WorldWideScience

Sample records for resonance pressure burp

  1. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  2. Micromechanical Resonator Driven by Radiation Pressure Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boales, Joseph A; Mateen, Farrukh; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2017-11-22

    Radiation pressure exerted by light on any surface is the pressure generated by the momentum of impinging photons. The associated force - fundamentally, a quantum mechanical aspect of light - is usually too small to be useful, except in large-scale problems in astronomy and astrodynamics. In atomic and molecular optics, radiation pressure can be used to trap or cool atoms and ions. Use of radiation pressure on larger objects such as micromechanical resonators has been so far limited to its coupling to an acoustic mode, sideband cooling, or levitation of microscopic objects. In this Letter, we demonstrate direct actuation of a radio-frequency micromechanical plate-type resonator by the radiation pressure force generated by a standard laser diode at room temperature. Using two independent methods, the magnitude of the resonator's response to forcing by radiation pressure is found to be proportional to the intensity of the incident light.

  3. A silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhangyang; Fan Shangchun; Cai Chenguang

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and test of a silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor. A square membrane and a doubly clamped resonant beam constitute a compound structure. The former senses the pressure directly, while the latter changes its resonant frequency according to deformation of the membrane. The final output relation between the resonant frequency and the applied pressure is deducted according to the structure mechanical properties. Sensors are fabricated by micromachining technology, and then sealed in vaccum. These sensors are tested by open-loop and close-loop system designed on purpose. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor has a sensitivity of 49.8Hz/kPa and repeatability of 0.08%.

  4. Spontaneous burp phenomenon: analysis of experimental data and approach to theoretical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E.

    2004-01-01

    Cases of spontaneous release of energy (''burp'') were observed numerously in solid methane, water ice and other hydrogeneous compounds irradiated in fast neutron fields with absorbed dose 2-10 MGy. Nature of this phenomenon is that accumulation of radicals and thermal instability of a sample under due concentration of radicals culminate to autocatalytic reaction of their recombination. The most odious feature of this phenomenon is that irradiation time, before a burp occurs, varies significantly even in identical irradiation condition. Respectively, amount of released energy varies as well. For example, in URAM-2 experiments with water ice, irradiation time before appearance of spontaneous burp varied from 5 hours to 11 hours for equal samples and up to 20 hours for the smallest sample. Another feature of the phenomenon is that regularities for occurrence of spontaneous release of energy (that is, dependence on temperature, size of sample, absorbed dose) can't be extracted explicitly from experimental data, if applying known relations for critical concentration of radicals, namely: Semenov's and Frank-Kamenetski's conditions of thermal instability of a sample, Jackson's relation for chain process of recombination of uniformly distributed radicals, critical condition based on accounting for acceleration of a process of recombination in the regions of micro-cracks, and, finally, critical condition for irregular distribution of radicals proposed by the author of this article. Not one of these theories predicts casual character of a burp on macro-scale basis. So that, notwithstanding fair amount of experimental data on spontaneous burps, it is still impossible to derive well-balanced theory of this phenomenon. One attempt to understand a reason for the strange behavior of spontaneous burping is a probabilistic, cluster model of spontaneous release of energy, developed in the chapter 4 of this paper. Spontaneous burps observed during URAM-2 project and in solid methane

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are reviewed. After a brief discussion of two novel experimental techniques, the main focus of this review is on several specific studies which illustrate the versatility and power of this high pressure field. Experimental aspects of NMR measurements at high pressure and high temperature and the techniques for the high resolution NMR spectroscopy at high pressure are discussed. An overview of NMR studies of the dynamic structure of simple polyatomic liquids and hydrogen bonded liquids is followed by a discussion of high resolution spectroscopy at high pressure. Examples of NMR studies of disordered organic solids and polymers conclude the review. (author)

  6. Pressure-driven amplification and penetration of resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizu, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Hudson, S. R.; Lazerson, S. A.; Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    We show that a resonant magnetic perturbation applied to the boundary of an ideal plasma screw-pinch equilibrium with nested surfaces can penetrate inside the resonant surface and into the core. The response is significantly amplified with increasing plasma pressure. We present a rigorous verification of nonlinear equilibrium codes against linear theory, showing excellent agreement.

  7. Resonance in the restricted problem caused by solar radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, K.B.; Gupta, B.

    1977-01-01

    Resonance is discussed in the motion of an artificial Earth satellite caused by solar radiation pressure. The Hamiltonian and the generating functions occurring in the problem are expanded in the power series of small parameter β, which depends on solar radiation pressure. Also the perturbations in the osculating elements are obtained up to O(βsup(1/2)). (author)

  8. Elastomeric polymer resonant waveguide grating based pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Fuchuan; Xie, Antonio Jou; Seo, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an elastomeric polymer resonant waveguide grating structure to be used as a pressure sensor. The applied pressure is measured by optical resonance spectrum peak shift. The sensitivity—as high as 86.74 pm psi −1 or 12.58 pm kPa −1 —has been experimentally obtained from a fabricated sensor. Potentially, the sensitivity of the demonstrated sensor can be tuned to different pressure ranges by the choices of elastic properties and layer thicknesses of the waveguide and cladding layers. The simulation results agree well with experimental results and indicate that the dominant effect on the sensor is the change of grating period when external pressure is applied. Based on the two-dimensional planar structure, the demonstrated sensor can be used to measure applied surface pressure optically, which has potential applications for optical ultrasound imaging and pressure wave detection/mapping

  9. Scalable Pressure Sensor Based on Electrothermally Operated Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Alcheikh, Nouha; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a new pressure sensor that offers the flexibility of being scalable to small sizes up to the nano regime. Unlike conventional pressure sensors that rely on large diaphragms and big-surface structures, the principle of operation here relies on convective cooling of the air surrounding an electrothermally heated resonant structure, which can be a beam or a bridge. This concept is demonstrated using an electrothermally tuned and electrostatically driven MEMS resonator, which is designed to be deliberately curved. We show that the variation of pressure can be tracked accurately by monitoring the change in the resonance frequency of the resonator at a constant electrothermal voltage. We show that the range of the sensed pressure and the sensitivity of detection are controllable by the amount of the applied electrothermal voltage. Theoretically, we verify the device concept using a multi-physics nonlinear finite element model. The proposed pressure sensor is simple in principle and design and offers the possibility of further miniaturization to the nanoscale.

  10. Scalable Pressure Sensor Based on Electrothermally Operated Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate a new pressure sensor that offers the flexibility of being scalable to small sizes up to the nano regime. Unlike conventional pressure sensors that rely on large diaphragms and big-surface structures, the principle of operation here relies on convective cooling of the air surrounding an electrothermally heated resonant structure, which can be a beam or a bridge. This concept is demonstrated using an electrothermally tuned and electrostatically driven MEMS resonator, which is designed to be deliberately curved. We show that the variation of pressure can be tracked accurately by monitoring the change in the resonance frequency of the resonator at a constant electrothermal voltage. We show that the range of the sensed pressure and the sensitivity of detection are controllable by the amount of the applied electrothermal voltage. Theoretically, we verify the device concept using a multi-physics nonlinear finite element model. The proposed pressure sensor is simple in principle and design and offers the possibility of further miniaturization to the nanoscale.

  11. Film bulk acoustic resonator pressure sensor with self temperature reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X L; Jin, P C; Zhou, J; Wang, W B; Dong, S R; Luo, J K; Garcia-Gancedo, L; Flewitt, A J; Milne, W I

    2012-01-01

    A novel film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) with two resonant frequencies which have opposite reactions to temperature changes has been designed. The two resonant modes respond differently to changes in temperature and pressure, with the frequency shift being linearly correlated with temperature and pressure changes. By utilizing the FBAR's sealed back trench as a cavity, an on-chip single FBAR sensor suitable for measuring pressure and temperature simultaneously is proposed and demonstrated. The experimental results show that the pressure coefficient of frequency for the lower frequency peak of the FBAR sensors is approximately −17.4 ppm kPa −1 , while that for the second peak is approximately −6.1 ppm kPa −1 , both of them being much more sensitive than other existing pressure sensors. This dual mode on-chip pressure sensor is simple in structure and operation, can be fabricated at very low cost, and yet requires no specific package, therefore has great potential for applications. (paper)

  12. Consideration of the 'Burp' phenomenon in solid methane accounting for nonuniform distribution of irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E. P.

    1997-09-01

    This paper focuses on an optional model of radical recombination in solid methane, apart from conventional theory. It shares the common property of two-order reactions, but accounts for local nonuniformitites of the objects involved (such as radical concentration, the track nature of energy deposition, and others). Accounting for local nonuniformity provides absolutely different results for the time dependence of the space-averaged concentration of radicals, both for the processes of their storage and 'burping', compared to the common approach; it also brings new conditions for the thermal instability of the methane slug under irradiation and gives a better understanding of most of the strange features of burp performances.

  13. Measurement of pressure on a surface using bubble acoustic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldham, Ben; Manasseh, Richard; Liffman, Kurt; Šutalo, Ilija D; Illesinghe, Suhith; Ooi, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The frequency response of gas bubbles as a function of liquid ambient pressure was measured and compared with theory. A bubble size with equivalent spherical radius of 2.29 mm was used over a frequency range of 1000–1500 Hz. The ultimate aim is to develop an acoustic sensor that can measure static pressure and is sensitive to variations as small as a few kPa. The classical bubble resonance frequency is known to vary with ambient pressure. Experiments were conducted with a driven bubble in a pressurizable tank with a signal processing system designed to extract the resonant peak. Since the background response of the containing tank is significant, particularly near tank-modal resonances, it must be carefully removed from the bubble response signal. A dual-hydrophone method was developed to allow rapid and reliable real-time measurements. The expected pressure dependence was found. In order to obtain a reasonable match with theory, the classical theory was modified by the introduction of a 'mirror bubble' to account for the influence of a nearby surface. (technical design note)

  14. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  15. Solar radiation pressure resonances in Low Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Elisa Maria; Schettino, Giulia; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to highlight the crucial role that orbital resonances associated with solar radiation pressure can have in Low Earth Orbit. We review the corresponding literature, and provide an analytical tool to estimate the maximum eccentricity which can be achieved for well-defined initial conditions. We then compare the results obtained with the simplified model with the results obtained with a more comprehensive dynamical model. The analysis has important implications both from a theoretical point of view, because it shows that the role of some resonances was underestimated in the past, and also from a practical point of view in the perspective of passive deorbiting solutions for satellites at the end-of-life.

  16. A scalable pressure sensor based on an electrothermally and electrostatically operated resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Alcheikh, Nouha; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Ilyas, Saad; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on the convective cooling of the air surrounding an electrothermally heated resonant bridge. Unlike conventional pressure sensors that rely on diaphragm deformation in response to pressure, the sensor does

  17. Apparatus and method for non-contact, acoustic resonance determination of intraocular pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, D.N.; Wray, W.O.

    1994-12-27

    The apparatus and method for measuring intraocular pressure changes in an eye under investigation by detection of vibrational resonances therein. An ultrasonic transducer operating at its resonant frequency is amplitude modulated and swept over a range of audio frequencies in which human eyes will resonate. The output therefrom is focused onto the eye under investigation, and the resonant vibrations of the eye observed using a fiber-optic reflection vibration sensor. Since the resonant frequency of the eye is dependent on the pressure therein, changes in intraocular pressure may readily be determined after a baseline pressure is established. 3 figures.

  18. Tilted c-Axis Thin-Film Bulk Wave Resonant Pressure Sensors With Improved Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderås, Emil; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum nitride thin film bulk wave resonant pressure sensors employing c- and tilted c-axis texture, have been fabricated and tested for their pressure sensitivities. The c-axis tilted FBAR pressure sensors demonstrate substantially higher pressure sensitivity compared to its c-axis oriented counterpart. More specifically the thickness plate quasi-shear resonance has demonstrated the highest pressure sensitivity while further being able to preserve its performance in liquid environment.

  19. Inspection of the grapevine BURP superfamily highlights an expansion of RD22 genes with distinctive expression features in berry development and ABA-mediated stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tomás Matus

    Full Text Available The RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 22 (RD22 gene is a molecular link between abscisic acid (ABA signalling and abiotic stress responses. Its expression has been used as a reliable ABA early response marker. In Arabidopsis, the single copy RD22 gene possesses a BURP domain also located at the C-terminus of USP embryonic proteins and the beta subunit of polygalacturonases. In grapevine, a RD22 gene has been identified but putative paralogs are also found in the grape genome, possibly forming a large RD22 family in this species. In this work, we searched for annotations containing BURP domains in the Vitis vinifera genome. Nineteen proteins were defined by a comparative analysis between the two genome predictions and RNA-Seq data. These sequences were compared to other plant BURPs identified in previous genome surveys allowing us to reconceive group classifications based on phylogenetic relationships and protein motif occurrence. We observed a lineage-specific evolution of the RD22 family, with the biggest expansion in grapevine and poplar. In contrast, rice, sorghum and maize presented highly expanded monocot-specific groups. The Vitis RD22 group may have expanded from segmental duplications as most of its members are confined to a region in chromosome 4. The inspection of transcriptomic data revealed variable expression of BURP genes in vegetative and reproductive organs. Many genes were induced in specific tissues or by abiotic and biotic stresses. Three RD22 genes were further studied showing that they responded oppositely to ABA and to stress conditions. Our results show that the inclusion of RNA-Seq data is essential while describing gene families and improving gene annotations. Robust phylogenetic analyses including all BURP members from other sequenced species helped us redefine previous relationships that were erroneously established. This work provides additional evidence for RD22 genes serving as marker genes for different organs or stresses

  20. Inspection of the grapevine BURP superfamily highlights an expansion of RD22 genes with distinctive expression features in berry development and ABA-mediated stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, José Tomás; Aquea, Felipe; Espinoza, Carmen; Vega, Andrea; Cavallini, Erika; Dal Santo, Silvia; Cañón, Paola; Rodríguez-Hoces de la Guardia, Amparo; Serrano, Jennifer; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    The RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 22 (RD22) gene is a molecular link between abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and abiotic stress responses. Its expression has been used as a reliable ABA early response marker. In Arabidopsis, the single copy RD22 gene possesses a BURP domain also located at the C-terminus of USP embryonic proteins and the beta subunit of polygalacturonases. In grapevine, a RD22 gene has been identified but putative paralogs are also found in the grape genome, possibly forming a large RD22 family in this species. In this work, we searched for annotations containing BURP domains in the Vitis vinifera genome. Nineteen proteins were defined by a comparative analysis between the two genome predictions and RNA-Seq data. These sequences were compared to other plant BURPs identified in previous genome surveys allowing us to reconceive group classifications based on phylogenetic relationships and protein motif occurrence. We observed a lineage-specific evolution of the RD22 family, with the biggest expansion in grapevine and poplar. In contrast, rice, sorghum and maize presented highly expanded monocot-specific groups. The Vitis RD22 group may have expanded from segmental duplications as most of its members are confined to a region in chromosome 4. The inspection of transcriptomic data revealed variable expression of BURP genes in vegetative and reproductive organs. Many genes were induced in specific tissues or by abiotic and biotic stresses. Three RD22 genes were further studied showing that they responded oppositely to ABA and to stress conditions. Our results show that the inclusion of RNA-Seq data is essential while describing gene families and improving gene annotations. Robust phylogenetic analyses including all BURP members from other sequenced species helped us redefine previous relationships that were erroneously established. This work provides additional evidence for RD22 genes serving as marker genes for different organs or stresses in grapevine.

  1. Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile intracranial pressure with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Ringstad

    Full Text Available Invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure can accurately predict shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, but may potentially cause complications such as bleeding and infection. We tested how a proposed surrogate parameter for pulsatile intracranial pressure, the phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient, compared with its invasive counterpart. In 22 patients with suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, preceding invasive intracranial pressure monitoring, and any surgical shunt procedure, we calculated the pulse pressure gradient from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities obtained at the upper cervical spinal canal using a simplified Navier-Stokes equation. Repeated measurements of the pulse pressure gradient were also undertaken in four healthy controls. Of 17 shunted patients, 16 responded, indicating high proportion of "true" normal pressure hydrocephalus in the patient cohort. However, there was no correlation between the magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient and pulsatile intracranial pressure (R = -.18, P = .43. Pulse pressure gradients were also similar in patients and healthy controls (P = .26, and did not differ between individuals with pulsatile intracranial pressure above or below established thresholds for shunt treatment (P = .97. Assessment of pulse pressure gradient at level C2 was therefore not found feasible to replace invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure in selection of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus for surgical shunting. Unlike invasive, overnight monitoring, the pulse pressure gradient from magnetic resonance imaging comprises short-term pressure fluctuations only. Moreover, complexity of cervical cerebrospinal fluid flow and -pulsatility at the upper cervical spinal canal may render the pulse pressure gradient a poor surrogate

  2. An endoplasmic reticulum-localized Coffea arabica BURP domain-containing protein affects the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants to diverse abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Sy Nguyen; Kang, Hunseung

    2017-11-01

    The Coffea arabica BURP domain-containing gene plays an important role in the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants to abiotic stresses via regulating the level of diverse proteins. Although the functions of plant-specific BURP domain-containing proteins (BDP) have been determined for a few plants, their roles in the growth, development, and stress responses of most plant species, including coffee plant (Coffea arabica), are largely unknown. In this study, the function of a C. arabica BDP, designated CaBDP1, was investigated in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The expression of CaBDP1 was highly modulated in coffee plants subjected to drought, cold, salt, or ABA. Confocal analysis of CaBDP1-GFP fusion proteins revealed that CaBDP1 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. The ectopic expression of CaBDP1 in Arabidopsis resulted in delayed germination of the transgenic plants under abiotic stress and in the presence of ABA. Cotyledon greening and seedling growth of the transgenic plants were inhibited in the presence of ABA due to the upregulation of ABA signaling-related genes like ABI3, ABI4, and ABI5. Proteome analysis revealed that the levels of several proteins are modulated in CaBDP1-expressing transgenic plants. The results of this study underscore the importance of BURP domain proteins in plant responses to diverse abiotic stresses.

  3. Laterally Driven Resonant Pressure Sensor with Etched Silicon Dual Diaphragms and Combined Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel structure of the resonant pressure sensor is presented in this paper, which tactfully employs intercoupling between dual pressure-sensing diaphragms and a laterally driven resonant strain gauge. After the resonant pressure sensor principle is introduced, the coupling mechanism of the diaphragms and resonator is analyzed and the frequency equation of the resonator based on the triangle geometry theory is developed for this new coupling structure. The finite element (FE simulation results match the theoretical analysis over the full scale of the device. This pressure sensor was first fabricated by dry/wet etching and thermal silicon bonding, followed by vacuum-packaging using anodic bonding technology. The test maximum error of the fabricated sensor is 0.0310%F.S. (full scale in the range of 30 to 190 kPa, its pressure sensitivity is negative and exceeding 8 Hz/kPa, and its Q-factor reaches 20,000 after wafer vacuum-packaging. A novel resonant pressure sensor with high accuracy is presented in this paper.

  4. Investigation based on nano-electromechanical system double Si3N4 resonant beam pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Guo, Can; Yuan, Xiaowei

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a type of NEMS (Nano-Electromechanical System) double Si3N4 resonant beams pressure sensor. The mathematical models are established in allusion to the Si3N4 resonant beams and pressure sensitive diaphragm. The distribution state of stress has been analyzed theoretically based on the mathematical model of pressure sensitive diaphragm; from the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm was optimized and then the dominance observed after the double resonant beams are adopted is illustrated. From the analysis result, the position of the Si3N4 resonant beams above the pressure sensitive diaphragm is optimized, illustrating advantages in the adoption of double resonant beams. The capability of the optimized sensor was generally analyzed using the ANSYS software of finite element analysis. The range of measured pressure is 0-400 Kpa, the coefficient of linearity correlation is 0.99346, and the sensitivity of the sensor is 498.24 Hz/Kpa, higher than the traditional sensors. Finally the processing techniques of the sensor chip have been designed with sample being successfully processed.

  5. Resonant frequency analysis on an electrostatically actuated microplate under uniform hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhikang; Zhao Libo; Ye Zhiying; Zhao Yulong; Jiang Zhuangde; Wang Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    The resonant frequency of a microplate is influenced by various physical parameters such as mass, surface stress, hydrostatic pressure and electrostatic force. In this paper, the effects of both electrostatic force and uniform hydrostatic pressure on the resonant frequency of a clamped circular microplate are investigated. An approximate solution is derived for the fundamental resonance frequency of the mciroplate under both types of loads using an energy equivalent method. It is found that both electrostatic force and uniform hydrostatic pressure decrease the resonant frequency of the microplate under small deflections. Additionally, the linearized expression of this solution shows that the resonant frequency varies linearly with pressure in the low and ultra-low range, and the corresponding pressure sensitivity depends on the voltage applied to the microplate. The analytical results are well validated by the finite element method. This study may be helpful for the design and optimization of electrostatically actuated resonance devices based on microplates, especially electrostatically actuated low- or ultra-low-pressure sensors. (paper)

  6. Pressure effects on the dissipative behavior of nanocrystalline diamond microelectromechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J T; Chu, V; Conde, J P; Holz, T; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M

    2015-01-01

    Diamond-based microelectromechanical resonators have the potential of enhanced performance due to the chemical inertness of the diamond structural layer and its high Young’s modulus, high wear resistance, low thermal expansion coefficient, and very high thermal conductivity. In this work, the resonance frequency and quality factor of MEMS resonators based on nanocrystalline diamond films are characterized under different air pressures. The dynamic behavior of 50–300 μm long linear bridges and double ended tuning forks, with resonance frequencies between 0.5 and 15 MHz and quality factors as high as 50 000 are described as a function of measurement pressure from high vacuum(∼10 mTorr) up to atmospheric conditions. The resonance frequencies and quality factors in vacuum show good agreement with the theoretical models including anchor and thermoelastic dissipation (TED). The Young’s moduli for nanocrystalline diamond films extrapolated from experimental data are between 840–920 GPa. The critical pressure values, at which the quality factor starts decreasing due to dissipation in air, are dependent on the resonator length. Longer structures, with quality factors limited by TED and lower resonance frequencies, have low critical pressures, of the order of 1–10 Torr and go from an intrinsic dissipation, to a molecular dissipation regime and finally to a region of viscous dissipation. Shorter resonators, with higher resonance frequencies and quality factors limited by anchor losses, have higher critical pressures, some higher than atmospheric pressure, and enter directly into the viscous dissipation regime from the intrinsic region. (paper)

  7. High-pressure electron-resonance studies of electronic, magnetic, and structural phase transitions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pifer, J.H.; Croft, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Research is described in development of a high-pressure electron-resonance probe capable of operating down to 1.5 0 K temperatures. The apparatus has been used to measure the EPR of a sample of DPPH at room temperature and zero pressure. EPR has been used to measure valence field instabilities in alloy systems. Studies have been done on metal-insulator transitions at high pressure, and are briefly described

  8. Bandwidth of reactor internals vibration resonance with coolant pressure oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    In a few decades a significant increase in a part of an electricity development on the NPP will require NPP to be operated in non full capacity modes and increase in operation time in transitive modes. Operating in such conditions as compared to the operation on a constant mode will lead to the increase in cyclic dynamical loading. In water cooled water moderated reactors these loading are realized as low-cyclic and high-cyclic loadings. High-cyclic loadings increases are caused by a raised vibration in non stationary modes of operation. It is known, that in some modes of a non full capacity reactor high-cyclic dynamic loadings can increase. It is obvious, that the development of management technologies is necessary for the life time management operation. In the context of this problem one of the main tasks are revealing and the prevention of the conditions of the occurrence of the operation leading to the resonant interaction of the coolant fluctuations and the equipment, reactor vessel (RV), fuel assemblies (FA) and reactor internals (RI) vibration. To prevent the appearance of the conditions for resonance interaction between the fluid flow and the equipments, it is necessary to provide the different frequencies for the self oscillations in the separated elements of the circulating system and also in the parts of the system formed by the comprising of these elements. While solving these problems it is necessary to have a theoretical and settlement substantiation of an oscillation frequency band of coolant outside of which there is no resonant interaction. The presented work is devoted to finding the solution of this problem. There are results of theoretical an estimation of width of such band as well as the examples of a preliminary quantitative estimation of Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit formed by the equipment of the NPP. The accordance of results had been calculated with had been measured are satisfied for practical purposes. These

  9. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months, a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%.

  10. A scalable pressure sensor based on an electrothermally and electrostatically operated resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-11-29

    We present a pressure sensor based on the convective cooling of the air surrounding an electrothermally heated resonant bridge. Unlike conventional pressure sensors that rely on diaphragm deformation in response to pressure, the sensor does not require diaphragms of the large surface area, and hence is scalable and can be realized even at the nanoscale. The concept is demonstrated using both straight and arch microbeam resonators driven and sensed electrostatically. The change in the surrounding pressure is shown to be accurately tracked by monitoring the change in the resonance frequency of the structure. The sensitivity of the sensor, which is controllable by the applied electrothermal load, is shown near 57 811 ppm/mbar for a pressure range from 1 to 10 Torr. We show that a straight beam operated near the buckling threshold leads to the maximum sensitivity of the device. The experimental data and simulation results, based on a multi-physics finite element model, demonstrate the feasibility and simplicity of the pressure sensor. Published by AIP Publishing.

  11. Optical fiber tip interferometer gas pressure sensor based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. B.; Wang, D. N.; Xu, Ben; Wang, Z. K.

    2018-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a gas pressure sensor based on an anti-resonant reflecting guidance (ARRG) mechanism in quartz capillary tube with an open cavity. The device is simple in fabrication by only fusion splicing a segment of capillary tube with single mode fiber. It has compact size, robust structure, convenient mode of operation, and high sensitivity of 4.278 nm/MPa. Moreover, as two Faby-Perot cavities exist in the device, which create the interference spectrum with several distinct resonance dips, a simultaneous gas pressure and temperature detection can be readily achieved by tracing two dip wavelengths. The error in the measurement due to the choice of different resonant dips can be effectively reduced by using the Fourier band pass filtering method.

  12. In-cylinder pressure resonance analysis for trapped mass estimation in automotive engines

    OpenAIRE

    Bares Moreno, Pau

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a new application for in-cylinder pressure sensors in internal combustion engines. The new method takes profit of the high-frequency content of the in-cylinder pressure signal to determine the speed of sound evolution during the expansion stroke and combines this estimation with the low-frequency content of the pressure signal and a volume estimation to obtain a measurement of the trapped mass. The new method is based on the studies of the resonance phenomenon in pent...

  13. Some observations of the pressure distribution in a tube bank for conditions of self generated acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Donaldson, I.S.; McKnight, W.

    1979-01-01

    The results for mean and fluctuating pressure distributions around tubes in an in-line tube bank are presented for both non-resonant and self-excited acoustic standing wave resonant flow regimes. It is readily deduced that the nature of the flow in the bank is dramatically altered with the onset of acoustic resonance. The velocity gradients which appear across the bank with the onset of resonance would suggest regions of flow recirculation in the bank although no evidence of this was found. The spectra of fluctuating pressure on the duct roof in the bank and on tubes deep in the bank exhibited coherent peaks only during resonance. (author)

  14. Transverse resonance-radiation pressure on atomic beams and the influence of fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkholm, J.E.; Freeman, R.R.; Ashkin, A.; Pearson, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated that a beam of neutral sodium atoms can be focused to a spot diameter of approx. 50 μ using the transverse dipole resonance-radiation pressure exerted by a 40 mW laser beam. Simple analysis shows that in some cases the spot sizes are limited by the random fluctuations of the spontaneous radiation pressure; with 1 W of laser power, spot sizes less than 10 μ should be attainable. The effects of heating by spontaneous scattering can have important detrimental effects in other applications of resonance - radiation pressure on atoms, such as the slowing or guiding of atoms. Consideration of heating effects is of paramount importance in the design of optical traps for neutral atoms. (KBE)

  15. Novel threshold pressure sensors based on nonlinear dynamics of MEMS resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad H.; Alsaleem, Fadi M.; Ouakad, Hassen M.

    2018-06-01

    Triggering an alarm in a car for low air-pressure in the tire or tripping an HVAC compressor if the refrigerant pressure is lower than a threshold value are examples for applications where measuring the amount of pressure is not as important as determining if the pressure has exceeded a threshold value for an action to occur. Unfortunately, current technology still relies on analog pressure sensors to perform this functionality by adding a complex interface (extra circuitry, controllers, and/or decision units). In this paper, we demonstrate two new smart tunable-threshold pressure switch concepts that can reduce the complexity of a threshold pressure sensor. The first concept is based on the nonlinear subharmonic resonance of a straight double cantilever microbeam with a proof mass and the other concept is based on the snap-through bi-stability of a clamped-clamped MEMS shallow arch. In both designs, the sensor operation concept is simple. Any actuation performed at a certain pressure lower than a threshold value will activate a nonlinear dynamic behavior (subharmonic resonance or snap-through bi-stability) yielding a large output that would be interpreted as a logic value of ONE, or ON. Once the pressure exceeds the threshold value, the nonlinear response ceases to exist, yielding a small output that would be interpreted as a logic value of ZERO, or OFF. A lumped, single degree of freedom model for the double cantilever beam, that is validated using experimental data, and a continuous beam model for the arch beam, are used to simulate the operation range of the proposed sensors by identifying the relationship between the excitation signal and the critical cut-off pressure.

  16. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  17. Slot Antenna Integrated Re-Entrant Resonator Based Wireless Pressure Sensor for High-Temperature Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shujing; Lu, Fei; Wu, Guozhu; Wu, Dezhi; Tan, Qiulin; Dong, Helei; Xiong, Jijun

    2017-08-25

    The highly sensitive pressure sensor presented in this paper aims at wireless passive sensing in a high temperature environment by using microwave backscattering technology. The structure of the re-entrant resonator was analyzed and optimized using theoretical calculation, software simulation, and its equivalent lump circuit model was first modified by us. Micro-machining and high-temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) process technologies were applied to fabricate the sensor, solving the common problem of cavity sealing during the air pressure loading test. In addition, to prevent the response signal from being immersed in the strong background clutter of the hermetic metal chamber, which makes its detection difficult, we proposed two key techniques to improve the signal to noise ratio: the suppression of strong background clutter and the detection of the weak backscattered signal of the sensor. The pressure sensor demonstrated in this paper works well for gas pressure loading between 40 and 120 kPa in a temperature range of 24 °C to 800 °C. The experimental results show that the sensor resonant frequency lies at 2.1065 GHz, with a maximum pressure sensitivity of 73.125 kHz/kPa.

  18. Optical nucleation of bubble clouds in a high pressure spherical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip; Sampathkumar, A; Murray, Todd W; Gaitan, D Felipe; Glynn Holt, R

    2011-11-01

    An experimental setup for nucleating clouds of bubbles in a high-pressure spherical resonator is described. Using nanosecond laser pulses and multiple phase gratings, bubble clouds are optically nucleated in an acoustic field. Dynamics of the clouds are captured using a high-speed CCD camera. The images reveal cloud nucleation, growth, and collapse and the resulting emission of radially expanding shockwaves. These shockwaves are reflected at the interior surface of the resonator and then reconverge to the center of the resonator. As the shocks reconverge upon the center of the resonator, they renucleate and grow the bubble cloud. This process is repeated over many acoustic cycles and with each successive shock reconvergence, the bubble cloud becomes more organized and centralized so that subsequent collapses give rise to stronger, better defined shockwaves. After many acoustic cycles individual bubbles cannot be distinguished and the cloud is then referred to as a cluster. Sustainability of the process is ultimately limited by the detuning of the acoustic field inside the resonator. The nucleation parameter space is studied in terms of laser firing phase, laser energy, and acoustic power used.

  19. Design and Manufacturing of a Passive Pressure Sensor Based on LC Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The LC resonator-based passive pressure sensor attracts much attention because it does not need a power source or lead wires between the sensing element and the readout system. This paper presents the design and manufacturing of a passive pressure sensor that contains a variable capacitor and a copper-electroplated planar inductor. The sensor is fabricated using silicon bulk micro-machining, electroplating, and anodic bonding technology. The finite element method is used to model the deflection of the silicon diaphragm and extract the capacitance change corresponding to the applied pressure. Within the measurement range from 5 to 100 kPa, the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.052 MHz/kPa, the linearity is 2.79%, and the hysteresis error is 0.2%. Compared with the sensitivity at 27 °C, the drop of output performance is 3.53% at 140 °C.

  20. Effects of the van der Waals Force on the Dynamics Performance for a Micro Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The micro resonant pressure sensor outputs the frequency signals where the distortion does not take place in a long distance transmission. As the dimensions of the sensor decrease, the effects of the van der Waals forces should be considered. Here, a coupled dynamic model of the micro resonant pressure sensor is proposed and its coupled dynamic equation is given in which the van der Waals force is considered. By the equation, the effects of the van der Waals force on the natural frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the micro resonant pressure sensor are investigated. Results show that the natural frequency and the vibrating amplitudes of the micro resonant pressure sensor are affected significantly by van der Waals force for a small clearance between the film and the base plate, a small initial tension stress of the film, and some other conditions.

  1. A resonant magnetic field microsensor with high quality factor at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-May, A L; García-Ramírez, P J; Martínez-Castillo, J; Sauceda-Carvajal, A; García-González, L; Aguilera-Cortés, L A; Figueras-Costa, E

    2009-01-01

    A resonant magnetic field microsensor with a high quality factor at atmospheric pressure has been designed, fabricated and tested. This microsensor does not require vacuum packaging to operate efficiently and presents a compact and simple geometrical configuration of silicon. This geometry permits us to decrease the size of the structure and facilities its fabrication and operation. It is constructed of a seesaw plate (400 × 150 × 15 µm 3 ), two torsional beams (60 × 40 × 15 µm 3 ), four flexural beams (130 × 12 × 15 µm 3 ) and a Wheatstone bridge with four p-type piezoresistors. The resonant device exploits the Lorentz force principle and operates at its first resonant frequency (136.52 kHz). A sinusoidal excitation current of 22.0 mA with a frequency of 136.52 kHz and magnetic fields from 1 to 400 G are considered. The mechanical response of the microsensor is modeled with the finite element method (FEM). The structure of the microsensor registered a maximum von Mises stress of 53.8 MPa between the flexural and the torsional beams. Additionally, a maximum deflection (372.5 nm) is obtained at the extreme end of the plate. The proposed microsensor has the maximum magnetic sensitivity of 40.3 µV G −1 (magnetic fields −1/2 , theoretical resolution of 1.43 mG Hz −1/2 and power consumption less than 10.0 mW

  2. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R., E-mail: landis@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  3. High pressure Moessbauer spectrometer for the high-resolution 93.3 keV resonance in 67Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adlassnig, W.; Potzel, W.; Moser, J.; Schaefer, C.; Steiner, M.; Kalvius, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    A high pressure, low temperature Moessbauer spectrometer for the high-resolution 93.3 keV resonance in 67 Zn is described. The pressure is generated by applying the opposed anvil technique. Using B 4 C anvils and a sandwich gasket quasihydrostatic pressures up to 6 GPa were obtained for the required large samples of 7 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. The piezoelectric Doppler drive is mounted on top of the pressure clamp. The whole system can be cooled to liquid He temperatures. The spectrometer was used to investigate at 4.2 K the pressure dependence of the Moessbauer parameters of Zn metal. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  5. Room-Temperature Pressure-Induced Optically-Actuated Fabry-Perot Nanomechanical Resonator with Multilayer Graphene Diaphragm in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a miniature and in situ ~13-layer graphene nanomechanical resonator by utilizing a simple optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P interferometric excitation and detection scheme. The graphene film was transferred onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125-μm inner diameter. In contrast to the pre-tension induced in membrane that increased quality (Q factor to ~18.5 from ~3.23 at room temperature and normal pressure, the limited effects of air damping on resonance behaviors at 10−2 and 105 Pa were demonstrated by characterizing graphene F-P resonators with open and micro-air-gap cavities. Then in terms of optomechanical behaviors of the resonator with an air micro-cavity configuration using a polished ferrule substrate, measured resonance frequencies were increased to the range of 509–542 kHz from several kHz with a maximum Q factor of 16.6 despite the lower Knudsen number ranging from 0.0002 to 0.0006 in damping air over a relative pressure range of 0–199 kPa. However, there was the little dependence of Q on resonance frequency. Note that compared with the inferior F-P cavity length response to applied pressures due to interfacial air leakage, the developed F-P resonator exhibited a consistent fitted pressure sensitivity of 1.18 × 105 kHz3/kPa with a good linearity error of 5.16% in the tested range. These measurements shed light on the pre-stress-dominated pressure-sensitive mechanisms behind air damping in in situ F-P resonant sensors using graphene or other 2D nanomaterials.

  6. Magnetic resonance measurement of turbulent kinetic energy for the estimation of irreversible pressure loss in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Hope, Michael D; Tseng, Elaine E; Saloner, David

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the ascending aorta of patients with aortic stenosis and to assess its relationship to irreversible pressure loss. Irreversible pressure loss caused by energy dissipation in post-stenotic flow is an important determinant of the hemodynamic significance of aortic stenosis. The simplified Bernoulli equation used to estimate pressure gradients often misclassifies the ventricular overload caused by aortic stenosis. The current gold standard for estimation of irreversible pressure loss is catheterization, but this method is rarely used due to its invasiveness. Post-stenotic pressure loss is largely caused by dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy into heat. Recent developments in magnetic resonance flow imaging permit noninvasive estimation of TKE. The study was approved by the local ethics review board and all subjects gave written informed consent. Three-dimensional cine magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to measure TKE in 18 subjects (4 normal volunteers, 14 patients with aortic stenosis with and without dilation). For each subject, the peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was compared with a pressure loss index. The pressure loss index was based on a previously validated theory relating pressure loss to measures obtainable by echocardiography. The total TKE did not appear to be related to global flow patterns visualized based on magnetic resonance-measured velocity fields. The TKE was significantly higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in normal volunteers (p < 0.001). The peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was strongly correlated to index pressure loss (R(2) = 0.91). Peak total TKE in the ascending aorta correlated strongly with irreversible pressure loss estimated by a well-established method. Direct measurement of TKE by magnetic resonance flow imaging may, with further validation, be used to estimate irreversible pressure loss in aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2013 American

  7. An experimental investigation on the pressure characteristics of high speed self-resonating pulsed waterjets influenced by feeding pipe diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dong; Kang, Dong; Ding, Xiao Long; Wang, Xiao Huan; Fang, Zhen Long [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Hubei Province (China)

    2016-11-15

    The destructive power of a continuous waterjet issuing from a nozzle can be greatly enhanced by generating self-resonance in the nozzle assembly to produce a Self-resonating pulsed waterjet (SRPW). To further improve the performance of SRPW, effects of feeding pipe diameter on the pressure characteristics were experimentally investigated by measuring and analyzing the axial pressure oscillation peaks and amplitudes. Four organ-pipe nozzles of different chamber lengths and three feeding pipes of different diameters were employed. Results show that feeding pipe diameter cannot change the feature of SRPW of having an optimum standoff distance, but it slightly changes the oscillating frequency of the jet. It is also found that feeding pipe diameter significantly affects the magnitudes of pressure oscillation peak and amplitude, largely depending on the pump pressure and standoff distance. The enhancement or attenuation of the pressure oscillation peak and amplitude can be differently affected by the same feeding pipe diameter.

  8. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events.

  9. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  10. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbers, T.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  11. Cardiovascular fluid dynamics. Methods for flow and pressure field analysis from magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, T

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular blood flow is highly complex and incompletely understood. Blood flow patterns are expected to influence the opening and closing of normal and prosthetic heart valves, the efficiency of cardiac filling and ejection, and the resistance to thrombus formation within the heart. Conventional diagnostic techniques are poorly suited to the study of the three-dimensional (3D) blood flow patterns in the heart chambers and large vessels. Noninvasive methods have also been inadequate in studying intracardiac pressure differences, which are the driving force of flow and are critical in the evaluation of many cardiovascular abnormalities. This thesis focuses on the development of non-invasive methods for analysis of 3D cardiovascular blood flow. Simultaneous study of cardiovascular fluid dynamics allowed knowledge exchange across the two disciplines, facilitating the development process and broadening the applicability of the methods. A time-resolved 3D phase-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to acquire the velocity vector field in a 3D volume encompassing the entire heart or a large vessel. Cardiovascular blood flow patterns were visualized by use of particle traces, which revealed, for instance, vortical flow patterns in the left atrium. By applying the Navier-Stokes equation along a user-defined line in the 3D velocity vector field, the relative pressure could be obtained as an excellent supplement to the flow pattern visualization. Using a delineation of the blood pool, the time-varying 3D relative pressure field in the human left ventricle was obtained from the velocity field by use of the pressure Poisson equation. A delineation of the heart muscle, a task that is almost impossible to perform on 3D MRI either automatically or manually, was also achieved by usage of particle traces. This segmentation allows automatic calculation of the 3D relative pressure field, as well as calculation of well-established parameters such as

  12. High-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance studies of fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    This thesis focuses on the use of high pressure NMR to study transport properties in electrolyte membranes used for fuel cells. The main concern is in studying the self-diffusion coefficients of ions and molecules in membranes and solutions, which can be used to characterize electrolytes in fuel cells. For this purpose, a high-pressure fringe field NMR method to study transport properties in material systems useful for fuel cell and battery electrolytes, was designed, developed, and implemented. In this investigation, pressure is the thermodynamic variable to obtain additional information about the ionic transport process, which could yield the crucial parameter, activation volume. Most of the work involves proton NMR, with additional investigations of others nuclei, such as fluorine, phosphorus and lithium. Using the FFG method, two fuel cell membrane types (NAFION-117, SPTES), and different dilutions of phosphoric acid were investigated, as was LiTf salt in Diglyme solution, which is used as a lithium battery electrolyte. In addition to high-pressure NMR diffusion measurements carried out in the fringe field gradient for the investigation of SPTES, pulse field gradient spin echo NMR was also used to characterize the water diffusion, in addition to measuring diffusion rates as a function of temperature. This second method allows us to measure distinct diffusion coefficients in cases where the different nuclear (proton) environments can be resolved in the NMR spectrum. Polymer electrolyte systems, in which the mobility of both cations and anions is probed by NMR self-diffusion measurements using standard pulsed field gradient methods and static gradient measurements as a function of applied hydrostatic pressure, were also investigated. The material investigated is the low molecular weight liquid diglyme/LiCF3SO3 (LiTf) complexes which can be used as electrolytes in lithium batteries. Finally, high-pressure diffusion coefficient measurements of phosphoric acid in

  13. Design and Analysis of a New Tuning Fork Structure for Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a micromachined resonant pressure sensor. The sensor is designed to optimize the sensitivity and reduce the cross-talk between the driving electrodes and sensing electrodes. The relationship between the sensitivity of the sensor and the main design parameters is analyzed both theoretically and numerically. The sensing and driving electrodes are optimized to get both high sensing capacitance and low cross-talk. This sensor is fabricated using a micromachining process based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI wafer. An open-loop measurement system and a closed-loop self-oscillation system is employed to measure the characteristics of the sensor. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a pressure sensitivity of about 29 Hz/kPa, a nonlinearity of 0.02%FS, a hysteresis error of 0.05%FS, and a repeatability error of 0.01%FS. The temperature coefficient is less than 2 Hz/°C in the range of −40 to 80 °C and the short-term stability of the sensor is better than 0.005%FS.

  14. Effect of Dynamic Pressure on the Performance of Thermoacoustic Refrigerator with Aluminium (Al) Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bheemsha; Nayak, B. Ramesh; Shivakumara, N. V.

    2018-04-01

    In practice the refrigerants are being used in the conventional refrigeration system to get the required cooling effect. These refrigerants produce Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and Hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which are highly harmful to the environment, particularly depleting of ozone layers resulting in green house emissions. In order to overcome these effects, the research needs to be focused on the development of an ecofriendly refrigeration system. The thermoacoustic refrigeration system is one among such system where the sound waves are used to compress and expand the gas particles. This study focuses on the effect of dynamic pressure on the thermoacoustic refrigerator made of aluminium with overall length of 748.82 mm, and the entire inner surface of the resonator tube was coated with 2mm thickness of polyurethane to minimize the heat losses to the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted with different stack geometries i.e. parallel plates having 0.119 mm thick with spacing between the plates maintained at 0.358 mm, 1mm diameter pipes, 2mm diameter pipes and 4 mm diameter pipes. Experiments were also conducted with different drive ratios of 0.6%, 1% and 1.6% for a constant dynamic pressure of 2 bar and 10 bar for helium and air as working medium. The results were plotted with the help of graphs, the variation of coefficient of performance (COP) and the relative coefficient of performance (COPR) for the above said conditions were calculated.

  15. Effects on Vocal Fold Collision and Phonation Threshold Pressure of Resonance Tube Phonation with Tube End in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enflo, Laura; Sundberg, Johan; Romedahl, Camilla; McAllister, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Resonance tube phonation in water (RTPW) or in air is a voice therapy method successfully used for treatment of several voice pathologies. Its effect on the voice has not been thoroughly studied. This investigation analyzes the effects of RTPW on collision and phonation threshold pressures (CTP and PTP), the lowest subglottal pressure…

  16. {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance study of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirer, K.R., E-mail: krshirer@ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Dioguardi, A.P.; Bush, B.T.; Crocker, J.; Lin, C.H.; Klavins, P. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Cooley, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maple, M.B. [Department of Physics and Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States); Chang, K.B.; Poeppelmeier, K.R. [Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Curro, N.J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of single crystals and aligned powders of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under pressure in the hidden order and paramagnetic phases. We find that the Knight shift decreases with applied pressure, consistent with previous measurements of the static magnetic susceptibility. Previous measurements of the spin lattice relaxation time revealed a partial suppression of the density of states below 30 K. This suppression persists under pressure, and the onset temperature is mildly enhanced.

  17. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  −100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  −0.967 kHz hPa −1 , namely  −0.69 ppm hPa −1 , which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW. (paper)

  18. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Steffen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB significantly improves heart rate variability (HRV. Breathing at resonance frequency (RF, approximately 6 breaths/min constitutes a key part of HRVB training and is hypothesized to be a pathway through which biofeedback improves HRV. No studies to date, however, have experimentally examined whether RF breathing impacts measures of HRV. The present study addressed this question by comparing three groups: the RF group breathed at their determined RF for 15 min; the RF + 1 group breathed at 1 breath/min higher than their determined RF for 15 min; and the third group sat quietly for 15 min. After this 15-min period, all groups participated in the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT for 8 min, and then sat quietly during a 10-min recovery period. HRV, blood pressure, and mood were measured throughout the experiment. Groups were not significantly different on any of the measures at baseline. After the breathing exercise, the RF group reported higher positive mood than the other two groups and a significantly higher LF/HF HRV ratio relative to the control group, a key goal in HRVB training (p < 0.05. Additionally, the RF group showed lower systolic blood pressure during the PASAT and during the recovery period relative to the control group, with the RF + 1 group not being significantly different from either group (p < 0.05. Overall, RF breathing appears to play an important role in the positive effect HRVB has on measures of HRV.

  19. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Slit shaped microwave induced atmospheric pressure plasma based on a parallel plate transmission line resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. K.; Seo, Y. S.; Lee, H. Wk; Aman-ur-Rehman; Kim, G. C.; Lee, J. K.

    2011-11-01

    A new type of microwave-excited atmospheric pressure plasma source, based on the principle of parallel plate transmission line resonator, is developed for the treatment of large areas in biomedical applications such as skin treatment and wound healing. A stable plasma of 20 mm width is sustained by a small microwave power source operated at a frequency of 700 MHz and a gas flow rate of 0.9 slm. Plasma impedance and plasma density of this plasma source are estimated by fitting the calculated reflection coefficient to the measured one. The estimated plasma impedance shows a decreasing trend while estimated plasma density shows an increasing trend with the increase in the input power. Plasma uniformity is confirmed by temperature and optical emission distribution measurements. Plasma temperature is sustained at less than 40 °C and abundant amounts of reactive species, which are important agents for bacteria inactivation, are detected over the entire plasma region. Large area treatment ability of this newly developed device is verified through bacteria inactivation experiment using E. coli. Sterilization experiment shows a large bacterial killing mark of 25 mm for a plasma treatment time of 10 s.

  1. Analytical investigation of microwave resonances of a curling probe for low and high-pressure plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2017-01-01

    The concept of ‘active plasma resonance spectroscopy’ (APRS) has attracted greater interest in recent years as an established plasma diagnostic technique. The APRS describes a class of related methods utilizing the intrinsic ability of plasma to resonate at or near the electron plasma frequency {ω\\text{pe}} . The Curling probe (CP) as a novel realization of the APRS idea, is a miniaturized spiral slot embedded flatly in the chamber wall. Consequently, a plasma diagnostic technique with minimum disturbance and without metal contamination can be developed. To measure the plasma parameters the CP is fed with a weak frequency-swept signal from the exterior of the plasma chamber by a network analyzer which also records the response of the plasma versus the frequency. The resonance behavior is strongly dependent on the electron density and the gas pressure. The CP has also the advantage of resonating at a frequency greater than {ω\\text{pe}} which is dependent on the spiral’s length. The double resonance characteristic gives the CP the ability to be applied in varying plasma regimes. Assuming that the spiralization does not have a considerable effect on the resonances, a ‘straightened’ infinite length CP has recently been investigated (Arshadi and Brinkmann 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 045014) to obtain the surface wave resonances. This work generalizes the approach and models the CP by a rectangular slot-type resonator located between plasma and quartz. Cold plasma theory and Maxwell’s equations are utilized to compute the electromagnetic fields propagating into the plasma by the diffraction of an incident plane wave at the slot. A mathematical model is employed and both kinds of resonances are derived. The analytical study of this paper shows good agreement with the numerical results of the probe inventors.

  2. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  3. Exploring nuclear magnetic resonance at the highest pressure. Closing the pseudogap under pressure in a high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a novel probe design for high pressure NMR experiments in gem anvil cells (GAC) was used which places a small microcoil inside the high pressure volume as the detection coil. Based on tests carried out at ambient pressure and high pressure of 42 kbar it is demonstrated that this approach is indeed feasible and results in an increase of sensitivity by two orders of magnitude compared to previous GAC-NMR designs. The design was then successfully employed in the investigation of the electronic properties of metallic aluminum and the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 at pressures of up to 101 kbar. Because of its improved sensitivity and the potential to achieve even higher pressures, the microcoil GAC-NMR setup should prove useful in the investigation of materials under high pressure conditions in the future. In the case of metallic aluminum, the effect of pressure on the electronic density of states at the Fermi level was probed via the Knight-shift K and the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 at room temperature up to a pressure of 101 kbar, extending the pressure range of previous NMR measurements by a factor of 14 [72]. Most notably, a decrease of K(p) by 11% is detected in the investigated pressure range that is inconsistent with a free electron behavior of the density of states. Numerical band structure calculations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data suggest that the observed changes of K and T 1 are due to a kink in the electronic states at a Lifshitz-transition at about 75 kbar which has not been observed previously. A further decrease of K by a factor of 2 is predicted to occur in the pressure range up to 300 kbar. In addition, an increase of the NMR linewidths of the metallic aluminum signal was observed above about 42 kbar that is inconsistent with a pure dipolar linewidth. Based on an analysis of the field dependence of this effect it was ascribed to a small additional quadrupolar broadening which is

  4. Offline combination of pressurized fluid extraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for antioxidant activity of grape skin extracts assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polovka, M.; Šťavíková, Lenka; Hohnová, Barbora; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, č. 51 (2010), s. 7990-8000 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA MŠk LC06023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : pressurized fluid extraction * electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy * antioxidant activity Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  5. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, David W.; Sears, Jesse A.; Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2017-12-05

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  6. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  7. Exploring nuclear magnetic resonance at the highest pressure. Closing the pseudogap under pressure in a high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Thomas

    2013-05-13

    In the present work, a novel probe design for high pressure NMR experiments in gem anvil cells (GAC) was used which places a small microcoil inside the high pressure volume as the detection coil. Based on tests carried out at ambient pressure and high pressure of 42 kbar it is demonstrated that this approach is indeed feasible and results in an increase of sensitivity by two orders of magnitude compared to previous GAC-NMR designs. The design was then successfully employed in the investigation of the electronic properties of metallic aluminum and the high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} at pressures of up to 101 kbar. Because of its improved sensitivity and the potential to achieve even higher pressures, the microcoil GAC-NMR setup should prove useful in the investigation of materials under high pressure conditions in the future. In the case of metallic aluminum, the effect of pressure on the electronic density of states at the Fermi level was probed via the Knight-shift K and the spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} at room temperature up to a pressure of 101 kbar, extending the pressure range of previous NMR measurements by a factor of 14 [72]. Most notably, a decrease of K(p) by 11% is detected in the investigated pressure range that is inconsistent with a free electron behavior of the density of states. Numerical band structure calculations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data suggest that the observed changes of K and T{sub 1} are due to a kink in the electronic states at a Lifshitz-transition at about 75 kbar which has not been observed previously. A further decrease of K by a factor of 2 is predicted to occur in the pressure range up to 300 kbar. In addition, an increase of the NMR linewidths of the metallic aluminum signal was observed above about 42 kbar that is inconsistent with a pure dipolar linewidth. Based on an analysis of the field dependence of this effect it was ascribed to a small additional

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim; Andersson, Jan T.; Mö ller, Isabelle; Amad, Maan H.; Witt, Matthí as; Sarathy, Mani

    2013-01-01

    oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same

  9. Production of atmospheric pressure microwave plasma with dielectric half-mirror resonator and its application to polymer surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Keyamura, Kazuki; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2018-06-01

    For the surface treatment of a polymer tube, a ring-shaped atmospheric pressure microwave plasma (APMP) using a coaxial waveguide is studied. In this APMP, a dielectric plate is used not only as a partial mirror for cavity resonation but also for the precise alignment of the discharge gap for ring-shaped plasma production. The optimum position of the dielectric plate is investigated by electromagnetic wave simulation. On the basis of simulation results, a ring-shaped plasma with good uniformity along the ring is produced. The coaxial APMP is applied to the surface treatment of ethylene tetrafluoroethylene. A very fast surface modification within 3 s is observed.

  10. Ultrasensitive thermometer for atmospheric pressure operation based on a micromechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Pini, V.; Tamayo, J.

    2014-01-01

    For highly integrated systems for bio and chemical analysis a precise and integrated measurement of temperature is of fundamental importance. We have developed an ultrasensitive thermometer based on a micromechanical resonator for operation in air. The high quality factor and the strong temperatu...

  11. Dynamic high pressure induced strong and weak hydrogen bonds enhanced by pre-resonance stimulated Raman scattering in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Fabing; Gong, Nan; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2017-12-11

    355 nm pulsed laser is employed to excite pre-resonance forward stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) of liquid water at ambient temperature. Due to the shockwave induced dynamic high pressure, the obtained Raman spectra begin to exhibit double peaks distribution at 3318 and 3373 cm -1 with the input energy of 17 mJ,which correspond with OH stretching vibration with strong and weak hydrogen (H) bonds. With laser energy rising from 17 to 27 mJ, the Stokes line at 3318 cm -1 shifts to 3255 and 3230 cm -1 because of the high pressure being enlarged. When the energy is up to 32 mJ, only 3373 cm -1 peak exists. The strong and weak H bond exhibit quite different energy dependent behaviors.

  12. High pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy with nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Saburo [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Science

    1996-04-01

    The first observation of the pressure-induced transition from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic SrFeO{sub 3} was succeeded by measuring Moessbauer spectroscopy under high pressure produced by the diamond anvil cell (DAC). Sample is a polycrystal powder of antiferromagnetic SrFe0{sub 3} with the Neel temperature T{sub N}=140 K, the cubic system and perovskite type crystal. The average pressures used were 44 GPa and 74 GPa (300 K). SrFeO{sub 3} is paramagnetic material at 300 K, but the Neel temperature increases more than 300 K under high pressure and the quantized axis turns to the external magnetic field, so that we take it as it means the system displaying the phase transition to the ferromagnet. By the method, we can practice the measurement at low and high temperature under the external magnetic field by using the polarized light source. (S.Y.)

  13. On the plasma confinement by acoustic resonance. An innovation for electrodeless high-pressure discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courret, Gilles; Nikkola, Petri; Wasterlain, Sébastien; Gudozhnik, Olexandr; Girardin, Michel; Braun, Jonathan; Gavin, Serge; Croci, Mirko; Egolf, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    In an applied research project on the development of a pulsed microwave sulfur lamp prototype of 1 kW, we have discovered an amazing phenomenon in which the plasma forms a ball staying at the center of the bulb despite gravity, thus protecting the glass from melting. In this paper, it is shown that this results from an acoustic resonance in a spherical mode. Measurements of the plasma response to short pulses are presented showing beats at the spherical resonance. It is demonstrated that the beats could result from the simultaneous excitation of two normal modes with a frequency difference of approximately 1%. One of the two frequencies matches precisely the microwave pulses repetition, a little below 30 kHz. Thus this one is due to a forced oscillation, whereas the other one is due to a free oscillation. The phase velocity of sound was calculated as a function of temperature in order to find the series of temperatures at which a resonance would occur if the bulb were an isothermal solid sphere. The mean temperature inside the actual bulb was determined from the only doublet of this series, that has characteristic frequencies close enough to cause the observed beats. In addition, one of these two modes has a spherical symmetry that can explain the plasma ball formation. The obtained mean temperature is consistent with the direct measurements on the bulb surface as well as with the temperature in the core of a similar plasma found in the literature. We have also proposed a model of the resonance onset based on the acoustic dispersion and the sound amplification due to electromagnetic coupling.

  14. Intensity and pressure dependence of resonance fluorescence of OH induced by a tunable UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, D. K.; Wang, C. C.; Hanabusa, M.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity and pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum of OH in the presence of N2 and H2O molecules was studied. Saturation of the absorption transition was observed at low pressures, and the corresponding fluorescence signal was found to vary as the square root of the exciting intensity. This observed dependence agreed with the predicted dependence which took into account the presence of laser modes in the spectrum of the exciting radiation. With full laser power incident, a saturation parameter as high as 3 x 10 to the 5th was observed. The fluorescence spectrum was found to peak at 3145 and at 3090 A, with the relative peak intensities dependent upon gas pressures and upon the particular rotational electronic transition used for excitation. It is concluded that vibrational relaxation of the electronically excited OH due to water vapor in the system plays a dominant role in determining the observed fluorescence spectrum.

  15. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Planning a Pedicled Perforator Flap for Pressure Sores in the Gluteal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-June; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Woo, Kyong-Je

    2018-04-01

    Pedicled perforator flaps (PPFs) have been widely used to treat pressure sores in the gluteal region. Selection of a reliable perforator is crucial for successful surgical treatment of pressure sores using PPFs. In this study, we evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in planning PPF reconstruction of pressure sores in the gluteal region. A retrospective chart review was performed in patients who had undergone these PPF reconstructions and who had received preoperative MRI. Preoperatively, the extent of infection and necrotic tissue was evaluated using MRI, and a reliable perforator was identified, considering the perforator location in relation to the defect, perforator size, and perforator courses. Intraoperatively, the targeted perforator was marked on the skin at the locations measured on the MRI images, and the marked location was confirmed using intraoperative handheld Doppler. Superior gluteal artery, inferior gluteal artery, or parasacral perforators were used for the PPFs. Surgical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 12 PPFs were performed in 12 patients. Superior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 7 patients, inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps were performed in 3 patients, and parasacral perforator flaps were performed in 2 patients. We could identify a reliable perforator on MRI, and it was found at the predicted locations in all cases. There was only one case of partial flap necrosis. There was no recurrence of the pressure sores during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months (range = 3-15 months). In selected patients with gluteal pressure sores, MRI is a suitable means for not only providing information about disease extent and comorbidities but also for evaluating perforators for PPF reconstructions.

  16. Association of Right Ventricular Pressure and Volume Overload with Non-Ischemic Septal Fibrosis on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon Kim

    Full Text Available Non-ischemic fibrosis (NIF on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR has been linked to poor prognosis, but its association with adverse right ventricular (RV remodeling is unknown. This study examined a broad cohort of patients with RV dysfunction, so as to identify relationships between NIF and RV remodeling indices, including RV pressure load, volume and wall stress.The population comprised patients with RV dysfunction (EF 6-fold more common in the highest, vs. the lowest, common tertile of PASP and RV size (p<0.001.Among wall stress components, NIF was independently associated with RV chamber dilation and afterload, supporting the concept that NIF is linked to adverse RV chamber remodeling.

  17. Nitric oxide concentration measurements in atmospheric pressure flames using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, N.; Kulatilaka, W. D.; Naik, S. V.; Laurendeau, N. M.; Lucht, R. P.; Kuehner, J. P.; Roy, S.; Katta, V. R.; Gord, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    We report the application of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) for measurements of nitric oxide concentration ([NO]) in three different atmospheric pressure flames. Visible pump (532 nm) and Stokes (591 nm) beams are used to probe the Q-branch of the Raman transition. A significant resonance enhancement is obtained by tuning an ultraviolet probe beam (236 nm) into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v’=0, v”=1) vibrational band of the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic system of NO. ERE-CARS spectra are recorded at various heights within a hydrogen-air flame producing relatively low concentrations of NO over a Hencken burner. Good agreement is obtained between NO ERE-CARS measurements and the results of flame computations using UNICORN, a two-dimensional flame code. Excellent agreement between measured and calculated NO spectra is also obtained when using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code for heavily sooting acetylene-air flames (φ=0.8 to φ=1.6) on the same Hencken burner. Finally, NO concentration profiles are measured using ERE-CARS in a laminar, counter-flow, non-premixed hydrogen-air flame. Spectral scans are recorded by probing the Q1 (9.5), Q1 (13.5) and Q1 (17.5) Raman transitions. The measured shape of the [NO] profile is in good agreement with that predicted using the OPPDIF code, even without correcting for collisional effects. These comparisons between [NO] measurements and predictions establish the utility of ERE-CARS for detection of NO in flames with large temperature and concentration gradients as well as in sooting environments.

  18. Characterization of non-polar aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil using atmospheric pressure laser ionization and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APLI FT-ICR MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Wolfgang; Panda, Saroj K; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2008-07-01

    We report on the successful application of the recently introduced atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) method as a novel tool for the analysis of crude oil and its components. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, unambiguous determination of key compounds in this complex matrix with unprecedented sensitivity is presented.

  19. Investigations of radiation pressure : optical side-band cooling of a trampoline resonator and the effect of superconductivity on the Casimir force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerkens, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of two subjects, that are both a consequence of radiation pressure. In optomechanics, light is used to influence the motion of a trampoline resonator. It is possible to slow down this motion, cooling it from room temperature to an effective temperature of several milllikelvins,

  20. Multiscale Pore Throat Network Reconstruction of Tight Porous Media Constrained by Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R.; Prodanovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the low porosity and permeability of tight porous media, hydrocarbon productivity strongly depends on the pore structure. Effective characterization of pore/throat sizes and reconstruction of their connectivity in tight porous media remains challenging. Having a representative pore throat network, however, is valuable for calculation of other petrophysical properties such as permeability, which is time-consuming and costly to obtain by experimental measurements. Due to a wide range of length scales encountered, a combination of experimental methods is usually required to obtain a comprehensive picture of the pore-body and pore-throat size distributions. In this work, we combine mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements by percolation theory to derive pore-body size distribution, following the work by Daigle et al. (2015). However, in their work, the actual pore-throat sizes and the distribution of coordination numbers are not well-defined. To compensate for that, we build a 3D unstructured two-scale pore throat network model initialized by the measured porosity and the calculated pore-body size distributions, with a tunable pore-throat size and coordination number distribution, which we further determine by matching the capillary pressure vs. saturation curve from MICP measurement, based on the fact that the mercury intrusion process is controlled by both the pore/throat size distributions and the connectivity of the pore system. We validate our model by characterizing several core samples from tight Middle East carbonate, and use the network model to predict the apparent permeability of the samples under single phase fluid flow condition. Results show that the permeability we get is in reasonable agreement with the Coreval experimental measurements. The pore throat network we get can be used to further calculate relative permeability curves and simulate multiphase flow behavior, which will provide valuable

  1. Delayed clearance of cerebrospinal fluid tracer from entorhinal cortex in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: A glymphatic magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per K; Ringstad, Geir

    2018-01-01

    The glymphatic system plays a key role for clearance of waste solutes from the rodent brain. We recently found evidence of glymphatic circulation in the human brain when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tracer in conjunction with multiple MRI acquisitions (gMRI). The present study explored the hypothesis that reduced glymphatic clearance in entorhinal cortex (ERC) may be instrumental in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) dementia. gMRI acquisitions were obtained over a 24-48 h time span in cognitively affected iNPH patients and non-cognitively affected patients with suspected CSF leaks. The CSF tracer enrichment was determined as changes in normalized MRI T1 signal units. The study included 30 patients with iNPH and 8 individuals with suspected CSF leaks (i.e. reference individuals). Compared to reference individuals, iNPH patients presented with higher medial temporal lobe atrophy score and Evan's index and inferior ERC thickness. We found delayed clearance of the intrathecal CSF tracer gadobutrol from CSF, the ERC and adjacent white matter, suggesting impaired glymphatic circulation. Reduced clearance and accumulation of toxic waste product such as amyloid-β may be a mechanism behind dementia in iNPH. Glymphatic MRI (gMRI) may become a tool for assessment of early dementia.

  2. Estimation of pulmonary artery pressure in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension by quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, T I; Boxt, L M; Katz, J; Reagan, K; Barst, R J

    1994-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) images for estimating mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was tested by comparing main pulmonary artery (MPA) and middescending thoracic aorta (AO) caliber in 12 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) with measurements made in eight other patients who were observed for diseases other than heart disease (controls). The ratio MPA/AO and the ratios of vessel caliber normalized to body surface area (MPAI and AOI, respectively) were computed. The PAP was obtained in all PPH patients and compared with caliber measurements. The PPH MPA (3.6 +/- 0.8 cm) was significantly larger than the control MPA (2.9 +/- 0.3 cm, p = 0.02); the PPH MPAI (2.8 +/- 0.7 cm/M2) was significantly greater than the control MPA (1.7 +/- 0.2 cm/M2, p < 0.0001). Control AO (2.2 +/- 0.3 cm) was significantly greater than PPH AO (1.6 +/- 0.4 cm, p < 0.0001); there was no significant difference between control AOI (1.3 +/- 0.2 cm/M2) and PPH AOI (1.2 +/- 0.2 cm/M2, p = 0.25). The PPH MPA/AO (2.3 +/- 0.6) was significantly greater than the control MPA/AO (1.3 +/- 0.1, p < 0.0001); overlap between MPA in the two groups was eliminated by indexing values to AO caliber (MPA/AO). Among PPH patients there was strong correlation between PAP and MPA/AO (PAP = 24 x MPA/AO + 3.7, r = 0.7, p < 0.01). Increased MPA/AO denotes the presence of pulmonary hypertension and may be used to estimate PAP.

  3. Pressure-Raman study of resonant TO(Γ)-two-phonon decay processes in ZnS: Comparison of three isotope compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallman, R.E.; Weinstein, B.A.; Serrano, J.; Lauck, R.; Cardona, M.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Ritter, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressure-Raman studies (to 15 GPa, at 300 K and 16 K) are reported on 64 Zn 34 S, 68 Zn 32 S, and natural ZnS to compare the effects of resonant 3-phonon mixing on the TO(Γ) phonons for the different isotope compositions. Under pressure the TO(Γ) Raman profiles exhibit several distinct features, and a sharp Lorentzian TO(Γ) peak eventually emerges at a threshold pressure P Th that differs for each isotope composition. These effects are due to resonant mixing of the TO(Γ) phonon with TA+LA combination modes. Calculations based on a bond-charge model and perturbation theory reproduce the observed pressure variations in the shape and the width of the TO(Γ) peaks. It is shown that these changes relate to singularities in the TA+LA density of states. Mass scaling of the TO(Γ) and TA+LA modes explains the isotope effect on P Th , and leads to the estimate γ LA(W) ∝1.2. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Pressure-Raman study of resonant TO({gamma})-two-phonon decay processes in ZnS: Comparison of three isotope compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallman, R.E.; Weinstein, B.A. [Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Serrano, J.; Lauck, R.; Cardona, M. [Max Plank Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, 70569 Stutgart (Germany); Cantarero, A.; Garro, N. [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universtitat de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ritter, T.M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics,UNC Pembroke, North Carolina 28372 (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Pressure-Raman studies (to 15 GPa, at 300 K and 16 K) are reported on {sup 64}Zn{sup 34}S, {sup 68}Zn{sup 32}S, and natural ZnS to compare the effects of resonant 3-phonon mixing on the TO({gamma}) phonons for the different isotope compositions. Under pressure the TO({gamma}) Raman profiles exhibit several distinct features, and a sharp Lorentzian TO({gamma}) peak eventually emerges at a threshold pressure P{sub Th} that differs for each isotope composition. These effects are due to resonant mixing of the TO({gamma}) phonon with TA+LA combination modes. Calculations based on a bond-charge model and perturbation theory reproduce the observed pressure variations in the shape and the width of the TO({gamma}) peaks. It is shown that these changes relate to singularities in the TA+LA density of states. Mass scaling of the TO({gamma}) and TA+LA modes explains the isotope effect on P{sub Th}, and leads to the estimate {gamma}{sub LA(W)} {proportional_to}1.2. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. The low-power low-pressure flow resonance in a natural circulation cooled boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Stekelenburg, A.J.C. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    The last few years the possibility of flow resonances during the start-up phase of natural circulation cooled BWRs has been put forward by several authors. The present paper reports on actual oscillations observed at the Dodewaard reactor, the world`s only operating BWR cooled by natural circulation. In addition, results of a parameter study performed by means of a simple theoretical model are presented. The influence of relevant parameters on the resonance characteristics, being the decay ratio and the resonance frequency, is investigated and explained.

  6. The appearance of homogeneous antiferromagnetism in URu sub 2 Si sub 2 under high pressure: a sup 2 sup 9 Si nuclear magnetic resonance study

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, K; Kohara, T; Amitsuka, H; Kuwahara, K; Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the low-temperature phase appearing below T sub o = 17.5 K in URu sub 2 Si sub 2 by means of sup 2 sup 9 Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a pressure range from 0 to 17.5 kbar across the pressure-induced phase transition at P sub c = 15 kbar. At pressures below P sub c , we have observed the sup 2 sup 9 Si NMR lines arising from antiferromagnetic (AF) and paramagnetic (PM) regions in the sample, giving evidence for a phase-separated AF ordering below T sub o. The AF region increases in volume fraction with increasing pressure up to P sub c. In the PM region, the temperature-dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate at Si sites shows a rapid decrease below T sub o , strongly suggesting the occurrence of a phase transition driven by a hidden order parameter. As applied pressure exceeds P sub c , the AF ordering appears uniformly at T sub o throughout the sample. In the pressure range from 0 to 17.5 kbar, the magnitude of the internal field at Si sites in the AF region rema...

  7. Numerical investigation on an array of Helmholtz resonators for the reduction of micro-pressure waves in modern and future high-speed rail tunnel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbutt, J. A.; Vahdati, M.; Carolan, D.; Dear, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    Previous research has proposed that an array of Helmholtz resonators may be an effective method for suppressing the propagation of pressure and sound waves, generated by a high-speed train entering and moving in a tunnel. The array can be used to counteract environmental noise from tunnel portals and also the emergence of a shock wave in the tunnel. The implementation of an array of Helmholtz resonators in current and future high-speed train-tunnel systems is studied. Wave propagation in the tunnel is modelled using a quasi-one-dimensional formulation, accounting for non-linear effects, wall friction and the diffusivity of sound. A multi-objective genetic algorithm is then used to optimise the design of the array, subject to the geometric constraints of a demonstrative tunnel system and the incident wavefront in order to attenuate the propagation of pressure waves. It is shown that an array of Helmholtz resonators can be an effective countermeasure for various tunnel lengths. In addition, the array can be designed to function effectively over a wide operating envelope, ensuring it will still function effectively as train speeds increase into the future.

  8. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  9. A noncontact wireless passive radio frequency (RF) resonant pressure sensor with optimized design for applications in high-temperature environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen; Tan, Qiulin; Xiong, Jijun; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Ren, Zhong; Luo, Tao; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2014-01-01

    A noncontact wireless passive pressure sensor based on alumina ceramic for pressure measurement is presented in this paper. A faithful pressure signal in harsh environment is captured through wireless sensing, and a novel antenna design method is developed to increase the measurement distance between the antenna and the sensor. The sensor is fabricated using a novel no-co-fired technology, and the properties of the alumina ceramic and platinum ensure the feasibility of the sensor in high-temperature environments. The experimental results show that the coupled distance between the antenna and the sensor can be up to 5.5 cm, and the designed sensor, featuring improved structural parameters, has a high responsivity (15.5 kHz kPa −1 ) in a pressure environment at room temperature. The sensor can be coupled with the antenna at 850 °C, which verifies the feasibility in high-temperature environments. (paper)

  10. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  11. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, K; Winter, R

    2005-08-01

    COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80 degrees C) and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13 degrees C). Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea) on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM) led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  12. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vogtt

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80ºC and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13ºC. Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  13. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands.

  14. Magnetic resonance elastography of the lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver: correlation of shear stiffness with trans-respiratory system pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with (1) H based magnetic resonance elastography is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (P(ao) ) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different P(ao) values. Mean (±STD error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13), and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for P(ao) values of 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O, respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing P(ao) , in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with (1) H magnetic resonance elastography using a noninvasive mechanical driver and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in P(ao) . Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Maintained functionality of an implantable radiotelemetric blood pressure and heart rate sensor after magnetic resonance imaging in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nölte, I; Boll, H; Figueiredo, G; Groden, C; Brockmann, M A; Gorbey, S; Lemmer, B

    2011-01-01

    Radiotelemetric sensors for in vivo assessment of blood pressure and heart rate are widely used in animal research. MRI with implanted sensors is regarded as contraindicated as transmitter malfunction and injury of the animal may be caused. Moreover, artefacts are expected to compromise image evaluation. In vitro, the function of a radiotelemetric sensor (TA11PA-C10, Data Sciences International) after exposure to MRI up to 9.4 T was assessed. The magnetic force of the electromagnetic field on the sensor as well as radiofrequency (RF)-induced sensor heating was analysed. Finally, MRI with an implanted sensor was performed in a rat. Imaging artefacts were analysed at 3.0 and 9.4 T ex vivo and in vivo. Transmitted 24 h blood pressure and heart rate were compared before and after MRI to verify the integrity of the telemetric sensor. The function of the sensor was not altered by MRI up to 9.4 T. The maximum force exerted on the sensor was 273 ± 50 mN. RF-induced heating was ruled out. Artefacts impeded the assessment of the abdomen and thorax in a dead rat, but not of the head and neck. MRI with implanted radiotelemetric sensors is feasible in principal. The tested sensor maintains functionality up to 9.4 T. Artefacts hampered abdominal and throacic imaging in rats, while assessment of the head and neck is possible

  16. Hyperdynamic CSF motion profiles found in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease assessed by fluid mechanics derived from magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Ken; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Naokazu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2017-10-18

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not only ascertain morphological features, but also measures physiological properties such as fluid velocity or pressure gradient. The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in patients with morphological abnormalities such as enlarged brain ventricles and subarachnoid spaces. We used a time-resolved three dimensional phase contrast (3D-PC) MRI technique to quantitatively evaluate CSF dynamics in the Sylvian aqueduct of healthy elderly individuals and patients with either idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) presenting with ventricular enlargement. Nineteen healthy elderly individuals, ten iNPH patients, and seven AD patients (all subjects ≥ 60 years old) were retrospectively evaluated 3D-PC MRI. The CSF velocity, pressure gradient, and rotation in the Sylvian aqueduct were quantified and compared between the three groups using Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Mann-Whitney U tests. There was no statistically significant difference in velocity among the three groups. The pressure gradient was not significantly different between the iNPH and AD groups, but was significantly different between the iNPH group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001), and similarly, between the AD group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001). Rotation was not significantly different between the iNPH and AD groups, but was significantly different between the iNPH group and healthy controls (p < 0.001), and similarly, between the AD group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001). Quantitative analysis of CSF dynamics with time resolved 3D-PC MRI revealed differences and similarities in the Sylvian aqueduct between healthy elderly individuals, iNPH patients, and AD patients. The results showed that CSF motion is in a hyperdynamic state in both iNPH and AD patient groups compared to healthy elderly individuals, and that iNPH patients and AD patients display similar CSF motion profiles.

  17. Portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis: indirect assessment of hepatic venous pressure gradient by measuring azygos flow with 2D-cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouya, Hervé; Grabar, Sophie; Vignaux, Olivier; Saade, Anastasia; Pol, Stanislas; Legmann, Paul; Sogni, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    To measure azygos, portal and aortic flow by two-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D-cine PC MRI), and to compare the MRI values to hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements, in patients with cirrhosis. Sixty-nine patients with cirrhosis were prospectively included. All patients underwent HVPG measurements, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 2D-cine PC MRI measurements of azygos, portal and aortic blood flow. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between the blood flow and HVPG. The performance of 2D-cine PC MRI to diagnose severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 16 mmHg) was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and area under the curves (AUC) were compared. Azygos and aortic flow values were associated with HVPG in univariate linear regression model. Azygos flow (p portal blood flow (AUC = 0.40 (95 % CI [0.25-0.54]). 2D-cine PC MRI is a promising technique to evaluate significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. • Noninvasive HVPG assessment can be performed with MRI azygos flow. • Azygos MRI flow is an easy-to-measure marker to detect significant portal hypertension. • MRI flow is more specific that varice grade to detect portal hypertension.

  18. Clinical significance of cerebrospinal fluid tap test and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography findings of tight high convexity in patients with possible idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Furuse, Motomasa; Nishida, Namiko; Oowaki, Hisayuki; Matsumoto, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a treatable syndrome with a classical triad of symptoms. The Japanese iNPH guidelines indicate that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test and tight high-convexity on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are important for the diagnosis. The relationships between the effectiveness of CSF shunt surgery in possible iNPH patients, the tap test result, and the MR imaging/computed tomography (CT) findings of tight high-convexity were evaluated in 88 possible iNPH patients (mean age 75 years) with one or more of the classical triad of symptoms, and mild to moderate ventricular dilation. All patients underwent the tap test in the outpatient clinic, and patients and caregivers assessed the clinical changes during one week. The tap test was positive in 47 patients and negative in 41 patients. Surgery was performed in 19 patients with positive tap test, and was effective in 17 patients. Although the findings were inconsistent in some patients, the result of the tap test was found to be highly correlated with the MR imaging/CT finding of tight high-convexity (p<0.0001), confirming that both these diagnostic tests are promising predictors of shunt effectiveness. (author)

  19. Renal Artery Stenosis Evaluated with 3D-Gd-Magnetic Resonance Angiography Using Transstenotic Pressure Gradient as the Standard of Reference. A Multireader Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekloef, H.; Ahlstrom, H.; Bostrom, A.; Bergqvist, D.; Andren, B.; Karacagil, S.; Nyman, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 3D-Gd-magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in detecting hemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis (RAS). Material and Methods: Thirty patients evaluated for atherosclerotic RAS by MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively included. Standard of reference for hemodynamically significant RAS was a transstenotic gradient of 15 mmHg. DSA visualized 60 main renal arteries and 9 accessory arteries. Pressure gradient measurement (PGM) was available from 61 arteries. Three radiologists evaluated all examinations independently in a blinded fashion. Results: RAS was present in 26 arteries. On MRA, each reader identified 4 of 9 accessory renal arteries, a detection rate of 44%. The three readers correctly classified 22/25/22 of the 26 vessels with a significant gradient as >60% RAS and 31/25/32 of the 35 with a significant gradient as <60% RAS on MRA. Interobserver agreement was substantial. MRA image quality was adequate for RAS evaluations in all patients. ROC curves indicated that MRA is an adequate method for evaluating RAS. When screening for RAS, a 50% diameter reduction cut-off is better than 60%. RAS with 40-80% diameter reductions accounted for 65% of discrepancies. Conclusion: MRA is an adequate method for evaluating RAS limited mainly by poor detection rate for accessory renal arteries

  20. Portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis: indirect assessment of hepatic venous pressure gradient by measuring azygos flow with 2D-cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouya, Herve; Vignaux, Olivier; Saade, Anastasia; Legmann, Paul; Grabar, Sophie; Pol, Stanislas; Sogni, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    To measure azygos, portal and aortic flow by two-dimensional cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D-cine PC MRI), and to compare the MRI values to hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements, in patients with cirrhosis. Sixty-nine patients with cirrhosis were prospectively included. All patients underwent HVPG measurements, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 2D-cine PC MRI measurements of azygos, portal and aortic blood flow. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the correlation between the blood flow and HVPG. The performance of 2D-cine PC MRI to diagnose severe portal hypertension (HVPG ≥ 16 mmHg) was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and area under the curves (AUC) were compared. Azygos and aortic flow values were associated with HVPG in univariate linear regression model. Azygos flow (p < 10 -3 ), aortic flow (p = 0.001), age (p = 0.001) and presence of varices (p < 10 -3 ) were independently associated with HVPG. Azygos flow (AUC = 0.96 (95 % CI) [0.91-1.00]) had significantly higher AUC than aortic (AUC = 0.64 (95 % CI) [0.51-0.77]) or portal blood flow (AUC = 0.40 (95 % CI) [0.25-0.54]). 2D-cine PC MRI is a promising technique to evaluate significant portal hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. (orig.)

  1. Pressure dependence of conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracewell, B.L.; Hochheimer, H.D.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this work were to attempt the following: (1) Measure the pressure dependence of the electrical conductivity of several quasi-one-dimensional, charge-density-wave solids, including measurements along various crystal directions. (2) Measure photocurrents in selected MX solids at ambient and elevated pressures. (3) Measure the resonance Raman spectra for selected MX solids as a function of pressure

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  3. Assessment of cardiac function and hemodynamics in children and adults with right ventricular pressure overload: role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romeih, Soha

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that pressure overload on the right ventricle (RV) leads to RV dysfunction, with considerable morbidity and mortality. Therefore, appropriate RV evaluation is essential because timely intervention may preserve RV function and prevent irreversible RV damage. Currently,

  4. Note: Theoretical study on the gas pressure dependence of x-ray yield in TE111 cavity based electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Sen, Soubhadra; Baskaran, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adopting Langevin methodology, a pressure dependent frictional force term which represents the collisional effect is added to the Lorentz equation. The electrons are assumed to be starting from the uniformly distributed co-ordinates on the central plane. The trajectory of each electron is numerically simulated by solving the modified Lorentz equation for a given pressure. The Bremsstrahlung x-ray energy spectrum for each electron crossing the cavity wall boundary is obtained using the Duane-Hunt law. The total x-ray yield is estimated by adding the spectral contribution of each electron. The calculated yields are compared with the experimental results and a good agreement is found

  5. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Ina; Castaing, Jacques; Calligaro, Thomas; Salomon, Joseph; Aucouturier, Marc; Reinholz, Uwe; Weise, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS

  6. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Ina [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Castaing, Jacques [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)]. E-mail: jacques.castaing@culture.fr; Calligaro, Thomas [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Salomon, Joseph [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Aucouturier, Marc [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Reinholz, Uwe [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Hans-Peter [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS.

  7. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  8. Resonance sensitivity of hydropower and pumping stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, M.; Halanay, A.

    1984-09-01

    Comparative analysis of resonance diagrams for several hydropower and pumping stations with surge tanks and air chambers shows large differences in the maximum resonance pressures. A strategy is advocated which consists of hydraulic resonance computations coupled with practical surveillance measures during the operation of resonance sensitive hydraulic systems. A fundamental hydraulic scheme is considered consisting of a reservoir, a pressure tunnel, a surge tank, a penstock and a turbine combined into a hydropower station. It is suggested that for each hydraulic surge system it is necessary to carry out special resonance analyses following the normal procedure to obtain the resonance sensitivity. For hydraulic systems which are resonance sensitive, mechanical electronic equipment should be used to measure non-stationary pressures of the water in the conduit as a way of continuous surveillance during functioning. 6 references, 6 figures.

  9. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  10. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of off-centre Jahn-Teller [CuF sub 4 F sub 4] sup 6 sup - complexes in SrF sub 2 crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Ulanov, V A; Hoffmann, S K; Zaripov, M M

    2003-01-01

    Pressure and temperature variations of the spin-Hamiltonian parameters and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths of non-central Jahn-Teller [CuF sub 4 F sub 4] sup 6 sup - complexes in SrF sub 2 crystal were studied by continuous-wave EPR. It was found that the static spin-Hamiltonian parameters, found at T = 85 K and at normal pressure (g sub | sub | = 2.491, g sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r = 2.083, a sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l = 360, a sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r = 26, A sub x sub ' sub ' = 96, A sub y sub ' sub ' = 99, A sub z sub ' sub ' = 403 and beta sub e sub x sub p = 17 diameter), are slightly changed with hydrostatic pressure and, at T = 85 K and P = 550 MPa, become equal to g sub | sub | = 2.489, g sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r = 2.083, a sub | sub | 348, a sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l s...

  11. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  12. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  13. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  14. Combination of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure photoionization and laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotronic resonance mass spectrometry for the investigation of complex mixtures – Application to the petroleomic analysis of bio-oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzog, Jasmine [LCP-A2MC, FR 2843 Institut Jean Barriol de Chimie et Physique Moléculaires et Biomoléculaires, FR 3624 Réseau National de Spectrométrie de Masse FT-ICR à très haut champ, Université de Lorraine, ICPM, 1 boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Carré, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.carre@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, FR 2843 Institut Jean Barriol de Chimie et Physique Moléculaires et Biomoléculaires, FR 3624 Réseau National de Spectrométrie de Masse FT-ICR à très haut champ, Université de Lorraine, ICPM, 1 boulevard Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 03 (France); Le Brech, Yann [LRGP, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, ENSIC, 1, Rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy (France); Mackay, Colin Logan [SIRCAMS, School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3FJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Dufour, Anthony [LRGP, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, ENSIC, 1, Rue Grandville, 54000 Nancy (France); Mašek, Ondřej [UK Biochar Research Center, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-05-29

    The comprehensive description of complex mixtures such as bio-oils is required to understand and improve the different processes involved during biological, environmental or industrial operation. In this context, we have to consider how different ionization sources can improve a non-targeted approach. Thus, the Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) has been coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI), laser desorption ionization (LDI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) to characterize an oak pyrolysis bio-oil. Close to 90% of the all 4500 compound formulae has been attributed to C{sub x}H{sub y}O{sub z} with similar oxygen class compound distribution. Nevertheless, their relative abundance in respect with their double bound equivalent (DBE) value has evidenced significant differences depending on the ion source used. ESI has allowed compounds with low DBE but more oxygen atoms to be ionized. APPI has demonstrated the efficient ionization of less polar compounds (high DBE values and less oxygen atoms). The LDI behavior of bio-oils has been considered intermediate in terms of DBE and oxygen amounts but it has also been demonstrated that a significant part of the features are specifically detected by this ionization method. Thus, the complementarity of three different ionization sources has been successfully demonstrated for the exhaustive characterization by petroleomic approach of a complex mixture. - Highlights: • Non-targeted mass spectrometry by combining electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure photoionization and laser/desorption ionization. • Exhaustive description of pyrolytic bio-oil components. • Distinction of sugaric derivatives, lignin derivatives and lipids contained in a woody-based pyrolytic bio-oil.

  15. Combination of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure photoionization and laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotronic resonance mass spectrometry for the investigation of complex mixtures - Application to the petroleomic analysis of bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Jasmine; Carré, Vincent; Le Brech, Yann; Mackay, Colin Logan; Dufour, Anthony; Mašek, Ondřej; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2017-05-29

    The comprehensive description of complex mixtures such as bio-oils is required to understand and improve the different processes involved during biological, environmental or industrial operation. In this context, we have to consider how different ionization sources can improve a non-targeted approach. Thus, the Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) has been coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI), laser desorption ionization (LDI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) to characterize an oak pyrolysis bio-oil. Close to 90% of the all 4500 compound formulae has been attributed to C x H y O z with similar oxygen class compound distribution. Nevertheless, their relative abundance in respect with their double bound equivalent (DBE) value has evidenced significant differences depending on the ion source used. ESI has allowed compounds with low DBE but more oxygen atoms to be ionized. APPI has demonstrated the efficient ionization of less polar compounds (high DBE values and less oxygen atoms). The LDI behavior of bio-oils has been considered intermediate in terms of DBE and oxygen amounts but it has also been demonstrated that a significant part of the features are specifically detected by this ionization method. Thus, the complementarity of three different ionization sources has been successfully demonstrated for the exhaustive characterization by petroleomic approach of a complex mixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  17. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  18. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  19. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  20. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  1. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  2. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. These resonances occur when the betatron oscillation wave numbers ν/sub x/ or ν/sub y/ and the synchrotron wave number ν/sub s/ satisfy the relation (ν/sub x,y/ - mν/sub s/) = 5, with m an integer denoting the m/sup th/ satellite. The main difference between SPEAR II and SPEAR I is the value of ν/sub s/, which in SPEAR II is approximately 0.04, an order of magnitude larger than in SPEAR I. An ad hoc meeting was held at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, where details of the SPEAR II results were presented and various possible mechanisms for producing these resonances were discussed. Later, experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  3. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  4. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, M. J., E-mail: mweaver@physics.ucsb.edu; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwmeester, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-01-18

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  5. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, M. J.; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si 3 N 4 with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators

  6. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, M. J.; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Perock, B.; Heeck, K.; de Man, S.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si3N4 with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  7. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...

  8. Gravitoelectromagnetic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between gravitational and electromagnetic radiation has a rather long research history. It is well known, in particular, that gravity-wave distortions can drive propagating electromagnetic signals. Since forced oscillations provide the natural stage for resonances to occur, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances have been investigated as a means of more efficient gravity-wave detection methods. In this report, we consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields on a Minkowski background, which also applies to astrophysical environments where gravity is weak, at the second perturbative level. We use covariant methods that describe gravitational waves via the transverse component of the shear, instead of pure-tensor metric perturbations. The aim is to calculate the properties of the electromagnetic signal, which emerges from the interaction of its linear counterpart with an incoming gravitational wave. Our analysis shows how the wavelength and the amplitude of the gravitationally driven electromagnetic wave vary with the initial conditions. More specifically, for certain initial data, the amplitude of the induced electromagnetic signal is found to diverge. Analogous, diverging, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances were also reported in cosmology. Given that, we extend our Minkowski space study to cosmology and discuss analogies and differences in the physics and in the phenomenology of the Weyl-Maxwell coupling between the aforementioned two physical environments.

  9. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  10. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  11. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  12. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  13. Versatile resonance-tracking circuit for acoustic levitation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, K; Apfel, R E; Marston, P L

    1978-02-01

    Objects can be levitated by radiation pressure forces in an acoustic standing wave. In many circumstances it is important that the standing wave frequency remain locked on an acoustic resonance despite small changes in the resonance frequency. A self-locking oscillator circuit is described which tracks the resonance frequency by sensing the magnitude of the transducer current. The tracking principle could be applied to other resonant systems.

  14. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  15. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  16. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  17. Narrow dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdalov, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on np interactions indicating to existence of narrow resonances in pp-system are discussed. Possible theoretical interpretations of these resonances are given. Experimental characteristics of the dibaryon resonances with isospin I=2 are considered

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  19. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  20. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  1. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  2. Graphene Squeeze-Film Pressure Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolleman, Robin J; Davidovikj, Dejan; Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; van der Zant, Herre S J; Steeneken, Peter G

    2016-01-13

    The operating principle of squeeze-film pressure sensors is based on the pressure dependence of a membrane's resonance frequency, caused by the compression of the surrounding gas which changes the resonator stiffness. To realize such sensors, not only strong and flexible membranes are required, but also minimization of the membrane's mass is essential to maximize responsivity. Here, we demonstrate the use of a few-layer graphene membrane as a squeeze-film pressure sensor. A clear pressure dependence of the membrane's resonant frequency is observed, with a frequency shift of 4 MHz between 8 and 1000 mbar. The sensor shows a reproducible response and no hysteresis. The measured responsivity of the device is 9000 Hz/mbar, which is a factor 45 higher than state-of-the-art MEMS-based squeeze-film pressure sensors while using a 25 times smaller membrane area.

  3. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They commonly ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which are ...

  4. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  5. Pressure Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Monfre, Jill M.

    2016-01-01

    Unrelieved pressure or friction of the skin, particularly over bony prominences, can lead to pressure ulcers, which affect up to one third of people in hospitals or community care, and one fifth of nursing home residents. Pressure ulcers are more likely in people with reduced mobility and poor skin condition, such as older people or those with vascular disease.

  6. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo C. Righini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode (WGM microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed.

  7. Electrical Characterization of Microelectromechanical Silicon Carbide Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Zorman

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the findings of a study to investigate the performance of SiC MEMS resonators with respect to resonant frequency and quality factor under a variety of testing conditions, including various ambient pressures, AC drive voltages, bias potentials and temperatures. The sample set included both single-crystal and polycrystalline 3C-SiC lateral resonators. The experimental results show that operation at reduced pressures increases the resonant frequency as damping due to the gas-rarefaction effect becomes significant. Both DC bias and AC drive voltages result in nonlinearities, but the AC drive voltage is more sensitive to noise. The AC voltage has a voltage coefficient of 1~4ppm/V at a DC bias of 40V. The coefficient of DC bias is about -11ppm/V to - 21ppm/V for poly-SiC, which is more than a factor of two better than a similarly designed polysilicon resonator (-54 ppm/V. The effective stiffness of the resonator decreases (softens as the bias potential is increased, but increases (hardens as drive voltage increase when scan is from low to high frequency. The resonant frequency decreases slightly with increasing temperature, exhibiting a temperature coefficient of -22 ppm/oC, between 22oC and 60oC. The thermal expansion mismatch between the SiC device and the Si substrate could be a reason that thermal coefficient for these SiC resonators is about twofold higher than similar polysilicon resonators. However, the Qs appear to exhibit no temperature dependence in this range.

  8. Simulation of Helmholtz Resonance Effects in Aircraft ECS

    OpenAIRE

    Pollok, Alexander; Schröffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Helmholtz resonators are closed volumes that are connected to pipes. They exhibit a pronounced resonance frequency, where small boundary pressure excitations in the volume or the environment lead to large mass flow excitations in the pipe. Aircraft have a topology similar to Helmholtz resonators, the closed volume is represented by the cabin, while the pipe is represented by the Environmental Control System. Some discrepancies appear due to the non-zero mass-flow or friction effects in...

  9. Shear Layer Dynamics in Resonating Cavity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    .... The PIV data was also combined with the surface pressure measurements through the application of the Quadratic Stochastic Estimation procedure to provide time resolved snapshots of the flow field. Examination of these results indicate the strong pumping action of the cavity regardless of whether resonance existed and was used to visualize the large scale structures interacting with the aft wall.

  10. Radiation pressure actuation of test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garoi, F; Ju, L; Zhao, C; Blair, D G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of radiation pressure force as test mass actuation for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. It is shown that it is viable to provide radiation pressure control on test masses for frequencies above ∼0.2 Hz in high performance vibration isolation systems. A very low mass, low frequency resonator has been used to verify that radiation pressure force is not corrupted by other forces such as due to radiometer effects

  11. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  12. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state

  13. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  14. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  15. High pressure metrology for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuga, Wladimir; Rabault, Thierry; Wüthrich, Christian; Pražák, Dominik; Chytil, Miroslav; Brouwer, Ludwig; Ahmed, Ahmed D. S.

    2017-12-01

    To meet the needs of industries using high pressure technologies, in traceable, reliable and accurate pressure measurements, a joint research project of the five national metrology institutes and the university was carried out within the European Metrology Research Programme. In particular, finite element methods were established for stress-strain analysis of elastic and nonlinear elastic-plastic deformation, as well as of contact processes in pressure-measuring piston-cylinder assemblies, and high-pressure components at pressures above 1 GPa. New pressure measuring multipliers were developed and characterised, which allow realisation of the pressure scale up to 1.6 GPa. This characterisation is based on research including measurements of material elastic constants by the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, hardness of materials of high pressure components, density and viscosity of pressure transmitting liquids at pressures up to 1.4 GPa and dimensional measurements on piston-cylinders. A 1.6 GPa pressure system was created for operation of the 1.6 GPa multipliers and calibration of high pressure transducers. A transfer standard for 1.5 GPa pressure range, based on pressure transducers, was built and tested. Herewith, the project developed the capability of measuring pressures up to 1.6 GPa, from which industrial users can calibrate their pressure measurement devices for accurate measurements up to 1.5 GPa.

  16. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  17. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  18. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  19. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashan, M A M; Kalavally, V; Ramakrishnan, N; Lee, H W

    2016-01-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface. (paper)

  20. Pressure transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    Strain gauges pressure transducers types are presented. Models, characteristics and calibration procedures were also analysed. Initially, a theoretical study was accomplished to evaluate metallic alloys behavior on sensing elements manufacturing, and diaphragm was used as deflecting elements. Electrical models for potenciometric transducers were proposed at the beginning and subsequently comproved according our experiments. Concerning bridge transducers, existing models confirmed the conditions of linearity and sensitivity related to the electrical signal. All the work done was of help on the calibration field and pressure measurements employing unbounded strain gauge pressure transducers

  1. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  2. Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for: Teens Dealing With Bullying Emotional Intelligence Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Coping With Stressful Situations Prom Pressure What Stresses You Out About School? Virginity: A Very Personal Decision Stress & Coping Center ...

  3. Novel Designs for Application Specific MEMS Pressure Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio; Reck, Kasper; Lorenzen, Lasse Vestergaard

    2010-01-01

    and high capacitive output signal (more than 100 pF) is depicted. An optical pressure sensor intrinsically immune to electromagnetic interference, with large pressure range (0-350 bar) and a sensitivity of 1 pm/bar is presented. Finally, a resonating wireless pressure sensor power source free...

  4. Determination of Dimensionless Attenuation Coefficient in Shaped Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2003-01-01

    The value of dimensionless attenuation coefficient is an important factor when numerically predicting high-amplitude acoustic waves in shaped resonators. Both the magnitude of the pressure waveform and the quality factor rely heavily on this dimensionless parameter. Previous authors have stated the values used, but have not completely explained their methods. This work fully describes the methodology used to determine this important parameter. Over a range of frequencies encompassing the fundamental resonance, the pressure waves were experimentally measured at each end of the shaped resonators. At the corresponding dimensionless acceleration, the numerical code modeled the acoustic waveforms generated in the resonator using various dimensionless attenuation coefficients. The dimensionless attenuation coefficient that most closely matched the pressure amplitudes and quality factors of the experimental and numerical results was determined to be the value to be used in subsequent studies.

  5. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  6. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  7. A numerical study on acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I Sun; Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator is investigated numerically by adopting linear acoustic analysis. Helmholtz-type resonator is employed as acoustic resonator to suppress acoustic instability passively. The tuning frequency of acoustic resonator is adjusted by varying its length. Through harmonic analysis, acoustic-pressure responses of chamber to acoustic excitation are obtained and the resonant acoustic modes are identified. Acoustic damping effect of acoustic resonator is quantified by damping factor. As the tuning frequency of acoustic resonator approaches the target frequency of the resonant mode to be suppressed, mode split from the original resonant mode to lower and upper modes appears and thereby complex patterns of acoustic responses show up. Considering mode split and damping effect as a function of tuning frequency, it is desirable to make acoustic resonator tuned to broad-band frequencies near the maximum frequency of those of the possible upper modes

  8. Voltage resonant inverter as a power source

    OpenAIRE

    Lupenko, Anatoliy; Stakhiv, Petro

    2014-01-01

    The operation mode of a voltage resonant inverter as a power source with variable load is analyzed. In order to reduce load power variations, an approach to development of the inverter’s load power response based on providing similar positive and negative power deviations from its nominal value has been proposed. The design procedure for resonant inverter with open loop structure as a power source has been elaborated. For a high pressure sodium lamp as a load, the power deviation of about 4% ...

  9. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  10. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Jiang; Jianfang Liu; Qingqing Lv; Shoudong Gu; Xiaoyang Jiao; Minjiao Li; Shasha Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radi...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  13. Ramifide resonators for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The resonators with the conductors ramified form for cyclotrons are systematized and separated into the self-contained class - the ramified resonators for cyclotrons (Carr). The ramified resonators are compared with the quarter-wave and half-wave nonramified resonators, accomplished from the transmitting lines fragments. The CRR are classified into two types: ones with the additional structural element, switched in parallel and in series. The CRR may include several additional structural elements. The CRR calculations may be concluded by analytical methods - the method of matrix calculation or the method of telegraph equations and numerical methods - by means of the ISFEL3D, MAFIA and other programs [ru

  14. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    the authors review the conditions for the onset of parametric resonance, and propose a nonlinear control strategy in order to both induce the resonant oscillations and to stabilize the unstable motion. Lagrange’s theory is used to derive the dynamics of the system and input–output feedback linearization...

  15. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Electromagnetic resonance waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaba, J.M.; Manjon, F.J.; Guirao, A.; Andres, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    We describe in this paper a set of experiments designed to make qualitative and quantitative measurements on electromagnetic resonances of several simple systems. The experiments are designed for the undergraduate laboratory of Electricity and Magnetism in Physics. These experiments can help the students understanding the concept of resonance, which appears in different fields of Physics. (Author) 8 refs

  17. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  18. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  1. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  2. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, Egyetem ter 1 (Hungary); Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-01-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  5. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure monitors may have some limitations. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... more Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) Elevated blood pressure and stages 1 and 2 high blood pressure ( ...

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  7. Multiple photon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, C.J.; Feldman, B.J.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the interaction of intense near-resonant monochromatic radiation with an N-level anharmonic oscillator. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple photon resonance, the process by which an N-level system resonantly absorbs two or more photons simultaneously, is investigated. Starting from the Schroedinger equation, diagrammatic techniques are developed that allow the resonant process to be analyzed quantitatively, in analogy with well-known two-level coherent phenomena. In addition, multiple photon Stark shifts of the resonances, shifts absent in two-level theory, are obtained from the diagrams. Insights into the nature of multiple photon resonances are gained by comparing the quantum mechanical system with classical coupled pendulums whose equations of motion possess identical eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In certain limiting cases, including that of the resonantly excited N-level harmonic oscillator and that of the equally spaced N-level system with equal matrix elements, analytic results are derived. The influence of population relaxation and phase-disrupting collisions on the multiple photon process are also analyzed, the latter by extension of the diagrammatic technique to the density matrix equations of motion. 11 figures

  8. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  9. Energy harvesting from hydraulic pressure fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunefare, K A; Skow, E A; Erturk, A; Savor, J; Verma, N; Cacan, M R

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art hydraulic hose and piping systems employ integral sensor nodes for structural health monitoring to avoid catastrophic failures. Energy harvesting in hydraulic systems could enable self-powered wireless sensor nodes for applications such as energy-autonomous structural health monitoring and prognosis. Hydraulic systems inherently have a high energy intensity associated with the mean pressure and flow. Accompanying the mean pressure is the dynamic pressure ripple, which is caused by the action of pumps and actuators. Pressure ripple is a deterministic source with a periodic time-domain behavior conducive to energy harvesting. An energy harvester prototype was designed for generating low-power electricity from pressure ripples. The prototype employed an axially-poled off-the-shelf piezoelectric stack. A housing isolated the stack from the hydraulic fluid while maintaining a mechanical coupling allowing for dynamic-pressure-induced deflection of the stack. The prototype exhibited an off-resonance energy harvesting problem since the fundamental resonance of the piezoelectric stack was much higher than the frequency content of the pressure ripple. The prototype was designed to provide a suitable power output for powering sensors with a maximum output of 1.2 mW. This work also presents electromechanical model simulations and experimental characterization of the piezoelectric power output from the pressure ripple in terms of the force transmitted into the harvester. (paper)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  11. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  12. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  13. Excitation of Nucleon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss developments in the area of nucleon resonance excitation, both necessary and feasible, that would put our understanding of nucleon structure in the regime of strong QCD on a qualitatively new level. They involve the collection of high quality data in various channels, a more rigorous approach in the search for ''missing'' resonances, an effort to compute some critical quantities in nucleon resonance excitations from first principles, i.e. QCD, and a proposal focused to obtain an understanding of a fundamental quantity in nucleon structure

  14. Dihadronic and dileptonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Simple phenomenological rules are suggested for calculation of dihadron and dilepton resonance masses. A general interpretation is given for different exotic resonances in nuclear physics: Darmstadt-effect, dibaryon, dipion and other resonances. Information about the inner structure of e ± , proton, neutron, pions and so on can be obtained from the usual reactions of the type e + + e - =>γγ, e ± +γ=>e ± γ, e ± μ ± , e ± N... at low, intermediate and high energies using existing experimental devices

  15. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  16. Resonant halide perovskite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiguntseva, Ekaterina Y.; Ishteev, Arthur R.; Komissarenko, Filipp E.; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Ushakova, Elena V.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Makarov, Sergey V.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid halide perovskites is a prospective material for fabrication of cost-effective optical devices. Unique perovskites properties are used for solar cells and different photonic applications. Recently, perovskite-based nanophotonics has emerged. Here, we consider perovskite like a high-refractive index dielectric material, which can be considered to be a basis for nanoparticles fabrication with Mie resonances. As a result, we fabricate and study resonant perovskite nanoparticles with different sizes. We reveal, that spherical nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescence signal. The achieved results lay a cornerstone in the field of novel types of organic-inorganic nanophotonics devices with optical properties improved by Mie resonances.

  17. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  18. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  19. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  20. Quantum Proximity Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that at long wavelengths λ an s-wave scatterer can have a scattering cross section σ on the order of λ 2 , much larger than its physical size, as measured by the range of its potential. Very interesting phenomena can arise when two or more identical scatterers are placed close together, well within one wavelength. We show that, for a pair of identical scatterers, an extremely narrow p-wave open-quote open-quote proximity close-quote close-quote resonance develops from a broader s-wave resonance of the individual scatterers. A new s-wave resonance of the pair also appears. The relation of these proximity resonances (so called because they appear when the scatterers are close together) to the Thomas and Efimov effects is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F.M., E-mail: m.lutz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Lange, Jens Sören, E-mail: Soeren.Lange@exp2.physik.uni-giessen.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Pennington, Michael, E-mail: michaelp@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bettoni, Diego [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Brambilla, Nora [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Crede, Volker [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Eidelman, Simon [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Budker Istitute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gillitzer, Albrecht [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gradl, Wolfgang [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Lang, Christian B. [Institut für Physik, Universität Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Metag, Volker [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Nakano, Takashi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting ‘Resonances in QCD’, which took place at GSI October 12–14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: • What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? • Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? • What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy–light and heavy–heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  3. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  4. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  5. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  6. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  7. Accidental degeneracy of resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.; Mondragon, A.; Jauregui, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: It will be shown that a degeneracy of resonances is associated with a second rank pole in the scattering matrix and a Jordan cycle of generalized eigenfunctions of the radial Schrodinger equation. The generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions are basis elements of an expansion in complex resonance energy eigenfunctions. In this orthonormal basis, the Hamiltonian is represented by a non-diagonal complex matrix with a Jordan block of rank two. Some general properties of the degeneracy of resonances will be exhibited and discussed in an explicit example of degeneracy of resonant states and double poles in the scattering matrix of a double barrier potential. The cross section, scattering wave functions and Jordan-Gamow eigenfunctions are computed at degeneracy and their properties as functions of the control parameters of the system are discussed. (Author)

  8. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  10. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  12. Radiation-resistant pressure transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasov, Sh.M.; Kerimova, T.I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : The sensitive element of vibrofrequency tensor converter (VTC) is an electromechanical resonator of string type with electrostatic excitation of longitudinal mechanical vibrations. The string is made from tensosensitive thread-like monocrystal n-Ge1-x Six (length 1-5 mm, diameter 8-12 mcm) with current outlet and strictly fixed by ends at plate or deformable surface (in elastic element) at 50 mcm apartheid. With increasing Si atomic percent in n-Ge1-x Six the converter tens sensitivity increases. There has been shown the scheme of pressure transducer which contains monocrystalline silicon membrane and string tens converter from thread-like monocrystal Ge-Si. Using method, when crystal position on membrane while it deforms by pressure, corresponds to free (uptight) state, allowed to obtain the maximum sensitivity in measurement of pressure fluctuation. The transducers of absolute and pressure differential of this type can be used in automated systems of life activity. The high sensitivity of string transducers to pressure exceeding 100 hertz/mm (water column) permits to use them in devices for measuring gas concentration. The combination of optical and deformation methods of measurements forms the basis of their operation. The pressure change occurs due to the fact that gas molecules absorbing the quanta of incident light, become at excited state and then excitation energy of their vibrational-rotatory degrees of freedom converts to the energy of translational motion of molecules, i.e. to heat appropriate to pressure increase. Using these tens converters of high pressure one can prevent the possible accidents on oil pipe-like Baku-Tibilisi-Ceyhan

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  14. Comment on resonant absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerling, P.

    1977-01-01

    An average over angles of incidence of the usual resonant absorption function is presented. This form is appropriate under experimental conditions where the angles of incidence vary greatly and in an unknown manner. For comparison a lens-ellipsoidal mirror illumination system with a known longitudinal aberration is considered. In the latter example the angles of incidence are readily obtained and the resulting resonance absorption function evaluated. The associated fields are calculated in a similar fashion. (author)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  16. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    1 Microwave Resonators and Filters Daniel E. Oates MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244 Wood St. Lexington, MA 02478 USA Email: oates@ll.mit.edu...explained in other chapters, the surface resistance of superconductors at microwave frequencies can be as much as three orders of magnitude lower than the...resonators and filters in the first edition of this handbook (Z.-Y. Shen 2003) discussed the then state of the art of microwave frequency applications

  17. Resonance phenomena near thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1995-12-01

    The trapping effect is investigated close to the elastic threshold. The nucleus is described as an open quantum mechanical many-body system embedded in the continuum of decay channels. An ensemble of compound nucleus states with both discrete and resonance states is investigated in an energy-dependent formalism. It is shown that the discrete states can trap the resonance ones and also that the discrete states can directly influence the scattering cross section. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  19. Surface acoustic wave oxygen pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transducer for the measurement of absolute gas-state oxygen pressure from pressures of less than 100 Pa to atmospheric pressure (1.01 x 10(exp 5) Pa) is based on a standard surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The piezoelectric material of the SAW device is coated with a compound which will selectively and reversibly bind oxygen. When oxygen is bound by the coating, the mass of the coating increases by an amount equal to the mass of the bound oxygen. Such an increase in the mass of the coating causes a corresponding decrease in the resonant frequency of the SAW device.

  20. Evaluation of acoustic resonance at branch section in main steam line. Part 1. Effects of steam wetness on acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Morita, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    The power uprating of the nuclear power plant (NPP) is conducted in United States, EU countries and so on, and also is planned in Japan. However, the degradation phenomena such as flow-induced vibration and wall thinning may increase or expose in the power uprate condition. In U.S. NPP, the dryer had been damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration under a 17% extended power uprating (EPU) condition. This is caused by acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSL). Increased velocity by uprating excites the pressure fluctuations and makes large amplitude resonance. To evaluate the acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of SRVs in actual BWR, it is necessary to clarify the acoustic characteristics in steam flow. Although there are several previous studies about acoustic resonance, most of them are not steam flow but air flow. Therefore in this study, to investigate the acoustic characteristics in steam flow, we conducted steam flow experiments in each dry and wet steam conditions, and also nearly saturated condition. We measured pressure fluctuation at the top of the single stub pipe and in main steam piping. As a result, acoustic resonance in dry steam flow could be evaluated as same as that in air flow. It is clarified that resonance amplitude of fluctuating pressure at the top of the stub pipe in wet steam was reduced to one-tenth compared with that in dry. (author)

  1. Model-based design of MEMS resonant pressure sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijlen, M.A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The massive integration of micromechanical structures on ICs to allow microsystems to sense and control the environment is expected to be one of the most important technological breakthroughs of the future. At present, cheap and small MEMS sensors are emerging in countless applications. Automotive

  2. Experimental study of the influence of different resonators on thermoacoustic conversion performance of a thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, E C; Ling, H; Dai, W; Yu, G Y

    2006-12-22

    In this paper, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator shape on the performance of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine is presented. Two different resonators were tested in the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat. One resonator is an iso-diameter one, and the other is a tapered one. To have a reasonable comparison reference, we keep the same traveling-wave loop, the same resonant frequency and the same operating pressure. The experiment showed that the resonator shape has significant influence on the global performance of the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine. The tapered resonator gives much better performance than the iso-diameter resonator. The tapered resonator system achieved a maximum pressure ratio of about 1.3, a maximum net acoustical power output of about 450 W and a highest thermoacoustic efficiency of about 25%.

  3. Resonance probe; La sonde a resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepechinsky, D; Messiaen, A; Rolland, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    After a brief review of papers recently published on the resonance probe as a tool for plasma diagnostics, the main features of the theory proposed by one of us are recalled. In this theory the geometry of the resonator formed by the probe, the ion sheath and the plasma is explicitly taken into account with the quasi-static and cold plasma approximations. Some new results emerging from this theory are indicated and a comparison with experimental data obtained with a spherical probe placed in a quiescent mercury-vapour plasma is made. A good quantitative agreement has been observed, indicating that the theory is satisfactory and justifying the assumptions involved. Nevertheless it appears that in some cases experimental results can only be interpreted when non collisional damping phenomena are taken into consideration. (author) [French] Apres un apercu des etudes recemment publiees sur la sonde a resonance pour le diagnostic des plasmas, on rappelle l'essentiel de la theorie proposee par l'un de nous ou il est tenu compte explicitement de la geometrie du resonateur forme par le systeme sonde-gaine ionique-plasma dans l'approximation quasi-statique et du plasma froid. On indique quelques resultats nouveaux pouvant etre tires de cette theorie et on la confronte avec les donnees experimentales obtenues pour une sonde spherique placee dans un plasma de mercure en equilibre. Un tres bon accord quantitatif a ete constate, indiquant que la theorie est satisfaisante et justifiant les approximations faites dans celle-ci. Il apparait toutefois que certains resultats experimentaux ne peuvent etre interpretes qu'en tenant compte des phenomenes d'amortissement non collisionnels. (auteur)

  4. Low Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  5. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low ... low blood pressure. Medications that can cause low blood pressure Some medications can cause low blood pressure, including: ...

  6. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder ... Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal fluid ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a pressure sore required? play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure ... arrow Why do some pressure sores take so long to heal? play_arrow Can a pressure sore ...

  8. Resonant enhancement in leptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, P. S. B.; Garny, M.; Klaric, J.; Millington, P.; Teresi, D.

    2018-02-01

    Vanilla leptogenesis within the type I seesaw framework requires the mass scale of the right-handed neutrinos to be above 109 GeV. This lower bound can be avoided if at least two of the sterile states are almost mass degenerate, which leads to an enhancement of the decay asymmetry. Leptogenesis models that can be tested in current and upcoming experiments often rely on this resonant enhancement, and a systematic and consistent description is therefore necessary for phenomenological applications. In this paper, we give an overview of different methods that have been used to study the saturation of the resonant enhancement when the mass difference becomes comparable to the characteristic width of the Majorana neutrinos. In this limit, coherent flavor transitions start to play a decisive role, and off-diagonal correlations in flavor space have to be taken into account. We compare various formalisms that have been used to describe the resonant regime and discuss under which circumstances the resonant enhancement can be captured by simplified expressions for the CP asymmetry. Finally, we briefly review some of the phenomenological aspects of resonant leptogenesis.

  9. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  10. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  11. Reduction of centrifugal fan noise by use of resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neise, W.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1980-11-01

    A method by which an acoustic resonator can be used to reduce at source the aerodynamic noise generated by turbomachinery has been investigated experimentally. The casing of a small, centrifugal blower was modified by replacing the cut-off of the scroll with the mouth of a quarter-wavelength resonator. The mouth of the resonator was constructed from a series of perforated plates with the same curvature as the cut-off to preserve the original geometry of the casing. Tuning of the resonator was achieved by changing the length via a movable end plug. The noise measurements were made in an anechoically terminated outlet duct at nearly a free delivery operating condition of the blower. With appropriate tuning of the resonator, reductions in the blade passing frequency tones of up to 29 dB were observed with corresponding overall sound pressure levels reductions of up to 7 dB(A). Parameters which influenced the band width of the resonator response were the porosity and the size of the resonator mouth and the flow velocity near the cut-off region. Throughout the tests, the aerodynamic performance of the blower was unaffected by the addition of the resonator to the casing.

  12. The effect of compressibility on the Alfven spatial resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of compressibility of magnetic field line on the damping rate of Alfven spatial resonance heating for a high beta plasma (Kinetic pressure/magnetic pressure) was analysed, using the ideal MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) model in cylindrical geometry for a diffuse θ-pinch with conducting wall. The dispersion relation was obtained solving the equation of motion in the plasma and vacuum regions together with boundary conditions. (Author) [pt

  13. High-Q, in-plane modes of nanomechanical resonators operated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Philip S.; Tan, Christine P.; Bellan, Leon; Craighead, Harold G.

    2009-05-01

    Nanomechanical resonators have traditionally been limited to use in vacuum due to low quality factors that come as a result of viscous damping effects in air or liquid. We have fabricated arrays of 90 nm thick trampoline-shaped resonators, studied their resonant frequency spectrum as a function of pressure, and found that some high frequency modes exhibit quality factors over 2000 at atmospheric pressure. We have excited the in-plane resonances of these devices, verified their identities both experimentally and with finite element modeling, and demonstrated their advantageous characteristics for ambient sensing. Even after deposition of a relatively thick polymer layer, the in-plane resonant modes still boast quality factors on the order of 2000. These results show promise for the use of nanomechanical resonant sensors in real-time atmospheric sensing applications.

  14. Josephson junctions array resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargiulo, Oscar; Muppalla, Phani; Mirzaei, Iman; Kirchmair, Gerhard [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the self- and cross-Kerr effect of extended plasma resonances in Josephson junction chains. The chain consists of 1600 individual junctions and we can measure quality factors in excess of 10000. The Kerr effect manifests itself as a frequency shift that depends linearly on the number of photons in a resonant mode. By changing the input power we are able to measure this frequency shift on a single mode (self-kerr). By changing the input power on another mode while measuring the same one, we are able to evaluate the cross-kerr effect. We can measure the cross-Kerr effect by probing the resonance frequency of one mode while exciting another mode of the array with a microwave drive.

  15. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Alcheikh, Nouha; Ramini, Abdallah; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  16. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  17. Chrystal and Proudman resonances simulated with three numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubalo, Maja; Janeković, Ivica; Orlić, Mirko

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study Chrystal and Proudman resonances in a simple closed basin and to explore and compare how well the two resonant mechanisms are reproduced with different, nowadays widely used, numerical ocean models. The test case was based on air pressure disturbances of two commonly used shapes (a sinusoidal and a boxcar), having various wave lengths, and propagating at different speeds. Our test domain was a closed rectangular basin, 300 km long with a uniform depth of 50 m, with the theoretical analytical solution available for benchmark. In total, 2250 simulations were performed for each of the three different numerical models: ADCIRC, SCHISM and ROMS. During each of the simulations, we recorded water level anomalies and computed the integral of the energy density spectrum for a number of points distributed along the basin. We have successfully documented the transition from Proudman to Chrystal resonance that occurs for a sinusoidal air pressure disturbance having a wavelength between one and two basin lengths. An inter-model comparison of the results shows that different models represent the two resonant phenomena in a slightly different way. For Chrystal resonance, all the models showed similar behavior; however, ADCIRC model providing slightly higher values of the mean resonant period than the other two models. In the case of Proudman resonance, the most consistent results, closest to the analytical solution, were obtained using ROMS model, which reproduced the mean resonant speed equal to 22.00 m/s— i.e., close to the theoretical value of 22.15 m/s. ADCIRC and SCHISM models showed small deviations from that value, with the mean speed being slightly lower—21.97 m/s (ADCIRC) and 21.93 m/s (SCHISM). The findings may seem small but could play an important role when resonance is a crucial process producing enhancing effects by two orders of magnitude (i.e., meteotsunamis).

  18. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  20. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  1. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  2. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  3. Resonant freak microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, F.M. de

    2011-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation describing transverse magnetic modes in a closed flat microwave resonator with 60 randomly distributed discs is numerically solved. At lower frequencies, the calculated wave intensity spatially distributed obeys the universal Porter-Thomas form if localized modes are excluded. A superposition of resonant modes is shown to lead to rare events of extreme intensities (freak waves) at localized 'hot spots'. The temporally distributed intensity of such a superposition at the center of a hot spot also follows the Porter-Thomas form. Branched modes are found at higher frequencies. The results bear resemblance to recent experiments reported in an open cavity.

  4. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  5. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  6. A simple sensing mechanism for wireless, passive pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazan, John F; Wassick, Michael T; Dahle, Reena; Beardslee, Luke A; Cady, Nathaniel C; Ledet, Eric H

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a simple wireless pressure sensor that consists of only three electrically isolated components. Two conductive spirals are separated by a closed cell foam that deforms when exposed to changing pressures. This deformation changes the capacitance and thus the resonant frequency of the sensors. Prototype sensors were submerged and wirelessly interrogated while being exposed to physiologically relevant pressures from 10 to 130 mmHg. Sensors consistently exhibited a sensitivity of 4.35 kHz/mmHg which is sufficient for resolving physiologically relevant pressure changes in vivo. These simple sensors have the potential for in vivo pressure sensing.

  7. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Meng; Wang, Ning-Li; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Di-Ya; Li, Zhen; Cao, Yi-Wen

    2018-02-01

    In accordance with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference theory, decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference can relieve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Increased intracranial pressure can also reduce optic nerve damage in glaucoma patients, and a safe, effective and noninvasive way to achieve this is by increasing the intra-abdominal pressure. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure at elevated intra-abdominal pressure. An inflatable abdominal belt was tied to each of 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22-30 years (12 females and 3 males), at the navel level, without applying pressure to the abdomen, before they laid in the magnetic resonance imaging machine. The baseline orbital subarachnoid space width around the optic nerve was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The abdominal belt was inflated to increase the pressure to 40 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), then the orbital subarachnoid space width was measured every 10 minutes for 2 hours. After removal of the pressure, the measurement was repeated 10 and 20 minutes later. In a separate trial, the intraocular pressure was measured for all the subjects at the same time points, before, during and after elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Results showed that the baseline mean orbital subarachnoid space width was 0.88 ± 0.1 mm (range: 0.77-1.05 mm), 0.77 ± 0.11 mm (range: 0.60-0.94 mm), 0.70 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.62-0.80 mm), and 0.68 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.57-0.77 mm) at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe, respectively. During the elevated intra-abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width increased from the baseline and dilation of the optic nerve sheath was significant at 1, 3 and 9 mm behind the globe. After decompression of the abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width normalized and returned to the baseline value. There was no significant difference in the

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  9. Uncertainty quantification in resonance absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    We assess the uncertainty in the resonance escape probability due to uncertainty in the neutron and radiation line widths for the first 21 resonances in 232 Th as given by . Simulation, quadrature and polynomial chaos methods are used and the resonance data are assumed to obey a beta distribution. We find the uncertainty in the total resonance escape probability to be the equivalent, in reactivity, of 75–130 pcm. Also shown are pdfs of the resonance escape probability for each resonance and the variation of the uncertainty with temperature. The viability of the polynomial chaos expansion method is clearly demonstrated.

  10. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  11. Resonant transducers for solid-state plasma density modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, Gary A., E-mail: hallock@ece.utexas.edu [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78701 (United States); Meier, Mark A., E-mail: mark.a.meier@exxonmobil.com [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77389 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have developed transducers capable of modulating the plasma density and plasma density gradients in indium antimonide. These transducers make use of piezoelectric drivers to excite acoustic pressure resonance at 3λ/2, generating large amplitude standing waves and plasma density modulations. The plasma density has been directly measured using a laser diagnostic. A layered media model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  12. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  13. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.

    2005-06-01

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  14. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  16. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  17. Resonance charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duman, E.L.; Evseev, A.V.; Eletskij, A.V.; Radtsig, A.A.; Smirnov, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    The calculation results for the resonance charge exchange cross sections for positive and negative atomic and molecular ions are given. The calculations are performed on the basis of the asymptotic theory. The factors affecting the calculation accuracy are analysed. The calculation data for 28 systems are compared with the experiment

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  20. Baryon resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenhoevel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The field of baryon resonances in nuclei is reviewed. Theoretical developments and experimental evidence as well are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on electromagnetic processes for the two nucleon system. Some aspects of real isobars in nuclei are touched upon. (orig.) [de

  1. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  3. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  4. Magnetostatic wave tunable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, J.-P.; Hartemann, P.

    1983-06-01

    Theoretical principles and techniques for the implementation of magnetostatic surface wave and volume wave resonators in high frequency oscillators are discussed. Magnetostatic waves are magnetic waves that propagate in materials exposed to a polarized magnetic field. The propagation speed ranges from 3-300 km/sec for wavelengths between 1 micron and 10 mm, in the presence of lags from 10-1000 nsec/ cm. Tunable resonators in the 1-20 GHz frequency range have been manufactured with YIG using liquid phase epitaxy for deposition on gadolinium and gallium substrates. Distributed-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity resonators are described and performance tests results are reported, including losses of 8 dB, a quality coefficient under voltage of 450, and frequency rejection outside of resonance better than 10 dB. However, saturation occurs at low power levels at frequencies lower than 4.2 GHz, a feature overcome with forward volume magnetostatic wave generators, which have a quality factor of 500, an insertion loss of 22 dB, and rejection around 15 dB.

  5. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for 30 P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + 27 Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in 49 V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling

  6. Screening Resonances In Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, P.

    1998-01-01

    When it was suggested that a new recombination mechanism (Resonant Radiative Recombination (RRR)) which, based on very general physical arguments, should happen in dense plasmas and promises to provide useful information for the local temperature and density diagnostics of plasmas, they assumed the existence of screening resonances. For model potentials the existence of screening resonances has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in a number of calculations. The key question, how well those potentials describe the dominant effects of a real plasma remains open. The relation of theoretical predictions to experimentally measurable effects is an important issue at the present stage of their research. In particular, RRR is expected to account for enhanced recombination rates of low energetic electrons with their ions, since the first stage is the resonant capture of a slow electron by an atom or ion. The mechanism that traps an electron is a combination of complicated many-body interactions of the ions and electrons. For clarity they start here, however, with a discussion in terms of local potential traps the shapes of which are determined predominantly and in an average way by two factors: the degree of screening present at the ionic site and the degree of short-range order in the immediate neighborhood of this ion

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  9. Line pressure effects on differential pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Evans, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of differential pressure transducers in experimental pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems was evaluated. Transient differential pressure measurements made using a simple calibration proportionality relating differential pressure to output voltage could have large measurement uncertainties. A more sophisticated calibration equation was derived to incorporate the effects of zero shifts and sensitivity shifts as pressure in the pressure sensing line changes with time. A comparison made between the original calibration proportionality equation and the derived compensation equation indicates that potential measurement uncertainties can be reduced

  10. Isoscalar giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, D. H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Cyclotron Inst.; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the knowledges of giant quadrupole resonance (GQR), low energy octupole resonance (LEOR), and giant monopole resonance (GMR), is described. In the lowest order of multipole resonance, both isoscalar and isovector modes can occur. The characteristics of the GQR in light nuclei are apparent in the experimental result for Mg-24. All of the isoscalar E2 strength are known in Mg-24. The Goldhaber-Teller model is preferred over the Steinwedel-Jensen model for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) transition density. A few interesting and puzzling features have been seen in Pb-208. There is some conflict between inelastic alpha and electron scatterings. About LEOR, the RPA calculation of Liu and Brown was compared to the data for 3/sup -/ strength in Ca-40, Zr-90 and Pb-208. The calculation was employed the residual interaction of the Skyrme type. The agreement in Zr-90 was excellent. The effect of quadrupole deformation on the LEOR in Sm isotopes was large. The inelastic alpha scattering data on Al-27, Ca-40, Ti-48, Ni-58, Zn-64 and 66, Zr-90, Sn-116, 118, 120 and 124, Sm-144, 148 and 154, and Pb-208 were utilized in order to identify the GMR, and the GMR parameters were obtained. The GMR exhausting a large fraction of the sum rule was apparent in the nuclei with mass larger than 90. The splitting of the GDR and the broadening of the GQR in permanently deformed nuclei were established. The splitting of GMR was seen in Sm-154. The studies with heavy ions are also described.

  11. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  12. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  15. Nanoelectromechanical resonator for logic operations

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.; Hafiz, Md A. Al; Chappanda, Karumbaiah N.; Ilyas, Saad; Holguin, Jorge; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    We report an electro-thermally tunable in-plane doubly-clamped nanoelectromechanical resonator capable of dynamically performing NOR, NOT, XNOR, XOR, and AND logic operations. Toward this, a silicon based resonator is fabricated using standard e

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  17. Experimental study of the pressure characteristics in the Stirling refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Park, Seong Je; Kim, Hyo Bong; Koh, Deuk Yong

    2001-01-01

    The linear compressor have been widely used for pressure wave generation in the Stirling cryocooler and Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler for tactical purpose. The linear compressor has small and compact structure, and long life due to having non-contact sealing mechanism and the pressure drop through regenerator was ver important role in the motion of displacer in the expander of the Stirling cryocooler. In this study, the characteristic of the linear compressor and the pressure drop through regenerator in the expander was experimentally investigated. The results show resonance of the compressor is very important to get maximum performance and the gas spring force in the compression space of the compressor has effect on the characteristic of resonance and the results show the pressure drop through regenerator is very small than operating pressure change

  18. Probabilistic interpretation of resonant states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper reviews the basic definition of the resonant state in quantum ... We show that particles leak from the central region in the resonant state. The ..... The basic idea is as follows (figure 4): Consider a resonant eigenstate. Φn(x ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  2. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  7. A New Resonance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2017-12-01

    The measurement of the speed of sound in air with the resonance tube is a popular experiment that often yields accurate results. One approach is to hold a vibrating tuning fork over an air column that is partially immersed in water. The column is raised and lowered in the water until the generated standing wave produces resonance: this occurs at the point where sound is perceived to have maximum loudness, or at the point where the amplitude of the standing wave has maximum value, namely an antinode. An antinode coincides with the position of the tuning fork, beyond the end of the air column, which consequently introduces an end correction. One way to minimize this end correction is to measure the distance between consecutive antinodes.

  8. Resonance of curved nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Ding, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States); Ruoff, R S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States)

    2006-08-23

    The effects of non-ideal experimental configuration on the mechanical resonance of boron (B) nanowires (NWs) were studied to obtain the corrected value for the Young's modulus. The following effects have been theoretically considered: (i) the presence of intrinsic curvature (ii) non-ideal clamps (iii) spurious masses (iv) coating layer, and (v) large displacements. An energy-based analytical analysis was developed to treat such effects and their interactions. Here, we focus on treating the effect of the intrinsic curvature on the mechanical resonance. The analytical approach has been confirmed by numerical FEM analysis. A parallax method was used to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the NW.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  10. Ultraminiature resonator accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.R.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vianco, P.T.

    1996-04-01

    A new family of microminiature sensors and clocks is being developed with widespread application potential for missile and weapons applications, as biomedical sensors, as vehicle status monitors, and as high-volume animal identification and health sensors. To satisfy fundamental technology development needs, a micromachined clock and an accelerometer have initially been undertaken as development projects. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micromachined silicon package is used as the frequency-modulated basic component of the sensor family. Resonator design philosophy follows trapped energy principles and temperature compensation methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range, corresponding to quartz wafer thicknesses in the 75--15 micron range. High-volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Chemical etching of quartz, as well as micromachining of silicon, achieves the surface and volume mechanical features necessary to fashion the resonating element and the mating package. Integration of the associated oscillator and signal analysis circuitry into the silicon package is inherent to the realization of a size reduction requirement. A low temperature In and In/Sn bonding technology allows assembly of the dissimilar quartz and silicon materials, an otherwise challenging task. Unique design features include robust vibration and shock performance, capacitance sensing with micromachined diaphragms, circuit integration, capacitance-to-frequency transduction, and extremely small dimensioning. Accelerometer sensitivities were measured in the 1--3 ppm/g range for the milligram proof-mass structures employed in the prototypes evaluated to date.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  13. Resonant state expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.)

  14. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why is it dangerous? play_arrow How common are pressure sores ... likely to develop pressure sores? play_arrow Is it true that a pressure sore can develop in ...

  15. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  16. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Top of Page CDC Fact Sheets Related to High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Pulmonary Hypertension Heart Disease Signs ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  18. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  19. Optical resonator theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jaeg Won; Cho, Sunh Oh; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jong Min

    2000-10-01

    In this report we present a theoretical study of bare optical resonators having in mind to extend it to active resonators. To compute diffractional losses, phase shifts, intensity distributions and phases of radiation fields on mirrors, we coded a package of numerical procedures on bases of a pair of integral equations. Two numerical schemes, a matrix formalism and an iterative method, are programmed for finding numeric solutions to the pair of integral equations. The iterative method had been tried by Fox and Li, but it was not applicable to cases for high Fresnel numbers since the numerical errors involved propagate and accumulate uncontrollably. In this report, we implemented the matrix method to extend the computational limit further. A great deal of case studies are carried out with various configurations of stable and unstable resonators. Our results presented in this report show not only a good agreement with the results previously obtained by Fox and Li, but also a legitimacy of our numerical procedures in high Fresnel numbers.

  20. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  1. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Jiri

    2002-03-25

    The combination of advanced high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques with high-pressure capability represents a powerful experimental tool in studies of protein folding. This review is organized as follows: after a general introduction of high-pressure, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of proteins, the experimental part deals with instrumentation. The main section of the review is devoted to NMR studies of reversible pressure unfolding of proteins with special emphasis on pressure-assisted cold denaturation and the detection of folding intermediates. Recent studies investigating local perturbations in proteins and the experiments following the effects of point mutations on pressure stability of proteins are also discussed. Ribonuclease A, lysozyme, ubiquitin, apomyoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin and troponin C were the model proteins investigated.

  2. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  3. Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems discusses the phenomenon of parametric resonance and its occurrence in mechanical systems,vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft and marine craft, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. The contributors provide an introduction to the root causes of this phenomenon and its mathematical equivalent, the Mathieu-Hill equation. Also included is a discussion of how parametric resonance occurs on ships and offshore systems and its frequency in mechanical and electrical systems. This book also: Presents the theory and principles behind parametric resonance Provides a unique collection of the different fields where parametric resonance appears including ships and offshore structures, automotive vehicles and mechanical systems Discusses ways to combat, cope with and prevent parametric resonance including passive design measures and active control methods Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems is ideal for researchers and mechanical engineers working in application fields such as MEM...

  4. A microwave resonance dew-point hygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, R. J.; Cuccaro, R.; Bell, S.; Gavioso, R. M.; Madonna Ripa, D.; Stevens, M.; de Podesta, M.

    2012-08-01

    We report the first measurements of a quasi-spherical microwave resonator used as a dew-point hygrometer. In conventional dew-point hygrometers, the condensation of water from humid gas flowing over a mirror is detected optically, and the mirror surface is then temperature-controlled to yield a stable condensed layer. In our experiments we flowed moist air from a humidity generator through a quasi-spherical resonator and detected the onset of condensation by measuring the frequency ratio of selected microwave modes. We verified the basic operation of the device over the dew-point range 9.5-13.5 °C by comparison with calibrated chilled-mirror hygrometers. These tests indicate that the microwave method may allow a quantitative estimation of the volume and thickness of the water layer which is condensed on the inner surface of the resonator. The experiments reported here are preliminary due to the limited time available for the work, but show the potential of the method for detecting not only water but a variety of other liquid or solid condensates. The robust all-metal construction should make the device appropriate for use in industrial applications over a wide range of temperatures and pressures.

  5. A microwave resonance dew-point hygrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, R J; Bell, S; Stevens, M; De Podesta, M; Cuccaro, R; Gavioso, R M; Ripa, D Madonna

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurements of a quasi-spherical microwave resonator used as a dew-point hygrometer. In conventional dew-point hygrometers, the condensation of water from humid gas flowing over a mirror is detected optically, and the mirror surface is then temperature-controlled to yield a stable condensed layer. In our experiments we flowed moist air from a humidity generator through a quasi-spherical resonator and detected the onset of condensation by measuring the frequency ratio of selected microwave modes. We verified the basic operation of the device over the dew-point range 9.5–13.5 °C by comparison with calibrated chilled-mirror hygrometers. These tests indicate that the microwave method may allow a quantitative estimation of the volume and thickness of the water layer which is condensed on the inner surface of the resonator. The experiments reported here are preliminary due to the limited time available for the work, but show the potential of the method for detecting not only water but a variety of other liquid or solid condensates. The robust all-metal construction should make the device appropriate for use in industrial applications over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. (paper)

  6. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  7. The numerical simulation of plasma flow in cylindrical resonant cavity of microwave plasma thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.-L.; He, H.-Q; Mao, G.-W.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Thruster (MPT) is an electro-thermal propulsive device. MPT consists of microwave generator, gas storing and supplying system, resonant cavity and accelerative nozzle. It generates free-floating plasma brought by the microwave discharge breakdown gas in the resonant cavity, and the plasma exhausted from nozzle produces thrust. MPT has prospective application in spacecraft because of its advantages of high thrust, moderate specific impulse and high efficiency. In this paper, the numerical simulation of the coupling flow field of microwave plasma in resonant cavity under different frequencies will be discussed. The results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) When the resonant model TM 011 was used, the higher the microwave frequency was, the smaller the size of MPT. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in small cavity, however, remain unchanged. 2) When the resonant model was used, the distribution of the temperature, the pressure and the electronic density in the resonant cavity remained unchanged under different resonant frequencies. 3) When the resonant frequency was increased with a fixed pressure distribution in a small cavity, compare to the MPT with lower frequency, the gas flow rate, the microwave power and the nozzle throat diameter of MPT all decreased. 4) The electromagnetic field in the cylindrical resonant cavity for all MPT with different frequencies was disturbed by the plasma formation. The strong disturbance happened in the region close to the plasma. (author)

  8. Quality factor improvement of silicon nitride micro string resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Malm, Bjarke; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Resonant micro and nano strings are of interest for sensor applications due to their extraordinary high quality factors, low mass and tunable resonant frequency. It has been found that the quality factor of strings is usually limited by clamping loss. In this work, clamping loss has been addressed...... by varying the clamping design and string geometry. We present silicon nitride micro strings with quality factors (Q) of up to 4 million in high vacuum achieved by minimizing clamping loss. For applications such as for chemical sensing, strings need to vibrate at atmospheric pressure. Maximal quality factor...

  9. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  10. Microwave measurements of water vapor partial pressure at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre, V.R.

    1991-01-01

    One of the desired parameters in the Yucca Mountain Project is the capillary pressure of the rock comprising the repository. This parameter is related to the partial pressure of water vapor in the air when in equilibrium with the rock mass. Although there are a number of devices that will measure the relative humidity (directly related to the water vapor partial pressure), they generally will fail at temperatures on the order of 150C. Since thee author has observed borehole temperatures considerably in excess of this value in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a different scheme is required to obtain the desired partial pressure data at higher temperatures. This chapter presents a microwave technique that has been developed to measure water vapor partial pressure in boreholes at temperatures up to 250C. The heart of the system is a microwave coaxial resonator whose resonant frequency is inversely proportional to the square root of the real part of the complex dielectric constant of the medium (air) filling the resonator. The real part of the dielectric constant of air is approximately equal to the square of the refractive index which, in turn, is proportional to the partial pressure of the water vapor in the air. Thus, a microwave resonant cavity can be used to measure changes in the relative humidity or partial pressure of water vapor in the air. Since this type of device is constructed of metal, it is able to withstand very high temperatures. The actual limitation is the temperature limit of the dielectric material in the cable connecting the resonator to its driving and monitoring equipment-an automatic network analyzer in our case. In the following sections, the theory of operation, design, construction, calibration and installation of the microwave diagnostics system is presented. The results and conclusions are also presented, along with suggestions for future work

  11. Resonance frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized

  12. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth / For Teens / Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) What's ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  13. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  14. General resonance mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2012-07-01

    We extend the framework of general gauge mediation to cases where the mediating fields have a nontrivial spectral function, as might arise from strong dynamics. We demonstrate through examples that this setup describes a broad class of possible models of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. A main emphasis is to give general formulas for cross sections for σ(visible → hidden) in these resonance models. We will also give formulas for soft masses, A-terms and demonstrate the framework with a holographic setup.

  15. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  16. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  17. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  18. General resonance mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2012-07-15

    We extend the framework of general gauge mediation to cases where the mediating fields have a nontrivial spectral function, as might arise from strong dynamics. We demonstrate through examples that this setup describes a broad class of possible models of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking. A main emphasis is to give general formulas for cross sections for {sigma}(visible {yields} hidden) in these resonance models. We will also give formulas for soft masses, A-terms and demonstrate the framework with a holographic setup.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  20. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can...... be realized. A high-index-contrast subwavelength grating verticalcavity surface-emitting laser with a monolithically integrated anti-reflection coating is presented. By incorporating an antireflection coating into the air cavity, higher tuning efficiency can be achieved at low threshold current. The first...

  1. Resonance test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Walter [Boulder, CO; White, Darris [Superior, CO

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

  2. Electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasson, J.R.; Salinas, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Published literature concerning electron spin resonance (ESR) from July 1977 to July 1979 is reviewed. The 108 literature sources cited were chosen from literally thousands and are intended to serve as a guide to the current literature and to provide an eclectic selection of publications cited for their contributions to the advance and/or applications of ESR spectroscopy. 40 of the sources are reviews, and a table is included to indicate the topic(s) mainly covered in each review. Other divisions of the material reviewed are apparatus and spectral analysis, analytical applications, and selected paramagnetic materials

  3. Apodized coupled resonator waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, J; Muñoz, P; Domenech, J D; Muriel, M A

    2007-08-06

    In this paper we propose analyse the apodisation or windowing of the coupling coefficients in the unit cells of coupled resonator waveguide devices (CROWs) as a means to reduce the level of secondary sidelobes in the bandpass characteristic of their transfer functions. This technique is regularly employed in the design of digital filters and has been applied as well in the design of other photonic devices such as corrugated waveguide filters and fiber Bragg gratings. The apodisation of both Type-I and Type-II structures is discussed for several windowing functions.

  4. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  5. Proton capture resonance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, G.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bilpuch, E.G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bybee, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Shriner, J.F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Vavrina, G.A. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Wallace, P.M. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Elastic Nonlinear Response in Granular Media Under Resonance Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Johnson, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    We are studying the elastic linear and nonlinear behavior of granular media using dynamic wave methods. In the work presented here, our goal is to quantify the elastic nonlinear response by applying wave resonance. Resonance studies are desirable because they provide the means to easily study amplitude dependencies of elastic nonlinear behavior and thus to characterize the physical nature of the elastic nonlinearity. This work has implications for a variety of topics, in particular, the in situ nonlinear response of surface sediments. For this work we constructed an experimental cell in which high sensitivity dynamic resonance studies were conducted using granular media under controlled effective pressure. We limit our studies here to bulk modes but have the capability to employ shear waves as well. The granular media are composed of glass beads held under pressure by a piston, while applying resonance waves from transducers as both the excitation and the material probe. The container is closed with two fitted pistons and a normal load is applied to the granular sample across the top piston. Force and displacement are measured directly. Resonant frequency sweeps with frequencies corresponding to the fundamental bulk mode are applied to the longitudinal source transducer. The pore pressure in the system is 1 atm. The glass beads used in our experiments are of diameter 0.5 mm, randomly deposited in a duralumin cylinder of diameter 30 mm and height of 15 mm. This corresponds to a granular skeleton acoustic wave velocity of v ª 750m/s under 50 N of force [0.07 Mpa]. The loaded system gives fundamental mode resonances in the audio frequency band at half a wavelength where resonance frequency is effective-pressure dependent. The volume fraction of glass beads thus obtained is found to be 0.63 ± 0.01. Plane-wave generating and detecting transducers of diameter 30 mm are placed on axis at the top and bottom of the cylindrical container in direct contact with the glass

  7. Fabrication of nanoplate resonating structures via micro-masonry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaswara, A; Legrand, B; Mathieu, F; Nicu, L; Leichle, T; Keum, H; Rhee, S; Kim, S

    2014-01-01

    Advantages of using nanoscale membrane and plate resonators over more common cantilever shapes include higher quality factor (Q factor) for an equivalent mass and better suitability to mass sensing applications in fluid. Unfortunately, the current fabrication methods used to obtain such membranes and plates are limited in terms of materials and thickness range, and can potentially cause stiction. This study presents a new method to fabricate nanoplate resonating structures based on micro-masonry, which is the advanced form of the transfer printing technique. Nanoplate resonators were fabricated by transfer printing 0.34 µm thick square-shaped silicon plates by means of polydimethylsiloxane microtip stamps on top of silicon oxide base structures displaying 20 µm diameter cavities, followed by a thermal annealing step to create a rigid bond. Typical resulting suspended structures display vibration characteristics, i.e. a resonance frequency of a few MHz and Q factors above 10 in air at atmospheric pressure, which are in accordance with theory. Moreover, the presented fabrication method enables the realization of multiple suspended structures in a single step and on the same single base, without mechanical crosstalk between the resonators. This work thus demonstrates the suitability and the advantages of the micro-masonry technique for the fabrication of plate resonators for mass sensing purpose. (paper)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  9. Resonantly scattering crystals and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.; Mahon, P.J.

    1990-12-01

    We examine coherence effects from forming a crystal of resonant scatterers by generalising the Fano model for autoionising resonances in electron scattering from atoms to a lattice of such scatterers. (We have in mind the case of neutron scattering from nuclei.) We solve this problem to yield two branches to the dispersion relation for the neutron in general and three when the resonance coincides with a Brillouin Zone boundary. The 'width' of the resonance is enhanced over the isolated nucleus, the best candidate for observation being the 2eV 185 Re resonance near the Bragg condition. We use these results to calculate the reflection coefficient from a surface, revealing total external reflection near resonance. We discuss experimental feasibility in both the neutron and electron cases. (author)

  10. Resonance Analysis of High-Frequency Electrohydraulic Exciter Controlled by 2D Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The resonant characteristic of hydraulic system has not been described yet because it is necessarily restricted by linear assumptions in classical fluid theory. A way of the resonance analysis is presented for an electrohydraulic exciter controlled by 2D valve. The block diagram of this excitation system is established by extracting nonlinear parts from the traditional linearization analysis; as a result the resonant frequency is obtained. According to input energy from oil source which is equal to the reverse energy to oil source, load pressure and load flow are solved analytically as the working frequency reaches the natural frequency. The analytical expression of resonant peak is also derived without damping. Finally, the experimental system is built to verify the theoretical analysis. The initial research on resonant characteristic will lay theoretical foundation and make useful complement for resonance phenomena of classical fluid theory in hydraulic system.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  12. Behavioral Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jan A.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Beisner, Beatrix; Neiman, Alexander; Russell, David F.; Yakusheva, Tatyana; Moss, Frank

    2001-03-01

    Zooplankton emit weak electric fields into the surrounding water that originate from their own muscular activities associated with swimming and feeding. Juvenile paddlefish prey upon single zooplankton by detecting and tracking these weak electric signatures. The passive electric sense in the fish is provided by an elaborate array of electroreceptors, Ampullae Lorenzini, spread over the surface of an elongated rostrum. We have previously shown that the fish use stochastic resonance to enhance prey capture near the detection threshold of their sensory system. But stochastic resonance requires an external source of electrical noise in order to function. The required noise can be provided by a swarm of plankton, for example Daphnia. Thus juvenile paddlefish can detect and attack single Daphnia as outliers in the vicinity of the swarm by making use of noise from the swarm itself. From the power spectral density of the noise plus the weak signal from a single Daphnia we calculate the signal-to-noise ratio and the Fisher information at the surface of the paddlefish's rostrum. The results predict a specific attack pattern for the paddlefish that appears to be experimentally testable.

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  14. Slowing down with resonance absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The presence of heavy nuclei in nuclear reactors, in significant concentrations, facilitates the appearance of absorption resonances. For the moderation in the presence of absorbers an exact solution of the integral equations is possible by numerical methods. Approximated solutions for separated resonances in function of the practical width, (NR and NRIM approximations) are discussed in this paper. The method is generalized, presenting the solution by an intermediate approximation, in the definition of the resonance integral. (Author) [pt

  15. Q-Boosted Optomechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    type a knob for optical Qo, where the inability to smooth etched nitride sidewall surfaces relegates OMO’s using it to Qo’s on the order of...6: Operation of an RP-OMO. As the ring resonator coupled to tapered fiber in (a) displaces by ∂r, the optical path length change produces the shift...frequency 0, B input pump laser field, tot the total optical resonator damping, ext the coupling between optical resonator and the tapered fiber

  16. Spectra of resonance surface photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G. [Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The theory of nonactivated electron transfer between atoms interacting reasonantly with coherent radiation and a metal surface is developed. The spectral resonances in photoabsorption and surface photoionization are found to be related to nonlinear interference effects in the interaction between discrete atomic levels and the continuum formed by the quasi-continuous electron spectrum of a normal metal. The asymmetry in the resonance surface photoionization spectrum is shown to have a shape typical of the Fano autoionization resonances. 18 refs.

  17. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Efficient primary and parametric resonance excitation of bistable resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-09-12

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient approach to excite primary and parametric (up to the 4th) resonance of Microelectromechanical system MEMS arch resonators with large vibrational amplitudes. A single crystal silicon in-plane arch microbeam is fabricated such that it can be excited axially from one of its ends by a parallel-plate electrode. Its micro/nano scale vibrations are transduced using a high speed camera. Through the parallel-plate electrode, a time varying electrostatic force is applied, which is converted into a time varying axial force that modulates dynamically the stiffness of the arch resonator. Due to the initial curvature of the structure, not only parametric excitation is induced, but also primary resonance. Experimental investigation is conducted comparing the response of the arch near primary resonance using the axial excitation to that of a classical parallel-plate actuation where the arch itself forms an electrode. The results show that the axial excitation can be more efficient and requires less power for primary resonance excitation. Moreover, unlike the classical method where the structure is vulnerable to the dynamic pull-in instability, the axial excitation technique can provide large amplitude motion while protecting the structure from pull-in. In addition to primary resonance, parametrical resonances are demonstrated at twice, one-half, and two-thirds the primary resonance frequency. The ability to actuate primary and/or parametric resonances can serve various applications, such as for resonator based logic and memory devices. (C) 2016 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

  19. Resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuti, Mine; Aikawa, Toshiki

    1981-01-01

    To investigate resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids, the non-linear radial oscillation of stars is studied based on the assumption that the non-adiabatic perturbation is expressed in terms of van der Pol's type damping. Two- and three-wave resonance in this system is applied to classical cepheids to describe their bump and double-mode behavior. The phase of bump and the depression of amplitude are explained for bump cepheids. The double-periodicity is shown by the enhancement of the third overtone in three-wave resonance. Non-linear effect on resonant period is also discussed briefly. (author)

  20. Transit time for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calderon, G.; Rubio, A.

    1990-09-01

    This work considers properties of the partial widths in one dimensional elastic resonant tunneling in order to propose a transit-time τ tr = (h/2π)/Γ n T res ) where Γ n is the elastic width and T res the transmission coefficient at resonance energy. This time is interpreted as an average over the resonance energy width. It is shown that the tunneling current density integrated across a sharp resonance is inversely proportional to τ tr . This transit time may be much larger than the values predicted by other definitions. (author). 20 refs

  1. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  2. Properties of resonance wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, R. M.; Gerjuoy, E.

    1973-01-01

    Construction and study of resonance wave functions corresponding to poles of the Green's function for several illustrative models of theoretical interest. Resonance wave functions obtained from the Siegert and Kapur-Peierls definitions of the resonance energies are compared. The comparison especially clarifies the meaning of the normalization constant of the resonance wave functions. It is shown that the wave functions may be considered renormalized in a sense analogous to that of quantum field theory. However, this renormalization is entirely automatic, and the theory has neither ad hoc procedures nor infinite quantities.

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  4. Effect of pressure on the magnetic properties of lanthanum manganite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar', L. E.; Leskova, Yu. V.; Nikiforov, A. E.; Kozlenko, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    The crystalline structure of pure lanthanum manganite under external hydrostatic pressure has been studied. The behavior of magnetic properties and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra under these conditions is theoretically predicted. It is shown that an increase in the Neel temperature with pressure is not only caused by the general contraction of the crystal, but is also related to certain peculiarities in the baric behavior of the orbital structure.

  5. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  6. Diurnal blood pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Kikuya, Masahiro

    2018-05-23

    The definition of diurnal blood pressure changes varies widely, which can be confusing. Short-term blood pressure variability during a 24-h period and the dipping status of diurnal blood pressure can be captured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and these metrics are reported to have prognostic significance for cardiovascular complications. Morning blood pressure surge also indicates this risk, but its effect may be limited to populations with specific conditions. Meanwhile, the combined use of conventional office blood pressure and out-of-office blood pressure allows us to identify people with white-coat and masked hypertension. Current home devices can measure nocturnal blood pressure during sleep more conveniently than ambulatory monitoring; however, we should pay attention to blood pressure measurement conditions regardless of whether they are in a home, ambulatory, or office setting. The relatively poor reproducibility of diurnal blood pressure changes, including the nocturnal fall of blood pressure, is another underestimated issue to be addressed. Although information on diurnal blood pressure changes is expected to be used more effectively in the future, we should also keep in mind that blood pressure levels have remained central to the primary and secondary prevention of blood pressure-related cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice.

  7. Computer model analysis of the radial artery pressure waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwid, H A; Taylor, L A; Smith, N T

    1987-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of aortic and radial artery pressures are reviewed, and a model of the cardiovascular system is presented. The model is based on resonant networks for the aorta and axillo-brachial-radial arterial system. The model chosen is a simple one, in order to make interpretation of the observed relationships clear. Despite its simplicity, the model produces realistic aortic and radial artery pressure waveforms. It demonstrates that the resonant properties of the arterial wall significantly alter the pressure waveform as it is propagated from the aorta to the radial artery. Although the mean and end-diastolic radial pressures are usually accurate estimates of the corresponding aortic pressures, the systolic pressure at the radial artery is often much higher than that of the aorta due to overshoot caused by the resonant behavior of the radial artery. The radial artery dicrotic notch is predominantly dependent on the axillo-brachial-radial arterial wall properties, rather than on the aortic valve or peripheral resistance. Hence the use of the radial artery dicrotic notch as an estimate of end systole is unreliable. The rate of systolic upstroke, dP/dt, of the radial artery waveform is a function of many factors, making it difficult to interpret. The radial artery waveform usually provides accurate estimates for mean and diastolic aortic pressures; for all other measurements it is an inadequate substitute for the aortic pressure waveform. In the presence of low forearm peripheral resistance the mean radial artery pressure may significantly underestimate the mean aortic pressure, as explained by a voltage divider model.

  8. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M; Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J; Fey, R H B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators

  9. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M [NXP Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J [Department of Mathematics, VU University—Faculty of Sciences, De Boelelaan 1081a, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fey, R H B, E-mail: cas.van.der.avoort@nxp.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators.

  10. Cyclotron resonance for electrons over helium in resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Shikin, V B

    2002-01-01

    The problem on the cyclotron resonance (CR) for electrons on the helium film, positioned in the resonator lower part, is solved. It is shown, that it relates to one of the examples of the known problem on the oscillations of the coupled oscillators system. The coupling constant between these oscillators constituting the variable function of the problem parameters. It is minimal in the zero magnetic field and reaches its maximum under the resonance conditions, when the cyclotron frequency coincides with one of the resonator modes. The CR details of the Uhf CR-energy absorption coupled by the electrons + resonator system, are calculated. The applications of the obtained results to the available CR experiments for electrons over helium

  11. Resonant High Power Combiners

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, Michel; Peillex-Delphe, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Particle accelerators need radio frequency sources. Above 300 MHz, the amplifiers mostly used high power klystrons developed for this sole purpose. As for military equipment, users are drawn to buy "off the shelf" components rather than dedicated devices. IOTs have replaced most klystrons in TV transmitters and find their way in particle accelerators. They are less bulky, easier to replace, more efficient at reduced power. They are also far less powerful. What is the benefit of very compact sources if huge 3 dB couplers are needed to combine the power? To alleviate this drawback, we investigated a resonant combiner, operating in TM010 mode, able to combine 3 to 5 IOTs. Our IOTs being able to deliver 80 kW C.W. apiece, combined power would reach 400 kW minus the minor insertion loss. Values for matching and insertion loss are given. The behavior of the system in case of IOT failure is analyzed.

  12. Laser cooling at resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkin, Yaakov; Khaykovich, Lev

    2018-05-01

    We show experimentally that three-dimensional laser cooling of lithium atoms on the D2 line is possible when the laser light is tuned exactly to resonance with the dominant atomic transition. Qualitatively, it can be understood by applying simple Doppler cooling arguments to the specific hyperfine structure of the excited state of lithium atoms, which is both dense and inverted. However, to build a quantitative theory, we must resolve to a full model which takes into account both the entire atomic structure of all 24 Zeeman sublevels and the laser light polarization. Moreover, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, we show that coherent processes play an important role in showing consistency between the theory and the experimental results.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  15. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  16. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  17. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  18. Pressure drops in low pressure local boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, Michel; Schleisiek, Karl

    1969-01-01

    For prediction of flow reduction in nuclear research reactors, it was necessary to establish a correlation giving the pressure drop in subcooled boiling for rectangular channels. Measurements of pressure drop on rectangular channel 60 and 90 cm long and with a coolant gap of 1,8 and 3,6 mm were performed in the following range of parameters. -) 3 < pressure at the outlet < 11 bars abs; -) 25 < inlet temperature < 70 deg. C; -) 200 < heat flux < 700 W/cm 2 . It appeared that the usual parameter, relative length in subcooled boiling, was not sufficient to correlate experimental pressure losses on the subcooled boiling length and that there was a supplementary influence of pressure, heat flux and subcooling. With an a dimensional parameter including these terms a correlation was established with an error band of ±10%. With a computer code it was possible to derive the relation giving the overall pressure drop along the channel and to determine the local gradients of pressure drop. These local gradients were then correlated with the above parameter calculated in local conditions. 95 % of the experimental points were computed with an accuracy of ±10% with this correlation of gradients which can be used for non-uniform heated channels. (authors) [fr

  19. Gas breakdown at cyclotron resonance with a submillimeter laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.P.; Temkin, R.J.; Lax, B.

    1976-01-01

    A pulsed 496-μm CH 3 F laser is used to produce gas breakdown in He at pressures between 1 and 300 Torr in an intense longitudinal magnetic field. Breakdown is detected by the observation of visible light when the electron cyclotron frequency (eB/m) equals the laser frequency, which occurs at B=216 kG for lambda=496 μm. At the lowest helium pressures and near cyclotron resonance, the focused laser intensity of 40 kW/cm 2 gives rise to very large electron heating rates, well beyond the limit of validity of conventional equilibrium breakdown theory. The observed result is an intensity-dependent resonant linewidth, much larger than predicted by equilibrium theories

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Magnetic resonance imaging inside metallic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2010-10-01

    We introduce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements inside metallic vessels. Until now, MRI has been unusable inside metallic vessels because of eddy currents in the walls. We have solved the problem and generated high quality images by employing a magnetic field gradient monitoring method. The ability to image within metal enclosures and structures means many new samples and systems are now amenable to MRI. Most importantly this study will form the basis of new MRI-compatible metallic pressure vessels, which will permit MRI of macroscopic systems at high pressure.

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome: magnetic resonance findings in two patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, R.; Pastor, J.; Escamilla, F.; Romero, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    The postural headache syndrome associated with a decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure is generally secondary to the CSF leakage that usually occurs after diagnostic lumbar puncture. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension can not be attributed to any known cause or previous diagnostic or therapeutic intervention. The syndrome is characterized by severe headache that is relieved by lying supine. During lumbar puncture, the CSF pressure is normally low. We present two patients in whom gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed widespread thickening and enhancement of the dura mater and subdural fluid collections. (Author) 13 refs

  2. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  4. Stark resonances in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecchi, V.; Maioli, M.; Modena Univ.; Sacchetti, A.

    1992-01-01

    By slightly restricting the conditions given by Herbst and Howland, we prove the existence of resonances in the Stark effect of disordered systems (and atomic crystals) for large atomic mean distance. In the crystal case the ladders of resonances have the Wannier behavior for small complex field. (orig.)

  5. Atomic and molecular resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botter, R.; Petit, A.

    1990-01-01

    Published in summary form only the paper recalls the principle of resonance photoionization, transition probability, selectivity and critical parameters. Examples of applications are briefly treated: Trace analysis by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for detection of Fe in Zr F 4 for fabrication of optical fibers and laser isotopic separation of U 235 and Gd 157 [fr

  6. Physics of optimal resonant tunneling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Racec, P.N.; Stoica, T.; Popescu, C.; Lepsa, M.I.; Roer, van de T.G.

    1997-01-01

    The optimal resonant tunneling, or the complete tunneling transparence of a biased double-barrier resonant-tunneling (DBRT) structure, is discussed. It is shown that its physics does not rest on the departure from the constant potential within the barriers and well, due to the applied electric

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  9. Resonance journal of science education

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE | May 2010. Resonance journal of science education. May 2010 Volume 15 Number 5. On the Measurement of Phase Difference using CROs b. SERIES ARTICLES. 400. Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics. Mini and Micro Airplanes. S P Govinda Raju. GENERAL ARTICLES. 411. Bird of Passage at ...

  10. Resonance investigation of pump-turbine during startup process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L Y; Wang, Z W; Kurosawa, S; Nakahara, Y

    2014-01-01

    The causes of resonance of a certain model pump-turbine unit during startup process were investigated in this article. A three-dimensional full flow path analysis model which contains spiral case, stay vanes, guide vanes, runner, gaps outside the runner crown and band, and draft tube was constructed. The transient hydraulic excitation force of full flow path was analyzed under five conditions near the resonance region. Based on one-way fluid- structure interaction (FSI) analysis model, the dynamic stress characteristics of the pump-turbine runner was investigated. The results of pressure pulsation, vibration mode and dynamic stress obtained from simulation were consistent with the test results. The study indicated that the hydraulic excitation frequency (Z g *f n ) Hz due to rotor-stator interference corresponding to the natural frequency of 2ND+4ND runner mode is the main cause of resonance. The relationship among pressure pulsation, vibration mode and dynamic stress was discussed in this paper. The results revealed the underlying causes of the resonance phenomenon

  11. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  13. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart ... kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  14. High blood pressure - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure is found. This is called essential hypertension. High blood pressure that is caused by another medical condition or medicine you are taking is called secondary hypertension. Secondary hypertension may be due to: Chronic ...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  17. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  18. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ...

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  20. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  1. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  2. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  3. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  4. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... especially prone to pressure sores? play_arrow What parts of the body are most likely to develop ... play_arrow How long is the typical healing time for a pressure sore? play_arrow Why do ...

  5. Integrated unaligned resonant modulator tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-10-03

    Methods and systems for tuning a resonant modulator are disclosed. One method includes receiving a carrier signal modulated by the resonant modulator with a stream of data having an approximately equal number of high and low bits, determining an average power of the modulated carrier signal, comparing the average power to a predetermined threshold, and operating a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the comparison of the average power and the predetermined threshold. One system includes an input structure, a plurality of processing elements, and a digital control element. The input structure is configured to receive, from the resonant modulator, a modulated carrier signal. The plurality of processing elements are configured to determine an average power of the modulated carrier signal. The digital control element is configured to operate a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the average power of the modulated carrier signal.

  6. Giant first-forbidden resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krmpotic, F.; Nakayama, K.; Sao Paulo Univ.; Pio Galeao, A.; Sao Paulo Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on first-forbidden charge-exchange resonances are discussed in the framework of a schematic model. We also evaluate the screening of the weak coupling constants induced by both the giant resonances and the δ-isobar. It is shown that the last effect does not depend on the multipolarity of the one-particle moment. Due to the same reason, the fraction of the reaction strength pushed up into the δ-resonance region is always the same regardless of the quantum numbers carried by the excitation. Simple expressions are derived for the dependence of the excitation energies of the first-forbidden giant resonances on the mass number and isospin of the target. The model reproduces consistently both the Gamow-Teller and the first-forbidden resonances. (orig.)

  7. High-pressure microbiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michiels, Chris; Bartlett, Douglas Hoyt; Aertsen, Abram

    2008-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. High Hydrostatic Pressure Effects in the Biosphere: from Molecules to Microbiology * Filip Meersman and Karel Heremans . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Effects...

  8. Nonlinear elasticity in resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xun; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Snieder, Roel

    2018-04-01

    Resonant bar experiments have revealed that dynamic deformation induces nonlinearity in rocks. These experiments produce resonance curves that represent the response amplitude as a function of the driving frequency. We propose a model to reproduce the resonance curves with observed features that include (a) the log-time recovery of the resonant frequency after the deformation ends (slow dynamics), (b) the asymmetry in the direction of the driving frequency, (c) the difference between resonance curves with the driving frequency that is swept upward and downward, and (d) the presence of a "cliff" segment to the left of the resonant peak under the condition of strong nonlinearity. The model is based on a feedback cycle where the effect of softening (nonlinearity) feeds back to the deformation. This model provides a unified interpretation of both the nonlinearity and slow dynamics in resonance experiments. We further show that the asymmetry of the resonance curve is caused by the softening, which is documented by the decrease of the resonant frequency during the deformation; the cliff segment of the resonance curve is linked to a bifurcation that involves a steep change of the response amplitude when the driving frequency is changed. With weak nonlinearity, the difference between the upward- and downward-sweeping curves depends on slow dynamics; a sufficiently slow frequency sweep eliminates this up-down difference. With strong nonlinearity, the up-down difference results from both the slow dynamics and bifurcation; however, the presence of the bifurcation maintains the respective part of the up-down difference, regardless of the sweep rate.

  9. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  10. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cord injuries? play_arrow Why are pressure sores so serious? play_arrow What is "sepsis," and why ... pressure sores? play_arrow Why is pressure relief so important when sitting in a wheelchair? play_arrow ...

  11. Exchange market pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, H.; Klaassen, F.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Currencies can be under severe pressure in the foreign exchange market, but in a fixed (or managed) exchange rate regime that is not fully visible via the change in the exchange rate. Exchange market pressure (EMP) is a concept developed to nevertheless measure the pressure in such cases. This

  12. High-pressure apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepdael, van L.J.M.; Bartels, P.V.; Berg, van den R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a high-pressure device (1) having a cylindrical high-pressure vessel (3) and prestressing means in order to exert an axial pressure on the vessel. The vessel (3) can have been formed from a number of layers of composite material, such as glass, carbon or aramide fibers which

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tamaki, Susumu; Kurata, Kyosuke; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx, the eustachian tube and the middle ear was performed in nine patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. MRI revealed the extent of the tumor more clearly than CT (computed tomography) when the tumor was situated in the parapharyngeal space. But when the tumor extended superficially in the nasopharyngeal mucosa, its margin could not be identified clearly by either MRI or CT because of hypervascularity and long T1 and T2 of the nasopharyngeal mucosa. Seven of the nine patients had unilateral otitis media with effusion. Their eustachian tube ventilation function was evaluated by an inflation-deflation technique. Failure of active equalization of negative pressure applied to the middle ear was found to be a characteristic disorder of their eustachian tube ventilation function. This dysfunction seemed to be correlated with the lateral dislocation of the eustachian tube cartilage caused by the tumor. (author)

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension represents a group of conditions characterized by higher than normal pulmonary artery pressures. Despite improved treatments, outcomes in many instances remain poor. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This technique offers certain advantages over other imaging modalities since it is well suited to the assessment of the right ventricle and the proximal pulmonary arteries. Reflecting the relatively sparse evidence supporting its use, CMR is not routinely recommended for patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, it is particularly useful in patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. Furthermore, it has proven informative in a number of ways; illustrating how right ventricular remodeling is favorably reversed by drug therapies and providing explicit confirmation of the importance of the right ventricle to clinical outcome. This review will discuss these aspects and practical considerations before speculating on future applications. PMID:22257586

  15. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the spectra of the P1 centers. We discuss the mechanisms that cause both the strong reduction of the peak intensity of the ‘allowed’ lines in EPR spectra of triplet defects and the transformation of the P1 spectra.

  16. [Contemporary possibilities of intraocular pressure measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornová, J; Baxant, A

    2013-10-01

    Authors introduced current possibilities of measuring intraocular pressure (IOP). A list of available methods of monitoring IOP is published; contact measurement method IOP directly on the cornea, but also over upper lid, methodology of minimal contact and non-contact measurement. Following contact methods are described; former measurements of IOP by impression Schiotz tonometer and the current methodology applanation. So far as the gold standard measurement Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) is considered, another methodology with applanation measurements are compared: Pascal dynamic contoured tonometer (DCT ), BioResonator - resonant applanation tonometer (ART ), digital applanation tonometer Tonopen and last hit: continuous measurement of IOP by Sensimed Triggerfish. Orientation and rapid assessment is palpation pressure control over the lid and measuring by tonometer Diaton. Rebound tonometer (RBT) iCare belongs to measurements with minimal contact, no need anesthetic drops and fluorescein, therefore a self - home version of IOP measurements (Icare ONE) is developed. Non-contact measurement of IOP by different pneumotonometers is popular for screening assessment of IOP. Reichert Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) is a non-contact applanation IOP measurement and reveals additional properties of the cornea. In the discussion of a range methodology is evaluated, the experience of other authors and their own experience is compared. For monitoring of patients is necessary to select the most suitable methodology, measure repeatedly and accurately to allow long-term monitoring of intraocular pressure.

  17. Heated electron distributions from resonant absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroot, J.S.; Tull, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified model of resonant absorption of obliquely incident laser light has been developed. Using a 1.5 dimensional electrostatic simulation computer code, it is shown that the inclusion of ion motion is critically important in determining the heated electron distributions from resonant absorption. The electromagnetic wave drives up an electron plasma wave. For long density scale lengths (Lapprox. =10 3 lambda/subD//sube/), the phase velocity of this wave is very large (ω/kapproximately-greater-than10V/sub th/) so that if heating does occur, a suprathermal tail of very energetic electrons is produced. However, the pressure due to this wave steepens the density profile until the density gradient scale length near the critical density (where the local plasma frequency equals the laser frequency) is of order 20lambda/subD//sube/. The electrostatic wave is thus forced to have a much lower phase velocity (ω/kapprox. =2.5V/sub th/). In this case, more electrons are heated to much lower velocities. The heated electron distributions are exponential in velocity space. Using a simple theory it is shown that this property of profile steepening applies to most of a typical laser fusion pulse. This steepening raises the threshold for parametric instabilities near the critical surface. Thus, the extensive suprathermal electron distributions typically produced by these parametric instabilities can be drastically reduced

  18. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    resonator, which reduces the energy loss arising from the heat conducting, the wall temperature almost have no limitation. The cavity is partitioned in two halves separated by a dialectic quartz plate. The propellant is swirl-injected tangentially in the nozzle side of the cavity (plasma chamber), which extends lifetime and working reliability of MPT. Compared, coaxial resonator has the characteristic of smaller structure, lighter weight, wider bandwidth of resonating frequency and more stable resonate state. microwave energy can heat propellant gas to produce thrust efficiently. According to the test method on the return loss of passive parts of microwave apparatus, this paper also makes experimental study on the resonating state of MPT cavity with scalar network analyzer operating under low signal. Purpose is to analyze its energy absorbing efficiency and resonant frequency band, research the matching of the cavity dimension, microwave coupling probe position and the isolate plate material within the cavity. The conclusion is helpful for the thruster design and improving the system efficiency. different propellant gases (Ar and He) have been fulfilled. The power, resonant pressure and mass flow rate have been measured and analyzed. Experiments show that MPT can start up reliably and work steadily. Keywords: microwave plasma thrustermicrowaveplasmaresonatorreturn loss

  19. Review on resonance cone fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1980-02-01

    Resonance cone fields and lower hybrid heating are reviewed in this report. The resonance cone fields were reported by Fisher and Gould, and they proposed the use of the measurement of resonance cones and structure as a diagnostic tool to determine the plasma density and electron temperature in magnetoplasma. After the resonance cone, a wave-like disturbance persists. Ohnuma et al. have measured bending, reflection and ducting of resonance cones in detail. The thermal modes in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma were seen. The reflection of thermal mode near an electron plasma frequency layer and an insulating plate has been observed. The non-linear effects of resonance cones is reported. Monochromatic electron beam produces the noise of broad band whistler mode. Lower hybrid waves have been the subject of propagation from the edge of plasma to the lower hybrid layer. Linear lower hybrid waves were studied. The lower hybrid and ion acoustic waves radiated from a point source were observed. The parametric decay of finite-extent, cold electron plasma waves was studied. The lower hybrid cone radiated from a point source going along magnetic field lines was observed. Several experimental data on the lower hybrid heating in tokamak devices have been reported. The theories on resonance cones and lower hybrid waves are introduced in this report. (Kato, T.)

  20. An electrokinetic pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Duckjong

    2008-01-01

    A new concept for a micro pressure sensor is demonstrated. The pressure difference between the inlet and the outlet of glass nanochannels is obtained by measuring the electrokinetically generated electric potential. To demonstrate the proposed concept, experimental investigations are performed for 100 nm wide nanochannels with sodium chloride solutions having various concentrations. The proposed pressure sensor is able to measure the pressure difference within a 10% deviation from linearity. The sensitivity of the electrokinetic pressure sensor with 10 −5 M sodium chloride solution is 18.5 µV Pa −1 , which is one order of magnitude higher than that of typical diaphragm-based pressure sensors. A numerical model is presented for investigating the effects of the concentration and the channel width on the sensitivity of the electrokinetic pressure sensor. Numerical results show that the sensitivity increases as the concentration decreases and the channel width increases

  1. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, J.E.; Omenetto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) and its Applications was held in Varese, Italy, 16-21 September 1990. Interest in RIS and its applications continues to grow, and RIS is expanding into a more diverse and mature field of study. This maturity was evident in this meeting both in the basic science and understanding of RIS processes and in the number of new and improved applications and techniques. The application of RIS techniques to molecular detection problems made remarkable progress since the last meeting two years ago. Subtle effects pertaining to isotopic discrimination received more theoretical attention, and there now seems to be good understanding of these effects, which can lead to correction procedures and/or methods to avoid isotopic effects. RIS applications were presented in which significant, real world problems were addressed, demonstrating its capability to solve problems that previously could not be accurately solved by other more traditional techniques. The contributions to the conference are grouped under the following major topic headings: physics applications of rare atoms; laser ionization mechanisms - spectroscopy; atomic, molecular and ion sources; molecular RIS; atomic RIS - Rydberg states; environmental trace analysis; biological and medical applications; state selected chemistry; new laser sources and techniques; ultra-high resolution and isotopic selectivity; surface and bulk analysis. (Author)

  3. Transverse electron resonance accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse (to the velocity, v-bar, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasms by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v-bar. The generating field oscillates with frequency ω = ω/sub p/, where ω/sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d≅2πc/ω/sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ω/sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E 2 /sub L/). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E

  4. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-07-25

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and $\\Delta$ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger Equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of $Q^2 > 1.5GeV^2$. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  5. Transverse electron resonance accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse (to the velocity, v, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasmas by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v. The generating field oscillates with frequency ω = ω/sub p/, where ω/sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d approx. = 2πc/ω/sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ω/sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E/sub L/ 2 ). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E

  6. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  8. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Pressure (Or No Royal Road)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses how difficult the various problems of pressure, partial pressure, gas laws, and vapor pressure are for students. Outlines the evolution of the concept of pressure, the gas equation for a perfect gas, partial pressures, saturated vapor pressure, Avogadro's hypothesis, Raoult's law, and the vapor pressure of ideal solutions. (JR)

  11. Efficient primary and parametric resonance excitation of bistable resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah; Alcheikh, Nouha; Ilyas, Saad; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    efficient and requires less power for primary resonance excitation. Moreover, unlike the classical method where the structure is vulnerable to the dynamic pull-in instability, the axial excitation technique can provide large amplitude motion while protecting

  12. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  13. Pressure locking test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, open-quotes Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.close quotes Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  14. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  15. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-12-22

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  17. The Resonance Integral of Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirlow, K; Johansson, E

    1959-04-15

    The resonance activation integral of gold has been determined, by means of cadmium ratio measurements of thin foils in a neutron beam. Comparison was made with a 1/v detector, and the neutron spectra were measured with a chopper. The resonance integral, RI, is defined as {integral}{sub 0.5}{sup {infinity}}{sigma}{sub r}(E)dE/E, where {sigma}{sub r}(E) is the differenc between the total absorption cross section and the 1/v part. An experimental value of 1490 {+-} 40 barns has been obtained. RI has also been computed from resonance parameter data with the result 1529 {+-} 70 barns.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  19. Hadron excitation of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, H.-P.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given on giant resonance studies in heavy nuclei using scattering of different hadronic probes. Concerning isoscalar giant resonances compression modes are discussed with the possibility to obtain more detailed structure information. From detailed studies of α scattering the distribution of isoscalar strengths of multipolarity up to L=6 was obtained. Some recent aspects of heavy ion excitation of collective modes are mentioned. The possibility to study isovector giant resonances in hadron charge exchange reactions is discussed. Finally, a comparison is made between α and 200 MeV proton scattering from which isoscalar and spin-isospin continuum response are extracted. (orig.)

  20. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the resutls on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monople giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excelent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that the decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  1. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-02-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the results on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  2. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  3. Microwave Wire Interrogation Method Mapping Pressure under High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that wireless reading for in-situ mapping of pressure under high-temperature environments is the most feasible method, because it is not subject to frequent heterogeneous jointing failures and electrical conduction deteriorating, or even disappearing, under heat load. However, in this article, we successfully demonstrate an in-situ pressure sensor with wire interrogation for high-temperature applications. In this proof-of-concept study of the pressure sensor, we used a microwave resonator as a pressure-sensing component and a microwave transmission line as a pressure characteristic interrogation tunnel. In the sensor, the line and resonator are processed into a monolith, avoiding a heterogeneous jointing failure; further, microwave signal transmission does not depend on electrical conduction, and consequently, the sensor does not suffer from the heat load. We achieve pressure monitoring under 400 °C when employing the sensor simultaneously. Our sensor avoids restrictions that exist in wireless pressure interrogations, such as environmental noise and interference, signal leakage and security, low transfer efficiency, and so on.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GRIDINA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Performed in this paper is numerical modeling of the angular dependence for light reflectivity R(F in surface plasmon-polariton resonance (SPR realized in Kretschmann geometry when studying the interface gold/suspension of spherical particles (cells in the assumption that the dielectric permittivity of particles suspension is described by the theory of effective medium. It has been shown that availability of suspended particles in solution inevitably results in appearance of an intermediate layer with the ε gradient between gold surface and suspension bulk, as a result of which the SPR angle shifts to lower values. Near the critical angle, the first derivative dR/dF demonstrates a clearly pronounced peak, which allows determining the value for suspension bulk and the gradient in the intermediate layer. Obtained in our experiments were SPR curves for two suspensions of erythrocytes – the dense one (erythrocyte mass after centrifuging and loose solution (whole blood. In the case of erythrocyte mass, fitting the experimental and calculated curves enabled us to quantitatively determine the bulk value for this erythrocyte mass (εb =1.96, thickness of the intermediate layer dm (300…400 nm and gradient in the intermediate layer. On the contrary, the SPR curve for whole blood appeared to be close to that of pure plasma. This fact allows only estimation of the thickness dm~2000...3000 nm as well as minimum ε value in the intermediate layer, which is close to that of plasma (ε = 1.79. Also, discussed is the mechanism of influence of the cell shape near the gold surface on the SPR effect.

  5. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas in tokamak and EBT configurations has been studied using 1-2/2 and 2-1/2 dimensional fully self-consistent electromagnetic particle codes. We have tested two major antenna configurations; we have also compared heating efficiencies for one and two ion species plasmas. We model a tokamak plasma with a uniform poloidal field and 1/R toroidal field on a particular q surface. Ion cyclotron waves are excited on the low field side by antennas parallel either to the poloidal direction or to the toroidal direction with different phase velocities. In 2D, minority ion heating (vsub(perpendicular)) and electron heating (vsub(parallel),vsub(perpendicular)) are observed. The exponential electron heating seems due to the decay instability. The minority heating is consistent with mode conversion of fast Alfven waves and heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron modes. Minority heating is stronger with a poloidal antenna. The strong electron heating is accompanied by toroidal current generation. In 1D, no thermal instability was observed and only strong minority heating resulted. For an EBT plasma we model it by a multiple mirror. We have tested heating efficiency with various minority concentrations, temperatures, mirror ratios, and phase velocities. In this geometry we have beach or inverse beach heating associated with the mode conversion layer perpendicular to the toroidal field. No appreciable electron heating is observed. Heating of ions is linear in time. For both tokamak and EBT slight majority heating above the collisional rate is observed due to the second harmonic heating. (author)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  7. Dipole Resonances of 76Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, R. S.; Cooper, N.; Werner, V.; Rusev, G.; Pietralla, N.; Kelly, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E.

    2013-10-01

    Dipole resonances in 76Ge have been studied using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF). The experiment was performed using the Free Electron Laser facility at HI γS/TUNL, which produced linearly polarised quasi-monoenergetic photons in the 4-9 MeV energy range. Photon strength, in particular dipole strength, is an important ingredient in nuclear reaction calculations, and recent interest in its study has been stimulated by observations of a pygmy dipole resonance near the neutron separation energy Sn of certain nuclei. Furthermore, 76Ge is a candidate for 0 ν 2 β -decay. The results are complimentary to a relevant experiment done at TU Darmstadt using Bremsstrahlung beams. Single-resonance parities and a preliminary estimate of the total photo-excitation cross section will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under grant no. DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  2. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility (ICR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — his facility is charged with developing and exploiting the unique capabilities of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and leads the...

  3. Narrow n anti n resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, L.N.; Dalkarov, O.D.; Kerbikov, B.O.; Shapiro, I.S.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the problem of quasinuclear states in systems of nucleons and antinucleons is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data on narrow meson resonances near N anti N threshold which appeared in 1971-74

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  5. Resonance detection of Moessbauer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The resonance detection method as compared with the usual method of registering Moessbauer spectra has a number of advantages, one of which is the increase of resolution of the Moessbauer spectrum. The method is based on the modulation of a secondary radiation of a converter tuned in the resonance with the Moessbauer gamma-quantum source. The resonance detection method with account of supression, secondary radiation outgoing from the converter is investigated. The converter represents a substrate enriched by the Moessbauer isotope placed either inside the gas counter, or coupled with any other detecting device. Analytical expressions for Moessbauer spectrum parameters: effect, area and width of the spectral line are derived. It is shown that the joint application of usual and resonance detection methods for registering the Moessbauer spectrum allows one to determine parameters of the source, converter and the investigated absorber

  6. Electron cyclotron resonance heating assisted plasma startup in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucalossi, J.; Hertout, P.; Lennholm, M.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-04-01

    ECRH assisted plasma startup at fundamental resonance is investigated in Tore Supra in view of ITER operation. ECRH pre-ionisation is found to be very efficient allowing plasma initiation in a wide range of pre-fill pressure compared to ohmic startup. Reliable assisted startup has been achieved at the ITER reference toroidal electric field (0.3 V/m) with 160 kW of ECRH. Resonance location scan indicates that the plasma is initiated at the resonance location and that the plasma current channel position had to be real-time controlled since the very beginning of the discharge to obtain robust plasma startup. (authors)

  7. Analysis and measurement of the stability of dual-resonator oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaed, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the stability of oscillators with dual-resonating tanks. After deriving oscillator models, it is shown that contrary to prior belief, there can be only one stable oscillating state. Sufficient conditions for stable oscillating states are derived and silicon measurement results are used to prove their validity. A fully integrated transmitter for intraocular pressure sensing that leverages the dual-resonator tank is designed and fabricated based on the derived models. An unstable version of the transmitter is also demonstrated to prove the concept of instability in dual-resonator oscillators © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  10. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  11. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  12. Hadronic resonances at FAIR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings cover the analysis of hadronic resonances in heavy ion collisions. The model used for these studies is the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model. The model will be briefly explained, resonance observables will be highlighted and various kinematical issues will be investigated. Special emphasis will be put on the FAIR energy regime, especially highlighting the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) program.

  13. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  14. Memory effects on stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Alexander; Sung, Wokyung

    1996-02-01

    We study the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with internal colored noise. In this situation the system possesses time-dependent memory friction connected with noise via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, so that in the absence of periodic driving the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium state. For this non-Markovian case we find that memory usually suppresses stochastic resonance. However, for a large memory time SR can be enhanced by the memory.

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  16. Pressure vessel failure at high internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1995-01-01

    A RPV failure due to plastic instability was investigated using the ABAQUS finite element code together with a material model of thermal plasticity for large deformations. Not only rotational symmetric temperature distributions were studied, but also 'hot spots'. Calculations show that merely by the depletion of strength of the material - even at internal wall temperatures well below the melting point of the fuel elements of about 2000/2400 C - the critical internal pressure can decrease to values smaller than the operational pressure of 16 Mpa. (orig.)

  17. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  18. Novel designs for application specific MEMS pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio; Reck, Kasper; Lorenzen, Lasse; Thomsen, Erik V

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of developing innovative microfabricated pressure sensors, we present here three designs based on different readout principles, each one tailored for a specific application. A touch mode capacitive pressure sensor with high sensitivity (14 pF/bar), low temperature dependence and high capacitive output signal (more than 100 pF) is depicted. An optical pressure sensor intrinsically immune to electromagnetic interference, with large pressure range (0-350 bar) and a sensitivity of 1 pm/bar is presented. Finally, a resonating wireless pressure sensor power source free with a sensitivity of 650 KHz/mmHg is described. These sensors will be related with their applications in harsh environment, distributed systems and medical environment, respectively. For many aspects, commercially available sensors, which in vast majority are piezoresistive, are not suited for the applications proposed.

  19. Novel Designs for Application Specific MEMS Pressure Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik V. Thomsen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of developing innovative microfabricated pressure sensors, we present here three designs based on different readout principles, each one tailored for a specific application. A touch mode capacitive pressure sensor with high sensitivity (14 pF/bar, low temperature dependence and high capacitive output signal (more than 100 pF is depicted. An optical pressure sensor intrinsically immune to electromagnetic interference, with large pressure range (0–350 bar and a sensitivity of 1 pm/bar is presented. Finally, a resonating wireless pressure sensor power source free with a sensitivity of 650 KHz/mmHg is described. These sensors will be related with their applications in  harsh environment, distributed systems and medical environment, respectively. For many aspects, commercially available sensors, which in vast majority are piezoresistive, are not suited for the applications proposed.

  20. Measuring fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for measuring the pressure of a fluid having characteristics that make it unsuitable for connection directly to a pressure gauge. The method is particularly suitable for the periodic measurement of the pressure of a supply of liquid Na to Na-lubricated bearings of pumps for pumping Na from a reservoir to the bearing via a filter, the reservoir being contained in a closed vessel containing an inert blanket gas, such as Ar, above the Na. (UK)

  1. Superconductivity at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, N B; Ginzburg, N I

    1969-07-01

    Work published during the last 3 or 4 yrs concerning the effect of pressure on superconductivity is reviewed. Superconducting modifications of Si, Ge, Sb, Te, Se, P and Ce. Change of Fermi surface under pressure for nontransition metals. First experiments on the influence of pressure on the tunneling effect in superconductors provide new information on the nature of the change in phonon and electron energy spectra of metals under hydrostatic compression. 78 references.

  2. Fuel vapor pressure (FVAPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    A subcode (FVAPRS) is described which calculates fuel vapor pressure. This subcode was developed as part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The fuel vapor pressure subcode (FVAPRS), is presented and a discussion of literature data, steady state and transient fuel vapor pressure equations and estimates of the standard error of estimate to be expected with the FVAPRS subcode are included

  3. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  4. Study of SmS properties in the low pressure phase (black phase)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, G.

    1986-01-01

    SmS was studied for the transition from low pressure phase (black phase) to high pressure phase with an intermediate valence. But the study of the black phase is very rich. The variations of electron transport properties with pressure at low temperature show a semi-metal phase located, in the pressure-temperature diagram in the black phase for pressure over 4 kbars, corresponding to the phase B'of the doping-temperature diagram. Electron spin resonance shows a lack of sulfur and nearby this defect a samarium ion, magnetically coupled with the matrix, presents a divalent trivalent transition. Resonance lines are broadened with temperature. Conductivity relaxations occur at low pressure and low temperature by trapping a conduction electron, by magnetic exchange giving a bounded magnetic polaron. The relaxation time at null magnetic field is activated. An approximation of trapping barrier and critical field corresponding the maximum magnetoresistance is given by a model [fr

  5. MRI measurements of intracranial pressure in the upright posture: The effect of the hydrostatic pressure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Noam; Lee, Sang H; Bagci, Ahmet M

    2015-10-01

    To add the hydrostatic component of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements in the upright posture for derivation of pressure value in a central cranial location often used in invasive ICP measurements. Additional analyses were performed using data previously collected from 10 healthy subjects scanned in supine and sitting positions with a 0.5T vertical gap MRI scanner (GE Medical). Pulsatile blood and CSF flows to and from the brain were quantified using cine phase-contrast. Intracranial compliance and pressure were calculated using a previously described method. The vertical distance between the location of the CSF flow measurement and a central cranial location was measured manually in the mid-sagittal T1 -weighted image obtained in the upright posture. The hydrostatic pressure gradient of a CSF column with similar height was then added to the MR-ICP value. After adjustment for the hydrostatic component, the mean ICP value was reduced by 7.6 mmHg. Mean ICP referenced to the central cranial level was -3.4 ± 1.7 mmHg compared to the unadjusted value of +4.3 ± 1.8 mmHg. In the upright posture, the hydrostatic pressure component needs to be added to the MRI-derived ICP values for compatibility with invasive ICP at a central cranial location. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1985-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (orig./PW)

  7. Pressurized water reactor with reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure vessel has a cylindrical jacket with a domed floor. A guide is arranged on the domed floor to even out the flow in the core. It consists of a cylindrical jacket, whose lower end has slots and fins. These fins are welded to the domed floor. (DG) [de

  8. Pressure ionization of dense plasmas in spherical ion-cell model with spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Blenski, T.; Takahashi, H.; Iguchi, T.; Nakazawa, M.

    1996-01-01

    We study the continuity of pressure of dense plasmas in pressure ionization in case where spin-orbit interactions are taken into account in calculations. Pressure is calculated using a stress-tensor pressure formula in the relativistically-corrected self-consistent field spherical ion-cell model (average-atom model). It appears that calculated pressure and electronic density distribution change continuously in pressure ionization if we take narrow shape resonances into account properly. This observation stresses the need of a coherent description of bound and free electrons. We also compare the results by the stress-tensor pressure formula with those by other pressure formulas. It appears that different pressure formulas give rather discrepant results in some cases. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Symmetry and resonance in Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuwankotta, J.M.; Verhulst, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we study resonances in two degrees of freedom, autonomous, hamiltonian systems. Due to the presence of a symmetry condition on one of the degrees of freedom, we show that some of the resonances vanish as lower order resonances. After giving a sharp estimate of the resonance domain, we

  10. Symmetry and resonance in Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuwankotta, J.M.; Verhulst, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study resonances in two degrees of freedom, autonomous, hamiltonian systems. Due to the presence of a symmetry condition on one of the degrees of freedom, we show that some of the resonances vanish as lower order resonances. After determining the size of the resonance domain, we

  11. Diaphragm Pump With Resonant Piezoelectric Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Shimko, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    make it oscillate at the resonance frequency of the spring and- mass structure. This frequency could be made high enough (of the order of 400 Hz) that the masses of all components could be made conveniently small. The resonance would amplify the relatively small motion of the piezoelectric stack (a stroke of the order of 10 m) to a diaphragm stroke of the order of 0.5 mm. The exact amplification factor would depend on the rate of damping of oscillations; this, in turn, would depend on details of design and operation, including (but not limited to) the desired pressure rise and volumetric flow rate. In order to obtain resonance with large displacement, the damping rate must be low enough that the energy imparted to the pumped fluid on each stroke is much less than the kinetic and potential energy exchanged between the mass and spring during each cycle of oscillation. To minimize the power demand of the pump, a highly efficient drive circuit would be used to excite the piezoelectric stack. This circuit (see Figure 2) would amount to a special-purpose regenerative, switching power supply that would operate in a power-source mode during the part of an oscillation cycle when the excitation waveform was positive and in a power-recovery mode during the part of the cycle when the excitation waveform was negative. The circuit would include a voltage-boosting dc-to-dc converter that would convert between a supply potential of 24 Vdc and the high voltage needed to drive the piezoelectric stack. Because of the power-recovery feature, the circuit would consume little power. It should be possible to build the circuit as a compact unit, using readily available components.

  12. Microelectromechanical resonator and method for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Jonathan W [Albuquerque, NM; Olsson, Roy H [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-10

    A method is disclosed for the robust fabrication of a microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator. In this method, a pattern of holes is formed in the resonator mass with the position, size and number of holes in the pattern being optimized to minimize an uncertainty .DELTA.f in the resonant frequency f.sub.0 of the MEM resonator due to manufacturing process variations (e.g. edge bias). A number of different types of MEM resonators are disclosed which can be formed using this method, including capacitively transduced Lame, wineglass and extensional resonators, and piezoelectric length-extensional resonators.

  13. As-Grown Gallium Nitride Nanowire Electromechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Joshua R.

    Technological development in recent years has led to a ubiquity of micro- and nano-scale electromechanical devices. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pressure, mass, etc., are now found in nearly all electronic devices at both the industrial and consumer levels. As has been true for integrated circuit electronics, these electromechanical devices have continued to be scaled down in size. For many nanometer-scale structures with large surface-to-volume ratio, dissipation (energy loss) becomes prohibitively large causing a decreasing sensitivity with decreasing sensor size. In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires are investigated as singly-clamped (cantilever) mechanical resonators with typical mechanical quality factors, Q (equal to the ratio of resonance frequency to peak full-width-at-half-maximum-power) and resonance frequencies, respectively, at or above 30,000, and near 1 MHz. These Q values---in vacuum at room temperature---indicate very low levels of dissipation; they are essentially the same as those for bulk quartz crystal resonators that form the basis of simple clocks and mass sensors. The GaN nanowires have lengths and diameters, respectively, of approximately 15 micrometers and hundreds of nanometers. As-grown GaN nanowire Q values are larger than other similarly-sized, bottom-up, cantilever resonators and this property makes them very attractive for use as resonant sensors. We demonstrate the capability of detecting sub-monolayer levels of atomic layer deposited (ALD) films, and the robust nature of the GaN nanowires structure that allows for their 'reuse' after removal of such layers. In addition to electron microscope-based measurement techniques, we demonstrate the successful capacitive detection of a single nanowire using microwave homodyne reflectometry. This technique is then extended to allow for simultaneous measurements of large ensembles of GaN nanowires on a single sample, providing statistical information about the distribution of

  14. A computational study of pressure-induced structural transition in ThSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinadh, Ch.U.M.; Rajagopalan, M.; Natarajan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The pressure induced phase transition from NaCl-type to CsCl-type structure in ThSb was studied using total energy calculations by tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital (TBLMTO) method within atomic sphere approximation (ASA). The density of states (DOS) at ambient pressure was compared with resonant photoemission studies (PES). The variation in interatomic distances during the transition was found to be in agreement with high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) studies. (author)

  15. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make......-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each of the coefficients, for a given type of microphone, can be expressed by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency axis normalized by the individual resonance frequency...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors, like diabetes, you may need treatment. How does high blood pressure affect pregnant women? A few women will get ... HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health ... High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Women and Diabetes Heart ...

  18. High-pressure crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrusiak, A.

    2008-01-01

    The history and development of high-pressure crystallography are briefly described and examples of structural transformations in compressed compounds are given. The review is focused on the diamond-anvil cell, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the principles of its operation and the impact it has had on high-pressure X-ray diffraction.

  19. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  20. Transmission Line Resonator Segmented with Series Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Boer, Vincent; Petersen, Esben Thade

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators are often used as coils in high field MRI. Due to distributed nature of such resonators, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the resonator. The equations for optimal...... values of evenly distributed capacitors are presented. The performances of the segmented resonator and a regular transmission line resonator are compared....

  1. Pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.

    1983-03-01

    An overview of the pressurized-water reactor (PWR) pressure boundary problems is presented. Specifically exempted will be discussions of problems with pumps, valves and steam generators on the basis that they will be covered in other papers. Pressure boundary reliability is examined in the context of real or perceived problems occurring over the past 5 to 6 years since the last IAEA Reliability Symposium. Issues explicitly covered will include the status of the pressurized thermal-shock problem, reliability of inservice inspections with emphasis on examination of the region immediately under the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cladding, history of piping failures with emphasis on failure modes and mechanisms. Since nondestructive examination is the topic of one session, discussion will be limited to results rather than techniques

  2. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Effects of cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. [noise reduction in aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the effects of internal cavity resonances on sound transmission into a thin cylindrical shell. The 'noise reduction' of the cylinder is defined and computed, with and without including the effects of internal cavity resonances. As would be expected, the noise reduction in the absence of cavity resonances follows the same qualitative pattern as does transmission loss. Numerical results show that cavity resonances lead to wide fluctuations and a general decrease of noise reduction, especially at cavity resonances. Modest internal absorption is shown to greatly reduce the effect of cavity resonances. The effects of external airflow, internal cabin pressurization, and different acoustical properties inside and outside the cylinder are also included and briefly examined.

  4. Panels with low-Q-factor resonators with theoretically infinite sound-proofing ability at a single frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, L. A.

    2015-07-01

    An infinite panel with two types of resonators regularly installed on it is theoretically considered. Each resonator is an air-filled cavity hermetically closed by a plate, which executes piston vibrations. The plate and air inside the cavity play the roles of mass and elasticity, respectively. Every other resonator is reversed. At a certain ratio between the parameters of the resonators at the tuning frequency of the entire system, the acoustic-pressure force that directly affects the panel can be fully compensated by the action forces of the resonators. In this case, the sound-proofing ability (transmission loss) tends to infinity. The presented calculations show that a complete transmission-loss effect can be achieved even with low- Q resonators.

  5. Highly Tunable Electrostatic Nanomechanical Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed Naveed Riaz

    2017-11-24

    There has been significant interest towards highly tunable resonators for on-demand frequency selection in modern communication systems. Here, we report highly tunable electrostatically actuated silicon-based nanomechanical resonators. In-plane doubly-clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches due to residual stresses, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining. The resonators are designed such that the effect of mid-plane stretching dominates the softening effect of the electrostatic force. This is achieved by controlling the gap-to-thickness ratio and by exploiting the initial curvature of the structure from fabrication. We demonstrate considerable increase in the resonance frequency of nanoresonators with the dc bias voltages up to 108% for 180 nm thick structures with a transduction gap of 1 $mu$m separating them from the driving/sensing electrodes. The experimental results are found in good agreement with those of a nonlinear analytical model based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. As a potential application, we demonstrate a tunable narrow band-pass filter using two electrically coupled nanomechanical arch resonators with varied dc bias voltages.

  6. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Nanomechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Gulak, Yuiry; Sundaram, Bala; Benaroya, Haym

    2007-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) offer great promise for many applications including motion and mass sensing. Recent experimental results suggest the importance of nonlinear effects in NEMS, an issue which has not been addressed fully in theory. We report on a nonlinear extension of a recent analytical model by Armour et al [1] for the dynamics of a single-electron transistor (SET) coupled to a nanomechanical resonator. We consider the nonlinear resonator motion in both (a) the Duffing and (b) nonlinear pendulum regimes. The corresponding master equations are derived and solved numerically and we consider moment approximations as well. In the Duffing case with hardening stiffness, we observe that the resonator is damped by the SET at a significantly higher rate. In the cases of softening stiffness and the pendulum, there exist regimes where the SET adds energy to the resonator. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of a single model displaying both negative and positive resonator damping in different dynamical regimes. The implications of the results for SET sensitivity as well as for, as yet unexplained, experimental results will be discussed. 1. Armour et al. Phys.Rev.B (69) 125313 (2004).

  8. Space charge in nanostructure resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Peter J.

    1996-10-01

    In quantum ballistic propagation of electrons through a variety of nanostructures, resonance in the energy-dependent transmission and reflection probabilities generically is associated with (1) a quasi-level with a decay lifetime, and (2) a bulge in electron density within the structure. It can be shown that, to a good approximation, a simple formula in all cases connects the density of states for the latter to the energy dependence of the phase angles of the eigen values of the S-matrix governing the propagation. For both the Lorentzian resonances (normal or inverted) and for the Fano-type resonances, as a consequence of this eigen value formula, the space charge due to filled states over the energy range of a resonance is just equal (for each spin state) to one electron charge. The Coulomb interaction within this space charge is known to 'distort' the electrical characteristics of resonant nanostructures. In these systems, however, the exchange effect should effectively cancel the interaction between states with parallel spins, leaving only the anti-parallel spin contribution.

  9. Highly Tunable Electrostatic Nanomechanical Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed Naveed Riaz; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    There has been significant interest towards highly tunable resonators for on-demand frequency selection in modern communication systems. Here, we report highly tunable electrostatically actuated silicon-based nanomechanical resonators. In-plane doubly-clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches due to residual stresses, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining. The resonators are designed such that the effect of mid-plane stretching dominates the softening effect of the electrostatic force. This is achieved by controlling the gap-to-thickness ratio and by exploiting the initial curvature of the structure from fabrication. We demonstrate considerable increase in the resonance frequency of nanoresonators with the dc bias voltages up to 108% for 180 nm thick structures with a transduction gap of 1 $mu$m separating them from the driving/sensing electrodes. The experimental results are found in good agreement with those of a nonlinear analytical model based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. As a potential application, we demonstrate a tunable narrow band-pass filter using two electrically coupled nanomechanical arch resonators with varied dc bias voltages.

  10. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, C O; Larionova, Ye

    2007-01-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far-including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems

  11. The estimation diastolic properties of the right and left heart's ventricles by a magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myagkov, A.P.; Cherepok, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of comparison of data heart's catheterization nd magnetic resonance imaging the technique of determination initial and enddiastolic pressure in heart's ventricles is developed. It has allowed to determine a diastolic extensibility, hardness, initial and enddiastolic pressure gradients for right and left ventricle. All necessary formulas and calculations techniques, control data of the models, received at the research of healthy subjects are described

  12. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... or absence of macrovascular disease was assessed by an independent physician. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients had no detectable retinal changes (grade 1), 13 had grade 2 retinopathy, and 18 had more advanced retinopathy (grades 3-6). Compared to patients without retinopathy (grade 1), patients with grades 2......BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...

  13. Nuclear level mixing resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussement, R.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.; Hardeman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The existent methods for measuring quadrupole interactions are not suited to nuclei with lifetimes in the micro-seconds to minutes region. AD/NQR, a possible candidate in this lifetime gap, has not yet succeeded in overcoming its predicted difficulties. A new resonant method, recently developed and based on the principles of level mixing (cfr atomic spectroscopy) covers this less accessible lifetime range. Many other kinds of resonances can be described according to the level mixing formalism. The particular example of NMR as a level mixing resonance (LMR) is discussed. The underlying theory of LMR and its important consequences, leading to some interesting features of the method, is briefly formulated. Two successfully performed measurements demonstrate the feasibility and the predicted characteristics of this new promising method. (orig.)

  14. Optical resonators and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dana Z.

    1986-08-01

    It may be possible to implement neural network models using continuous field optical architectures. These devices offer the inherent parallelism of propagating waves and an information density in principle dictated by the wavelength of light and the quality of the bulk optical elements. Few components are needed to construct a relatively large equivalent network. Various associative memories based on optical resonators have been demonstrated in the literature, a ring resonator design is discussed in detail here. Information is stored in a holographic medium and recalled through a competitive processes in the gain medium supplying energy to the ring rsonator. The resonator memory is the first realized example of a neural network function implemented with this kind of architecture.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  16. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  17. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  18. Pressure Ulcers Surveillance Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Esin Gencer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pressure ulcer is a chronic wound. It reduces the quality of life of the elderly and individuals with restricted range of motion. It prolongs hospital stay and increases the risk of complications. The cost is quite high. Preventive actions for the prevention of pressure ulcers should be developed. Planning protocols and standards of care are among the main targets. Material and Method: Research was conducted in one-year period between 2012 May and 2013 May on patients who were followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital clinics and intensive care unit with pressure ulcers. The research population consisted of 569 patients. Patient data were recorded in SPSS 16 for Windows program. Statistical analyzes were performed with retrospective methods. The demographic characteristics of patients with pressure ulcers were analyzed as frequency and descriptive statistics. Prevalence and incidence of one year were calculated. Results: Of the patients, 58% were males, 42% were females. Of the patients, 36% were in the age range of 61-80 years, and their average length of stay was 42,9 days. Of the patients, 70% were at stage 2 and 3. In 15% of patients pressure ulcers occurred on the first day of hospitalization. Pressure ulcers were developed between days 2 and 10 in 59% of the patients. Prevalence rate was 2.5%, the incidence was 1.9%, the prevalence rate was 5.9% in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: It is easier to prevent pressure ulcers than treating.

  19. Pressure suppressing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Makoto.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the pressure in the reactor container from excessively increasing even when vapor leaks from the dry well to a space of the suppression chamber, without passing though the suppression pool at the time of loss of coolant accident. Constitution: When vapor of a high temperature and a high pressure at the time of loss of coolant accident flows from the dry well to the suppression chamber without passing through suppression pool water, vapor dose not condense with pool water, and therefore the pressure within the chamber abnormally increases. For this reason, this abnormal pressure is detected by a pressure detector thereby to start the operations of a blower and a pump. By starting the blower, the pressure in the dry well becomes lower than the pressure in the chamber, and vapor entirely passes through the pool water and entirely condenses with the pool water. By starting the pump, the pool water is sprayed over the space of the chamber, and vapor in the space is condensed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of resonant acoustic waves in near-critical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2015-10-01

    Flow and transport induced by resonant acoustic waves in a near-critical fluid filled cylindrical enclosure is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Supercritical carbon dioxide (near the critical or the pseudo-critical states) in a confined resonator is subjected to acoustic field created by an electro-mechanical acoustic transducer and the induced pressure waves are measured by a fast response pressure field microphone. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is chosen such that the lowest acoustic mode propagates along the enclosure. For numerical simulations, a real-fluid computational fluid dynamics model representing the thermo-physical and transport properties of the supercritical fluid is considered. The simulated acoustic field in the resonator is compared with measurements. The formation of acoustic streaming structures in the highly compressible medium is revealed by time-averaging the numerical solutions over a given period. Due to diverging thermo-physical properties of supercritical fluid near the critical point, large scale oscillations are generated even for small sound field intensity. The strength of the acoustic wave field is found to be in direct relation with the thermodynamic state of the fluid. The effects of near-critical property variations and the operating pressure on the formation process of the streaming structures are also investigated. Irregular streaming patterns with significantly higher streaming velocities are observed for near-pseudo-critical states at operating pressures close to the critical pressure. However, these structures quickly re-orient to the typical Rayleigh streaming patterns with the increase operating pressure.