet–Magnus expansion are illustrated by simple solid-state NMR and physical applications such as in nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, NMR, quantum field theory and high energy physics, electromagnetism, optics, general relativity, search of periodic orbits, and geometric control of mechanical systems. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics. This review article also discusses future potential theoretical directions in solid-state NMR.

  20. Bound states in the continuum on periodic structures surrounded by strong resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2018-04-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are trapped or guided modes with their frequencies in the frequency intervals of the radiation modes. On periodic structures, a BIC is surrounded by a family of resonant modes with their quality factors approaching infinity. Typically the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|2 , where β and β* are the Bloch wave vectors of the resonant modes and the BIC, respectively. But for some special BICs, the quality factors are proportional to 1 /|β - β*|4 . In this paper, a general condition is derived for such special BICs on two-dimensional periodic structures. As a numerical example, we use the general condition to calculate special BICs, which are antisymmetric standing waves, on a periodic array of circular cylinders, and show their dependence on parameters. The special BICs are important for practical applications, because they produce resonances with large quality factors for a very large range of β .

  1. Parent state swapping of resonances in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stibbe, D.T.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio R-matrix scattering calculations are presented for electron-H 2 as a function of H 2 bond length. It is found that 2 Σ u + and 2Π u resonances in the 10 eV region appear to be associated with multiple 'parent' target states and that the resonances can swap parents as a function of internuclear separation. It is shown how these phenomena provide an explanation for the inconsistencies in previous assignments of resonances in this region and other anomalies such as pronounced isotopic effects. It is suggested that this parent swapping behaviour is likely to be a common feature of electron-impact excitation of other molecules and is particularly important for any models that include nuclear motion. (author)

  2. Comprehensive profiling and marker identification in non-volatile citrus oil residues by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Guillaume; Boccard, Julien; Mehl, Florence; Debrus, Benjamin; Marcourt, Laurence; Merle, Philippe; Delort, Estelle; Baroux, Lucie; Sommer, Horst; Rudaz, Serge; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    The detailed characterization of cold-pressed lemon oils (CPLOs) is of great importance for the flavor and fragrance (F&F) industry. Since a control of authenticity by standard analytical techniques can be bypassed using elaborated adulterated oils to pretend a higher quality, a combination of advanced orthogonal methods has been developed. The present study describes a combined metabolomic approach based on UHPLC-TOF-MS profiling and (1)H NMR fingerprinting to highlight metabolite differences on a set of representative samples used in the F&F industry. A new protocol was set up and adapted to the use of CPLO residues. Multivariate analysis based on both fingerprinting methods showed significant chemical variations between Argentinian and Italian samples. Discriminating markers identified in mixtures belong to furocoumarins, flavonoids, terpenoids and fatty acids. Quantitative NMR revealed low citropten and high bergamottin content in Italian samples. The developed metabolomic approach applied to CPLO residues gives some new perspectives for authenticity assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phytosterols elevation in bamboo shoot residue through laboratorial scale solid-state fermentation using isolated Aspergillus niger CTBU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X X; Chen, R S; Shen, Y; Yin, Z Y

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus niger CTBU isolated from local decayed bamboo shoot residue was employed to solid-state fermentation (SSF) of bamboo shoot residue to elevate the content of phytosterols. Strain acclimatization was carried out under the fermentation condition using bamboo shoot as substrate for fermentation performance improvement. The optimal fermentation temperature and nitrogen level were investigated using acclimatized strain, and SSF was carried out in a 500-ml Erlenmeyer flask feeding 300-mg bamboo shoot residue chips under the optimal condition (33 °C and feeding 4 % urea), and 1,186 mg (100 g)(-1) of total phytosterol was attained after 5-day fermentation, in comparison, only 523 mg (100 g)(-1) of phytosterol was assayed in fresh shoots residue. HPLC analysis of the main composition of total phytosterols displays that the types of phytosterols and composition ratio of main sterols keep steady. This laboratorial scale SSF unit could be scaled up for raw phytosterols production from discarded bamboo shoot residue and could reduce its cost.

  4. Survey of pyrethroid, macrocyclic lactone and antibacterial residues in bulk milk tank from Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia C.A. Picinin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A survey of veterinary drug residues in bulk milk tank from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, was carried out through a broad scope analysis. Here, 132 raw milk samples were collected at 45 dairy farms in Minas Gerais from August 2009 to February 2010, and analyzed for 42 analytes, comprising pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones and antibacterials, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in tandem mode and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Within all milk samples, at least one veterinary drug residue was identified in 40 milk samples (30.30% by confirmatory tests, whereas 16 samples (12.12% showed the presence of at least two residues. With regard to the Brazilian maximum residue levels, 11 milk samples (8.33% were non-compliant according to Brazilian Legislation. The veterinary drugs detected in the non-compliant milk samples include penicillin V (one sample, abamectin (one sample and cypermethrin (nine samples. Furthermore, the antibacterial screening methods failed to identify most of the positive samples that were detected by confirmatory tests, leading to a large discrepancy between the screening and confirmatory antimicrobial tests. Thus, the present study indicated that the veterinary drugs residues still represents a great concern for the milk production chain.

  5. Josephson plasma resonance in vortex filament state of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yuji; Gaifullin, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    High temperature superconductors have the crystalline structure in which two-dimensional CuO 2 planes are piled in layers, consequently, the anisotropy of electroconductivity arises, and this brings about stable and low energy Josephson plasma in superconducting state. Also as to the vortex filament state of high temperature superconductors, the effect of thermal fluctuation due to low dimensionality, short coherence length and high transition temperature becomes conspicuous. In reality, these plasma and vortex filament state are related closely. Light reflection and plasma edge in superconducting state, Josephson plasma resonance in the vortex filament state of BiO 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ , the plasma vibration in Josephson junction, Josephson plasma in magnetic field, Josephson plasma in the liquid state of vortex filament, Josephson plasma in the solid state of vortex filament, and Josephson plasma in parallel magnetic field are reported. The Josephson plasma resonance is the experimental means for exploring vortex filament state from microscopic standpoint, and its development hereafter is expected. (K.I.)

  6. On the effect of image states on resonant neutralization of hydrogen anions near metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    We directly assess the role of image state electronic structures on the ion-survival by comparing the resonant charge transfer dynamics of hydrogen anions near Pd(1 1 1), Pd(1 0 0), and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces. Our simulations show that image states that are degenerate with the metal conduction band favor the recapture of electrons by outgoing ions. In sharp contrast, localized image states that occur inside the band gap hinder the recapture process and thus enhance the ion-neutralization probability

  7. Bounds on the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Terri M.; Brown, Kenneth R.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2005-01-01

    The role of mixed-state entanglement in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computation is not yet well understood. In particular, despite the success of quantum-information processing with NMR, recent work has shown that quantum states used in most of those experiments were not entangled. This is because these states, derived by unitary transforms from the thermal equilibrium state, were too close to the maximally mixed state. We are thus motivated to determine whether a given NMR state is entanglable - that is, does there exist a unitary transform that entangles the state? The boundary between entanglable and nonentanglable thermal states is a function of the spin system size N and its temperature T. We provide bounds on the location of this boundary using analytical and numerical methods; our tightest bound scales as N∼T, giving a lower bound requiring at least N∼22 000 proton spins to realize an entanglable thermal state at typical laboratory NMR magnetic fields. These bounds are tighter than known bounds on the entanglability of effective pure states

  8. Nonequilibrium steady states and resonant tunneling in time-periodically driven systems with interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tao; Hofstetter, Walter

    2018-03-01

    Time-periodically driven systems are a versatile toolbox for realizing interesting effective Hamiltonians. Heating, caused by excitations to high-energy states, is a challenge for experiments. While most setups so far address the relatively weakly interacting regime, it is of general interest to study heating in strongly correlated systems. Using Floquet dynamical mean-field theory, we study nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) in the Falicov-Kimball model, with time-periodically driven kinetic energy or interaction. We systematically investigate the nonequilibrium properties of the NESS. For a driven kinetic energy, we show that resonant tunneling, where the interaction is an integer multiple of the driving frequency, plays an important role in the heating. In the strongly correlated regime, we show that this can be well understood using Fermi's golden rule and the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation for a time-periodically driven system. We furthermore demonstrate that resonant tunneling can be used to control the population of Floquet states to achieve "photodoping." For driven interactions introduced by an oscillating magnetic field near a widely adopted Feshbach resonance, we find that the double occupancy is strongly modulated. Our calculations apply to shaken ultracold-atom systems and to solid-state systems in a spatially uniform but time-dependent electric field. They are also closely related to lattice modulation spectroscopy. Our calculations are helpful to understand the latest experiments on strongly correlated Floquet systems.

  9. Resonances, cusp effects and a virtual state in e/sup -/-He scattering near the n = 3 thresholds. [Variational methods, resonance, threshold structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbet, R K [International Business Machines Corp., San Jose, Calif. (USA). Research Lab.

    1978-01-14

    Variational calculations locate and identify resonances and new threshold structures in electron impact excitation of He metastable states, in the region of the 3/sup 3/S and 3/sup 1/S excitation thresholds. A virtual state is found at the 3/sup 3/S threshold.

  10. Maintenance optimization and prognostics of residual life - A state of the art report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystad, Bent

    2006-01-15

    In many industries a huge part of the daily operational costs are related to maintenance. One key function in cutting costs is in optimization of the maintenance efforts. A major task is to change the work culture and work processes from being repair oriented, with focus on repairing breakdowns, to being proactive and maintain critical parts/systems before failures occur. Estimation of residual life distributions is of great need to obtain an optimum preventive maintenance strategy. In this report two approaches for estimation of residual life are discussed. The first model assumes that the residual life follows a Weibull distribution where the parameters are dependent on expert judgement, inspection data, repair data, and technical health trends. The second model is based on a continuous time Markov chain. In maintenance optimization a quantitative approach like the mean residual life estimation is needed in addition to a qualitative approach like the Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) methodology to give support for e.g. optimization of the maintenance overhaul intervals.The use of residual life knowledge in opportunistic maintenance is also discussed.(auth)

  11. Neutron components of isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance states in 58,60,62,64Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalik, R.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-proton matrix element ratios (η) for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance states of even Ni isotopes are investigated within the framework of the shell model quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The dependence of η ratios on radial neutron and proton ground state density distribution differences (Δ np ) is found to be about 1.0-1.5 Δ np . The theoretical η ratios are 14-23% lower than the hydrodynamical limit. The agreement between theoretical and experimental η ratios is observed for 58 Ni and 60 Ni isotopes. The η ratios for 62 Ni and 64 Ni suggested by the resonance π ± inelastic scattering cannot be interpreted even including the radial variations of the neutron fields. 18 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. Low-noise, transformer-coupled resonant photodetector for squeezed state generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyong; Shi, Shaoping; Zheng, Yaohui

    2017-10-01

    In an actual setup of squeezed state generation, the stability of a squeezing factor is mainly limited by the performance of the servo-control system, which is mainly influenced by the shot noise and gain of a photodetector. We present a unique transformer-coupled LC resonant amplifier as a photodetector circuit to reduce the electronic noise and increase the gain of the photodetector. As a result, we obtain a low-noise, high gain photodetector with the gain of more than 1.8×10 5 V/A, and the input current noise of less than 4.7 pA/Hz. By adjusting the parameters of the transformer, the quality factor Q of the resonant circuit is close to 100 in the frequency range of more than 100 MHz, which meets the requirement for weak power detection in the application of squeezed state generation.

  13. Nutrient assessment of olive leaf residues processed by solid-state fermentation as an innovative feedstuff additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P-J; Huang, L-X; Zhang, C-H; Zhang, Y-L

    2016-07-01

    Olive leaf residue feedstuff additives were prepared by solid-state fermentation (SSF), and its feeding effects on broiler chickens were examined. The fermentation's nutrient value, that is, protein enrichment, cellulase activity, tannic acid degradation and amino acid enhancement, was determined. The effect of different strains, including molds (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryzae and Trichoderma viride) and yeasts (Candida utilis, Candida tropicalis and Geotrichum candidum), and the fermentation time on the nutrient values of the feedstuff additives was investigated. The experimental results showed that the optimal parameters for best performance were A. niger and C. utilis in a 1 : 1 ratio (v/v) in co-culture fermentation for 5 days. Under these conditions, the total content of amino acids in the fermented olive leaf residues increased by 22·0% in comparison with that in the raw leaf residues. Both Glutamic acid and Aspartic acid contents were increased by more than 25·4%. Broiler chickens fed with different amounts of feedstuff additives were assessed. The results demonstrated that the chicken weight gains increased by 120%, and normal serum biochemical parameters were improved significantly after 10% of the feedstuff additives were supplemented to the daily chicken feed for 28 days. The co-culture combination of A. niger and C. utilis with SSF for olive leaf residue had the best nutrient values. The addition of 10% fermented olive leaf residue facilitated the chicken growth and development. This study reveals that olive leaf residues fermented by SSF exhibited considerable potential as feed additives for feeding poultry. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Calculation of quasi-stationary states parameters within the algebraic version of the resonating group method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okhrimenko, I.P.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamical equations of the algebraic version of the resonating group method are used to determine the positions and the widths of quasi-stationary states or to find the poles of the S-matrix in the fourth quadrant of the K-plane. Concrete calculations are performed by the example of an α-decay of 8 Be. A comparison with the results of the other authors and experiment is made

  15. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present stu...

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of prion peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Jonathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    High-resolution structural studies using x-ray diffraction and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are not feasible for proteins of low volubility and high tendency to aggregate. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) is in principle capable of providing structural information in such systems, however to do this efficiently and accurately, further SSNMR tools must be developed This dissertation describes the development of three new methods and their application to a biological system of interest, the priori protein (PrP).

  17. Resonant state expansion applied to three-dimensional open optical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doost, M. B.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    The resonant-state expansion (RSE), a rigorous perturbative method in electrodynamics, is developed for three-dimensional open optical systems. Results are presented using the analytically solvable homogeneous dielectric sphere as unperturbed system. Since any perturbation which breaks the spherical symmetry mixes transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes, the RSE is extended here to include TM modes and a zero-frequency pole of the Green's function. We demonstrate the valid...

  18. A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos method for studying quantum resonance states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2014-01-01

    A complex guided spectral transform Lanczos (cGSTL) algorithm is proposed to compute both bound and resonance states including energies, widths and wavefunctions. The algorithm comprises of two layers of complex-symmetric Lanczos iterations. A short inner layer iteration produces a set of complex formally orthogonal Lanczos (cFOL) polynomials. They are used to span the guided spectral transform function determined by a retarded Green operator. An outer layer iteration is then carried out with the transform function to compute the eigen-pairs of the system. The guided spectral transform function is designed to have the same wavefunctions as the eigenstates of the original Hamiltonian in the spectral range of interest. Therefore the energies and/or widths of bound or resonance states can be easily computed with their wavefunctions or by using a root-searching method from the guided spectral transform surface. The new cGSTL algorithm is applied to bound and resonance states of HO, and compared to previous calculations

  19. On the Fer expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane, E-mail: esm041@mail.harvard.edu

    2016-01-18

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Fer expansion that is helpful to describe the evolution of the spin system in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics based on the Fer expansion which provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Significant applications of the Fer expansion are illustrated in NMR and in physics such as classical physics, nonlinear dynamics systems, celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy, hydrodynamics, nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, high energy physics, electromagnetism. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics.

  20. On the Fer expansion: Applications in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical approaches are useful and powerful tools for more accurate and efficient spin dynamics simulation to understand experiments and devising new RF pulse sequence in nuclear magnetic resonance. Solid-state NMR is definitely a timely topic or area of research, and not many papers on the respective theories are available in the literature of nuclear magnetic resonance or physics reports. This report presents the power and the salient features of the promising theoretical approach called Fer expansion that is helpful to describe the evolution of the spin system in nuclear magnetic resonance. The report presents a broad view of algorithms of spin dynamics based on the Fer expansion which provides procedures to control and describe the spin dynamics in solid-state NMR. Significant applications of the Fer expansion are illustrated in NMR and in physics such as classical physics, nonlinear dynamics systems, celestial mechanics and dynamical astronomy, hydrodynamics, nuclear, atomic, molecular physics, and quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, high energy physics, electromagnetism. The aim of this report is to bring to the attention of the spin dynamics community, the bridge that exists between solid-state NMR and other related fields of physics and applied mathematics.

  1. Theory and computation of triply excited resonances: Application to states of He-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaides, C.A.; Piangos, N.A.; Komninos, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Autoionizing multiply excited states offer unusual challenges to the theory of electronic structure and spectra because of the presence of strong electron correlations, of their occasional weak binding, of their proximity to more than one threshold, and of their degeneracy with many continua. Here we discuss a theory that addresses these difficulties in conjunction with the computation of their wave functions and intrinsic properties. Emphasis is given on the justification of the possible presence of self-consistently obtained open-channel-like (OCL) correlating configurations in the square-integrable representation of such states and on their effect on the energy E and the width Γ. Application of the theory has allowed the prediction of two hitherto unknown He - triply excited resonances, the 2s2p 2 2 P (E=59.71 eV, above the He ground state, Γ=79 meV) and the 2p 3 2 Do (E=59.46 eV, Γ=282 meV) (1 a.u.=27.2116 eV). These resonances are above the singly excited states of He and are embedded in its doubly excited spectrum. The relatively broad 2p 3 2 Do state interacts strongly with the He 2s2p 3 Po εd continuum. The effect of this interaction has been studied in terms of the coupling with fixed core scattering states as well as with a self-consistently computed OCL bound configuration

  2. Entropy, energy and negativity in Fermi-resonance coupled states of substituted methanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Xiwen; Wan Mingfang; Ma Zhongqi

    2010-01-01

    Several measures of entanglement have attracted considerable interest in the relationship of a measure of entanglement with other quantities. The dynamics of entropy, energy and negativity is studied for Fermi-resonance coupled vibrations in substituted methanes with three kinds of initial mixed states, which are the mixed density matrices of binomial states, thermal states and squeezed states on two vibrational modes, respectively. It is demonstrated that for mixed binomial states and mixed thermal states with small magnitudes the entropies of the stretch and the bend are anti-correlated in the same oscillatory frequency, so do the energies for each kind of state with small magnitudes, whereas the entropies exhibit positive correlations with the corresponding energies. Furthermore, for small magnitudes quantum mutual entropy is positively correlated with the interacting energy. Analytic forms of entropies and energies are provided with initial conditions in which they are stationary, and the agreement between analytic and numerical simulations is satisfactory. The dynamical entanglement measured by negativity is examined for those states and conditions. It is shown that negativity displays a sudden death for mixed binomial states and mixed thermal states with small magnitudes, and the time-averaged negativity has the minimal value under the conditions of stationary entropies and energies. Moreover, negativity is positively correlated with the mutual entropy and the interacting energy just for mixed squeezed states with small magnitudes. Those are useful for molecular quantum information processing and dynamical entanglement.

  3. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the

  4. A general assignment method for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of proteins based on the correlation of resonances through heteronuclear dipolar couplings in samples aligned parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George J; Son, Woo Sung; Opella, Stanley J

    2011-04-01

    A general method for assigning oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR spectra of proteins is demonstrated. In principle, this method requires only a single sample of a uniformly ¹⁵N-labeled membrane protein in magnetically aligned bilayers, and a previously assigned isotropic chemical shift spectrum obtained either from solution NMR on micelle or isotropic bicelle samples or from magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR on unoriented proteoliposomes. The sequential isotropic resonance assignments are transferred to the OS solid-state NMR spectra of aligned samples by correlating signals from the same residue observed in protein-containing bilayers aligned with their normals parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. The underlying principle is that the resonances from the same residue have heteronuclear dipolar couplings that differ by exactly a factor of two between parallel and perpendicular alignments. The method is demonstrated on the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bilayers, whose assignments have been previously made using an earlier generation of methods that relied on the preparation of many selectively labeled (by residue type) samples. The new method provides the correct resonance assignments using only a single uniformly ¹⁵N-labeled sample, two solid-state NMR spectra, and a previously assigned isotropic spectrum. Significantly, this approach is equally applicable to residues in alpha helices, beta sheets, loops, and any other elements of tertiary structure. Moreover, the strategy bridges between OS solid-state NMR of aligned samples and solution NMR or MAS solid-state NMR of unoriented samples. In combination with the development of complementary experimental methods, it provides a step towards unifying these apparently different NMR approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Doubly excited 2s2p 1,3Po resonance states of helium in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Ho, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We have made an investigation on the 2s2p 1,3 P o resonance states of helium embedded in dense plasma environments. A screened Coulomb potential obtained from the Debye model is used to represent the interaction between the charge particles. A correlated wave function consisting of a generalized exponential expansion has been used to represent the correlation effect. Resonance energies and widths for the doubly excited He embedded in plasmas with various Debye lengths are determined using the stabilization method by calculating the density of resonance states. The resonance energies and widths for various Debye parameters ranging from infinity to a small value for the lowest 1,3 P o resonance states are reported

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Continuous Flow-Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of an Intermediate Redox State of Cytochrome-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forster, M.; Hester, R. E.; Cartling, B.

    1982-01-01

    An intermediate redox state of cytochrome c at alkaline pH, generated upon rapid reduction by sodium dithionite, has been observed by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy in combination with the continuous flow technique. The RR spectrum of the intermediate state is reported for excitation both...... in the (alpha, beta) and the Soret optical absorption band. The spectra of the intermediate state are more like those of the stable reduced form than those of the stable oxidized form. For excitation of 514.5 nm, the most prominent indication of an intermediate state is the wave-number shift of one RR band from...... 1,562 cm-1 in the stable oxidized state through 1,535 cm-1 in the intermediate state to 1,544 cm-1 in the stable reduced state. For excitation at 413.1 nm, a band, present at 1,542 cm-1 in the stable reduced state but not present in the stable oxidized state, is absent in the intermediate state. We...

  8. Time-resolved resonance raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in the lowest excited singlet state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; Langkilde, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrwn of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in its lowest excited S1 state excited in resonance with the S1 → Sn absorption band at 650 nm in non-polar solvents is reported. Three vibrational bands at 1572, 1481 and 1165 cm−1 are observed. A possible assignment of the the 1481 cm−...

  9. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  10. Exploiting jet binning to identify the initial state of high-mass resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Liebler, Stefan; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.

  11. Exploiting jet binning to identify the initial state of high-mass resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Liebler, Stefan; Tackmann, Frank J.; Tackmann, Kerstin; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Zeune, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model-independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.

  12. Characterization of excited electronic states of naphthalene by resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonang, C.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The first resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering from naphthalene are reported. Fourth harmonic of a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser is used to resonantly excite the 1 B 1u + transition, producing Raman spectra that confirm the dominance of the vibronically active ν 28 (b 3g ) mode and the Franck--Condon active a g modes, ν 5 and ν 3 . A synchronously pumped stilbene dye laser and its second harmonic are employed as the excitation sources for hyper-Raman and Raman scattering from the overlapping 1 B 2 u + and 1 A g - states. The Raman spectra indicate that the equilibrium geometry of naphthalene is distorted primarily along ν 5 , ν 8 , and ν 7 normal coordinates upon excitation to 1 B 2 u + . The hyper-Raman spectrum shows that ν 25 (b 2u ) is the mode principally responsible for vibronic coupling between the 1 A g - and 1 B 2u + states. The results demonstrate the advantageous features of resonance hyper-Raman scattering for the case of overlapping one- and two-photon allowed transitions. Calculations based on simple molecular orbital configurations are shown to qualitatively agree with the experimental results

  13. The breakout of the Hot CNO cycle via ^18Ne resonant states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Tan, W.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Gorres, J.; Roberts, A.; Villano, A.; Wiescher, M.; Brune, C.; Heinen, Z.; Massey, T.; Ozkan, N.; Guray, R. T.; Mach, H.

    2010-11-01

    The energy generation rate in the HCNO cycle is limited by the β decay of the waiting point nuclei ^14O and ^15O. However, when the temperatures and densities are high enough (e.g. Novae and X-ray Bursts) it is possible to bypass them by p/α captures resulting in a thermonuclear runaway towards the rp-process. One of the two paths for breakouts from the HCNO cycle is the reaction chain ^14O(α,p)^17F(p,γ)^18Ne(α,p), which proceeds through resonant states on ^18Ne, making their reactions rates very sensitive on the partial and total widths, excitation energies and spins of such resonances. We studied the resonant states in ^18Ne via ^16O(^3He,n) reaction. The neutrons were measured with an array of liquid scintillators using Time-of-Flight and pulse-shape discrimination techniques. The charged particles were detected in coincidence with neutrons by an array of silicon detectors, allowing us to measure α, p, p' and 2p decay branching ratios. Tentative spin assignments were made in comparison with zero range DWBA calculations. This new information will be included in reaction network calculations to evaluate its impact on the nuclear energy generation that occurs in these stellar explosive environments.

  14. [Atherogenic dyslipidemia and residual risk. State of the art in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Pedro-Botet Montoya, Juan; Pintó Sala, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Pandemics of metabolic síndrome, obesity, and type 2 diabetes is a major challenge for the next years and supported the grat burden of cardiovascular diseases. The R3i (Residual Risk Reduction initiative) has previously highlighted atherogenic dyslipidaemia as an important and modifiable contributor to the lipid related residual cardiovascular risk. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia is defined as an imbalance between proatherogenic triglycerides-rich apoB-containing lipoproteins and antiatherogenic AI containing lipoproteins. To improve clinical management of atherogenic dyslipidaemia a despite of lifestyle intervention includes pharmacological approach, and fibrates is the main option for combination with a statin to further reduce non-HDL cholesterol. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Model of charge-state distributions for electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Edgell

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model for the ion charge-state distribution (CSD in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS plasma is presented that incorporates non-Maxwellian distribution functions, multiple atomic species, and ion confinement due to the ambipolar potential well that arises from confinement of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR heated electrons. Atomic processes incorporated into the model include multiple ionization and multiple charge exchange with rate coefficients calculated for non-Maxwellian electron distributions. The electron distribution function is calculated using a Fokker-Planck code with an ECR heating term. This eliminates the electron temperature as an arbitrary user input. The model produces results that are a good match to CSD data from the ANL-ECRII ECRIS. Extending the model to 1D axial will also allow the model to determine the plasma and electrostatic potential profiles, further eliminating arbitrary user input to the model.

  16. Inelastic electron scattering, fine structure of M1 giant resonances and Gamow-Teller states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in obtaining detailed fine structure distributions of magnetic giant resonances in nuclei using high resolution inelastic electron scattering at low energy is discussed. Specific examples chosen are the medium heavy nuclei 40 42 44 48 Ca in which M1 excitations are due to neutron spin-flip transitions and the N=28 isotones 50 Ti, 52 Cr and 54 Fe where in addition also proton excitations contribute to the measured M1 strength. It is found that the M1 strength is very fragmented and considerably quenched in comparison to predictions of shell model calculations in a model space that includes up to 2p-2h excitations. Finally, the old problem of M1 strength in 208 Pb is revisited and the results of a form factor measurement of a recently discovered low lying Jsup(π)=1 + state by nuclear resonance fluorescence are presented. (Auth.)

  17. Steady State Analysis of LCLC Resonant Converter with Capacitive Output Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Shafiyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mathematical analysis and modeling of a 4th order LCLC resonant converter with capacitive output filter in steady-state condition. Due to the nonlinearity of the LCLC resonant circuit with capacitive output filter, the conventional modeling procedure cannot thoroughly describe the behavior of the converter. In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed that can accommodate the absence of the output inductor and predict the converter performance for a wide range of operating conditions. A 2.25KW prototype converter is provided to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed model. Experimental results show that the proposed model can precisely predict the behavior of the converter for a wide range of operating conditions.

  18. Air Quality and Health Impacts of an Aviation Biofuel Supply Chain Using Forest Residue in the Northwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Vikram; Gao, Allan H; Martinkus, Natalie B; Wolcott, Michael P; Lamb, Brian K

    2018-04-03

    Forest residue is a major potential feedstock for second-generation biofuel; however, little knowledge exists about the environmental impacts of the development and production of biofuel from such a feedstock. Using a high-resolution regional air quality model, we estimate the air quality impacts of a forest residue based aviation biofuel supply chain scenario in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Using two potential supply chain regions, we find that biomass and biofuel hauling activities will add simulation. Using BenMAP, a health impact assessment tool, we show that avoiding slash pile burning results in a decrease in premature mortality as well as several other nonfatal and minor health effects. In general, we show that most air quality and health benefits result primarily from avoided slash pile burning emissions.

  19. Dynamic conductivity modified by impurity resonant states in doping three-dimensional Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Chen; Zheng, Shi-Han; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Li, Jun; Yang, Mou

    2018-04-01

    The impurity effect is studied in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals in the framework of a T-matrix method to consider the multiple scattering events of Dirac electrons off impurities. It has been found that a strong impurity potential can significantly restructure the energy dispersion and the density of states of Dirac electrons. An impurity-induced resonant state emerges and significantly modifies the pristine optical response. It is shown that the impurity state disturbs the common longitudinal optical conductivity by creating either an optical conductivity peak or double absorption jumps, depending on the relative position of the impurity band and the Fermi level. More importantly, these conductivity features appear in the forbidden region between the Drude and interband transition, completely or partially filling the Pauli block region of optical response. The underlying physics is that the appearance of resonance states as well as the broadening of the bands leads to a more complicated selection rule for the optical transitions, making it possible to excite new electron-hole pairs in the forbidden region. These features in optical conductivity provide valuable information to understand the impurity behaviors in 3D Dirac materials.

  20. A study of the Roper resonance as a hybrid state from J/ψ decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ping, R.G.; Chiang, H.C.; Zou, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of the Roper resonance as a hybrid baryon is investigated through studying the transitional amplitudes in J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N* decays. We begin with perturbative QCD to describe the dynamical process for the J/ψ->3q-bar +3q decay to the lowest order of αs, and by extending the modified quark creation model to the J/ψ energy region to describe the J/ψ->3q-bar +3q+g process. The nonperturbative effects are incorporated by a simple quark model of baryons to evaluate the angular distribution parameters and decay widths for the processes J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N*. From fitting the decay width of J/ψ->γpp-bar to the experimental data, we extract the quark-pair creation strength gI=15.40-bar GeV. Our numerical results for J/ψ->p-bar N*, N-bar *N* decays show that the branching ratios for these decays are quite different if the Roper resonance is assumed to be a common 3q state or a pure hybrid state. For testing its mixing properties, we present a scheme to construct the Roper wave function by mixing vertical bar qqqg> state with a normal vertical bar qqq,2s> state. Under this picture, the ratios of the decay widths to that of the J/ψ->pp-bar decay are re-evaluated versus the mixing parameter. A test of the hybrid nature of the Roper resonance in J/ψ decays is discussed

  1. Deterministic Many-Resonator W Entanglement of Nearly Arbitrary Microwave States via Attractive Bose-Hubbard Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gangat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multipartite entanglement of large numbers of physically distinct linear resonators is of both fundamental and applied interest, but there have been no feasible proposals to date for achieving it. At the same time, the Bose-Hubbard model with attractive interactions (ABH is theoretically known to have a phase transition from the superfluid phase to a highly entangled nonlocal superposition, but observation of this phase transition has remained out of experimental reach. In this theoretical work, we jointly address these two problems by (1 proposing an experimentally accessible quantum simulation of the ABH phase transition in an array of tunably coupled superconducting circuit microwave resonators and (2 incorporating the simulation into a highly scalable protocol that takes as input any microwave-resonator state with negligible occupation of number states |0⟩ and |1⟩ and nonlocally superposes it across the whole array of resonators. The large-scale multipartite entanglement produced by the protocol is of the W type, which is well known for its robustness. The protocol utilizes the ABH phase transition to generate the multipartite entanglement of all of the resonators in parallel, and is therefore deterministic and permits an increase in resonator number without any increase in protocol complexity; the number of resonators is limited instead by system characteristics such as resonator-frequency disorder and inter-resonator coupling strength. Only one local and two global controls are required for the protocol. We numerically demonstrate the protocol with realistic system parameters and estimate that current experimental capabilities can realize the protocol with high fidelity for greater than 40 resonators. Because superconducting-circuit microwave resonators are capable of interfacing with other devices and platforms such as mechanical resonators and (potentially optical fields, this proposal provides a route toward large-scale W

  2. Homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities based on quenching fluorescence of tyrosine/tryptophan residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanling; Yang, Xiaolan; Pu, Jun; Zhao, Yunsheng; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Guoming; Zheng, Jun; Yuan, Huidong; Liao, Fei

    2010-11-01

    A new homogeneous competitive assay of ligand affinities was proposed based on quenching the fluorescence of tryptophan/tyrosine residues in a protein via Főrster-resonance-energy-transfer using a fluorescent reference ligand as the acceptor. Under excitation around 280 nm, the fluorescence of a protein or a bound acceptor was monitored upon competitive binding against a nonfluorescent candidate ligand. Chemometrics for deriving the binding ratio of the acceptor with either fluorescence signal was discussed; the dissociation constant ( Kd) of a nonfluorescent candidate ligand was calculated from its concentration to displace 50% binding of the acceptor. N-biotinyl-N'-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine (BNEDA) and N-biotinyl-N'-dansyl-ethylenediamine (BDEDA) were used as the reference ligands and acceptors to streptavidin to test this new homogeneous competitive assay. Upon binding of an acceptor to streptavidin, there were the quench of streptavidin fluorescence at 340 nm and the characteristic fluorescence at 430 nm for BNEDA or at 525 nm for BDEDA. Kd of BNEDA and BDEDA was obtained via competitive binding against biotin. By quantifying BNEDA fluorescence, Kd of each tested nonfluorescent biotin derivative was consistent with that by quantifying streptavidin fluorescence using BNEDA or BDEDA as the acceptor. The overall coefficients of variation were about 10%. Therefore, this homogeneous competitive assay was effective and promising to high-throughput-screening.

  3. The over-barrier resonant states and multi-channel scattering by a quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Polupanov

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an explicit numerical method for accurate calculation ofthe analytic continuation of the scattering matrix, describing the multichannelscattering by a quantum well, to the unphysical region of complexvalues of the energy. Results of calculations show that one or severalpoles of the S-matrix exist, corresponding to the over-barrier resonantstates that are critical for the effect of the absolute reflection at scatteringof the heavy hole by a quantum well in the energy range where only theheavy hole may propagate over barriers in a quantum-well structure.Light- and heavy-hole states are described by the Luttinger Hamiltonianmatrix. The qualitative behaviour of the over-barrier scattering andresonant states is the same at variation of the shape of the quantum-wellpotential, however lifetimes of resonant states depend drastically on theshape and depth of a quantum well.

  4. Study of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states in Sn and Dy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolk, A.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of the giant dipole resonance built on highly excited states. The aim is to get more detailed information on the properties of the GDR and to use it as a tool for the investigation of nuclear structure at high excitation energy. The high energy γ-rays seen from the decay of excited state GDRs in heavy ion fusion reactions reflect the average properties of the states populated by the γ-emission. The measurements at different initial excitation energies of 114 Sn provide information on the nuclear level density near the particle separation energy at an average angular momentum of 10ℎ. The study of shape changes at very high spin in 152-156 Dy nuclei is presented. A theoretical model developed to describe fusion-evaporation reactions is presented. 149 refs.; 63 figs.; 13 tabs

  5. Residual Stress State in Single-Edge Notched Tension Specimen Caused by the Local Compression Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yifan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses (FEA are performed to simulate the local compression (LC technique on the clamped single-edge notched tension (SE(T specimens. The analysis includes three types of indenters, which are single pair of cylinder indenters (SPCI, double pairs of cylinder indenters (DPCI and single pair of ring indenters (SPRI. The distribution of the residual stress in the crack opening direction in the uncracked ligament of the specimen is evaluated. The outcome of this study can facilitate the use of LC technique on SE(T specimens.

  6. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    2007-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the coating and the substrate, the macro-stresses were found to be compressive and to decrease in magnitude with increasing processing speed. The origin of the macro- and micro-stresses is discussed. T...

  7. High magnetic field observation of the resonance donor states of S in InSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, S.; Konczewicz, L.; Kowalski, J.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements in InSb heavily doped with sulfur (n approximately 5x10 18 cm -3 ) are performed. At T = 4.2 K the Hall coefficient and transverse magnetoresistivity are measured as a function of pressure up to 2100 MPa and magnetic field up to 18 T. At the highest pressure, a decrease of the frequency and a decrease of the damping of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed. These effects are explained as a result of the transfer of electrons from the conduction band to the resonance states of sulfur. At atmospheric pressure these states are 0.55 eV above the bottom of conduction band. In the lower pressure range, the experimental dependence of the effective Dingle temperature T*sub(D) = Tsub(D) + Tsub(i) can be explained by the model in which the scattering by ionized impurities and short-range potentials are taken into account. At the highest pressures a change of inhomogeneity of carrier concentration due to the transfer of electrons to the resonance states has to be considered. (author)

  8. Factors influencing fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmakumar, Rohan; Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Li Debiao

    2007-01-01

    The presence of susceptibility-shifting media can lead to signal voids in magnetic resonance images. While signal voids have been traditionally used to detect such magnetic perturbers, selective magnetic resonance imaging of off-resonant spins surrounding susceptibility-shifted media allows for them to be visualized as hyper-intense (positive contrast) regions. These positive contrast methods can potentially improve the detection conspicuity of magnetic perturbers against regions that appear dark due to the absence of protons, such as air. Recently, a fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) technique has been proposed as a positive contrast imaging method. This work systematically evaluates the contrast characteristics and acquisition strategies of FLAPS-based imaging from the standpoint of imaging parameters and physical properties of the magnetic perturbers. Results show that scan parameters (T R , flip angle, B 0 ), physical properties of the perturber (size and concentration of shift reagent) and the ratio of the relaxation constants (T 1 /T 2 ) of the medium are significant factors influencing the FLAPS-based positive contrast

  9. Final states with 3rd generation quarks @ 13 TeV (resonant or not)

    CERN Document Server

    Everaerts, Pieter Bruno Bart

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of new physics models gives rise to final states with third-generation quarks. This note presents new results for some of these models using 13 TeV proton-proton collisions at the CERN LHC. Direct production of third-generation supersymmetric superpartners and vector-like quarks are discussed. Also the searches looking for resonances with third-generation quarks are covered. None of the searches discussed here shows an indication of new physics and the new exclusion limits are presented.

  10. XFEL resonant photo-pumping of dense plasmas and dynamic evolution of autoionizing core hole states

    OpenAIRE

    Rosmej, F. B.; Moinard, A.; Renner, O.; Galtier, E.; Lee, J. J.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P. A.; Schlotter, W.; Turner, J. J.; Lee, R. W.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Seely, J.

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to the case of LIF (Laser-Induced Fluorescence), an equally revolutionary impact to science is expected from resonant X-ray photo-pumping. It will particularly contribute to a progress in high energy density science: pumped core hole states create X-ray transitions that can escape dense matter on a 10 fs-time scale without essential photoabsorption, thus providing a unique possibility to study matter under extreme conditions. In the first proof of principle experiment at the X-ray F...

  11. Highly excited bound-state resonances of short-range inverse power-law potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2017-11-15

    We study analytically the radial Schroedinger equation with long-range attractive potentials whose asymptotic behaviors are dominated by inverse power-law tails of the form V(r) = -β{sub n}r{sup -n} with n > 2. In particular, assuming that the effective radial potential is characterized by a short-range infinitely repulsive core of radius R, we derive a compact analytical formula for the threshold energy E{sub l}{sup max} = E{sub l}{sup max}(n, β{sub n}, R), which characterizes the most weakly bound-state resonance (the most excited energy level) of the quantum system. (orig.)

  12. Solid State Multinuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Electrolyte Decomposition Products on Lithium Ion Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, J .H. S. R.; Udinwe, V.; Sideris, P. J.; Smart, M. C.; Krause, F. C.; Hwang, C.; Smith, K. A.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation in lithium ion cells prepared with advanced electrolytes is investigated by solid state multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of electrode materials harvested from cycled cells subjected to an accelerated aging protocol. The electrolyte composition is varied to include the addition of fluorinated carbonates and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, a flame retardant). In addition to species associated with LiPF6 decomposition, cathode NMR spectra are characterized by the presence of compounds originating from the TPP additive. Substantial amounts of LiF are observed in the anodes as well as compounds originating from the fluorinated carbonates.

  13. Resonant tunneling of spin-wave packets via quantized states in potential wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulf-Hendrik; Gatzen, Marius; Demidov, Vladislav E; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2007-09-21

    We have studied the tunneling of spin-wave pulses through a system of two closely situated potential barriers. The barriers represent two areas of inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field, where the existence of spin waves is forbidden. We show that for certain values of the spin-wave frequency corresponding to the quantized spin-wave states existing in the well formed between the barriers, the tunneling has a resonant character. As a result, transmission of spin-wave packets through the double-barrier structure is much more efficient than the sequent tunneling through two single barriers.

  14. Resonance formation in the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ final state in two-photon collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A study of resonance formation is presented in the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ final state in two-photon collisions at LEP. The $a_2(1320)$ radiative width is measured to be $\\Gamma_{\\gamma\\gamma}=0.98\\pm0.05\\pm0.09$ keV{}. The helicity 2 production is dominant. Exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ production has also been studied in the mass region above the $a_2$ in the $\\rho\\pi$ and $f_2\\pi$ channels. This region is dominated by a $\\rm J^P$=$2^+$ helicity 2 wave.

  15. Searches for new resonances in dijet and dilepton final states with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Goldouzian, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Searches for new massive resonances in final states with a pair of leptons or jets have always been a powerful tool for discovery in high energy physics.We review here the latest results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments, based on proton-proton collision data collected at the centre-of-mass energy of 8 and 13 TeV at the LHC.The LHC dijet searches explore both the low-mass range and the high mass end of the spectrum by employing several novel search strategies. The results are interpreted in a range of theories beyond the standard model of particle physics.

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: investigating the spins of nuclear related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, Th.

    2007-10-01

    The author reviews his successive research works: his research thesis work on the Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) which is a quadric-polar nucleus multi-quanta correlation spectroscopy method, the modelling of NMR spectra of disordered materials, the application to materials of interest for the nuclear industry (notably the glasses used for nuclear waste containment). He presents the various research projects in which he is involved: storing glasses, nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetism, solid hydrogen storing matrices, methodological and instrument developments in high magnetic field and high resolution solid NMR, long range distance measurement by solid state Tritium NMR (observing the structure and dynamics of biological complex systems at work)

  17. Nonlinearity of the refractive index due to an excitonic molecule resonance state in CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, R.; Broser, I.; Buschick, K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report the observation of an intensity-dependent refractive-index nonlinearity in CdS due to a resonance state where an excitonic molecule is created by induced absorption of light. The refractive index n as a function of the incident laser photon energy E is measured directly by light refraction in thin crystal prisms. A renormalized dielectric function describes the measured n(E) spectra well. This strong refractive-index nonlinearity is well suited to produce an optical bistability and to further strengthen the evidence of CdS to be an important material for laser-induced dynamic gratings

  18. Life cycle assessment of integrated solid state anaerobic digestion and composting for on-farm organic residues treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangyang; Manandhar, Ashish; Li, Guoxue; Shah, Ajay

    2018-03-20

    Driven by the gradual changes in the structure of energy consumption and improvements of living standards in China, the volume of on-farm organic solid waste is increasing. If untreated, these unutilized on-farm organic solid wastes can cause environmental problems. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment to compare the environmental impacts of different on-farm organic waste (which includes dairy manure, corn stover and tomato residue) treatment strategies, including anaerobic digestion (AD), composting, and AD followed by composting. The input life cycle inventory data are specific to China. The potential environmental impacts of different waste management strategies were assessed based on their acidification potential (AP), eutrophication potential (EP), global warming potential (GWP), ecotoxicity potential (ETP), and resource depletion (RD). The results show that the preferred treatment strategy for dairy manure is the one that integrated corn stover and tomato residue utilization and solid state AD technologies into the system. The GWP of integrated solid state AD and composting was the least, which is -2900 kg CO 2 eq/ t of dairy manure and approximately 14.8 times less than that of current status (i.e., liquid AD of dairy manure). Solid state AD of dairy manure, corn stover and tomato residues is the most favorable option in terms of AP, EP and ETP, which are more than 40% lower than that of the current status (i.e., AP: 3.11 kg SO 2 , EP: -0.94 kg N, and ETP: -881 CTUe (Comparative Toxic Units ecotoxicity)). The results also show that there is a significant potential for AP, EP, ETP, and GWP reduction, if AD is used prior to composting. The scenario analysis for transportation distance showed that locating the AD plant and composting facility on the farm was advantageous in terms of all the life cycle impact categories. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellulase and xylanase productions by isolated Amazon Bacillus strains using soybean industrial residue based solid-state cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck Júlio X.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, a large amount of a fibrous residue is generated as result of soybean (Glycine max protein production. This material, which is rich in hemicellulose and cellulose, can be used in solid state cultivations for the production of valuable metabolites and enzymes. In this work, we studied the bioconversion of this residue by bacteria strains isolated from water and soil collected in the Amazon region. Five strains among 87 isolated bacteria selected for their ability to produce either celullases or xylanases were cultivated on the aforementioned residue. From strain BL62, identified as Bacillus subtilis, it was obtained a preparation showing the highest specific cellulase activity, 1.08 UI/mg protein within 24 hours of growth. Concerning xylanase, the isolate BL53, also identified as Bacillus subtilis, showed the highest specific activity for this enzyme, 5.19 UI/mg protein within 72 hours of cultivation. It has also been observed the production of proteases that were associated with the loss of cellulase and xylanase activities. These results indicated that the selected microorganisms, and the cultivation process, have great biotechnological potential.

  20. Decay properties of the key resonant states in 8Li(α,n)11B for primordial nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubono, S.; Ikeda, N.; Tanaka, M.H.; Nomura, T.; Katayama, I.; Fuchi, Y.; Kawashima, H.; Kajino, T.

    1991-01-01

    The particle decay property of the key resonant states in the reaction 8 Li(α, n) 11 B for the inhomogeneous big bang models was studied experimentally. The sum of the branching ratios of the 10.572 MeV state for the neutron decays to the excited states in 11 B is as large as for the ground state, indicating that the neutron decays to excited states are crucial and enhance the reaction rate for heavy element synthesis considerably. (orig.)

  1. Formation of resonances with final state photons in two photon interactions, and development of calorimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, R.

    1986-07-01

    In this thesis, resonances produced in two photon interactions were investigated with the TASSO detector at PETRA. The η ' and A 2 resonances were studied in a final state of charged pions and low energy photons. The couplings of these resonances to γγ were measured: Γ γγ (η ' (958)) 5.1±0.4(stat.)±0.65(syst.) Kev, Γ γγ (A 2 (1320)) 0.90±0.27(stat.)±0.16(syst.) Kev. A search for ι(1460) and η c (2980) was initiated. Upper limits on the γγ widths of these resonances times their branching ratio to the decay channel were obtained: Γ γγ (ι→γγ) x B(ι→ρ 0 γ) γγ (η c →γγ) x B(η c →η ' π + π - ) < 2.6 keV (95% C.L.). A proportional tubes electromagnetic calorimeter operating in the proportional mode was constructed. Tower readout was incorporated. The calorimeter gave an energy resolution of σ/E = 19%/√E. Large surface, thin Gap Chambers (TGC), were developed and constructed for the OPAL hadron pole-tip-calorimeter. The TGC operate in a high gain mode. They provide large signals for both pad and strip readout, without the need for amplification. To form a hadron calorimeter, ten chambers were interlaced with 8 cm thick iron slabs between them. An energy resolution of: σ/E = 105%/√E was obtained

  2. Protein-RNA interface residue prediction using machine learning: an assessment of the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Rasna R; Caragea, Cornelia; Lewis, Benjamin A; Towfic, Fadi; Terribilini, Michael; El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2012-05-10

    RNA molecules play diverse functional and structural roles in cells. They function as messengers for transferring genetic information from DNA to proteins, as the primary genetic material in many viruses, as catalysts (ribozymes) important for protein synthesis and RNA processing, and as essential and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression in living organisms. Many of these functions depend on precisely orchestrated interactions between RNA molecules and specific proteins in cells. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which proteins recognize and bind RNA is essential for comprehending the functional implications of these interactions, but the recognition 'code' that mediates interactions between proteins and RNA is not yet understood. Success in deciphering this code would dramatically impact the development of new therapeutic strategies for intervening in devastating diseases such as AIDS and cancer. Because of the high cost of experimental determination of protein-RNA interfaces, there is an increasing reliance on statistical machine learning methods for training predictors of RNA-binding residues in proteins. However, because of differences in the choice of datasets, performance measures, and data representations used, it has been difficult to obtain an accurate assessment of the current state of the art in protein-RNA interface prediction. We provide a review of published approaches for predicting RNA-binding residues in proteins and a systematic comparison and critical assessment of protein-RNA interface residue predictors trained using these approaches on three carefully curated non-redundant datasets. We directly compare two widely used machine learning algorithms (Naïve Bayes (NB) and Support Vector Machine (SVM)) using three different data representations in which features are encoded using either sequence- or structure-based windows. Our results show that (i) Sequence-based classifiers that use a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM

  3. Shape resonances and the excitation of helium autoionising states by electrons in the 57-66 eV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgt, P.J.M. van der; Eck, J. van; Heideman, H.G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical excitation functions of singly excited helium states are presented, measured by detecting the yield of emitted photons as a function of the incident electron energy from 56 to 66 eV. Many structures are observed, which are caused by negative-ion resonances and by the decay of autoionising states followed by post-collision interaction. Some of the structures are interpreted as being caused by hitherto unknown shape resonances lying very close to the thresholds of a particular class of autoionising states. As these shape resonances almost exclusively decay to their respective parent (autoionising) states, thereby considerably enhancing the threshold excitation cross sections of these states, they can only be observed via the PCI effect on the excitation functions of (higher lying) singly excited states. Using the recently introduced supermultiplet classification for doubly excited states a selection rule for the near-threshold excitation of doubly excited states by electron impact is deduced from the measurements. Only states with large probabilities in the Wannier region of configuration space (where the two electrons are at nearly equal distances and on opposite sides of the nucleus) are strongly excited. It is pointed out that these states are precisely the states that can support the above mentioned shape resonances at their thresholds. (author)

  4. Clarification on the decarboxylation mechanism in KasA based on the protonation state of key residues in the acyl-enzyme state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wook; Engels, Bernd

    2013-07-11

    The β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KasA) is a promising drug target because it is essential for the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis , a causative agent of tuberculosis. It catalyzes a condensation reaction that comprises three steps. The resulting elongated acyl chains are subsequently needed for the cell wall construction. While the mechanism of the first step (acylation of Cys171 in the active site) is straightforward already, the second step (decarboxylation of malonyl substrate) has been controversial due to the difficulty in determining the correct protonation states of the involved residues (His311, His345, Lys340, Glu354). Available experimental data suggest three possible mechanisms which differ considerably. They are not consistent with each other because these studies could not be performed for KasA at the beginning of decarboxylation step (acyl-enzyme state of KasA). Instead, different mutants had to be used which are expected to resemble this situation. In this first computational study about this topic, we use the free energy perturbation (FEP) method to compute the relevant pKa values in the acyl-enzyme state of KasA and use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to rationalize the results. Subsequent density functional theory (DFT)-based quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD simulations and umbrella samplings have been used to disentangle the close relationships between the protonation states of the involved residues. By these simulations, we can address the preferred protonation states and roles of the residues involved in decarboxylation reaction, thereby suggesting the possible mechanism for the decarboxylation step.

  5. Statistical Characterization of the Charge State and Residue Dependence of Low-Energy CID Peptide Dissociation Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M.; Tseng, George C.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2005-01-01

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s). Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and should be useful in algorithm development that employs improved models to predict fragment ion

  6. Even-parity resonances with synchrotron radiation from Laser Excited Lithium at 1s^22p State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tie; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    Correlated many-body dynamics is still one of the unsolved fundamental problems in physics. Such correlation effects can be most clearly studied in processes involving single atoms for their simplicity.Lithium, being the simplest open shell atom, has been under a lot of study. Most of the studies focused on ground state lithium. However, only odd parity resonances can be populated through single photon (synchrotron radiation) absorption from ground state lithium (1s^22s). Lithium atoms, after being laser excited to the 1s^22p state, allow the study of even parity resonances. We have measured some of the even parity resonances of lithium for resonant energies below 64 eV. A single-mode diode laser is used to excite lithium from 1s^22s ground state to 1s^22p (^2P3/2) state. Photoions resulting from the interaction between the excited lithium and synchrotron radiation were analyzed and collected by an ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a Z- stack channel plate detector. The Li^+ ion yield was recorded while scanning the undulator along with the monochromator. The energy scans have been analyzed regarding resonance energies and parameters of the Fano profiles. Our results for the observed resonances will be presented.

  7. NMR backbone resonance assignments of the prodomain variants of BDNF in the urea denatured state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Bains, Henrietta; Anastasia, Agustin; Bracken, Clay

    2018-04-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of proteins which plays a central role in neuronal survival, growth, plasticity and memory. A single Val66Met variant has been identified in the prodomain of human BDNF that is associated with anxiety, depression and memory disorders. The structural differences within the full-length prodomain Val66 and Met66 isoforms could shed light on the mechanism of action of the Met66 and its impact on the development of neuropsychiatric-associated disorders. In the present study, we report the backbone 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N NMR assignments of both full-length Val66 and Met66 prodomains in the presence of 2 M urea. These conditions were utilized to suppress residual structure and aid subsequent native state structural investigations aimed at mapping and identifying variant-dependent conformational differences under native-state conditions.

  8. Observation of the hot GDR in neutron-deficient thorium evaporation residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Carpenter, M.P.; Dioszegi, I.; Eisenman, K.; Heckman, P.; Hofman, D.J.; Kelly, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nanal, V.; Pennington, T.; Siemssen, R.H.; Thoennessen, M.; Varner, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    The giant dipole resonance built on excited states was observed in very fissile nuclei in coincidence with evaporation residues. The reaction 48 Ca+ 176 Yb populated evaporation residues of mass A=213-220 with a cross section of ∼200 μb at 259 MeV. The extracted giant dipole resonance parameters are in agreement with theoretical predictions for this mass region

  9. Bound states via Higgs exchanging and heavy resonant di-Higgs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaofeng Kang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The existence of Higgs boson h predicted by the standard model (SM was established and hunting for clues to new physics (NP hidden in h has become the top priority in particle physics. In this paper we explore an intriguing phenomenon that prevails in NP associated with h, bound state (Bh, referring to the ground state only of relatively heavy particles ϕ out of NP via interchanging h. This is well-motivated due to the intrinsic properties of h: It has zero spin and light mass, capable of mediating Yukawa interactions; moreover, it may be strongly coupled to ϕ in several important contexts, from addressing the naturalness problem by compositeness/supersymmetry (SUSY/classical scale invariance to understanding neutrino mass origin radiatively and matter asymmetry by electroweak baryogensis. The new resonance Bh, being a neutral scalar boson, has important implications to the large hadron collider (LHC di-Higgs search because it yields a clear resonant di-Higgs signature at the high mass region (≳1 TeV. In other words, searching for Bh offers a new avenue to probe the hidden sector with a Higgs-portal. For illustration in this paper we concentrate on two examples, the stop sector in SUSY and an inert Higgs doublet from a radiative neutrino model. In particular, h-mediation opens a new and wide window to probe the conventional stoponium and the current date begins to have sensitivity to stoponium around TeV.

  10. Bound states via Higgs exchanging and heavy resonant di-Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhaofeng

    2017-08-01

    The existence of Higgs boson h predicted by the standard model (SM) was established and hunting for clues to new physics (NP) hidden in h has become the top priority in particle physics. In this paper we explore an intriguing phenomenon that prevails in NP associated with h, bound state (Bh, referring to the ground state only) of relatively heavy particles ϕ out of NP via interchanging h. This is well-motivated due to the intrinsic properties of h: It has zero spin and light mass, capable of mediating Yukawa interactions; moreover, it may be strongly coupled to ϕ in several important contexts, from addressing the naturalness problem by compositeness/supersymmetry (SUSY)/classical scale invariance to understanding neutrino mass origin radiatively and matter asymmetry by electroweak baryogensis. The new resonance Bh, being a neutral scalar boson, has important implications to the large hadron collider (LHC) di-Higgs search because it yields a clear resonant di-Higgs signature at the high mass region (≳ 1 TeV). In other words, searching for Bh offers a new avenue to probe the hidden sector with a Higgs-portal. For illustration in this paper we concentrate on two examples, the stop sector in SUSY and an inert Higgs doublet from a radiative neutrino model. In particular, h-mediation opens a new and wide window to probe the conventional stoponium and the current date begins to have sensitivity to stoponium around TeV.

  11. Searches for top-antitop quark resonances in semileptonic final states with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00358030

    This thesis presents the results of two searches for a top-antitop quark ($t\\bar{t}$) resonance in semileptonic final states using data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Evidence of resonant $t\\bar{t}$ production would represent a clear sign of new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The first search is based on the full data set recorded by the CMS experiment in proton-proton (pp) collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\text{TeV}$ during the LHC Run-1, for a total integrated luminosity of $19.7~\\text{fb}^{-1}$. The second search considers $2.6~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ of pp collisions data recorded by the CMS experiment in the first year of the LHC Run-2 (2015) at the higher center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\text{TeV}$. Both analyses make use of state-of-the-art techniques for the identification of top quarks produced with large transverse momentum. This approach maximizes the sensitivity of the analyses for high-mass...

  12. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p{sup 4} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 4}P, {sup 2}P, and {sup 2}D as well as the [{sup 1}D]4p {sup 2}F satellite states of Ar{sup +}. By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [{sup 3}P] 4p ({sup 2}S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time.

  13. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p 4 [ 3 P] 4p 4 P, 2 P, and 2 D as well as the [ 1 D]4p 2 F satellite states of Ar + . By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [ 3 P] 4p ( 2 S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time

  14. Beyond the Förster formulation for resonance energy transfer: the role of dark states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissa, C; Manna, A K; Terenziani, F; Painelli, A; Pati, S K

    2011-07-28

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) is investigated in pairs of charge-transfer (CT) chromophores. CT chromophores are an interesting class of π conjugated chromophores decorated with one or more electron-donor and acceptor groups in polar (D-π-A), quadrupolar (D-π-A-π-D or A-π-D-π-A) or octupolar (D(-π-A)(3) or A(-π-D)(3)) structures. Essential-state models accurately describe low-energy linear and nonlinear spectra of CT-chromophores and proved very useful to describe spectroscopic effects of electrostatic interchromophore interactions in multichromophoric assemblies. Here we apply the same approach to describe RET between CT-chromophores. The results are quantitatively validated by an extensive comparison with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, confirming that essential-state models offer a simple and reliable approach for the calculation of electrostatic interchromophore interactions. This is an important result since it sets the basis for more refined treatments of RET: essential-state models are in fact easily extended to account for molecular vibrations in truly non-adiabatic approaches and to account for inhomogeneous broadening effects due to polar solvation. Optically forbidden (dark) states of quadrupolar and octupolar chromophores offer an interesting opportunity to verify the reliability of the dipolar approximation. In striking contrast with the dipolar approximation that strictly forbids RET towards or from dark states, our results demonstrate that dark states can take an active role in RET with interaction energies that, depending on the relative orientation of the chromophores, can be even larger than those relevant to allowed states. Essential-state models, whose predictions are quantitatively confirmed by TDDFT results, allow us to relate RET interaction energies towards allowed and dark states to the supramolecular symmetry of the RET-pair, offering reliable design strategies to optimize RET-interactions. This

  15. Automated solid-state NMR resonance assignment of protein microcrystals and amyloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Elena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Gath, Julia [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Ravotti, Francesco; Szekely, Kathrin; Huber, Matthias [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Buchner, Lena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Guentert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Solid-state NMR is an emerging structure determination technique for crystalline and non-crystalline protein assemblies, e.g., amyloids. Resonance assignment constitutes the first and often very time-consuming step to a structure. We present ssFLYA, a generally applicable algorithm for automatic assignment of protein solid-state NMR spectra. Application to microcrystals of ubiquitin and the Ure2 prion C-terminal domain, as well as amyloids of HET-s(218-289) and {alpha}-synuclein yielded 88-97 % correctness for the backbone and side-chain assignments that are classified as self-consistent by the algorithm, and 77-90 % correctness if also assignments classified as tentative by the algorithm are included.

  16. Automated solid-state NMR resonance assignment of protein microcrystals and amyloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Elena; Gath, Julia; Habenstein, Birgit; Ravotti, Francesco; Székely, Kathrin; Huber, Matthias; Buchner, Lena; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is an emerging structure determination technique for crystalline and non-crystalline protein assemblies, e.g., amyloids. Resonance assignment constitutes the first and often very time-consuming step to a structure. We present ssFLYA, a generally applicable algorithm for automatic assignment of protein solid-state NMR spectra. Application to microcrystals of ubiquitin and the Ure2 prion C-terminal domain, as well as amyloids of HET-s(218–289) and α-synuclein yielded 88–97 % correctness for the backbone and side-chain assignments that are classified as self-consistent by the algorithm, and 77–90 % correctness if also assignments classified as tentative by the algorithm are included

  17. The resonating group method three cluster approach to the ground state 9 Li nucleus structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, G.F.; Pozdnyakov, Yu.A.; Terenetsky, K.O.; Verbitsky, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-cluster approach for light atomic nuclei is formulated in frame of the algebraic version of resonating group method. Overlap integral and Hamiltonian matrix elements on generating functions are obtained for 9 Li nucleus. All permissible by Pauli principle 9 Li different cluster nucleon permutations were taken into account in the calculations. The results obtained can be easily generalised on any three-cluster system up to 12 C. Matrix elements obtained in the work were used in the variational calculations of the ground state energetic and geometric 9 Li characteristics. It is shown that 9 Li ground state is not adequate to the shell model limit and has pronounced three-cluster structure. (author). 16 refs., 4 tab., 2 figs

  18. Tunneling induced dark states and the controllable resonance fluorescence spectrum in quantum dot molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing and manipulating quantum dots (QDs), has been used to investigate the resonance fluorescence spectrum from linear triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling, using atomic physics methods. Interesting features such as quenching and narrowing of the fluorescence are observed. In such molecules the tunneling between the quantum dots can also induce a dark state. The results are explained by the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the laser and the tunneling. Unlike the atomic system, in such quantum dot molecules quantum coherence can be induced using tunneling, requiring no coupling lasers, which will allow tunneling controllable quantum dot molecules to be applied to quantum optics and photonics. (paper)

  19. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paul, Susan M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The development of solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has, to a large extent, focused on using spin-1/2 nuclei as probes to investigate molecular structure and dynamics. For such nuclei, the technique of cross polarization is well-established as a method for sensitivity enhancement. However, over two-thirds of the nuclei in the periodic table have a spin-quantum number greater than one-half and are known as quadrupolar nuclei. Such nuclei are fundamental constituents of many inorganic materials including minerals, zeolites, glasses, and gels. It is, therefore, of interest to explore the extent to which polarization can be transferred from quadrupolar nuclei. In this dissertation, solid-state NMR experiments involving cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei to spin-1/2 nuclei under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions are investigated in detail.

  20. Overall and class-specific scores of pesticide residues from fruits and vegetables as a tool to rank intake of pesticide residues in United States: A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Chiu, Yu-Han; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge; Sun, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables are among the primary sources of pesticide exposure through diet, but the lack of adequate measurements hinder the research on health effects of pesticide residues. Pesticide Residue Burden Score (PRBS) for estimating overall dietary pesticide intake, organochlorine pesticide score (OC-PRBS) and organophosphate pesticide score (OP-PRBS) for estimating organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides-specific intake, respectively, were derived using U.S. Department of Agriculture Pesticide Data Program data and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) food frequency questionnaire data. We evaluated the performance of these scores by validating the scores against pesticide metabolites measured in urine or serum among 3,679 participants in NHANES using generalized linear regression. The PRBS was positively associated with a score summarizing the ranks of all pesticide metabolites in a linear fashion (p for linear trend trend trend 0.07) for the OC-PRBS. The PRBS and OP-PRBS had similar performance when they were derived from fruits and vegetables with high vs. low pesticide residues, respectively (p for trend trend 0.07) than from less contaminated Fruits and vegetables (p for trend 0.63), although neither of the associations achieved statistical significance. The PRBS and the class-specific scores for two major types of pesticides were significantly associated with pesticide biomarkers. These scores can reasonably rank study participants by their pesticide residue exposures from fruits and vegetables in large-scale environmental epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dipole-resonance assisted isomerization in the electronic ground state using few-cycle infrared pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skocek, Oliver; Uiberacker, Christoph; Jakubetz, Werner

    2011-06-30

    A computational investigation of HCN → HNC isomerization in the electronic ground state by one- and few-cycle infrared pulses is presented. Starting from a vibrationally pre-excited reagent state, isomerization yields of more than 50% are obtained using single one- to five-cycle pulses. The principal mechanism includes two steps of population transfer by dipole-resonance (DR), and hence, the success of the method is closely linked to the polarity of the system and, in particular, the stepwise change of the dipole moment from reactant to transition state and on to products. The yield drops massively if the diagonal dipole matrix elements are artificially set to zero. In detail, the mechanism includes DR-induced preparation of a delocalized vibrational wavepacket, which traverses the barrier region and is finally trapped in the product well by DR-dominated de-excitation. The excitation and de-excitation steps are triggered by pulse lobes of opposite field direction. As the number of optical cycles is increased, the leading field lobes prepare a vibrational superposition state by off-resonant ladder climbing, which is then subjected to the three steps of the principal isomerization mechanism. DR excitation is more efficient from a preformed vibrational wavepacket than from a molecular eigenstate. The entire process can be loosely described as Tannor-Kosloff-Rice type transfer mechanism on a single potential surface effected by a single pulse, individual field lobes assuming the roles of pump- and dump-pulses. Pre-excitation to a transient wavepacket can be enhanced by applying a separate, comparatively weak few-cycle prepulse, in which the prepulse prepares a vibrational wavepacket. The two-pulse setup corresponds to a double Tannor-Kosloff-Rice control scheme on a single potential surface.

  2. Multiproton final states in positive pion absorption below the Δ(1232) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannelli, R. A.; Ritchie, B. G.; Applegate, J. M.; Beck, E.; Beck, J.; Vanderpool, A. O.; Morris, C. L.; Rahwool-Sullivan, M.; Jones, M. K.; Ransome, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Inclusive cross sections for positive pion absorption leading to final states including two or more protons have been measured with a large solid angle detector for incident pion energies from 30 to 135 MeV for targets with A=2-208. The mass dependences for the inclusive (π + ,2p), (π + ,3p), and total absorption cross sections for multiproton final states were found to be proportional to A n with n≅0.5. These cross sections also were observed to have an energy dependence at energies below 150 MeV reflective of the importance of the Δ(1232) resonance, similar to that observed for πd→pp. The inclusive cross sections for (π + ,4p) were found to be less than 10 mb for all targets at all energies. Estimates were also obtained for cross sections for pion absorption leading to 2p1n and 3p1n final states. Quasideuteron absorption contributions increase slowly with A, and the energy dependence of those contributions mirrors that for πd→pp. The data obtained here for multiproton final states indicate that a significant fraction of absorption events, increasing with A, most likely arises from final states containing fewer than two protons. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  3. Realizing Fulde-Ferrell Superfluids via a Dark-State Control of Feshbach Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2018-01-01

    We propose that the long-sought Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity with nonzero momentum pairing can be realized in ultracold two-component Fermi gases of K 40 or Li 6 atoms by optically tuning their magnetic Feshbach resonances via the creation of a closed-channel dark state with a Doppler-shifted Stark effect. In this scheme, two counterpropagating optical fields are applied to couple two molecular states in the closed channel to an excited molecular state, leading to a significant violation of Galilean invariance in the dark-state regime and hence to the possibility of Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity. We develop a field theoretical formulation for both two-body and many-body problems and predict that the Fulde-Ferrell state has remarkable properties, such as anisotropic single-particle dispersion relation, suppressed superfluid density at zero temperature, anisotropic sound velocity, and rotonic collective mode. The latter two features can be experimentally probed using Bragg spectroscopy, providing a smoking-gun proof of Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity.

  4. Radioactive residues at nuclear sites in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, J.; Rampertaap, A.; Greeves, J.; MacKinney, J.; Raguso, M.; Selstrom, J.

    2000-01-01

    The United States of America has a large number of sites where radioactive materials have been mined, processed, produced, or used. Upon completion of activities at these sites, some will be cleaned up completely and released for unrestricted future use. However, at other sites, contamination will remain on the site following cleanup, requiring long term institutional controls. Depending on the purpose or the activity conducted at a specific site, these locations are generally under the jurisdiction of a federal agency: the United States Department of Energy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, or the United States Department of Defense. However, under certain conditions, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission relinquishes regulatory authority to individual states to regulate the commercial uses of radioactive materials (except for nuclear reactors), so some locations with radioactive materials are under the jurisdiction of individual states. Other sites with naturally occurring radioactive contamination may also be controlled by individual states. One or two sites under the jurisdiction of each agency are discussed where radioactive materials either existed in the past or exist today, and the source of contamination, the anticipated end state, and the process by which the responsible agency did or will conduct cleanup and site closure are described. Several issues are reviewed that must be addressed in order to design and implement remediations that will ensure long term protection for the environment and future inhabitants. The role of citizens in environmental cleanups is examined, and how institutional controls may be applied to ensure long term protection of remediations that leave some contaminants in place. (author)

  5. Normal mode splitting and ground state cooling in a Fabry—Perot optical cavity and transmission line resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hua-Jun; Mi Xian-Wu

    2011-01-01

    Optomechanical dynamics in two systems which are a transmission line resonator and Fabrya—Perot optical cavity via radiation—pressure are investigated by linearized quantum Langevin equation. We work in the resolved sideband regime where the oscillator resonance frequency exceeds the cavity linewidth. Normal mode splittings of the mechanical resonator as a pure result of the coupling interaction in the two optomechanical systems is studied, and we make a comparison of normal mode splitting of mechanical resonator between the two systems. In the optical cavity, the normal mode splitting of the movable mirror approaches the latest experiment very well. In addition, an approximation scheme is introduced to demonstrate the ground state cooling, and we make a comparison of cooling between the two systems dominated by two key factors, which are the initial bath temperature and the mechanical quality factor. Since both the normal mode splitting and cooling require working in the resolved sideband regime, whether the normal mode splitting influences the cooling of the mirror is considered. Considering the size of the mechanical resonator and precooling the system, the mechanical resonator in the transmission line resonator system is easier to achieve the ground state cooling than in optical cavity. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woutersen, S.; de Milan, J.B.; de Lange, C.A.; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the

  7. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  8. Coexistence of Multiple Nonlinear States in a Tristable Passive Kerr Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Anderson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive Kerr cavities driven by coherent laser fields display a rich landscape of nonlinear physics, including bistability, pattern formation, and localized dissipative structures (solitons. Their conceptual simplicity has for several decades offered an unprecedented window into nonlinear cavity dynamics, providing insights into numerous systems and applications ranging from all-optical memory devices to microresonator frequency combs. Yet despite the decades of study, a recent theoretical work has surprisingly alluded to an entirely new and unexplored paradigm in the regime where nonlinearly tilted cavity resonances overlap with one another [T. Hansson and S. Wabnitz, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 1259 (2015JOBPDE0740-322410.1364/JOSAB.32.001259]. We use synchronously driven fiber ring resonators to experimentally access this regime and observe the rise of new nonlinear dissipative states. Specifically, we observe, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the stable coexistence of temporal Kerr cavity solitons and extended modulation instability (Turing patterns, and perform real-time measurements that unveil the dynamics of the ensuing nonlinear structure. When operating in the regime of continuous wave tristability, we further observe the coexistence of two distinct cavity soliton states, one of which can be identified as a “super” cavity soliton, as predicted by Hansson and Wabnitz. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations of the infinite-dimensional Ikeda map that governs the cavity dynamics. The results from our work reveal that experimental systems can support complex combinations of distinct nonlinear states, and they could have practical implications to future microresonator-based frequency comb sources.

  9. Coexistence of Multiple Nonlinear States in a Tristable Passive Kerr Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Miles; Wang, Yadong; Leo, François; Coen, Stéphane; Erkintalo, Miro; Murdoch, Stuart G.

    2017-07-01

    Passive Kerr cavities driven by coherent laser fields display a rich landscape of nonlinear physics, including bistability, pattern formation, and localized dissipative structures (solitons). Their conceptual simplicity has for several decades offered an unprecedented window into nonlinear cavity dynamics, providing insights into numerous systems and applications ranging from all-optical memory devices to microresonator frequency combs. Yet despite the decades of study, a recent theoretical work has surprisingly alluded to an entirely new and unexplored paradigm in the regime where nonlinearly tilted cavity resonances overlap with one another [T. Hansson and S. Wabnitz, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 1259 (2015), 10.1364/JOSAB.32.001259]. We use synchronously driven fiber ring resonators to experimentally access this regime and observe the rise of new nonlinear dissipative states. Specifically, we observe, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the stable coexistence of temporal Kerr cavity solitons and extended modulation instability (Turing) patterns, and perform real-time measurements that unveil the dynamics of the ensuing nonlinear structure. When operating in the regime of continuous wave tristability, we further observe the coexistence of two distinct cavity soliton states, one of which can be identified as a "super" cavity soliton, as predicted by Hansson and Wabnitz. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations of the infinite-dimensional Ikeda map that governs the cavity dynamics. The results from our work reveal that experimental systems can support complex combinations of distinct nonlinear states, and they could have practical implications to future microresonator-based frequency comb sources.

  10. Search for heavy resonances decaying to two Higgs bosons in final states containing four b quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Rurua, Lali; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Jain, Sandhya; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Dellacasa, Giulio; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Markin, Oleg; Rusinov, Vladimir; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Benhabib, Lamia; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; 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Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lewis, Jonathan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Rupprecht, Nathaniel; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-07-04

    A search is presented for narrow heavy resonances X decaying into pairs of Higgs bosons (H) in proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. The search considers HH resonances with masses between 1 and 3 TeV, having final states of two b quark pairs. Each Higgs boson is produced with large momentum, and the hadronization products of the pair of b quarks can usually be reconstructed as single large jets. The background from multijet and $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ events is significantly reduced by applying requirements related to the flavor of the jet, its mass, and its substructure. The signal would be identified as a peak on top of the dijet invariant mass spectrum of the remaining background events. No evidence is observed for such a signal. Upper limits obtained at 95% confidence level for the product of the production cross section and branching fraction $\\sigma( \\mathrm{ gg \\to X } )\\, \\mathcal{B...

  11. Potential of ensiling for efficient management of spent residue from solid state fermentation system

    OpenAIRE

    Roussos, Sevastianos; Raimbault, Maurice; Geoffroy, F.; Saucedo-Castaneda, G.; Lonsane, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on ensiling of spent solids from solid state fermentation process for production of cellulases by #Trichoderma harzianum$ showed that good quality ensiled solids can be obtained by using about 43% initial substrate dry matter with 0.3% ensiling additive. (Résumé d'auteur)

  12. Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Deprez, Sabine; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald; Castro, São L.; Sunaert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artifacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA). Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting-state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way. PMID:26869899

  13. Residues of organochlorine pesticides, mercury, and PCB's in mourning doves from eastern United States--1970-71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, J.F.

    1974-01-01

    Mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) breast muscle samples from birds collected in 1970-71 from Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Missouri, Kentucky, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Florida were found to contain residues of DDT, DDE, DDD, polychlorinated biphenyls, dieldrin, mirex, mercury, and heptachlor epoxide in amounts not considered hazardous to consumers, human or nonhuman. There were 145 birds involved, 7 to 10 from each State. Residues of DDT plus DDE plus DDD averaged 5.83 ppm lipid weight (0.068 ppm wet weight); those of PCB's, 9.75 ppm lipid weight (0.121 ppm wet weight); compounds were found in all birds. Heptachlor epoxide and dieldrin were found in little more than trace amounts: heptachlor in all birds, dieldrin in 73. Mirex was found only in birds from South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, averaging 4.32 ppm lipid weight (0.046 ppm wet weight) in eight birds. Less than 0.05 ppm (wet weight) mercury was found in all birds except 10, in which it ranged from 0.07 to 0.67 ppm. The 10 were from Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee, and Alabama.

  14. Morphology, composition, and mixing state of primary particles from combustion sources - crop residue, wood, and solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Kong, Shaofei; Zhang, Yinxiao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Liang; Yan, Qin; Lingaswamy, A P; Shi, Zongbo; Lv, Senlin; Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Hu, Min; Zhang, Daizhou; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Li, Weijun

    2017-07-11

    Morphology, composition, and mixing state of individual particles emitted from crop residue, wood, and solid waste combustion in a residential stove were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study showed that particles from crop residue and apple wood combustion were mainly organic matter (OM) in smoldering phase, whereas soot-OM internally mixed with K in flaming phase. Wild grass combustion in flaming phase released some Cl-rich-OM/soot particles and cardboard combustion released OM and S-rich particles. Interestingly, particles from hardwood (pear wood and bamboo) and softwood (cypress and pine wood) combustion were mainly soot and OM in the flaming phase, respectively. The combustion of foam boxes, rubber tires, and plastic bottles/bags in the flaming phase released large amounts of soot internally mixed with a small amount of OM, whereas the combustion of printed circuit boards and copper-core cables emitted large amounts of OM with Br-rich inclusions. In addition, the printed circuit board combustion released toxic metals containing Pb, Zn, Sn, and Sb. The results are important to document properties of primary particles from combustion sources, which can be used to trace the sources of ambient particles and to know their potential impacts in human health and radiative forcing in the air.

  15. Observation of the Distribution of Molecular Spin States by Resonant Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Ohm, T.; Sangregorio, C.; Sessoli, R.; Mailly, D.; Paulsen, C.

    1999-05-01

    Below 360 mK, Fe8 magnetic molecular clusters are in the pure quantum relaxation regime and we show that the predicted ``square-root time'' relaxation is obeyed, allowing us to develop a new method for watching the evolution of the distribution of molecular spin states in the sample. We measure as a function of applied field H the statistical distribution P\\(ξH\\) of magnetic energy bias ξH acting on the molecules. Tunneling initially causes rapid transitions of molecules, thereby ``digging a hole'' in P\\(ξH\\) (around the resonant condition ξH = 0). For small initial magnetization values, the hole width shows an intrinsic broadening which may be due to nuclear spins.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on conformation states and metal ion exchange properties of vanadium bromoperoxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Boer, E.; Boon, K.; Wever, R.

    1988-01-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study was carried out to examine structural aspects of vanadium-containing bromoperoxidase from the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum. At high pH, the reduced form of bromoperoxidase showed an apparently axially symmetric EPR signal with 16 hyperfine lines. When the pH was lowered, a new EPR spectrum was formed. When EPR spectra of the reduced enzyme were recorded in the pH range from 4.2 to 8.4, it appeared that these changes were linked to a functional group with an apparent pK/sub a/ of about 5.4. In D 2 O this value for the pK/sub a/ was 5.3. It is suggested that these effects arise from protonation of histidine or aspartate/glutamate residues near the metal ion. The values for the isotropic hyperfine coupling constant of the reduced enzyme at both high and low pH are also consistent with a ligand field containing nitrogen and/or oxygen donor atoms. When reduced bromoperoxidase was dissolved in D 2 O or H 2 17 O instead of H 2 16 O, vanadium (IV) hyperfine line widths were markedly affected, demonstrating that water is a ligand of the metal ion. Together with previous work these findings suggest that vanadium (IV) is not involved in catalytic turnover and confirm the model in which the vanadium (V) ion of the native enzyme only serves to bind both hydrogen peroxide and bromide. After excess vanadate was added to a homogeneous preparation of purified bromoperoxidase, the extent of vanadium bound to the protein increased from 0.5 to 1.1, with a concomitant enhancement of enzymic activity. Finally, it is demonstrated that both vanadate (VO 4 3- ) and molybdate (MoO 4 2- ) compete for the same site on apobromoperoxidase

  17. Optical detection of magnetic resonance of the F-centre in CaO in its phosphorescent state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krap, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The F-centre in CaO consists of two electrons trapped in an oxygen vacancy. The centre possesses bound excited states, of which the phosphorescent 3 Tsub(1u) state is a Jahn-Teller state. Jahn-Teller systems have been of interest in many investigations. However, detailed experimental studies about the relaxation paths for the Jahn-Teller states are relatively few. The author studies by means of optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR) and phosphorescence microwave double resonance (PMDR) techniques the relaxation between the components of the 3 Tsub(1u) state, the magnetic properties of the individual spin-vibronic Jahn-Teller states and the inhomogeneous line broadening in the ODMR and PMDR spectra. (Auth.)

  18. Quasi-bound alpha resonant states populated by the 12C(6Li, d) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Ukita, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster phenomenon in the light nuclei structure has been the subject of a long time investigation since the proposal of the Ikeda diagrams [1]. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of this phenomenon in (xα) and (xα+n) nuclei through the ( 6 Li, d) alpha transfer reaction [2-4]. Alpha resonant states around the (4α) threshold in the nucleus 16 O are the focus of the present contribution. In fact, the importance of these resonances at the elements production in stars is recognized, as primarily pointed out by Hoyle in 12 C [6]. The existence of a rotational band with the α + 12 C (Hoyle) cluster state structure was recently demonstrated by Ohkubo and Hirabayashi [6]. In order to explore this region of interest, measurements of the 12 C( 6 Li, d) 16 O reaction up to 17 MeV of excitation at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique (plates Fuji G6B, 50 μm thick). Spectra associated with six scattering angles, from 5 deg to 29 deg in the laboratory frame, each one 50 cm along the focal surface, were measured. Several narrow resonances with a quasi-bound behavior embedded in the continuum were detected and the resolution of 25 keV allowed for the separation of doublets not resolved before [7,8]. The absolute cross sections and the respective deuteron angular distributions were determined and the analysis is in progress. [1] K. Ikeda et al., Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. E 68, 464 (1968); H. Horiuchi, K. Ikeda, and Y. Suzuki, ibid. 44, 225 (1978). [2] M.R.D.Rodrigues et al., in12th International Conference on Nuclear Reaction Mechanism, Varenna, Italy, edited by F. Cerutti and A. Ferrari , CERN Proceedings, 2010-2, pp. 331- 335. [3] T. Borello-Lewin et al., Proceedings of SOTANCP2, Brussels, Belgium 2010, edited by P. Descouvemount et al., Int. J. Mod. Mod. Phys E 20, 1018-1021 (2011). [4] T. Borello

  19. Recent Advances in Characterization of Lignin Polymer by Solution-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run-Cang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for efficient utilization of biomass induces a detailed analysis of the fundamental chemical structures of biomass, especially the complex structures of lignin polymers, which have long been recognized for their negative impact on biorefinery. Traditionally, it has been attempted to reveal the complicated and heterogeneous structure of lignin by a series of chemical analyses, such as thioacidolysis (TA, nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO, and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR technology undoubtedly have made solution-state NMR become the most widely used technique in structural characterization of lignin due to its versatility in illustrating structural features and structural transformations of lignin polymers. As one of the most promising diagnostic tools, NMR provides unambiguous evidence for specific structures as well as quantitative structural information. The recent advances in two-dimensional solution-state NMR techniques for structural analysis of lignin in isolated and whole cell wall states (in situ, as well as their applications are reviewed.

  20. Coherent control of long-distance steady-state entanglement in lossy resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, D. G.; Dai, L.; Kwek, L. C.

    2010-07-01

    We show that coherent control of the steady-state long-distance entanglement between pairs of cavity-atom systems in an array of lossy and driven coupled resonators is possible. The cavities are doped with atoms and are connected through waveguides, other cavities or fibers depending on the implementation. We find that the steady-state entanglement can be coherently controlled through the tuning of the phase difference between the driving fields. It can also be surprisingly high in spite of the pumps being classical fields. For some implementations where the connecting element can be a fiber, long-distance steady-state quantum correlations can be established. Furthermore, the maximal of entanglement for any pair is achieved when their corresponding direct coupling is much smaller than their individual couplings to the third party. This effect is reminiscent of the establishment of coherence between otherwise uncoupled atomic levels using classical coherent fields. We suggest a method to measure this entanglement by analyzing the correlations of the emitted photons from the array and also analyze the above results for a range of values of the system parameters, different network geometries and possible implementation technologies.

  1. On the spin states of habitable zone exoplanets around M dwarfs: the effect of a near-resonant companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Alec M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.

    2017-12-01

    One long-standing problem for the potential habitability of planets within M dwarf systems is their likelihood to be tidally locked in a synchronously rotating spin state. This problem thus far has largely been addressed only by considering two objects: the star and the planet itself. However, many systems have been found to harbour multiple planets, with some in or very near to mean motion resonances. The presence of a planetary companion near a mean motion resonance can induce oscillatory variations in the mean motion of the planet, which we demonstrate can have significant effects on the spin state of an otherwise synchronously rotating planet. In particular, we find that a planetary companion near a mean motion resonance can excite the spin states of planets in the habitable zone of small, cool stars, pushing otherwise synchronously rotating planets into higher amplitude librations of the spin state, or even complete circulation resulting in effective stellar days with full surface coverage on the order of years or decades. This increase in illuminated area can have potentially dramatic influences on climate, and thus on habitability. We also find that the resultant spin state can be very sensitive to initial conditions due to the chaotic nature of the spin state at early times within certain regimes. We apply our model to two hypothetical planetary systems inspired by the K00255 and TRAPPIST-1 systems, both of which have Earth-sized planets in mean motion resonances orbiting cool stars.

  2. Search for heavy resonances in two-particle final states with leptons, jets and photons at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Gueth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    At the LHC, the production of heavy resonances decaying into a pair of particles can be probed at unprecedented centre-of-mass energies. Two-particle resonances are predicted in a variety of BSM models and can be searched for in a largely model-independent fashion. Results from searches for resonances in final states with leptons, jets and photons based on the full dataset of 20/fb taken by the CMS detector in 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are presented. They are interpreted in terms of various theories of BSM physics ranging from generic heavy resonances such as the Z' to excited quarks or Randall-Sundrum gravitons. In the absence of a significant deviation from the expected SM background 95\\% CL limits are set on model parameters of the theories under study.

  3. Steady state obliquity of a rigid body in the spin-orbit resonant problem: application to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the stable Cassini state 1 in the p : q spin-orbit resonant problem. Our study includes the effect of the gravitational potential up to degree and order 4 and p : q spin-orbit resonances with p,q≤ 8 and p≥ q. We derive new formulae that link the gravitational field coefficients with its secular orbital elements and its rotational parameters. The formulae can be used to predict the orientation of the spin axis and necessary angular momentum at exact resonance. We also develop a simple pendulum model to approximate the dynamics close to resonance and make use of it to predict the libration periods and widths of the oscillatory regime of motions in phase space. Our analytical results are based on averaging theory that we also confirm by means of numerical simulations of the exact dynamical equations. Our results are applied to a possible rotational history of Mercury.

  4. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: askutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering (India)

    2016-09-15

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  5. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled "1"3C,"1"5N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  6. Giant resonance and dipolar states of light nuclei; La resonance geante et les etats dipolaires des noyaux legers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Cross-section for ({gamma},n) reactions on C{sup 12},, O{sup 10}, Mg{sup 24} and Ca{sup 40} have been measured using 'monochromatic' gamma rays of variable energy obtained from the annihilation in flight of fast positrons. We compare the observed structure with the shell model of nucleus, including residual interaction between nucleons by 'hole particle' techniques. (author) [French] Les photons 'monochromatiques', d'energie variable, produits par l'annihilation en vol de positons, sont utilises pour mesurer la section efficace ({gamma},n) de {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 21}Mg et {sup 40}Ca. La structure observee est comparee aux previsions theoriques du modele a particules independantes, tenant compte de l'interaction residuelle entre nucleons par la methode 'trou-particule'. (auteur)

  7. Efimov states near a Feshbach resonance and the limits of van der Waals universality at finite background scattering length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Schmidt, Richard; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the spectrum of three-body Efimov bound states near a Feshbach resonance within a model which accounts both for the finite range of interactions and the presence of background scattering. The latter may be due to direct interactions in an open channel or a second overlapping Feshbach resonance. It is found that background scattering gives rise to substantial changes in the trimer spectrum as a function of the detuning away from a Feshbach resonance, in particular in the regime where the background channel supports Efimov states on its own. Compared to the situation with negligible background scattering, the regime where van der Waals universality applies is shifted to larger values of the resonance strength if the background scattering length is positive. For negative background scattering lengths, in turn, van der Waals universality extends to even small values of the resonance strength parameter, consistent with experimental results on Efimov states in 39K. Within a simple model, we show that short-range three-body forces do not affect van der Waals universality significantly. Repulsive three-body forces may, however, explain the observed variation between around -8 and -10 of the ratio between the scattering length where the first Efimov trimer appears and the van der Waals length.

  8. Automatic selection of resting-state networks with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Francesca eStorti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a resting-state condition can reveal the co-activation of specific brain regions in distributed networks, called resting-state networks, which are selected by independent component analysis (ICA of the fMRI data. One of the major difficulties with component analysis is the automatic selection of the ICA features related to brain activity. In this study we describe a method designed to automatically select networks of potential functional relevance, specifically, those regions known to be involved in motor function, visual processing, executive functioning, auditory processing, memory, and the default-mode network. To do this, image analysis was based on probabilistic ICA as implemented in FSL software. After decomposition, the optimal number of components was selected by applying a novel algorithm which takes into account, for each component, Pearson's median coefficient of skewness of the spatial maps generated by FSL, followed by clustering, segmentation, and spectral analysis. To evaluate the performance of the approach, we investigated the resting-state networks in 25 subjects. For each subject, three resting-state scans were obtained with a Siemens Allegra 3 T scanner (NYU data set. Comparison of the visually and the automatically identified neuronal networks showed that the algorithm had high accuracy (first scan: 95%, second scan: 95%, third scan: 93% and precision (90%, 90%, 84%. The reproducibility of the networks for visual and automatic selection was very close: it was highly consistent in each subject for the default-mode network (≥ 92% and the occipital network, which includes the medial visual cortical areas (≥ 94%, and consistent for the attention network (≥ 80%, the right and/or left lateralized frontoparietal attention networks, and the temporal-motor network (≥ 80%. The automatic selection method may be used to detect neural networks and reduce subjectivity in ICA

  9. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain's functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an "in-love" group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an "ended-love" group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a "single" group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the

  10. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zueqian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  11. Resonant-state expansion applied to three-dimensional open optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doost, M. Â. B.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. Â. A.

    2014-07-01

    The resonant-state expansion (RSE), a rigorous perturbative method in electrodynamics, is developed for three-dimensional open optical systems. Results are presented using the analytically solvable homogeneous dielectric sphere as unperturbed system. Since any perturbation which breaks the spherical symmetry mixes transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes, the RSE is extended here to include TM modes and a zero-frequency pole of the Green's function. We demonstrate the validity of the RSE for TM modes by verifying its convergence towards the exact result for a homogeneous perturbation of the sphere. We then apply the RSE to calculate the modes for a selection of perturbations sequentially reducing the remaining symmetry, given by a change of the dielectric constant of half-sphere and quarter-sphere shape. Since no exact solutions are known for these perturbations, we verify the RSE results by comparing them with the results of state of the art finite element method (FEM) and finite difference in time domain (FDTD) solvers. We find that for the selected perturbations, the RSE provides a significantly higher accuracy than the FEM and FDTD for a given computational effort, demonstrating its potential to supersede presently used methods. We furthermore show that in contrast to presently used methods, the RSE is able to determine the perturbation of a selected group of modes by using a limited basis local to these modes, which can further reduce the computational effort by orders of magnitude.

  12. Capital Account Policy in South Korea: The Informal Residues of the Developmental State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Leiteritz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the political dynamics of capital account policy in South Korea. The first part is devoted to the historical evolution of capital account policy from the 1960s to the present day. It highlights the path of substantial financial opening that began in the early 1990s with two distinct waves of capital account liberalization before and after the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998. The second part of the paper aims to detect the political origins of why capital account liberalization has not been complete and sustained. It locates them at the level of domestic informal institutions: first, the ideational legacy of the previous developmental state model – economic nationalism – that was predicated upon substantial barriers to international capital movements. Second, the political power of the export-oriented sector, namely of large conglomerates, that prefer exchange-rate stability and thus restrictions on capital inflows. This paper offers a heuristic argument based on a single case study which needs to be subjected to further empirical testing.

  13. Resonance states in 16O+16O, 12C+16O, α+ 16O and α+ 12C with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The resonance states in 16O + 16O, 12C + 16O, + 16O and + 12C are described using modified Morse potential proposed earlier whose success has already been demon-strated in the case of 12C + 12C system. The general validity of such a potential with long range, shallow depth and repulsive soft core determined ...

  14. Cardiovascular cine imaging and flow evaluation using Fast Interrupted Steady-State (FISS) magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Robert R; Serhal, Ali; Pursnani, Amit; Pang, Jianing; Koktzoglou, Ioannis

    2018-02-19

    Existing cine imaging techniques rely on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) or spoiled gradient-echo readouts, each of which has limitations. For instance, with bSSFP, artifacts occur from rapid through-plane flow and off-resonance effects. We hypothesized that a prototype cine technique, radial fast interrupted steady-state (FISS), could overcome these limitations. The technique was compared with standard cine bSSFP for cardiac function, coronary artery conspicuity, and aortic valve morphology. Given its advantageous properties, we further hypothesized that the cine FISS technique, in combination with arterial spin labeling (ASL), could provide an alternative to phase contrast for visualizing in-plane flow patterns within the aorta and branch vessels. The study was IRB-approved and subjects provided consent. Breath-hold cine FISS and bSSFP were acquired using similar imaging parameters. There was no significant difference in biplane left ventricular ejection fraction or cardiac image quality between the two techniques. Compared with cine bSSFP, cine FISS demonstrated a marked decrease in fat signal which improved conspicuity of the coronary arteries, while suppression of through-plane flow artifact on thin-slice cine FISS images improved visualization of the aortic valve. Banding artifacts in the subcutaneous tissues were reduced. In healthy subjects, dynamic flow patterns were well visualized in the aorta, coronary and renal arteries using cine FISS ASL, even when the slice was substantially thicker than the vessel diameter. Cine FISS demonstrates several benefits for cardiovascular imaging compared with cine bSSFP, including better suppression of fat signal and reduced artifacts from through-plane flow and off-resonance effects. The main drawback is a slight (~ 20%) decrease in temporal resolution. In addition, preliminary results suggest that cine FISS ASL provides a potential alternative to phase contrast techniques for in-plane flow

  15. Proton magnetic resonance study of the influence of chemical modification, mutation, quaternary state, and ligation state on dynamic stability of the heme pocket in hemoglobin as reflected in the exchange of the proximal histidyl ring labile proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.H.; La Mar, G.N.; Nagai, K.

    1989-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the rates of exchange with deuterium of the proximal histidyl ring protons in a series of chemically modified and mutated forms of Hb A. Differences in rates of exchange are related to differences in the stability of the deformed or partially unfolded intermediates from which exchange with bulk solvent takes place. Each modified/mutated Hb exhibited kinetic subunit heterogeneity in the reduced ferrous state, with the alpha subunit exhibiting faster exchange than the beta subunit. Modification or mutation resulted in significant increases in the His F8 ring NH exchange rates primarily for the affected subunit and only if the modification/mutation occurs at the allosterically important alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface. Moreover, this enhancement in exchange rate is observed primarily in that quaternary state of the modified/mutated Hb in which the modified/substituted residue makes the intersubunit contact. This confirms the importance of allosteric constraints in determining the dynamic properties of the heme pocket. Using modified or mutated Hbs that can switch between the alternate quaternary states within a given ligation state or ligate within a given quaternary state, we show that the major portion of the enhanced exchange rate in R-state oxy Hb relative to T-state deoxy Hb originates from the quaternary switch rather than from ligation. However, solely ligation effects are not negligible. The exchange rates of the His F8 ring labile protons increase dramatically upon oxidizing the iron to the ferric state, and both the subunit kinetic heterogeneity and the allosteric sensitivity to the quaternary state are essentially abolished

  16. Low frequency fluctuations in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Küblböck, M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has emerged as a widely used, highly accepted and very popular method for the assessment of neuronal activity in the human brain. It is a completely non-invasive imaging technique with high temporal resolution, which relies on the measurement of local differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. Therefore, fMRI can be regarded as an indirect measure of neuronal activity via measurement of localised changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen consumption. Maps of neuronal activity are calculated from fMRI data acquired either in the presence of an explicit task (task-based fMRI) or in absence of a task (resting-state fMRI). While in task-based fMRI task-specific patterns of brain activity are subject to research, resting-state fMRI reveals fundamental networks of intrinsic brain activity. These networks are characterized by low-frequency oscillations in the power spectrum of resting-state fMRI data. In the present work, we first introduce the physical principles and the technical background that allow us to measure these changes in blood oxygenation, followed by an introduction to the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect and to analysis methods for both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. We also analyse the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) of a novel 2D-EPI sequence, which allows the experimenter to acquire several slices simultaneously in order to assess the optimal parameter settings for this sequence at 3T. We then proceed to investigate the temporal properties of measures for the amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in resting-state fMRI data, which are regarded as potential biomarkers for a wide range of mental diseases in various clinical studies and show the high stability and robustness of these data, which are important prerequisites for application as a biomarker as well as their dependency on head motion

  17. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  18. On the role of anti-bound states in the RPA description of the giant monopole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertse, T.; Bang, J.

    1989-01-01

    The limit of the applicability of the resonant Random Phase Approximation (RPA) method is tested by calculating escape widths in the giant monopole resonance of 16 O and comparing them to the results of a time dependent Hartree-Fock calculation. Though the widths of the narrow s-wave component agree reasonably well, the broad p-wave component shows large disagreement, which cannot be cured by complementing the basis with anti-bound states in the RPA calculation. (author) 18 refs.; 3 tabs

  19. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging: the impact of regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Ru; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of regression methods on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). During rsfMRI preprocessing, regression analysis is considered effective for reducing the interference of physiological noise on the signal time course. However, it is unclear whether the regression method benefits rsfMRI analysis. Twenty volunteers (10 men and 10 women; aged 23.4 ± 1.5 years) participated in the experiments. We used node analysis and functional connectivity mapping to assess the brain default mode network by using five combinations of regression methods. The results show that regressing the global mean plays a major role in the preprocessing steps. When a global regression method is applied, the values of functional connectivity are significantly lower (P ≤ .01) than those calculated without a global regression. This step increases inter-subject variation and produces anticorrelated brain areas. rsfMRI data processed using regression should be interpreted carefully. The significance of the anticorrelated brain areas produced by global signal removal is unclear. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system: present state of the art and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates high-resolution images of the cardiovascular system. Conventional MRI techniques provide images in six to ten minutes per tomographic slice. New strategies have substantially improved the speed of imaging. The technology is relatively expensive, and its cost-effectiveness remains to be defined in relation to other effective, less expensive, and noninvasive technologies, such as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. The ultimate role of MRI will depend on several factors, including the development of specific applications such as (1) noninvasive angiography, especially of the coronary arteries;(2) noninvasive, high-resolution assessment of regional myocardial blood flow distribution (e.g., using paramagnetic contrast agents); (3) characterization of myocardial diseases using proton-relaxation property changes; and (4) evaluation of in vivo myocardial biochemistry. The three-dimensional imaging capability and the ability to image cardiovascular structures without contrast material give MRI a potential advantage over existing noninvasive diagnostic imaging techniques. This report analyzes current applications of MRI to the cardiovascular system and speculates on their future

  1. Bound states, resonances and poles in the low-energy K-barN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    The locations in the complex energy plane of the dynamic poles of the T matrix for the (K-bar N,Σπ) system are calculated. Investigated are a quark bag model and several potential models, including one which agrees with the strong interaction shift in kaonic hydrogen as well as scattering data. The parameters of the model are fit to K - p scattering and reaction cross sections, branching ratios, and mass spectra from K - p→ Σπππ, Λπππ. The Σ P1322 (1385) and Λ D03 (1520) resonances are found to be predominately elementary bag states with considerable dressing for the Σ P13 . The Λ S01 (1405) appears as a complicated composite systems arising from two poles. The model with certain parameter sets does predict two sign changes in the real part of the K-bar N scattering amplitude near threshold, but they are not quite at the correct energies to produce agreement with the sign of the strong interaction shift of kaonic hydrogen. (author). 10 refs., 10 figs

  2. Impurity Resonant States p-type Doping in Wide-Band-Gap Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Yi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Zhiguo; Yuan, Gongdong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin; Lu, Na; Ferguson, Ian; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new strategy for achieving efficient p-type doping in high bandgap nitride semiconductors to overcome the fundamental issue of high activation energy has been proposed and investigated theoretically, and demonstrated experimentally. Specifically, in an AlxGa1-xN/GaN superlattice structure, by modulation doping of Mg in the AlxGa1-xN barriers, high concentration of holes are generated throughout the material. A hole concentration as high as 1.1 × 1018 cm-3 has been achieved, which is about one order of magnitude higher than that typically achievable by direct doping GaN. Results from first-principle calculations indicate that the coupling and hybridization between Mg 2p impurity and the host N 2p orbitals are main reasons for the generation of resonant states in the GaN wells, which further results in the high hole concentration. We expect this approach to be equally applicable for other high bandgap materials where efficient p-type doing is difficult. Furthermore, a two-carrier-species Hall-effect model is proposed to delineate and discriminate the characteristics of the bulk and 2D hole, which usually coexist in superlattice-like doping systems. The model reported here can also be used to explain the abnormal freeze-in effect observed in many previous reports.

  3. In vivo determination of hepatic stiffness using steady-state free precession magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Dieter; Asbach, Patrick; Rump, Jens; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Somasundaram, Rajan; Modrow, Jens; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce an magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) protocol based on fractional motion encoding and planar wave acquisition for rapid measurements of in vivo human liver stiffness. Vibrations of a remote actuator membrane were fed by a rigid rod to the patient's surface beneath the right costal arch resulting in axial shear deflections of the liver. Data acquisition was performed using a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence incorporating oscillating gradients for motion sensitization. Tissue vibrations of frequency fv = 51 Hz were tuned by twice the sequence repetition time (1/fv = 2TR). Twenty axial images acquired by time-resolved through-plane wave encoding were used for planar elasticity reconstruction. The MRE data acquisition was achieved within 4 breathholds of 17 seconds each. The method was applied to 12 healthy volunteers and 2 patients with diffuse liver disease (fibrosis grade 3). MRE data acquisition was successful in all volunteers and patients. The elastic moduli were measured with values between 1.99 +/- 0.16 and 5.77 +/- 0.88 kPa. Follow-up studies demonstrated the reproducibility of the method and revealed a difference of 0.74 +/- 0.47 kPa (P analysis of the strain wave field captured by axial wave images. The measured data indicate individual variations of hepatic stiffness in healthy volunteers.

  4. Experimental aspect of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biomaterials such as bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Sinha, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly becoming a popular technique to probe micro-structural details of biomaterial such as bone with pico-meter resolution. Due to high-resolution structural details probed by SSNMR methods, handling of bone samples and experimental protocol are very crucial aspects of study. We present here first report of the effect of various experimental protocols and handling methods of bone samples on measured SSNMR parameters. Various popular SSNMR experiments were performed on intact cortical bone sample collected from fresh animal, immediately after removal from animal systems, and results were compared with bone samples preserved in different conditions. We find that the best experimental conditions for SSNMR parameters of bones correspond to preservation at -20 °C and in 70% ethanol solution. Various other SSNMR parameters were compared corresponding to different experimental conditions. Our study has helped in finding best experimental protocol for SSNMR studies of bone. This study will be of further help in the application of SSNMR studies on large bone disease related animal model systems for statistically significant results. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Migraine classification using magnetic resonance imaging resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Catherine D; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing; Wu, Teresa; Schwedt, Todd J

    2017-08-01

    Background This study used machine-learning techniques to develop discriminative brain-connectivity biomarkers from resting-state functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging ( rs-fMRI) data that distinguish between individual migraine patients and healthy controls. Methods This study included 58 migraine patients (mean age = 36.3 years; SD = 11.5) and 50 healthy controls (mean age = 35.9 years; SD = 11.0). The functional connections of 33 seeded pain-related regions were used as input for a brain classification algorithm that tested the accuracy of determining whether an individual brain MRI belongs to someone with migraine or to a healthy control. Results The best classification accuracy using a 10-fold cross-validation method was 86.1%. Resting functional connectivity of the right middle temporal, posterior insula, middle cingulate, left ventromedial prefrontal and bilateral amygdala regions best discriminated the migraine brain from that of a healthy control. Migraineurs with longer disease durations were classified more accurately (>14 years; 96.7% accuracy) compared to migraineurs with shorter disease durations (≤14 years; 82.1% accuracy). Conclusions Classification of migraine using rs-fMRI provides insights into pain circuits that are altered in migraine and could potentially contribute to the development of a new, noninvasive migraine biomarker. Migraineurs with longer disease burden were classified more accurately than migraineurs with shorter disease burden, potentially indicating that disease duration leads to reorganization of brain circuitry.

  6. Direct determination of resonance energy transfer in photolyase: structural alignment for the functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuang; Guo, Lijun; Ai, Yuejie; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Luo, Yi; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-11-13

    Photoantenna is essential to energy transduction in photoinduced biological machinery. A photoenzyme, photolyase, has a light-harvesting pigment of methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) that transfers its excitation energy to the catalytic flavin cofactor FADH¯ to enhance DNA-repair efficiency. Here we report our systematic characterization and direct determination of the ultrafast dynamics of resonance energy transfer from excited MTHF to three flavin redox states in E. coli photolyase by capturing the intermediates formed through the energy transfer and thus excluding the electron-transfer quenching pathway. We observed 170 ps for excitation energy transferring to the fully reduced hydroquinone FADH¯, 20 ps to the fully oxidized FAD, and 18 ps to the neutral semiquinone FADH(•), and the corresponding orientation factors (κ(2)) were determined to be 2.84, 1.53 and 1.26, respectively, perfectly matching with our calculated theoretical values. Thus, under physiological conditions and over the course of evolution, photolyase has adopted the optimized orientation of its photopigment to efficiently convert solar energy for repair of damaged DNA.

  7. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  8. High-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a solid-state spin sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David R.; Bucher, Dominik B.; Lee, Junghyun; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum systems that consist of solid-state electronic spins can be sensitive detectors of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals, particularly from very small samples. For example, nitrogen–vacancy centres in diamond have been used to record NMR signals from nanometre-scale samples, with sensitivity sufficient to detect the magnetic field produced by a single protein. However, the best reported spectral resolution for NMR of molecules using nitrogen–vacancy centres is about 100 hertz. This is insufficient to resolve the key spectral identifiers of molecular structure that are critical to NMR applications in chemistry, structural biology and materials research, such as scalar couplings (which require a resolution of less than ten hertz) and small chemical shifts (which require a resolution of around one part per million of the nuclear Larmor frequency). Conventional, inductively detected NMR can provide the necessary high spectral resolution, but its limited sensitivity typically requires millimetre-scale samples, precluding applications that involve smaller samples, such as picolitre-volume chemical analysis or correlated optical and NMR microscopy. Here we demonstrate a measurement technique that uses a solid-state spin sensor (a magnetometer) consisting of an ensemble of nitrogen–vacancy centres in combination with a narrowband synchronized readout protocol to obtain NMR spectral resolution of about one hertz. We use this technique to observe NMR scalar couplings in a micrometre-scale sample volume of approximately ten picolitres. We also use the ensemble of nitrogen–vacancy centres to apply NMR to thermally polarized nuclear spins and resolve chemical-shift spectra from small molecules. Our technique enables analytical NMR spectroscopy at the scale of single cells.

  9. Conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters: correlation of resonance Raman spectra with structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Angus, R.H.; Storer, A.C.; Varughese, K.I.; Carey, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The conformational states of N-acylalanine dithio esters, involving rotational isomers about the RC(=O)NH-CH(CH 3 ) and NHCH(CH 3 )-C(=S) bonds, are defined and compared to those of N-acylglycine dithio esters. The structure of N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester has been determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis; it is a B-type conformer with the amide N atom cis to the thiol sulfur. Raman and resonance Raman (RR) measurements on this compound and for the B conformers of solid N-benzoyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester and its NHCH(CD 3 )C(=S) and NHCH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) analogues are used to set up a library of RR data for alanine-based dithio esters in a B-conformer state. RR data for this solid material in its isotopically unsubstituted and CH(C-D 3 )C(=S) and CH(CH 3 ) 13 C(=S) forms provide information on the RR signatures of alanine dithio esters in A-like conformations. RR spectra are compared for the solid compounds, for N-(p-nitrobenzoyl)-DL-alanine, N-(β-phenylpropionyl)-DL-alanine, and (methyloxycarbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-DL-alanine ethyl dithio ester, and for several 13 C=S- and CD 3 -substituted analogues in CCl 4 or aqueous solutions. The RR data demonstrate that the alanine-based dithio esters take up A, B, and C 5 conformations in solution. The RR spectra of these conformers are clearly distinguishable from those for the same conformers of N-acylglycine dithio esters. However, the crystallographic and spectroscopic results show that the results show that the conformational properties of N-acylglycine and N-acylalanine dithio esters are very similar

  10. On the resonant state of magnetization in array of interacting nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P. D.; Orlov, V. A.; Rudenko, R. Yu.; Prokopenko, V. S.; Orlova, I. N.; Kobyakov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Development of the interpretation of the phenomenon of the lift of the magnetic resonance frequencies degeneracy caused by the magnetostatic interaction in assemblies of nanodisks has been done. The difference of the resonance behavior of magnetic vortexes in a round and rectangular nanodots has been studied experimentally and explained.

  11. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  12. Threshold states in /sup 26/Al. Pt. 2. Extraction of resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champagne, A E; Howard, A J; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.

    1983-06-20

    The total width of the Esub(c.m.)=376 keV resonance in the /sup 25/Mg+p system has been measured using the /sup 25/Mg(p,..gamma..)/sup 26/Al reaction and is found to be 460+-70 eV. From this information, a resonance strength ..omega gamma..=5.7x10/sup 16/ eV is obtained for the astrophysically important 37.2 keV resonance in /sup 26/Al through an R-matrix parameterization of the relative energy dependence of the resonance width. In a similar manner, an upper limit ..omega gamma..<=1.0x10/sup -11/ eV is deduced for a possible resonance at Esub(c.m.)=94.0 keV.

  13. The influence of final state interaction on two-particle correlations in multiple production of particles and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of pair correlations of interacting particles moving with nearby velocities is analysed. A general formalism of the two-particle space-time density matrix, taking into account the space-time coherence of the production process, is developed. The influence of strong final state interaction on two-particle correlations in the case of the production of a system resonance + particle is investigated in detail. It is shown that in the limit of small distances between the resonance and particle production points the effect of final state interaction is enhanced due to logarithmic singularity of the triangle diagram. Numerical estimates indicate that, in this limit, the effect of strong final state interaction becomes important even for two-pion correlations. (author)

  14. Search for Resonances Decaying to Dijet Final States at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with Scouting Data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A search for resonances decaying to dijet final states is performed in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. Using a loose online data selection and a reduced data format collected with a novel technique called $\\textit{data scouting}$, the search extends to low-mass values, testing previously unprobed low couplings. No evidence for a signal is found. The result is interpreted as upper limits on the production cross section as a function of the resonance mass. These limits are translated into an upper limit on the resonance coupling, allowing a comparison with results obtained in the same mass region at lower collision energies.

  15. PRODUCTION OF LIPASES IN SOLID-STATE FERMENTATION BY Aspergillus niger F7-02 WITH AGRICULTURAL RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka Quadri Adio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study mould strains screened and molecularly identified as Aspergillus niger F7-02 was used to produced extracellular lipase in Solid State Fermentation (SSF process. Different agricultural residues were combined in different ratios as carbon, nitrogen and elemental sources in the solid culture medium. The optimization of the culture medium was carried out for such parameters as incubation time (24 h - 96 h, inoculum concentration (0.5 – 3.0%, w/v, initial moisture content (40 – 70%, w/v, and initial pH (6 – 8 for maximum yield. The maximum lipase activity of 76.7 U/ml was obtained with a medium containing rice bran (RB, palm kernel cake (PKC, groundnut cake (GNC and starch (S at the ratio of 5:5:3:1 (%w/w with optimum conditions of 60% moisture, 1% inoculum and a pH of 7.0 with an incubation temperature of 30 oC and incubation time of 72 h.

  16. Enhanced production of xylanase from locally isolated fungal strain using agro-industrial residues under solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Roheena; Nisar, Kinza; Aslam, Aafia; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Naz, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    This study is related to the isolation of fungal strain for xylanase production using agro-industrial residues. Forty fungal strains with xylanolytic potential were isolated by using xylan agar plates and quantitatively screened in solid-state fermentation. Of all the tested isolates, the strain showing highest ability to produce xylanase was assigned the code Aspergillus niger LCBT-14. For the enhanced production of the enzyme, five different fermentation media were evaluated. Out of all media, M4 containing wheat bran gave maximum enzyme production. Effect of different variables including incubation time, temperature, pH, carbon and nitrogen sources has been investigated. The optimum enzyme production was obtained after 72 h at 30°C and pH 4. Glucose as a carbon source while ammonium sulphate and yeast extract as nitrogen sources gave maximum xylanase production (946 U/mL/min). This study was successful in producing xylanase by A. niger LCBT-14 economically by utilising cheap indigenous substrate.

  17. Production of cellulases from Aspergillus niger NS-2 in solid state fermentation on agricultural and kitchen waste residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Namita; Tewari, Rupinder; Soni, Raman; Soni, Sanjeev Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Various agricultural and kitchen waste residues were assessed for their ability to support the production of a complete cellulase system by Aspergillus niger NS-2 in solid state fermentation. Untreated as well as acid and base-pretreated substrates including corn cobs, carrot peelings, composite, grass, leaves, orange peelings, pineapple peelings, potato peelings, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse, saw dust, wheat bran, wheat straw, simply moistened with water, were found to be well suited for the organism's growth, producing good amounts of cellulases after 96 h without the supplementation of additional nutritional sources. Yields of cellulases were higher in alkali treated substrates as compared to acid treated and untreated substrates except in wheat bran. Of all the substrates tested, wheat bran appeared to be the best suited substrate producing appreciable yields of CMCase, FPase and β-glucosidase at the levels of 310, 17 and 33 U/g dry substrate respectively. An evaluation of various environmental parameters demonstrated that appreciable levels of cellulases could be produced over a wide range of temperatures (20-50 °C) and pH levels (3.0-8.0) with a 1:1.5 to 1:1.75 substrate to moisture ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CDCC calculations of fusion of 6Li with targets 144Sm and 154Sm: effect of resonance states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Lubian, J.; Zhang, H. Q.; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2017-12-01

    Continuum Discretized Coupled-Channel (CDCC) model calculations of total, complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for reactions of the weakly bound 6Li with 144,154Sm targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier are presented. In the cluster structure frame of 6Li→α+d, short-range absorption potentials are considered for the interactions between the ground state of the projectile 6Li and α-d fragments with the target. In order to separately calculate complete and incomplete fusion and to reduce double-counting, the corresponding absorption potentials are chosen to be of different range. Couplings to low-lying excited states 2+, 3- of 144Sm and 2+, 4+ of 154Sm are included. So, the effect on total fusion from the excited states of the target is investigated. Similarly, the effect on fusion due to couplings to resonance breakup states of 6Li, namely, l=2, J π =3+,2+,1+ is also calculated. The latter effect is determined by using two approaches, (a) by considering only resonance state couplings and (b) by omitting these states from the full discretized energy space. Among other things, it is found that both resonance and non-resonance continuum breakup couplings produce fusion suppression at all the energies considered. A. Gómez Camacho from CONACYT, México, J. Lubian from CNPq, FAPERJ, Pronex, Brazil. S.G.Z was partly supported by the NSF of China (11120101005, 11275248, 11525524, 11621131001, 11647601, 11711540016), 973 Program of China (2013CB834400) and the Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences of CAS. H.Q.Z. from NSF China (11375266)

  19. Awareness of pesticide residues in locally available food and condiments among food sellers: a case study of Osun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Ayo Deji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific objectives are: i to determine the level of awareness of pesticide residue in locally available food among food sellers in Ile Ife area of Osun state, Nigeria; ii to identify the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of food sellers who use pesticides, natural means in preserving their foodstuff from getting spoilt; iii to determine the level of understanding of food sellers who use pesticides about the likely health implications that could result. The design of the study is cross sectional. Structured open-ended questionnaires were administered to 98 randomly selected food sellers in Ile Ife area Osun state, Nigeria. This includes males and female. The inference from the study shows that majority of the food sellers were between ages 21 and 30 years, suggesting that more of the young people are involved in the selling of foodstuff in the area of study. Most of the food sellers used phostozin, an organophosphate compound as preservatives for cereals. The majority of those that were aware of the health hazards associated with the usage of pesticides as preservative were literate school leavers. Among respondents to the questionnaire, it was expected that many of those food sellers likely to demonstrate caution in the usage of pesticide would be the literate school leavers. This is because they are more aware of the possible associated health hazards than their fellow food sellers who are not literate. The level of awareness of health implications associated with use of pesticides on consumable food items is higher among school certificate holders who are food sellers. Phostozin, an organophosphate, is a common preservative pesticide used on cereals foodstuff (e.g., bean, rice, maize in the area of study, especially among the age group between 21 and 30 years.

  20. Bioethanol production: an integrated process of low substrate loading hydrolysis-high sugars liquid fermentation and solid state fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysis residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qiulu; Li, Xin; Ma, Bin; Xu, Yong; Ouyang, Jia; Zhu, Junjun; Yu, Shiyuan; Yong, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    An integrated process of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation was investigated for high ethanol production. The combination of enzymatic hydrolysis at low substrate loading, liquid fermentation of high sugars concentration and solid state fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysis residue was beneficial for conversion of steam explosion pretreated corn stover to ethanol. The results suggested that low substrate loading hydrolysis caused a high enzymatic hydrolysis yield; the liquid fermentation of about 200g/L glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided a high ethanol concentration which could significantly decrease cost of the subsequent ethanol distillation. A solid state fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysis residue was combined, which was available to enhance ethanol production and cellulose-to-ethanol conversion. The results of solid state fermentation demonstrated that the solid state fermentation process accompanied by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. All-solid-state continuous-wave doubly resonant all-intracavity sum-frequency mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmann, H M; Heine, F; Huber, G; Halldórsson, T

    1997-10-01

    A new resonator design for doubly resonant continuous-wave intracavity sum-frequency mixing is presented. We generated 212 mW of coherent radiation at 618 nm by mixing the radiation of a 1080-nm Nd(3+):YAlO(3) laser and a 1444-nm Nd(3+):YAG laser. Two different mixing resonator setups and several nonlinear-optical crystals were investigated. So far output is limited by unequal performance of the two fundamental lasers and coating problems of the nonlinear crystals.

  2. The formation of a native-like structure containing eight conserved hydrophobic residues is rate limiting in two-state protein folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Osmark, Peter; Neergaard, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    The acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) contain 26 highly conserved sequence positions. The majority of these have been mutated in the bovine protein, and their influence on the rate of two-state folding and unfolding has been measured. The results identify eight sequence positions, out of 24...... probed, that are critical for fast productive folding. The residues are all hydrophobic and located in the interface between the N- and C-terminal helices. The results suggest that one specific site dominated by conserved hydrophobic residues forms the structure of the productive rate-determining folding...... step and that a sequential framework model can describe the protein folding reaction....

  3. XFEL resonant photo-pumping of dense plasmas and dynamic evolution of autoionizing core hole states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Moinard, A.; Renner, O.; Galtier, E.; Lee, J. J.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P. A.; Schlotter, W.; Turner, J. J.; Lee, R. W.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Seely, J.

    2016-03-01

    Similarly to the case of LIF (Laser-Induced Fluorescence), an equally revolutionary impact to science is expected from resonant X-ray photo-pumping. It will particularly contribute to a progress in high energy density science: pumped core hole states create X-ray transitions that can escape dense matter on a 10 fs-time scale without essential photoabsorption, thus providing a unique possibility to study matter under extreme conditions. In the first proof of principle experiment at the X-ray Free Electron Laser LCLS at SCLAC [Seely, J., Rosmej, F.B., Shepherd, R., Riley, D., Lee, R.W. Proposal to Perform the 1st High Energy Density Plasma Spectroscopic Pump/Probe Experiment”, approved LCLS proposal L332 (2010)] we have successfully pumped inner-shell X-ray transitions in dense plasmas. The plasma was generated with a YAG laser irradiating solid Al and Mg targets attached to a rotating cylinder. In parallel to the optical laser beam, the XFEL was focused into the plasma plume at different delay times and pump energies. Pumped X-ray transitions have been observed with a spherically bent crystal spectrometer coupled to a Princeton CCD. By using this experimental configuration, we have simultaneously achieved extremely high spectral (λ/δλ ≈ 5000) and spatial resolution (δx≈70 μm) while maintaining high luminosity and a large spectral range covered (6.90 - 8.35 Å). By precisely measuring the variations in spectra emitted from plasma under action of XFEL radiation, we have successfully demonstrated transient X- ray pumping in a dense plasma.

  4. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  5. The α-helical C-terminal domain of full-length recombinant PrP converts to an in-register parallel β-sheet structure in PrP fibrils: evidence from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2010-11-09

    We report the results of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on amyloid fibrils formed by the full-length prion protein PrP (residues 23−231, Syrian hamster sequence). Measurements of intermolecular 13C−13C dipole−dipole couplings in selectively carbonyl-labeled samples indicate that β-sheets in these fibrils have an in-register parallel structure, as previously observed in amyloid fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes and in yeast prion fibrils. Two-dimensional 13C−13C and 15N−13C solid state NMR spectra of a uniformly 15N- and 13C-labeled sample indicate that a relatively small fraction of the full sequence, localized to the C-terminal end, forms the structurally ordered, immobilized core. Although unique site-specific assignments of the solid state NMR signals cannot be obtained from these spectra, analysis with a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm suggests that the core is comprised primarily of residues in the 173−224 range. These results are consistent with earlier electron paramagnetic resonance studies of fibrils formed by residues 90−231 of the human PrP sequence, formed under somewhat different conditions [Cobb, N. J., Sonnichsen, F. D., McHaourab, H., and Surewicz, W. K. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18946−18951], suggesting that an in-register parallel β-sheet structure formed by the C-terminal end may be a general feature of PrP fibrils prepared in vitro.

  6. Dicke phase transition with multiple superradiant states in quantum chaotic resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, C.; Di, Falco, A.; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the Dicke phase transition in chaotic optical resonators realized with two-dimensional photonics crystals. This setup circumvents the constraints of the system originally investigated by Dicke and allows a detailed study of the various properties of the superradiant transition. Our experimental results, analytical prediction, and numerical modeling based on random-matrix theory demonstrate that the probability density P? of the resonance widths provides a new criterion to test the occurrence of the Dicke transition.

  7. Dicke phase transition with multiple superradiant states in quantum chaotic resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, C.

    2014-06-12

    We experimentally investigate the Dicke phase transition in chaotic optical resonators realized with two-dimensional photonics crystals. This setup circumvents the constraints of the system originally investigated by Dicke and allows a detailed study of the various properties of the superradiant transition. Our experimental results, analytical prediction, and numerical modeling based on random-matrix theory demonstrate that the probability density P? of the resonance widths provides a new criterion to test the occurrence of the Dicke transition.

  8. Resonance scattering by auroral N2+: steady state theory and observations from Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jokiaho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auroral energy input at high latitudes often depend on observations of emissions from the first negative band of ionised nitrogen. However, these emissions are affected by solar resonance scattering, which makes photometric and spectrographic measurements difficult to interpret. This work is a statistical study from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, during the solar minimum between January and March 2007, providing a good coverage in shadow height position and precipitation conditions. The High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES measured three bands of N2+ 1N (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3, and one N2 2P band (0,3 in the magnetic zenith. The brightness ratios of the N2+ bands are compared with a theoretical treatment with excellent results. Balance equations for all important vibrational levels of the three lowest electronic states of the N2+ molecule are solved for steady-state, and the results combined with ion chemistry modelling. Brightnesses of the (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3 bands of N2+ 1N are calculated for a range of auroral electron energies, and different values of shadow heights. It is shown that in sunlit aurora, the brightness of the (0,1 band is enhanced, with the scattered contribution increasing with decreasing energy of precipitation (10-fold enhancements for energies of 100 eV. The higher vibrational bands are enhanced even more significantly. In sunlit aurora the observed 1N (1,2/(0,1 and (2,3/(0,1 ratios increase as a function of decreasing precipitation energy, as predicted by theory. In non-sunlit aurora the N2+ species have a constant proportionality to neutral N2. The ratio of 2P(0,3/1N(0,1 in the morning hours shows a pronounced decrease, indicating enhancement of N2+ 1N emission. Finally we study the relationship of all emissions and their ratios to rotational temperatures. A clear effect is observed on rotational development of the bands. It is possible that greatly enhanced rotational temperatures may be a

  9. Differentiation of residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation necrosis with arterial spin labeling and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging-derived metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; El-Serougy, Lamiaa; Gaballa, Gada; Talaat, Mona [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura (Egypt); Abdelsalam, Mohamed [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2018-02-15

    The aim of this study is to differentiate recurrent/residual gliomas from postradiation changes using arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics. Prospective study was conducted upon 42 patients with high-grade gliomas after radiotherapy only or prior to other therapies that underwent routine MR imaging, ASL, and DTI. The tumor blood flow (TBF), fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the enhanced lesion and related edema were calculated. The lesion was categorized as recurrence/residual or postradiation changes. There was significant differences between residual/recurrent gliomas and postradiation changes of TBF (P = 0.001), FA (P = 0.001 and 0.04), and MD (P = 0.001) of enhanced lesion and related edema respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of TBF of enhanced lesion and related edema used to differentiate residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes were 0.95 and 0.93 and of MD were 0.95 and 0.81 and of FA were 0.81 and 0.695, respectively. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of the enhanced lesion revealed AUC of 0.98, accuracy of 95%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 95.8%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 93.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95.8%. Combined metrics of ASL and DTI of related edema revealed AUC of 0.97, accuracy of 92.5%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV of 88.2%, and NPV of 95.7. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of enhanced lesion and related edema are valuable noninvasive tools in differentiating residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes. (orig.)

  10. Theory of Correlated Pairs of Electrons Oscillating in Resonant Quantum States to Reach the Critical Temperature in a Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Aroche, Raúl Riera; Rosas-Cabrera, Rodrigo Arturo; Burgos, Rodrigo Arturo Rosas; Betancourt-Riera, René; Betancourt-Riera, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The formation of Correlated Electron Pairs Oscillating around the Fermi level in Resonant Quantum States (CEPO-RQS), when a metal is cooled to its critical temperature T=Tc, is studied. The necessary conditions for the existence of CEPO-RQS are analyzed. The participation of electron-electron interaction screened by an electron dielectric constant of the form proposed by Thomas Fermi is considered and a physical meaning for the electron-phonon-electron interaction in the formation of the CEPO...

  11. Reactor performance and energy analysis of solid state anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure with corn stover and tomato residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangyang; Xu, Fuqing; Li, Yu; Lu, Jiaxin; Li, Shuyan; Shah, Ajay; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Hongyu; Gong, Xiaoyan; Li, Guoxue

    2018-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion is commonly believed to be benefical for biogas production. However, additional of co-substrates may require additional energy inputs and thus affect the overall energy efficiency of the system. In this study, reactor performance and energy analysis of solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of tomato residues with dairy manure and corn stover were investigated. Different fractions of tomato residues (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100%, based on volatile solid weight (VS)) were co-digested with dairy manure and corn stover at 15% total solids. Energy analysis based on experimental data was conducted for three scenarios: SS-AD of 100% dairy manure, SS-AD of binary mixture (60% dairy manure and 40% corn stover, VS based), and SS-AD of ternary mixture (36% dairy manure, 24% corn stover, and 40% tomato residues, VS based). For each scenario, the energy requirements for individual process components, including feedstock collection and transportation, feedstock pretreatment, biogas plant operation, digestate processing and handling, and the energy production were examined. Results showed that the addition of 20 and 40% tomato residues increased methane yield compared to that of the dairy manure and corn stover mixture, indicating that the co-digestion could balance nutrients and improve the performance of solid-state anaerobic digestion. The energy required for heating substrates had the dominant effect on the total energy consumption. The highest volatile solids (VS) reduction (57.0%), methane yield (379.1 L/kg VS feed ), and net energy production were achieved with the mixture of 24% corn stover, 36% dairy manure, and 40% tomato residues. Thus, the extra energy input for adding tomato residues for co-digestion could be compensated by the increase of methane yield. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-qun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3 and Taixi (KI3 using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19, inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18 and cuneus (Brodmann area 18, but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11, inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44 and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  13. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Qun; Wang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Jun-Qi; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Jia-Rong; Ouyang, Huai-Liang; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Taixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19), inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18) and cuneus (Brodmann area 18), but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11), inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44) and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  14. Conversion of agroindustrial residues for high poly(γ-glutamic acid) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 via solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bao; Xu, Hong; Xu, Zongqi; Xu, Cen; Xu, Zheng; Lei, Peng; Qiu, Yibin; Liang, Jinfeng; Feng, Xiaohai

    2015-04-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) production by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 was carried out through solid-state fermentation with dry mushroom residues (DMR) and monosodium glutamate production residues (MGPR; a substitute of glutamate) for the first time. Dry shiitake mushroom residue (DSMR) was found to be the most suitable solid substrate among these DMRs; the optimal DSMR-to-MGPR ratio was optimized as 12:8. To increase γ-PGA production, industrial waste glycerol was added as a carbon source supplement to the solid-state medium. As a result, γ-PGA production increased by 34.8%. The batch fermentation obtained an outcome of 115.6 g kg(-1) γ-PGA and 39.5×10(8) colony forming units g(-1) cells. Furthermore, a satisfactory yield of 107.7 g kg(-1) γ-PGA was achieved by compost experiment on a scale of 50 kg in open air, indicating that economically large-scale γ-PGA production was feasible. Therefore, this study provided a novel method to produce γ-PGA from abundant and low-cost agroindustrial residues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2018-05-01

    We present a state interaction spin-orbit coupling method to calculate electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from density matrix renormalization group wavefunctions. We apply the technique to compute g-tensors for the TiF3 and CuCl42 - complexes, a [2Fe-2S] model of the active center of ferredoxins, and a Mn4CaO5 model of the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex. These calculations raise the prospects of determining g-tensors in multireference calculations with a large number of open shells.

  16. Search for heavy resonances in diboson final states with the CMS detector at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Mukherjee, Swagata [Physics Institute III A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The search strategy for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of bosons in proton-proton collisions in the CMS detector at LHC is presented. Several New Physics scenarios including the recently proposed heavy vector triplet (HVT) simplified model predict the existence of Beyond Standard Model (BSM) resonances that have enhanced couplings to boson pairs. This search is particularly challenging, since for large resonance masses the two bosons are boosted and the final decay products are difficult to separate. This requires the development and use of dedicated techniques such as special tau reconstruction and lepton isolation approaches. In the absence of a significant deviation from the Standard Model expectation, upper limits are set on the signal cross section times branching ratio for the HVT signal model.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  18. Empty-electronic-state evolution for Sc and electron dynamics at the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Wagener, T.J.; Gao, Y.; Weaver, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Inverse photoemission has been used to study the developing electronic states of an early transition metal, Sc, during thin-film growth and to investigate the effects of these states on the 3p-3d giant dipole resonance. Energy- and coverage-dependent intensity variations of the empty Sc states show that the 3d maximum moves 1.1 eV toward the Fermi level as the thickness of the Sc film increases from 1 to 300 A as measured with an incident electron energy of 41.25 eV, an effect attributed to metallic band formation via hybridization of atomic 4s and 3d states. Incident-energy-dependent intensity variations for these empty Sc features show resonant photon emission for incident electron energies above the 3p threshold, with maxima at 43 and 44 eV for 300- and 5-A-thick films, respectively. Considerations of hybridization-induced energy shifts of the empty Sc 3d states demonstrate that the radiative energy changes very little with Sc coverages. These studies indicate coupling of decay channels involving the inverse photoemission continuum and the recombination of the atomic 3p-3d giant dipole transition, the energy of the latter being determined by atomic 3p-3d excitation processes

  19. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  20. An analysis of stripping to isolated analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, E.F.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de.

    1983-04-01

    The Feshbach projection formalism is used to calculate the form factors for the (d,n) stripping process to isolated analog resonances. These are used in a standard DWBA stripping calculation in which the radial integration over all space is accomplished by including outerspace contributions evaluated along the complex contours of Vincent and Fortune. It turns out that the shape and magnitude of the predicted cross section is quite insensitive to the continuum proton wave emanating from the resonant residual state. (Author) [pt

  1. Resonance Raman scattering of β-carotene solution excited by visible laser beams into second singlet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luyao; Shi, Lingyan; Secor, Jeff; Alfano, Robert

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to use self-absorption correction to determine the Raman enhancement of β-carotene. The Raman spectra of β-carotene solutions were measured using 488nm, 514nm, 532nm and 633nm laser beams, which exhibited significant resonance Raman (RR) enhancement when the laser energy approaches the electronic transition energy from S 0 to S 2 state. The Raman intensity and the actual resonance Raman gain without self-absorption from S 2 state by β-carotene were also obtained to evaluate the effect of self-absorption on RR scattering. Moreover, we observed the Raman intensity strength followed the absorption spectra. Our study found that, although 488nm and 514nm pumps seemed better for stronger RR enhancement, 532nm would be the optimum Raman pump laser with moderate RR enhancement due to reduced fluorescence and self-absorption. The 532nm excitation will be helpful for applying resonance Raman spectroscopy to investigate biological molecules in tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using biharmonic laser pumping for preparation of pure and entangled multiexciton states in clusters of resonantly interacting fluorescent centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basieva, I.T.; Basiev, T.T.; Dietler, G.; Pukhov, K.K.; Sekatskii, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Use of a biharmonic laser pumping for preparation of pure and entangled multiexciton states in dimers and tetramers of resonantly interacting fluorescent particles is analysed. Special emphasis is given to the preparation of all possible pure exciton states and their maximally entangled Bell states. The general results are illustrated using as an example the pair and quartet centres of neodymium ions in calcium fluoride (M- and N-centres), where all necessary experimental information concerning the interactions and decoherence is available, and experimental preparation of Bell vacuum-single exciton and vacuum-biexciton states has been recently demonstrated. These results can be easily rescaled for the cases of quantum dots and dye molecules. Numerical results are compared with the analytical results obtained for a particular case of the biharmonic excitation of dimers. Excellent agreement between these approaches is demonstrated

  3. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - current state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerski, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has progressed rapidly from laboratory curiosity to commercial exploitation and clinical application in the space of only three years. The physical principles underlying the technique are described and the equipment requirements outlined. The question of optimal magnetic field strength is discussed. (author)

  4. Exact ground-state correlation functions of one-dimenisonal strongly correlated electron models with resonating-valence-bond ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Masanori; Honjo, Shinsuke; Kohmoto, Mahito

    1996-01-01

    We investigate one-dimensional strongly correlated electron models which have the resonating-valence-bond state as the exact ground state. The correlation functions are evaluated exactly using the transfer matrix method for the geometric representations of the valence-bond states. In this method, we only treat matrices with small dimensions. This enables us to give analytical results. It is shown that the correlation functions decay exponentially with distance. The result suggests that there is a finite excitation gap, and that the ground state is insulating. Since the corresponding noninteracting systems may be insulating or metallic, we can say that the gap originates from strong correlation. The persistent currents of the present models are also investigated and found to be exactly vanishing

  5. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A; Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  6. Organochlorine residues and shell thicknesses in eggs of the clapper rail, common gallinule, purple gallinule, and limpkin (class Aves), eastern and southern United States, 1972-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, E E; Ohlendorf, H M; Cromartie, E

    1980-12-01

    Organochlorine residues and shell thicknesses were surveyed in eggs of the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), purple gallinule (Porphyrula martinica), common gallinule (Gallinula chloropas), and limpkin (Aramus guarauna) from the eastern and southern United States. Clapper rail eggs were collected during 1972-73 in New Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina. During 1973-74, gallinule eggs were collected in Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana, and limpkin eggs were collected in Florida. Egg contents were analyzed for residues of organochlorine pesticides, including DDT, TDE, DDE, dieldrin, mirex, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), cis-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), toxaphene, and endrin, and for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Shell thicknesses of recent eggs of these species were compared with archival eggs that had been collected before 1947. With the exception of the limpkin, the majority of eggs analyzed contained residues of p,p'-DDE and PCBs. Geometric means ranged from 0.10 ppm to 1.3 ppm. Small amounts (less than 1.0 ppm) of mirex, dieldrin, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), TDE, and DDT were detected in a few eggs. No evidence of eggshell thinning was found for any of the species studied. DDE residues in clapper rail eggs were higher in New Jersey and Virginia than in South Carolina.

  7. Organochlorine residues and shell thickness in eggs of the clapper rail, common gallinule, purple gallinule, and limpkin (Class Aves), eastern and southern United States, 1972-74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, E.E.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Cromartie, E.

    1980-01-01

    Organochlorine residues and shell thicknesses were surveyed in eggs of the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), purple gallinule (Porphyrula martinica), common gallinule (Gallinula chloropas), and limpkin (Aramus guarauna) from the eastern and southern United States. Clapper rail eggs were collected during 1972-73 in New Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina. During 1973-74, gallinule eggs were collected in Florida, South Carolina, and Louisiana, and limpkin eggs were collected in Florida. Egg contents were analyzed for residues of organochlorine pesticides, including DDT, TDE, DDE, dieldrin, mirex, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), cis-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), toxaphene, and endrin, and for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Shell thicknesses of recent eggs of these species were compared with archival eggs that had been collected before 1947. With the exception of the limpkin, the majority of eggs analyzed contained residues of p,p'-DDE and PCBs. Geometric means ranged from 0.10 ppm to 1.3 ppm. Small amounts (less than 1.0 ppm) of mirex, dieldrin, cis-chlordane (and/or trans-nonachlor), TDE, and DDT were detected in a few eggs. No evidence of eggshell thinning was found for any of the species studied. DDE residues in clapper rail eggs were higher in New Jersey and Virginia than in South Carolina.

  8. Bonding wood-saxon potential and the mechanism of resonance states in the ''1''2C+''1''2C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    In present work the ''1''2C+''1''2C system are investigated in the realistic Woods--Saxon potential with Coulomb interaction. The comparison of the calculated states with the experimental data has shown, that the observed (identified) resonances may be explained by the single-channel description, i.e., as potential resonances. The quadrupole moments and transition probabilities for low-laying states have been calculated

  9. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M R D; Borello-Lewin, T; Miyake, H; Duarte, J L M; Rodrigues, C L; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L B; Ukita, G M; Cappuzzello, F; Foti, A; Cavallaro, M; Agodi, C; Cunsolo, A; Carbone, D; Bondi, M; Napoli, M De; Roeder, B T; Linares, R; Lombardo, I

    2014-01-01

    The 9 Be( 6 Li,d) 13 C and 12,13 C( 6 Li,d) 16,17 O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13 C and 15-30 keV for 16 O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θ d = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility

  10. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Ukita, G. M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A.; Carbone, D.; Bondi, M.; De Napoli, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Linares, R.; Lombardo, I.

    2014-12-01

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C and 12,13C(6Li,d)16,17O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13C and 15-30 keV for 16O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θd = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility.

  11. Searches for non-resonant new phenomena in final states with leptons and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Some recent searches for hints of processes beyond the standard model performed by the CMS collaboration are presented. These focused on the detection of new phenomena more indirectly than the direct observation of a resonance indicating the presence of a new particle. No significant deviation from the standard model expectations have been observed and constraints for new physics have been set in several well-motivated scenarios.

  12. Generation of maximally entangled mixed states of two atoms via on-resonance asymmetric atom-cavity couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shang-Bin

    2007-01-01

    A scheme for generating the maximally entangled mixed state of two atoms on-resonance asymmetrically coupled to a single mode optical cavity field is presented. The part frontier of both maximally entangled mixed states and maximal Bell violating mixed states can be approximately reached by the evolving reduced density matrix of two atoms if the ratio of coupling strengths of two atoms is appropriately controlled. It is also shown that exchange symmetry of global maximal concurrence is broken if and only if coupling strength ratio lies between (√(3)/3) and √(3) for the case of one-particle excitation and asymmetric coupling, while this partial symmetry breaking cannot be verified by detecting maximal Bell violation

  13. Properties and applications of HTS-shielded dielectric resonators: A state-of-the-art report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, N.; Scholen, A.; Tellmann, N.; Zuccaro, C.; Urban, K.W.

    1996-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) shielded dielectric resonators (DRs) have demonstrated to provide quality factors Q between 5 x 10 5 and several 10 6 at frequencies up to 20 GHz and levels of dissipated rf power in the range of Watts. As dielectric materials, high purity single crystals of sapphire, LaAlO 3 , and rutile exhibit sufficiently low microwave losses. There are two main areas of application which are considered to benefit from HTS-shielded DRs, namely low-phase-noise oscillators for radar systems and digital communication, and high-power filters for satellite communication. Projections for phase noise are -145 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset from the carrier frequency, a value of -110 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz was measured recently for an oscillator with a carrier frequency of 5.6 GHz. Modeling of filters based on resonators with Qs in the 10 6 range indicates their ability to reduce the rf power dissipation apparent in the output multiplexers of communication satellite payloads. Presently, schemes for resonator coupling and tuning while maintaining high Qs are under development

  14. Electron spin resonance probed competing states in NiMnInSi Heusler alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.S. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Titov, I.S.; Granovsky, A.B. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorob' evy Gory, 11999l Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-01

    Shape memory Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 12}Si{sub 3} is investigated with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique in a temperature range of 200–300 K. ESR is a dynamic probe allowing us to separate the responses from various magnetic phases, thus to study the complex phase transitions. The sample shows three transition temperatures: T{sub c}{sup A} (271 K), T{sub M} (247 K) and T{sub c}{sup M} (212 K), where T{sub c}{sup A} is the Curie temperature of austenitic phase, T{sub M} and T{sub c}{sup M} are the temperatures of magnetostructural martensitic transition and the Curie temperature of martensitic phase, respectively. Furthermore, ESR data reveals the coexistence of two magnetic modes in whole temperature range of 200–300 K. Particularly in martensitic phase, two magnetic modes are attributed to two different kinds of lattice deformation, the slip and twinning deformations. - Highlights: • Electron spin resonance study on magnetocaloric Heusler alloy within 200–300 K. • Magnetic phase separation below and above the structural transition temperature. • Phase competing is in association with different types of lattice distortions. • Electron spin resonance results are complementary to the magnetization data.

  15. The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF3CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woetzel, Ulf; Maeder, Heinrich; Harder, Hauke; Pracna, Petr; Sarka, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF 3 CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2 has been measured by means of waveguide microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy in the range 8-26 GHz. Two types of direct l-type resonance transitions induced by the (Δk = ±2, Δl = ±2) interaction could be observed: 262 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 2 selection rule covering values of J = 17-64 and G vertical bar k - l vertical bar from 2 to 15, and 75 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 4 selection rule covering values of J = 44-70 and G up to 3. The strong (2, 2) resonance furthermore allowed the observation of A 1 -A 2 splittings of the k = l = ±2 states from J = 63-70. The transitions with G = 3 showed splittings due to the (4, -2) and (0, 6) interactions. The corresponding energy level systems and part of the Hamiltonian matrix are discussed. Strong perturbations due to Δ(k - l) = 3 interactions coupling the states k = ±1, l = ±2 and k = ±4, l ±2 made possible the observation of perturbation-allowed transitions with selection rule k = ±1, l =± 2 ↔ k = 0, l = ±2. Additionally, the J = 2-1 and 3-2 rotational transitions have been measured. A multiple fitting analysis has been performed in which the experimental data have been fitted using five reduced forms of the effective Hamiltonian as proposed by Sarka and Harder [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 254]. Parameters up to sixth order have been determined including the axial rotational constant A for both values of vertical bar l vertical bar and the unitary equivalence of the determined parameter sets has been demonstrated

  16. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (β-In 2 O 3 ) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal (α)-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although β-In 2 O 3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N 2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N 2 -annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N 2 -annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]≤0.5%). Although [O]∝1% could be estimated by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed in N 2 -annealed InN films, [O]≤0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed by H 2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O 2 , using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Maximum coherent superposition state achievement using a non-resonant pulse train in non-degenerate three-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Li; Niu, Yueping; Jin, Luling; Gong, Shangqing

    2010-01-01

    The coherent superposition state of the lower two levels in non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms is investigated using the accumulative effects of non-resonant pulse trains when the repetition period is smaller than the decay time of the upper level. First, using a rectangular pulse train, the accumulative effects are re-examined in the non-resonant two-level atoms and the modified constructive accumulation equation is analytically given. The equation shows that the relative phase and the repetition period are important in the accumulative effect. Next, under the modified equation in the non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms, we show that besides the constructive accumulation effect, the use of the partial constructive accumulation effect can also achieve the steady state of the maximum coherent superposition state of the lower two levels and the latter condition is relatively easier to manipulate. The analysis is verified by numerical calculations. The influence of the external levels in such a case is also considered and we find that it can be avoided effectively. The above analysis is also applicable to pulse trains with arbitrary envelopes.

  18. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  19. Teleportation of N-qubit W State without Bell-State Measurement via Selective Resonant Interaction in Cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Wenxue; Geng Jun; Cheng Guangling; Chen Aixi

    2010-01-01

    We present a scheme in which the N-atom W state is teleported by employing the selective interaction of a cavity field with a driven three-level atom in the A configuration and detecting a single atom in one of the ground states. The long-lived W state is teleported from atom A to atom B when the atoms B and A are sent through a cavity successively and atom A is then detected. The advantage is that the present one does not involve the Bell-state measurement and is robust against the atomic spontaneous emission. (general)

  20. Divergence of relative difference in Gaussian distribution function and stochastic resonance in a bistable system with frictionless state transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Seiya; Ichiki, Akihisa; Tadokoro, Yukihiro

    2018-03-01

    A bistable system efficiently detects a weak signal by adding noise, which is referred to as stochastic resonance. A previous theory deals with friction in state transition; however, this hypothesis is inadequate when friction force is negligible such as in nano- and molecular-scale systems. We show that, when the transition occurs without friction, the sensitivity of the bistable system to a Gaussian-noise-imposed weak signal becomes significantly high. The sensitivity is determined by the relative difference in noise distribution function. We find that the relative difference in Gaussian distribution function diverges in its tail edge, resulting in a high sensitivity in the present system.

  1. Experimental Study and steady state stability analysis of CLL-T Series Parallel Resonant Converter with Fuzzy controller using State Space Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nagarajan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Closed Loop CLL-T (capacitor inductor inductor Series Parallel Resonant Converter (SPRC has been simulated and the performance is analysised. A three element CLL-T SPRC working under load independent operation (voltage type and current type load is presented in this paper. The Steady state Stability Analysis of CLL-T SPRC has been developed using State Space technique and the regulation of output voltage is done by using Fuzzy controller. The simulation study indicates the superiority of fuzzy control over the conventional control methods. The proposed approach is expected to provide better voltage regulation for dynamic load conditions. A prototype 300 W, 100 kHz converter is designed and built to experimentally demonstrate, dynamic and steady state performance for the CLL-T SPRC are compared from the simulation studies.

  2. Towards a beyond 1 GHz solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: External lock operation in an external current mode for a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki; Ebisawa, Yusuke; Tennmei, Konosuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Nakagome, Hideki; Hosono, Masami; Takasugi, Kenji; Hase, Takashi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Achieving a higher magnetic field is important for solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). But a conventional low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet cannot exceed 1 GHz (23.5 T) due to the critical magnetic field. Thus, we started a project to replace the Nb 3 Sn innermost coil of an existing 920 MHz NMR (21.6 T) with a Bi-2223 high temperature superconducting (HTS) innermost coil. Unfortunately, the HTS magnet cannot be operated in persistent current mode; an external dc power supply is required to operate the NMR magnet, causing magnetic field fluctuations. These fluctuations can be stabilized by a field-frequency lock system based on an external NMR detection coil. We demonstrate here such a field-frequency lock system in a 500 MHz LTS NMR magnet operated in an external current mode. The system uses a 7 Li sample in a microcoil as external NMR detection system. The required field compensation is calculated from the frequency of the FID as measured with a frequency counter. The system detects the FID signal, determining the FID frequency, and calculates the required compensation coil current to stabilize the sample magnetic field. The magnetic field was stabilized at 0.05 ppm/3 h for magnetic field fluctuations of around 10 ppm. This method is especially effective for a magnet with large magnetic field fluctuations. The magnetic field of the compensation coil is relatively inhomogeneous in these cases and the inhomogeneity of the compensation coil can be taken into account.

  3. Decay of the giant quadrupoles resonance and higher excitation states in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanos, N.; Fernandez, B.; Gillibert, A.

    1991-01-01

    Light charged particles have been measured in coincidence with inelastically scattered fragments from the 40 Ca + 40 Ca reaction at 50 MeV/N. Such a measurement allows to unravel the different reaction mechanisms contributing to the inelastic spectrum: pick-up break-up reactions, knock out and inelastic excitations. The giant quadrupole resonance in 40 Ca is shown to present a 30% non statistical decay branch. A prominent structure at 34 MeV is attributed to target excitation, the decay of this structure is studied

  4. Study Of 9 Li-alpha Cluster States In 13B Using The Resonant Scattering Method

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Garcia, Juan Pablo; Fisichella, M; Alcorta, M; Borge, M J G; Davinson, T; Figuera, P; Laird, A; Lattuada, M; Shotter, A C; Soic, N; Tengblad, O; Torresi, D; Zadro, M

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the compound nucleus 13B, the excitation function of the resonant reaction 4He(9Li,α) was measured. This measurement was carried out using the thick target inverse kinematics scattering technique, with a thick 4He gas target and a 9Li beam. The 13B energy region explored was in the excitation energy range 14 - 20 MeV, where 9Li-α configurations of 13B are predicted. The measured excitation function at θc.m.=180◦ shows different clear structures in a 13B excitation energy region which was experimentally unknown.

  5. Evidence for resonance states of lead decaying into two exit channels with counterbalancing contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Cerrina, F.; Fahlman, A.; Carlson, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of the electrons emitted in the decay of the 6s 2 6p 2 +hν→6s6p 2 ( 4 P/sub 1/2/)np/sub 3/2/ resonance series of Pb shows that negative contributions occur in the 6p -1 2 P/sub 1/2/ channel and positive contributions in the 6p -1 2 P/sub 3/2/ channel due to interference with the direct photoionization process. These contributions effectively cancel. Hence the series is difficult to observe in absorption, but can easily be delineated in emission

  6. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  7. Search for hadronic resonance in multijet final states with the CDF detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for a new hadronic resonance in 3.2 fb -1 of data using the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Fermilab Tevatron accelerator collides beams of protons and antiprotons at a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. A unique approach is presented to extract multijet resonances from the large QCD background. Although the search is model independent, a pair produced supersymmetric gluino decaying through R-parity violation into three partons each is used to test our sensitivity to new physics. We measure these partons as jets, and require a minimum of six jets in an event. We make use of the kinematic features and correlations and use an ensemble of jet combinations to distinguish signal from multijet QCD backgrounds. Our background estimates also include all-hadronic t(bar t) decays that have a signature similar to signal. We observe no significant excess in an invariant mass range of 77 GeV/c 2 to 240 GeV/c 2 and place 95% C.L. limits on σ(p(bar p) → (tilde g)(tilde g) → 3jets + 3jets) as a function of gluino invariant mass.

  8. Propagation of vector solitons in a quasi-resonant medium with stark deformation of quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazonov, S. V., E-mail: sazonov.sergei@gmail.com [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Ustinov, N. V., E-mail: n_ustinov@mail.ru [Moscow State Railway University, Kaliningrad Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a vector two-component optical pulse propagating in quasi-resonance conditions in a medium of nonsymmetric quantum objects is investigated for Stark splitting of quantum energy levels by an external electric field. We consider the case when the ordinary component of the optical pulse induces {sigma} transitions, while the extraordinary component induces the {pi} transition and shifts the frequencies of the allowed transitions due to the dynamic Stark effect. It is found that under Zakharov-Benney resonance conditions, the propagation of the optical pulse is accompanied by generation of an electromagnetic pulse in the terahertz band and is described by the vector generalization of the nonlinear Yajima-Oikawa system. It is shown that this system (as well as its formal generalization with an arbitrary number of optical components) is integrable by the inverse scattering transformation method. The corresponding Darboux transformations are found for obtaining multisoliton solutions. The influence of transverse effects on the propagation of vector solitons is investigated. The conditions under which transverse dynamics leads to self-focusing (defocusing) of solitons are determined.

  9. Solid-state effects on thermal-neutron cross sections and on low-energy resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.A.; Mook, H.A.; Hill, N.W.; Shahal, O.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross sections of several single crystals (Si, Cu, sapphire), several polycrystalline samples (Cu, Fe, Be, C, Bi, Ta), and a fine-powder copper sample have been measured from 0.002 to 5 eV. The Cu powder and polycrystalline Fe, Be and C data exhibit the expected abrupt changes in cross section. The cross section of the single crystal of Si is smooth with only small broad fluctuations. The data on two single Cu crystals, the sapphire crystal, cast Bi, and rolled samples of Ta and Cu have many narrow peaks approx. 10 -3 eV wide. High resolution (0.3%) transmission measurements were made on the 1.057-eV resonance in 240 Pu and the 0.433-eV resonance in 180 Ta, both at room and low temperatures to study the effects of crystal binding. Although the changes in Doppler broadening with temperature were apparent, no asymmetries due to a recoilless contribution were observed

  10. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  11. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Search for resonant states in 10C and 11C and their impact on the primordial 7Li abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammache, F.; Coc, A.; de Séréville, N.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.; Assié, M.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Franchoo, S.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Fox, S.; Hamadache, C.; Kiener, J.; Laird, A.; Le Crom, B.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Lefebvre, L.; Matea, I.; Matta, A.; Mavilla, G.; Mrazek, J.; Morfouace, P.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Parikh, A.; Perrot, L.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Suzuki, D.; Tatischeff, V.; Ujic, P.; Vandebrouck, Marine

    2018-01-01

    The cosmological 7Li problem arises from the significant discrepancy of about a factor 3 between the predicted primordial 7Li abundance and the observed one. The main process for the production of 7Li during Big-Bang nucleosynthesis is the decay of 7Be. Many key nuclear reactions involved in the production and destruction of 7Be were investigated in attempt to explain the 7Li deficit but none of them led to successful conclusions. However, some authors suggested recently the possibility that the destruction of 7Be by 3He and 4He may reconcile the predictions and observations if missing resonant states in the compound nuclei 10C and 11C exist. Hence, a search of these missing resonant states in 10C and 11C was investigated at the Orsay Tandem-Alto facility through 10B(3He,t)10C and 11B(3He,t)11C charge-exchange reactions respectively. After a short overview of the cosmological 7Li problem from a nuclear physics point of view, a description of the Orsay experiment will be given as well as the obtained results and their impact on the 7Li problem.

  13. Native State Mass Spectrometry, Surface Plasmon Resonance, and X-ray Crystallography Correlate Strongly as a Fragment Screening Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lucy A; Dolezal, Olan; Ren, Bin; Ryan, John H; Peat, Thomas S; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-03-10

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is contingent on the development of analytical methods to identify weak protein-fragment noncovalent interactions. Herein we have combined an underutilized fragment screening method, native state mass spectrometry, together with two proven and popular fragment screening methods, surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography, in a fragment screening campaign against human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). In an initial fragment screen against a 720-member fragment library (the "CSIRO Fragment Library") seven CA II binding fragments, including a selection of nonclassical CA II binding chemotypes, were identified. A further 70 compounds that comprised the initial hit chemotypes were subsequently sourced from the full CSIRO compound collection and screened. The fragment results were extremely well correlated across the three methods. Our findings demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity to apply native state mass spectrometry as a complementary fragment screening method to accelerate drug discovery.

  14. Non-resonant Higgs-pair production in the b anti bb anti b final state at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardrope, David; Jansen, Eric; Konstantinidis, Nikos; Cooper, Ben; Falla, Rebecca; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    We present a particle-level study of the Standard Model non-resonant Higgs-pair production process in the b anti bb anti b final state, at the Large Hadron Collider at √(s) = 14 TeV. Each Higgs boson is reconstructed from a pair of close-by jets formed with the anti-k{sub t} jet clustering algorithm, with radius parameter R = 0.4. Given the kinematic properties of the produced Higgs bosons, this Higgs reconstruction approach appears to be more suitable than the use of largeradius jets that was previously proposed in the literature.We find that the sensitivity for observing this final state can be improved significantly when the full set of uncorrelated angular and kinematic variables of the 4b system is exploited, leading to a statistical significance of 1.8 per experiment with an integrated luminosity of 3 ab{sup -1}. (orig.)

  15. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  16. Assessment of the residual tumour of colorectal liver metastases after chemotherapy: diffusion-weighted MR magnetic resonance imaging in the peripheral and entire tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Doblas, Sabrina; Giraudeau, Celine [Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Clichy (France); Ronot, Maxime; Van Beers, Bernard; Vilgrain, Valerie [Paris Diderot University, INSERM, UMR 1149, Clichy (France); Radiology Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Belghiti, Jacques [Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France); Paradis, Valerie [Pathology Department, Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Clichy (France)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in detecting residual tumours (RTs) in colorectal liver metastases (CLMs) following chemotherapy, with a focus on tumour periphery. From January 2009-January 2012, 57 patients who underwent liver resection for CLMs with preoperative MRI (<3 months) including DWI were retrospectively included. CLMs were classified into three response groups on pathology: (1) major histological (MHR, RTs ≤ 10 %), (2) partial histological (PHR, RT = 10-49 %), and (3) no histological (NHR, RT ≥ 50 %). On DWI, regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around the entire tumour and tumour periphery. Apparent diffusion (ADC) and pure diffusion (D) coefficients were calculated using a monoexponential fit, and compared using Kruskal-Wallis test on a lesion-per-lesion analysis. 111 CLMs were included. Fourteen (12.5 %), 42 (38 %) and 55 (49.5 %) CLMs presented a MHR, PHR and NHR, respectively. ADC and D of the peripheral ROIs were significantly higher in the MHR group (P = 0.013/P = 0.013). ADC and D from the entire tumour were not significantly different among the groups (P = 0.220/P = 0.103). In CLM treated with chemotherapy, ADC and D values from the entire tumour are not related to the degree of RT, while peripheral zone diffusion parameters could help identify metastases with MHR. (orig.)

  17. Residues in the analyst of the patient's symbiotic connection at a somatic level: unrepresented states in the patient and analyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsil, Geraldine

    2018-02-01

    This paper discusses the residues of a somatic countertransference that revealed its meaning several years after apparently successful analytic work had ended. Psychoanalytic and Jungian analytic ideas on primitive communication, dissociation and enactment are explored in the working through of a shared respiratory symptom between patient and analyst. Growth in the analyst was necessary so that the patient's communication at a somatic level could be understood. Bleger's concept that both the patient's and analyst's body are part of the setting was central in the working through. © 2018, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  18. Simultaneous EEG/fMRI analysis of the resonance phenomena in steady-state visual evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ali; Bayraktaroglu, Zubeyir; Karahan, Esin; Erdogan, Basri; Bilgic, Basar; Ozker, Muge; Kasikci, Itir; Duru, Adil D; Ademoglu, Ahmet; Oztürk, Cengizhan; Arikan, Kemal; Tarhan, Nevzat; Demiralp, Tamer

    2011-04-01

    The stability of the steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) across trials and subjects makes them a suitable tool for the investigation of the visual system. The reproducible pattern of the frequency characteristics of SSVEPs shows a global amplitude maximum around 10 Hz and additional local maxima around 20 and 40 Hz, which have been argued to represent resonant behavior of damped neuronal oscillators. Simultaneous electroencephalogram/functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) measurement allows testing of the resonance hypothesis about the frequency-selective increases in SSVEP amplitudes in human subjects, because the total synaptic activity that is represented in the fMRI-Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (fMRI-BOLD) response would not increase but get synchronized at the resonance frequency. For this purpose, 40 healthy volunteers were visually stimulated with flickering light at systematically varying frequencies between 6 and 46 Hz, and the correlations between SSVEP amplitudes and the BOLD responses were computed. The SSVEP frequency characteristics of all subjects showed 3 frequency ranges with an amplitude maximum in each of them, which roughly correspond to alpha, beta and gamma bands of the EEG. The correlation maps between BOLD responses and SSVEP amplitude changes across the different stimulation frequencies within each frequency band showed no significant correlation in the alpha range, while significant correlations were obtained in the primary visual area for the beta and gamma bands. This non-linear relationship between the surface recorded SSVEP amplitudes and the BOLD responses of the visual cortex at stimulation frequencies around the alpha band supports the view that a resonance at the tuning frequency of the thalamo-cortical alpha oscillator in the visual system is responsible for the global amplitude maximum of the SSVEP around 10 Hz. Information gained from the SSVEP/fMRI analyses in the present study might be extrapolated to the

  19. Dynamic Functional Connectivity States Between the Dorsal and Ventral Sensorimotor Networks Revealed by Dynamic Conditional Correlation Analysis of Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Maleeha F; Lindquist, Martin A; Pillai, Jay J; Agarwal, Shruti; Gujar, Sachin K; Choe, Ann S; Caffo, Brian; Sair, Haris I

    2017-12-01

    Functional connectivity in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has received substantial attention since the initial findings of Biswal et al. Traditional network correlation metrics assume that the functional connectivity in the brain remains stationary over time. However, recent studies have shown that robust temporal fluctuations of functional connectivity among as well as within functional networks exist, challenging this assumption. In this study, these dynamic correlation differences were investigated between the dorsal and ventral sensorimotor networks by applying the dynamic conditional correlation model to rs-fMRI data of 20 healthy subjects. k-Means clustering was used to determine an optimal number of discrete connectivity states (k = 10) of the sensorimotor system across all subjects. Our analysis confirms the existence of differences in dynamic correlation between the dorsal and ventral networks, with highest connectivity found within the ventral motor network.

  20. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  1. Giant angular resonance and the structure of the lowest-lying nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.; Usmanov, P.N.; Yuldashbaeva, Eh.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is given of the Hamiltonian of the two-rotor model, which is based on the assumption that the giant angular resonance exists, i.e. that it is possible to rotate the neutron component of a deformed nucleus as a whole with respect to the proton component. The realization of the projections on the intrinsic axes of the angular momentum operators is found, the Hamiltonian matrix is determined in the basis convenient for the case of strong neutron-proton coupling. The spectrum of the two-rotor model is determined taking into account the nondiagonal matrix elements in the lowest order of the perturbation theory. The g factors and the probabilities of the M1 transitions are discussed

  2. The state of development of an intense resonance electron-ion accelerator based on Doppler effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A.M.; Ivanov, B.I.; Butenko, V.I.; Ognivenko, V.V.; Onishchenko, I.N.; Prishchepov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    An intense ion accelerator has been proposed and now is being developed in which accelerating and focusing electric fields in a slow wave structure are excited by an intense electron beam using the anomalous and the normal Doppler effects. The results of theoretical studies and computer simulations show the advantage of this acceleration method that will make it possible to obtain acceleration rates of the order of 10 - 100 MeV/m, and ion beam energies and currents of the order of 10-100 MeV, 1-10 A. The project and technical documentation of an experimental accelerating installation were worked out. Currently, the 5 MeV accelerator-injector URAL-5 is in operation; preliminary experiments on a small installation have been carried out; experimental investigations of an accelerating RF resonator model (in 1/2 scaling) are being performed; the accelerating test installation is being manufactured. (author). 1 tab. 12 fig., 6 refs

  3. The state of development of an intense resonance electron-ion accelerator based on Doppler effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, A M; Ivanov, B I; Butenko, V I; Ognivenko, V V; Onishchenko, I N; Prishchepov, V P [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    An intense ion accelerator has been proposed and now is being developed in which accelerating and focusing electric fields in a slow wave structure are excited by an intense electron beam using the anomalous and the normal Doppler effects. The results of theoretical studies and computer simulations show the advantage of this acceleration method that will make it possible to obtain acceleration rates of the order of 10 - 100 MeV/m, and ion beam energies and currents of the order of 10-100 MeV, 1-10 A. The project and technical documentation of an experimental accelerating installation were worked out. Currently, the 5 MeV accelerator-injector URAL-5 is in operation; preliminary experiments on a small installation have been carried out; experimental investigations of an accelerating RF resonator model (in 1/2 scaling) are being performed; the accelerating test installation is being manufactured. (author). 1 tab. 12 fig., 6 refs.

  4. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  5. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day

    2017-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  6. Three-body resonance generated by a separable potential which describes a 2s1/2 single-particle state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, K.

    1988-12-01

    It is shown that a separable potential previously used to describe a 2s 1/2 single-particle state gives rise not only to a bound state but also to a resonance of the core-plus-two-nucleons three-body system. (author) [pt

  7. Charge-resonance excitations in symmetric molecules - Comparison of linear response DFT with CC3 for the excited states of a model dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2009-01-01

    to a reference CC3 calculation revealing a better description of the excited states by CAM-B3LYP than that of B3LYP. The Λ parameter introduced by Peach et al. [M.J.G. Peach, P. Benfield, T. Helgaker, D.J. Tozer, J. Chem. Phys. 128 (2008) 044118] does not always reveal the problematic charge-resonance states...

  8. Making initiatives resonate: how can non-state initiatives advance national contributions under the UNFCCC?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermwille, Lukas

    2018-01-01

    The international governance landscape on climate change mitigation is increasingly complex across multiple governance levels. Climate change mitigation initiatives by non-state stakeholders can play an important role in governing global climate change. The article addresses the relationship between

  9. Bound states of 27Al studied at selected 26Mg(p,γ)27Al resonances, ch. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, J.W.; Holvast, A.J.C.D.; Baghus, A.; Endt, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the γ-ray decay and angular distributions at eight low-energy (Esub(P) 26 Mg (p,γ) 27 Al resonances lead to the spin and parity assignments Jsup(π) = 3/2 + , 1/2 - , 3/2 - , 5/2 + , 5/2, 3/2 - , 9/2 - and 7/2 for the bound states at Esub(x) = 3.96, 4.05, 5.15, 5.25, 5.44, 6.16, 6.99, 7.23 and 7.47 MeV, respectively. For other levels, spin and parity limitations are set. Also reported are precise excitation energies, branching and mixing ratios and lifetime limits. For the resonances, additional information is given on energies, strengths and widths. The reaction Q-value is Q = 8267.2 +- 0.7 keV. The level scheme of 27 Al, complemented with these new data, is compared with the results from recent shell-model calculations

  10. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  11. Adverse Effects of Excess Residual PbI2 on Photovoltaic Performance, Charge Separation, and Trap-State Properties in Mesoporous Structured Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yi; Hao, Ming-Yang; Han, Jun; Yu, Man; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Pu; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2017-03-17

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have rapidly come to prominence in the photovoltaic field. In this context, CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , as the most widely adopted active layer, has been attracting great attention. Generally, in a CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 layer, unreacted PbI 2 inevitably coexists with the perovskite crystals, especially following a two-step fabrication process. There appears to be a consensus that an appropriate amount of unreacted PbI 2 is beneficial to the overall photovoltaic performance of a device, the only disadvantageous aspect of excess residual PbI 2 being viewed as its insulating nature. However, the further development of such perovskite-based devices requires a deeper understanding of the role of residual PbI 2 . In this work, PbI 2 -enriched and PbI 2 -controlled perovskite films, as two extreme cases, have been prepared by modulating the crystallinity of a pre-deposited PbI 2 film. The effects of excess residual PbI 2 have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and optoelectronic studies. The initial charge separation, the trap-state density, and the trap-state distribution have all been found to be adversely affected in PbI 2 -enriched devices, to the detriment of photovoltaic performance. This leads to a biphasic recombination process and accelerates the charge carrier recombination dynamics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effects of four-wave mixing on four-photon resonance excitation and ionization in the presence of a three-photon intermediate state resonance enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Miller, J.C.; Hart, R.C.; Garrett, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    We consider effects which occur when four-wave sum frequency generation and multiphoton ionization are induced by lasers tuned near a three-photon resonance and simultaneously near or at a dipole allowed four-photon resonance. In studies with unfocused laser beams, if the phase mismatch of the generated four-wave-mixing field is large and the related two-photon resonance for the absorption of a four-wave-mixing photon and a laser photon results in strong absorption of the four-wave-mixing field, a coherent cancellation occurs between the pumping of the resonance by two- and four-photon processes. This interference effect occurs when the first laser is tuned on either side of the three-photon resonance and |Δk rL |much-gt 1, where Δk r is the mismatch and L is the length of the path of the laser beams in the gas. With focused laser beams large differences occur between ionization with unidirectional beams and with counterpropagating laser beams when |Δk rb |much-gt 1, where b is the confocal parameter of the focused laser beams. Strong absorption of the four-wave-mixing field is shown not to be necessary for strong destructive interference with focused laser beams when the phase mismatch is large. This work also suggests an explanation for earlier experiments where the presence of a four-photon resonance enabled the generation of third-harmonic light in a positively dispersive wavelength region. We argue that this process can occur when the laser used to achieve the four-photon resonance is focused on the small z (z is the coordinate in the direction of propagation) side of the focal point of the laser responsible for the third-harmonic generation

  13. Intrahepatic fat, abdominal adipose tissues, and metabolic state: magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Tene, Lilac; Cohen, Noa; Shelef, Ilan; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Gepner, Yftach; Zelicha, Hila; Rein, Michal; Bril, Nitzan; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Sarusy, Benjamin; Dicker, Dror; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2017-07-01

    Intrahepatic fat (IHF) is best known to associate with waist circumference (WC) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT), but its relation to abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue is controversial. While IHF ≥ 5% dichotomously defines fatty liver, %IHF is rarely considered as a continuous variable that includes the normal range. In this study, we aimed to evaluate %IHF association with abdominal fat subdepots, pancreatic, and renal-sinus fats. We evaluated %IHF, abdominal fat subdepots, %pancreatic, and renal-sinus fats, among individuals with moderate abdominal obesity, using 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Among 275 participants, %IHF widely ranged (0.01%-50.4%) and was lower in women (1.6%) than men (7.3%; P fat was positively associated with %IHF (P = .005). In an age, sex, WC, and VAT-adjusted models, elevated liver enzymes, glycemic, lipid, and inflammatory biomarkers were associated with increased %IHF (P fat is differentially associated with abdominal fat subdepots. Intrahepatic-fat as a continuous variable could be predicted by specific traditional parameters, even within the current normal range, and partially independent of VAT. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Resonant states and wavepacket super-diffusion in intra-chain correlated ladders with diluted disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moura, F A B F; Leao, F F S; Lyra, M L

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we study a tight-binding Hamiltonian model system of a binary correlated ladder with diluted disorder. We introduce intra-chain correlations between the on-site potentials by imposing that ε i, s = - ε i,-s where s = ± 1 indexes the two ladder chains. Further, we consider each ladder chain as composed of inter-penetrating ordered and random sub-chains. We show that the presence of a random on-site distribution in one of the inter-penetrating chains leads to Anderson localization except at a specific symmetric pair of energy eigenmodes. Further, by integrating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we follow the time-evolution of an initially localized one-electron wavepacket. We report that the remaining delocalized resonant modes are responsible for a super-diffusive spread of the wavepacket dispersion while the wavepacket participation function remains finite. A scaling analysis of the wavepacket distribution shows that it obeys a universal scaling form with the development of a power-law tail followed by a super-diffusively evolving cutoff. We obtain three exponents characterizing this super-diffusive dynamics and show that they satisfy a simple scaling relation.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Umar; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiomyopathy with a prevalence of 1:500 (0.2%) in the general population. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most feared presentation of HCM. Therefore, it is essential to identify individuals at high risk in order to prevent SCD. The absence of conventional risk factors does not nullify the risk of HCM related SCD. Although echocardiography is currently the most widely used imaging modality, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) allows detailed characterization of the HCM phenotype, which makes it possible to differentiate HCM from other causes of left ventricular hypertrophy. CMR has the potential to further refine risk stratification. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on CMR is a high-risk feature and there is emerging data to suggest that the presence of LGE should be employed as a marker for major adverse outcomes such as SCD, arrhythmias, systolic and diastolic heart failure. Hence, LGE on CMR may be considered an additional risk factor for SCD in HCM patients and should be incorporated in decision-making for implant-able cardioverter defibrillator implantation to aid primary prevention. Novel markers such as the extent of myocardial fibrosis on CMR must be accounted for comprehensive risk stratifica-tion of HCM patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current status and emerging role of CMR in HCM.

  16. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in children: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Reis Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Whole-body imaging in children was classically performed with radiography, positron-emission tomography, either combined or not with computed tomography, the latter with the disadvantage of exposure to ionizing radiation. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, in association with the recently developed metabolic and functional techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, has brought the advantage of a comprehensive evaluation of pediatric patients without the risks inherent to ionizing radiation usually present in other conventional imaging methods. It is a rapid and sensitive method, particularly in pediatrics, for detecting and monitoring multifocal lesions in the body as a whole. In pediatrics, it is utilized for both oncologic and non-oncologic indications such as screening and diagnosis of tumors in patients with genetic syndromes, evaluation of disease extent and staging, evaluation of therapeutic response and post-therapy follow-up, evaluation of non neoplastic diseases such as multifocal osteomyelitis, vascular malformations and syndromes affecting multiple regions of the body. The present review was aimed at describing the major indications of whole-body MRI in pediatrics added of technical considerations.

  17. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state

  18. Cellulase with high β-glucosidase activity by Penicillium oxalicum under solid state fermentation and its use in hydrolysis of cassava residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin-Hui; Zhao, Shuai; Jiang, Sui-Xin; Liao, Xu-Zhong; Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated cellulase production by Penicillium oxalicum EU2106 under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and its hydrolysis efficiency toward NaOH-H 2 O 2 -pretreated cassava residue (NHCR) produced after bioethanol fermentation. Optimization of SSF cultivation conditions for P. oxalicum EU2106 using a Box-behnken design-based response-surface methodology resulted in maximal cellulase activity of 34.0 ± 2.8 filter-paper units/g dry substrate, exhibiting a ~ twofold increase relative to activities obtained under non-optimized conditions. Furthermore, SSF-derived cellulase converted 94.3 ± 1.5% of NHCR cellulose into glucose within 96 h. Interestingly, P. oxalicum EU2106 produced higher β-glucosidase activity under SSF conditions than that under submerged-state fermentation conditions, resulting in the elimination of cellobiose inhibition during the early stages of NHCR cellulose hydrolysis. Overall, this work provided an alternative for a potential cellulase source and a preferred option for cassava residue biotechnological application.

  19. Establishing the resting state default mode network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging tasks as an endophenotype: A twins study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Ram, Kaushik; Williams, Leanne M; Gatt, Justine M; Grieve, Stuart M

    2014-08-01

    The resting state default mode network (DMN) has been shown to characterize a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Evidence suggests an underlying genetic basis for this network and hence could serve as potential endophenotype for these disorders. Heritability is a defining criterion for endophenotypes. The DMN is measured either using a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan or by extracting resting state activity from task-based fMRI. The current study is the first to evaluate heritability of this task-derived resting activity. 250 healthy adult twins (79 monozygotic and 46 dizygotic same sex twin pairs) completed five cognitive and emotion processing fMRI tasks. Resting state DMN functional connectivity was derived from these five fMRI tasks. We validated this approach by comparing connectivity estimates from task-derived resting activity for all five fMRI tasks, with those obtained using a dedicated task-free resting state scan in an independent cohort of 27 healthy individuals. Structural equation modeling using the classic twin design was used to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to variance for the resting-state DMN functional connectivity. About 9-41% of the variance in functional connectivity between the DMN nodes was attributed to genetic contribution with the greatest heritability found for functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and right inferior parietal nodes (P<0.001). Our data provide new evidence that functional connectivity measures from the intrinsic DMN derived from task-based fMRI datasets are under genetic control and have the potential to serve as endophenotypes for genetically predisposed psychiatric and neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was use...

  1. Quantum dynamics of Ne-Br2 vibrational predissociation: the role of continuum resonances as doorway states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vela, A; Janda, K C

    2006-01-21

    Wave-packet simulations of the Ne-Br2(B,upsilon') vibrational predissociation dynamics in the range upsilon' = 16-29 are reported. The aim is to interpret recent time-dependent pump-probe experiments [Cabrera et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 054311 (2005)]. Good agreement is found between the calculated and the experimental lifetimes corresponding to decay of the Ne-Br2(B,upsilon') initial state and to appearance of Br2(B,upsilonBr2(B,upsilonBr2(B,upsilonBr2 distances greater than 15 angstroms. In the light of the results, a structure of the spectrum of continuum resonances is suggested and discussed.

  2. Study of the reinforcement of rubber styrene-butadiene with mesoporous silices by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, Ligia; Lopez, Betty; Pena, Bibiana; Rios, Juan Esteban; Castano, Nelson

    2001-01-01

    The knowledge about the interaction rubber/filler for the rubber reinforced with carbon black of silica is important to understand the physical properties, which determine the reinforcement. This paper presents a comparative study of the interactions between styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and silica for a silica Ultrasil type and mesoporous silica MCM-41 type prepared by different procedures, based on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: 1H MAS NMR; 13C MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS, 29Si MAS and 29Si CP/MAS NMR. Mesoporous silica synthesized under certain specific conditions showed better interaction with the rubber than the ultrasil VN3 silica, commonly used as a reinforcement load. Mechanical tests for the SBR vulcanised with this silica indicate an important increase for values of elongation and tearing resistance, but an increase in the vulcanization time in it is compared with the SBR vulcanise with Ultrasil

  3. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  4. An All-Solid-State High Repetiton Rate Titanium:Sapphire Laser System For Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Schwellnus, F.; Gottwald, T.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.

    2009-03-01

    On-line production facilities for radioactive isotopes nowadays heavily rely on resonance ionization laser ion sources due to their demonstrated unsurpassed efficiency and elemental selectivity. Powerful high repetition rate tunable pulsed dye or Ti:sapphire lasers can be used for this purpose. To counteract limitations of short pulse pump lasers, as needed for dye laser pumping, i.e. copper vapor lasers, which include high maintenance and nevertheless often only imperfect reliability, an all-solid-state Nd:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system has been constructed. This could complement or even replace dye laser systems, eliminating their disadvantages but on the other hand introduce shortcomings on the side of the available wavelength range. Pros and cons of these developments will be discussed.

  5. On experimental determination of characteristics of nuclear fusion reactions from mu-molecular resonance states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Pen'kov, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Charge-nonsymmetrical deuterium-helium muon complexes (dμHe) are studied. A method is proposed for experimentally determining the rates of nuclear fusion reactions in dμHe molecules in the J=1 and J=0 states (J is the orbital moment of the system) and the partial rates for radiative decay of these complexes in these states. Experiments are supposed to be carried out at meson factories with gaseous and cryogenic targets filled with a mixture of deuterium and helium

  6. Two-quasineutron states in 98248Cf and 98250Cf and the neutron-neutron residual interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katori, K.; Ahmad, I.; Friedman, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-quasineutron states in 248 Cf and 250 Cf were investigated by single-neutron transfer reactions, 249 Cf(d,t) 248 Cf and 249 Cf(d,p) 250 Cf. The majority of levels observed were assigned to 12 bands in 248 Cf and six bands in 250 Cf, constructed from the single-particle states in neighboring Cf nuclei. The effective two-body interactions between two odd neutrons coupled outside a deformed core were deduced from the differences in the energies of the bandheads formed by the parallel and antiparallel coupling of the intrinsic spins of the two single-particle states

  7. Virtual states, halos and resonances in three-body atomic and nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico, T.; Yamashita, M.T.; Tomio, L.

    2009-01-01

    By considering nuclear and ultracold trapped atomic systems, we review the trajectory of Efimov excited states in the complex plane by changing the two-body scattering lengths and one three-body scale. This article is based on the presentation by T. Frederico at the Fifth Workshop on Critical Stability, Erice, Sicily. (author)

  8. First study of the interference between initial and final state radiation at the Z resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Rybin, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    The interference between initial and final state radiation in the process \\eemm\\ at $\\sqs \\approx \\MZ$ has been studied by measuring the forward-backward asymmetry as a function of the acoplanarity angle between the final state muons. The interference is expected to be sensitive to the space-time separation of the initial and final state radiation. The measured asymmetry distribution has been compared to theoretical predictions using the \\KORALZ\\ generator, with and without ørdalph\\ interference. The magnitude of the interference between initial and $ \\pm 0.06 $ (syst.) \\GeV} . \\end{center} has been extracted. The interpretation of this result is discussed. There is an additional uncertainty in the estimate of \\GZ\\ from as yet uncalculated higher order interference terms. By assuming a value of \\GZ\\ consistent with the world average, the data were used to estimate the size of these uncalculated corrections. The interference between initial and final state radiation in the process \\eemm\\ at \\sqs \\approx \\MZ h...

  9. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging for surgical planning in pediatric patients: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Jarod L; Griffin, Natalie; Hacker, Carl D; Vellimana, Ananth K; Akbari, S Hassan; Shimony, Joshua S; Smyth, Matthew D; Leuthardt, Eric C; Limbrick, David D

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral mapping for surgical planning and operative guidance is a challenging task in neurosurgery. Pediatric patients are often poor candidates for many modern mapping techniques because of inability to cooperate due to their immature age, cognitive deficits, or other factors. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is uniquely suited to benefit pediatric patients because it is inherently noninvasive and does not require task performance or significant cooperation. Recent advances in the field have made mapping cerebral networks possible on an individual basis for use in clinical decision making. The authors present their initial experience translating rs-fMRI into clinical practice for surgical planning in pediatric patients. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed cases in which the rs-fMRI analysis technique was used prior to craniotomy in pediatric patients undergoing surgery in their institution. Resting-state analysis was performed using a previously trained machine-learning algorithm for identification of resting-state networks on an individual basis. Network maps were uploaded to the clinical imaging and surgical navigation systems. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics, including need for sedation during imaging and use of task-based fMRI, were also recorded. RESULTS Twenty patients underwent rs-fMRI prior to craniotomy between December 2013 and June 2016. Their ages ranged from 1.9 to 18.4 years, and 12 were male. Five of the 20 patients also underwent task-based fMRI and one underwent awake craniotomy. Six patients required sedation to tolerate MRI acquisition, including resting-state sequences. Exemplar cases are presented including anatomical and resting-state functional imaging. CONCLUSIONS Resting-state fMRI is a rapidly advancing field of study allowing for whole brain analysis by a noninvasive modality. It is applicable to a wide range of patients and effective even under general anesthesia. The nature of resting-state

  10. Quasi-bound alpha resonant states populated by the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li, d) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (LNS/INFN), Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Sud; Ukita, G.M. [Universidade de Santo Amaro (UNISA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Psicologia

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The alpha cluster phenomenon in the light nuclei structure has been the subject of a long time investigation since the proposal of the Ikeda diagrams [1]. The main purpose of the research program in progress is the investigation of this phenomenon in (x{alpha}) and (x{alpha}+n) nuclei through the ({sup 6}Li, d) alpha transfer reaction [2-4]. Alpha resonant states around the (4{alpha}) threshold in the nucleus {sup 16}O are the focus of the present contribution. In fact, the importance of these resonances at the elements production in stars is recognized, as primarily pointed out by Hoyle in {sup 12}C [6]. The existence of a rotational band with the {alpha} +{sup 12} C (Hoyle) cluster state structure was recently demonstrated by Ohkubo and Hirabayashi [6]. In order to explore this region of interest, measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li, d){sup 16}O reaction up to 17 MeV of excitation at an incident energy of 25.5 MeV, have been performed employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge Split-Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique (plates Fuji G6B, 50 {mu}m thick). Spectra associated with six scattering angles, from 5 deg to 29 deg in the laboratory frame, each one 50 cm along the focal surface, were measured. Several narrow resonances with a quasi-bound behavior embedded in the continuum were detected and the resolution of 25 keV allowed for the separation of doublets not resolved before [7,8]. The absolute cross sections and the respective deuteron angular distributions were determined and the analysis is in progress. [1] K. Ikeda et al., Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. E 68, 464 (1968); H. Horiuchi, K. Ikeda, and Y. Suzuki, ibid. 44, 225 (1978). [2] M.R.D.Rodrigues et al., in12th International Conference on Nuclear Reaction Mechanism, Varenna, Italy, edited by F. Cerutti and A. Ferrari , CERN Proceedings, 2010-2, pp. 331- 335. [3] T. Borello-Lewin et al., Proceedings of SOTANCP2, Brussels, Belgium 2010, edited by P. Descouvemount et al., Int. J

  11. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  12. Study of astrophysically important resonant states in 30 S using the 32S(p,t30 S reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A small fraction (< 1% of presolar SiC grains is suggested to have been formed in the ejecta of classical novae. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction plays an important role in understanding the Si isotopic abundances in such grains, which in turn provide us with information on the nature of the probable white dwarf progenitor’s core, as well as the peak temperatures achieved during nova outbursts, and thus the nova nucleosynthetic path. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction rate at nova temperatures is determined by two low-lying 3+ and 2+ resonances above the proton threshold at 4399 keV in 30S. Despite several experimental studies in the past, however, only one of these two states has only been observed very recently. We have studied the 30S nuclear structure via the 32S(p,t 30S reaction at 5 laboratory angles between 9° to 62°. We have observed 14 states, eleven of which are above the proton threshold, including two levels at 4692.7 ± 4.5 keV and 4813.8 ± 3.4 keV that are candidates for the 3+ and the previously “issing” 2+ state, respectively.

  13. Identifying the default mode network structure using dynamic causal modeling on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xin; Biswal, Bharat B

    2014-02-01

    The default mode network is part of the brain structure that shows higher neural activity and energy consumption when one is at rest. The key regions in the default mode network are highly interconnected as conveyed by both the white matter fiber tracing and the synchrony of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. However, the causal information flow within the default mode network is still poorly understood. The current study used the dynamic causal modeling on a resting-state fMRI data set to identify the network structure underlying the default mode network. The endogenous brain fluctuations were explicitly modeled by Fourier series at the low frequency band of 0.01-0.08Hz, and those Fourier series were set as driving inputs of the DCM models. Model comparison procedures favored a model wherein the MPFC sends information to the PCC and the bilateral inferior parietal lobule sends information to both the PCC and MPFC. Further analyses provide evidence that the endogenous connectivity might be higher in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. These data provided insight into the functions of each node in the DMN, and also validate the usage of DCM on resting-state fMRI data. © 2013.

  14. Search for heavy resonances decaying into the fully hadronic di-tau final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Marcus Matthias

    The discovery of a heavy neutral particle would be a direct hint for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis searches for new heavy neutral particles decaying into two tau leptons, which further decay into hadrons, are presented. They cover neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) as well as $Z'$ bosons, predicted by various theories with an extended gauge sector. Both analyses are based on the full 2012 proton-proton collision dataset taken by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The extended Higgs sector in the MSSM suggests additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons which decay into tau leptons in about 10\\% of the time. Given that the dominant final state, $\\phi\\to b\\bar{b}$, suffers from tremendous QCD initiated backgrounds, the decay into two tau leptons is the most promising final state to discover such new resonances. The fully hadronic final state is the dominant one with a branching fraction of about 42\\%. I...

  15. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Cimmino, A; Cornelis, T; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Poyraz, D; Salva, S; Schöfbeck, R; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; De Visscher, S; Delaere, C; Delcourt, M; Forthomme, L; Francois, B; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Magitteri, A; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Wertz, S; Beliy, N; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; Da Silveira, G G; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; 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Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Kurt, P; O'Brien, C; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Bowen, J; Bruner, C; Castle, J; Kenny, R P; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; 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Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N

    2016-07-15

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8  fb^{-1}. The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance Z_{B}^{'} to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV.

  16. Influence of the state of phase of lipid bilayer on the exposure of glucose residues on the surface of liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalva, Denise Gradella; Giansanti, Luisa; Mauceri, Alessandro; Ceccacci, Francesca; Mancini, Giovanna

    2017-11-01

    The presence of carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e. lectins) on the surface of various bacterial strains and their overexpression in some tumor tissues makes the use of glycosylated liposomes a promising approach for the specific drug delivery in antibacterial and anti-cancer therapies. However, the functionalization of liposome surface with sugar moieties by glycosylated amphiphiles does not ensure the binding of sugar-coated vesicles with lectins. In fact, the composition and properties of lipid bilayer play a pivotal role in the exposure of sugar residues and in the interaction with lectins. The influence of the length of the hydrophilic spacer that links the sugar to liposome surface and of the presence of saturated or unsaturated phospholipids in the lipid bilayer on the ability of glucosylated liposomes to interact with a model lectin, Concanavalin A, was investigated. Our results demonstrate that both the chain length and the prensece of unsaturation, parameters that strongly affect the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, affect agglutination. In particular, agglutination is favored when liposomes are in the gel phase within a defined range of temperature. Moreover, the obtained results confirm that the length of the PEG spacer, that influences both lipid organization and the exposure of sugar moieties to the bulk, plays a crucial role in liposome/lectin interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Peculiarities of resonant tunneling of electrons through the triply degenerate state of a quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermakov, V.M.

    1997-01-01

    In the case of low transparency of barriers, tunneling of electrons through a double barrier system with account their Coulomb interaction in the inter barrier space (quantum well) is considered. The quantum state of the well is supposed to be triply degenerated. It was shown that the dependence of quantum well accupation on the applied bias has a step like character at low temperatures, and there is a threshold value in the region of small applied bias. These properties can be explained by splitting of states in the well due to the electron interaction. The considered system also has bistability properties. This is due to the possibility for electrons to occupy upper levels in the well while lower levels remain empty. Charge fluctuations in the well are also discussed

  18. On final-state interaction in d - NN reaction in the (1236) - resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Nagorskaya, I.A.

    1975-01-01

    The spectator model is corrected due to scattering of particles in the final state. It is shown that the discrepancies between the data for γd→u 0 π + uu and γd→u 0 pn and the predictions from the spectator model are mainly due to the nucleon-nucleon scattering in the final state. By means of a generally used evaluation procedure for the experimental data it is shown that the reaction cross sections of γu→π 0 u and γu→ - p, which are obtained from the experiments with deuterons, are not very sensitive to these corrections will have no influence on conclusions concerning the exotic properties of the electromagnetic current

  19. Projected study of neutronic decay of giant resonances and continuum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Fortier, S.; Frascaria, N.; Gales, S.; Guillot, J.; Langevin, H.; Laurent, H.; Maison, J.M.; Nguyen Van Giai

    1988-01-01

    A project to study the decay of very excited states in nuclei is presented. A multidetector to measure these modes for excited structures situated beyond the neutron emission threshold is proposed. Coincidence experiments would allow a study of the wave functions of these elementary excitations and of the damping mechanisms in the nuclear domain. The definition of the characteristics of the system; tests to be carried out before selecting a detector; and nonscientific and nontechnical aspects of the project are also presented [fr

  20. A solid state nuclear magnetic resonance study of industrial inorganic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajda, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to look at a number of colourful ceramic pigment systems, most of which are sold commercially in large quantities. Doped zircon (ZrSiO 4 ) pigments were examined using 19 F, 23 Na, 29 Si, 51 V and 91 Zr NMR. In these systems, paramagnetic species are incorporated into the sample in small quantities creating the colourful pigment. The impurity dopants in the systems studied either dope directly into lattice sites in the zircon, or form an extra chemical phase. NMR was able to distinguish between these two doping mechanisms in a number of doped zircon pigments. Most spectra showed effects which were due to the magnetic influence of paramagnetic colouring species, and the strength of the interaction depended on the magnetic moment of the ion containing the unpaired electron. In the case of vanadium doped zircon, the moment was small enough that it allowed extra contact shifted peaks to be resolved in the spectra which indicated that the V 4+ colouring ion probably substitutes into both the tetrahedral SiO 4 site, and at the dodecahedral ZrO 8 site. This is of current interest, and many other spectroscopic and computational experiments have also been performed to elucidate which of the two sites V 4+ is located at. A 17 O-enriched zircon sample was also synthesised through a sol-gel route, and the local environment at the oxygen sites was followed through zircon formation from the TEOS and Zr-isopropoxide precursors. A multinuclear approach looking at the 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si isotopes within silver containing glasses was able to provide information about the coordination of the isotopes within the glasses. 109 Ag NMR was evaluated as an experimental technique for examining silver containing compounds. 119 Sn NMR was used to quantify the amount of Sn(ll) and Sn(IV) in orange coloured SnO-ZnO-TiO 2 (TZT) produced pigments, and the colour of the sample was found to correlate with the width of the Sn(IV) peak. The level of

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Fasted State Colonic Liquid Pockets in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L; Mudie, Deanna M; Wright, Jeff; Heissam, Khaled; Abrehart, Nichola; Pritchard, Susan E; Al Atwah, Salem; Gowland, Penny A; Garnett, Martin C; Amidon, Gregory E; Spiller, Robin C; Amidon, Gordon L; Marciani, Luca

    2017-08-07

    The rate and extent of drug dissolution and absorption from solid oral dosage forms is highly dependent on the volume of liquid in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). However, little is known about the time course of GIT liquid volumes after drinking a glass of water (8 oz), particularly in the colon, which is a targeted site for both locally and systemically acting drug products. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies offered novel insights on GIT liquid distribution in fasted humans in the stomach and small intestine, and showed that freely mobile liquid in the intestine collects in fairly distinct regions or "pockets". Based on this previous pilot data, we hypothesized that (1) it is possible to quantify the time course of the volume and number of liquid pockets in the undisturbed colon of fasted healthy humans following ingestion of 240 mL, using noninvasive MRI methods; (2) the amount of freely mobile water in the fasted human colon is of the order of only a few milliliters. Twelve healthy volunteers fasted overnight and underwent fasted abdominal MRI scans before drinking 240 mL (∼8 fluid ounces) of water. After ingesting the water they were scanned at frequent intervals for 2 h. The images were processed to quantify freely mobile water in the total and regional colon: ascending, transverse, and descending. The fasted colon contained (mean ± SEM) 11 ± 5 pockets of resting liquid with a total volume of 2 ± 1 mL (average). The colonic fluid peaked at 7 ± 4 mL 30 min after the water drink. This peak fluid was distributed in 17 ± 7 separate liquid pockets in the colon. The regional analysis showed that pockets of free fluid were found primarily in the ascending colon. The interindividual variability was very high; the subjects showed a range of number of colonic fluid pockets from 0 to 89 and total colonic freely mobile fluid volume from 0 to 49 mL. This is the first study measuring the time course of the number, regional location, and volume of

  2. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Residual stress state in an induction hardened steel bar determined by synchrotron- and neutron diffraction compared to results from lab-XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, Jonas; Steuwer, Axel; Stormvinter, Albin; Kristoffersen, Hans; Haakanen, Merja; Berglund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Induction hardening is a relatively rapid heat treatment method to increase mechanical properties of steel components. However, results from FE-simulation of the induction hardening process show that a tensile stress peak will build up in the transition zone in order to balance the high compressive stresses close to the surface. This tensile stress peak is located in the transition zone between the hardened zone and the core material. The main objective with this investigation has been to non-destructively validate the residual stress state throughout an induction hardened component. Thereby, allowing to experimentally confirming the existence and magnitude of the tensile stress peak arising from rapid heat treatment. For this purpose a cylindrical steel bar of grade C45 was induction hardened and characterised regarding the microstructure, hardness, hardening depth and residual stresses. This investigation shows that a combined measurement with synchrotron/neutron diffraction is well suited to non-destructively measure the strains through the steel bar of a diameter of 20 mm and thereby making it possible to calculate the residual stress profile. The result verified the high compressive stresses at the surface which rapidly changes to tensile stresses in the transition zone resulting in a large tensile stress peak. Measured stresses by conventional lab-XRD showed however that at depths below 1.5 mm the stresses were lower compared to the synchrotron and neutron data. This is believed to be an effect of stress relaxation from the layer removal. The FE-simulation predicts the depth of the tensile stress peak well but exaggerates the magnitude compared to the measured results by synchrotron/neutron measurements. This is an important knowledge when designing the component and the heat treatment process since this tensile stress peak will have great impact on the mechanical properties of the final component.

  4. Residual stress state in an induction hardened steel bar determined by synchrotron- and neutron diffraction compared to results from lab-XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.holmberg@swerea.se [Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal (Sweden); University West, 461 86 Trollhättan (Sweden); Steuwer, Axel [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Stormvinter, Albin; Kristoffersen, Hans [Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal (Sweden); Haakanen, Merja [Stresstech OY, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40 800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Berglund, Johan [Swerea IVF AB, Argongatan 30, 431 22 Mölndal (Sweden)

    2016-06-14

    Induction hardening is a relatively rapid heat treatment method to increase mechanical properties of steel components. However, results from FE-simulation of the induction hardening process show that a tensile stress peak will build up in the transition zone in order to balance the high compressive stresses close to the surface. This tensile stress peak is located in the transition zone between the hardened zone and the core material. The main objective with this investigation has been to non-destructively validate the residual stress state throughout an induction hardened component. Thereby, allowing to experimentally confirming the existence and magnitude of the tensile stress peak arising from rapid heat treatment. For this purpose a cylindrical steel bar of grade C45 was induction hardened and characterised regarding the microstructure, hardness, hardening depth and residual stresses. This investigation shows that a combined measurement with synchrotron/neutron diffraction is well suited to non-destructively measure the strains through the steel bar of a diameter of 20 mm and thereby making it possible to calculate the residual stress profile. The result verified the high compressive stresses at the surface which rapidly changes to tensile stresses in the transition zone resulting in a large tensile stress peak. Measured stresses by conventional lab-XRD showed however that at depths below 1.5 mm the stresses were lower compared to the synchrotron and neutron data. This is believed to be an effect of stress relaxation from the layer removal. The FE-simulation predicts the depth of the tensile stress peak well but exaggerates the magnitude compared to the measured results by synchrotron/neutron measurements. This is an important knowledge when designing the component and the heat treatment process since this tensile stress peak will have great impact on the mechanical properties of the final component.

  5. Impurity-induced tuning of quantum-well States in spin-dependent resonant tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, Alan; Coho, A; Kioussis, Nicholas; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Chshiev, M; Granovsky, A

    2004-07-23

    We report exact model calculations of the spin-dependent tunneling in double magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of impurities in the well. We show that the impurity can tune selectively the spin channels giving rise to a wide variety of interesting and novel transport phenomena. The tunneling magnetoresistance, the spin polarization, and the local current can be dramatically enhanced or suppressed by impurities. The underlying mechanism is the impurity-induced shift of the quantum well states (QWSs), which depends on the impurity potential, impurity position, and the symmetry of the QWS. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  6. Stating of cervical carcinoma using magnetic resonance imaging; Estadificacion del carcinoma de cervix por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleaga, L.; Vela, M. C.; Grande, J.; Cura del, J. L.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The infiltration of the parametrium represents one of the most important factors that determine the prediction and treatment of cervical carcinoma. Our objetive is to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the staging of cervical carcinomas, to establish the reliability of this technique and to carry out a comparative study of the sequences used to demonstrate the parametrial invasion. We have carried out a retrospective study on 44 patients diagnosed with cervix neoplasia, using clinical exploration and performing a biopsy. the MRI studies have been carried out using a 1 Tesla magnet and the sequences used have been SE T1, Se proton density (PD) and T2 and dynamic GRE after administering gadolinium intravenously in the axial and sagital projections. The stages determined by MRI have been compared to the anatomopathological stages of the surgical specimens in cases where surgery was carried out and with the clinical stage in cases where no radical surgery was carried out. A diagnosis value of MRI has been determined to demonstrate the parametrial invasion, comparing the SE T2 sequence with the dynamic GE sequence with gadolinium. We calculate the volume of the tumour in the MRI studies to evaluate the difference of the volume between patients with tumoral stages that are clinically surgical and not surgical. MRI determines the invasion of the parametrium with a sensitivity of 88.8%, a specificity of 80% a positive value of 76.1%, a negative predictive value of 90.9% and a reliability of 83.7%. For the SE T2 sequences the sensitivity was 86.6%, the specifity 80%, the posistive predictive value 81.25%, the negative predictive value 85.7% and the reliability 83.3%. For the dynamic GE sequence with intravenous gadolinium the sensitivity was 86.6%, the specifity 86.6%, the posistive predictive value 86.6%, the negative predictive value 86.6% and the reliability 86.6%. The use of the dynamic GE sequence after the intravenous administration of

  7. REST: a toolkit for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Song

    Full Text Available Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI has been drawing more and more attention in recent years. However, a publicly available, systematically integrated and easy-to-use tool for RS-fMRI data processing is still lacking. We developed a toolkit for the analysis of RS-fMRI data, namely the RESting-state fMRI data analysis Toolkit (REST. REST was developed in MATLAB with graphical user interface (GUI. After data preprocessing with SPM or AFNI, a few analytic methods can be performed in REST, including functional connectivity analysis based on linear correlation, regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF, and fractional ALFF. A few additional functions were implemented in REST, including a DICOM sorter, linear trend removal, bandpass filtering, time course extraction, regression of covariates, image calculator, statistical analysis, and slice viewer (for result visualization, multiple comparison correction, etc.. REST is an open-source package and is freely available at http://www.restfmri.net.

  8. Solid-state 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of three aluminum-centered dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Mroué, Kamal H.

    2010-02-01

    We report the first solid-state 27Al NMR study of three aluminum phthalocyanine dyes: aluminum phthalocyanine chloride, AlPcCl (1); aluminum-1,8,15,22-tetrakis(phenylthio)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine chloride, AlPc(SPh)4Cl (2); and aluminum-2,3-naphthalocyanine chloride, AlNcCl (3). Each of these compounds contains Al3+ ions coordinating to four nitrogen atoms and a chlorine atom. Solid-state 27Al NMR spectra, including multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) spectra and quadrupolar Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra of stationary powdered samples have been acquired at multiple high magnetic field strengths (11.7, 14.1, and 21.1 T) to determine their composition and number of aluminum sites, which were analyzed to extract detailed information on the aluminum electric field gradient (EFG) and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. The quadrupolar parameters for each 27Al site were determined from spectral simulations, with quadrupolar coupling constants (CQ) ranging from 5.40 to 10.0 MHz and asymmetry parameters (η) ranging from 0.10 to 0.50, and compared well with the results of quantum chemical calculations of these tensors. We also report the largest 27Al chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA), with a span of 120 ± 10 ppm, observed directly in a solid material. The combination of MQMAS and computational predictions are used to interpret the presence of multiple aluminum sites in two of the three samples.

  9. Tamarind seed powder and palm kernel cake: two novel agro residues for the production of tannase under solid state fermentation by Aspergillus niger ATCC 16620.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, A; Pandey, A; Daud, M Jaafar; Szakacs, G

    2005-07-01

    Palm kernel cake (PKC), the residue obtained after extraction of palm oil from oil palm seeds and tamarind seed powder (TSP) obtained after removing the fruit pulp from tamarind fruit pod were tested for the production of tannase under solid-state fermentation (SSF) using Aspergillus niger ATCC 16620. The fungal strain was grown on the substrates without any pretreatment. In PKC medium, a maximum enzyme yield of 13.03 IU/g dry substrate (gds) was obtained when SSF was carried out at 30 degrees C, 53.5% initial substrate moisture, 33 x 10(9) spores/5 g substrate inoculum size and 5% tannic acid as additional carbon source after 96 h of fermentation. In TSP medium, maximum tannase yield of 6.44 IU/gds was obtained at 30 degrees C, 65.75% initial substrate moisture, 11 x 10(9) spores/5 g substrate inoculum, 1% glycerol as additional carbon source and 1% potassium nitrate as additional nitrogen source after 120 h of fermentation. Results from the study are promising for the economic utilization and value addition of these important agro residues, which are abundantly available in many tropical and subtropical countries.

  10. Three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state magnetic resonance imaging in syringomyelia: advantages over conventional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Florian; Ebner, Florian H; Danz, Søren; Riether, Felix; Ritz, Rainer; Dietz, Klaus; Naegele, Thomas; Tatagiba, Marcos S

    2008-05-01

    Neuroradiology has become indispensable in detecting the pathophysiology in syringomyelia. Constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide superior contrast at the sub-arachnoid tissue borders. As this region is critical in preoperative evaluation, the authors hypothesized that CISS imaging would provide superior assessment of syrinx pathology and surgical planning. Based on records collected from a database of 130 patients with syringomyelia treated at the authors' institution, 59 patients were prospectively evaluated with complete neuroradiological examinations. In addition to routine acquisitions with FLAIR, T1- and T2-weighted, and contrast-enhanced MR imaging series, the authors obtained sagittal cardiac-gated sequences to visualize cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations and axial 3D CISS MR sequences to detect focal arachnoid webs. Statistical qualitative and quantitative evaluations of spinal cord/CSF contrast, spinal cord/CSF delineation, motion artifacts, and artifacts induced by pulsatile CSF flow were performed. The 3D CISS MR sequences demonstrated a contrast-to-noise ratio significantly better than any other routine imaging sequence (p CSF flow voids. Constructive interference in steady-state MR imaging enables the neurosurgeon to accurately identify cases requiring decompression for obstructed CSF. Motion artifacts can be eliminated with technical variations.

  11. Regional homogeneity within the default mode network in bipolar depression: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hong Liu

    Full Text Available AIM: We sought to use a regional homogeneity (ReHo approach as an index in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the features of spontaneous brain activity within the default mode network (DMN in patients suffering from bipolar depression (BD. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with BD and 26 gender-, age-, and education-matched healthy subjects participated in the resting-state fMRI scans. We compared the differences in ReHo between the two groups within the DMN and investigated the relationships between sex, age, years of education, disease duration, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD total score, and ReHo in regions with significant group differences. RESULTS: Our results revealed that bipolar depressed patients had increased ReHo in the left medial frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobe compared to healthy controls. No correlations were found between regional ReHo values and sex, age, and clinical features within the BD group. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that abnormal brain activity is mainly distributed within prefrontal-limbic circuits, which are believed to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bipolar depression.

  12. [Functional connectivity of temporal parietal junction in online game addicts:a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ji; Qian, Ruobing; Lin, Bin; Fu, Xianming; Wei, Xiangpin; Weng, Chuanbo; Niu, Chaoshi; Wang, Yehan

    2014-02-11

    To explore the functions of temporal parietal junction (TPJ) as parts of attention networks in the pathogenesis of online game addiction using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A total of 17 online game addicts (OGA) were recruited as OGA group and 17 healthy controls during the same period were recruited as CON group. The neuropsychological tests were performed for all of them to compare the inter-group differences in the results of Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and attention functions. All fMRI data were preprocessed after resting-state fMRI scanning. Then left and right TPJ were selected as regions of interest (ROIs) to calculate the linear correlation between TPJ and entire brain to compare the inter-group differences. Obvious differences existed between OGA group (71 ± 5 scores) and CON group (19 ± 7 scores) in the IAT results and attention function (P online game addicts showed decreased functional connectivity with bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), bilateral hippocampal gyrus and bilateral amygdaloid nucleus, but increased functional connectivity with right cuneus.However, left TPJ demonstrated decreased functional connectivity with bilateral superior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, but increased functional connectivity with bilateral cuneus (P online game addicts.It suggests that TPJ is an important component of attention networks participating in the generation of online game addiction.

  13. Theory of strongly saturated double-resonance line shapes in arbitrary angular momentum states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galbraith, H.W.; Dubs, M.; Steinfeld, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    We calculate the steady-state probe absorption line-shape function for a strongly driven, Zeeman-degenerate molecular system. The probe laser is treated to lowest order while the pump laser is dealt with to all orders. We obtain the probe line shape for the cases of parallel and perpendicular linear polarization of the two lasers. As expected, the effects of M degeneracy, as well as differences due to the relative laser polarizations, are most pronounced when Doppler broadening is not important. However, even in the presence of large Doppler broadening we find a narrowing of the population hole by including the Zeeman degeneracy and a further narrowing if perpendicular laser polarizations are used

  14. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  16. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  17. On the parametrization of the Δ residue function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasan, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The complex residues at the Δ(1236) and Δ(1950) poles in the relevant partial-wave amplitudes provide information on the behaviour of the Δ Regge residue function in the resonance region u>0. Attempts to incorporate this information in parametrizations of the residue by functions that are real on the real u-axis result in residues which have unsatisfactory behaviour in the region u 2 . The choice of complex functions for the trajectory and residue removes this undesirable feature and provides a better representation of the residue in the resonance region, suggesting that complex parametrizations would be better suited to Regge analyses of near-backward scattering. (Auth.)

  18. Mannobiose Binding Induces Changes in Hydrogen Bonding and Protonation States of Acidic Residues in Concanavalin A As Revealed by Neutron Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlits, Oksana O. [UT/ORNL; Coates, Leighton [Biology; Woods, Robert J. [Complex; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Biology

    2017-08-30

    Plant lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with various biomedical applications. Concanavalin A (Con A) holds promise in treating cancerous tumors. To better understand the Con A carbohydrate binding specificity, we obtained a room-temperature neutron structure of this legume lectin in complex with a disaccharide Manα1–2Man, mannobiose. The neutron structure afforded direct visualization of the hydrogen bonding between the protein and ligand, showing that the ligand is able to alter both protonation states and interactions for residues located close to and distant from the binding site. An unprecedented low-barrier hydrogen bond was observed forming between the carboxylic side chains of Asp28 and Glu8, with the D atom positioned equidistant from the oxygen atoms having an O···D···O angle of 101.5°.

  19. Thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage, creep and residual strength of concrete for PCRVs at uniaxial stress state and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschl, H.; Stoeckl, S.

    1981-01-01

    At the Institut fuer Massivbau of the Technical University of Munich testing machines were built, which allow to test sealed and unsealed cylinders with uniaxial stress state at elevated temperatures till 523 K (250 0 C). With this equipment tests were carried out at predried, unsealed and sealed specimens to study - thermal expansion coefficient - modulus of elasticity - shrinkage and - creep of concrete at elevated temperatures of 353 K (80 0 C) and 393 K (120 0 C) and at a normal temperature of 293 K (20 0 C). In addition the residual strength of all specimens was measured. In the worst case (unsealed, i.e. drying specimens) some showed a maximum decrease in strength up to 60%. (orig.) [de

  20. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  1. Search for narrow resonances in dijet final states at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 8 TeV with the novel CMS technique of data scouting

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Forthomme, Laurent; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Elgammal, Sherif; Mohamed, Amr; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Ari; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Oh, Sung Bin; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Qazi, Shamona; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Danilov, Mikhail; Zhemchugov, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Rupprecht, Nathaniel; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen