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Sample records for resonance integral measurements

  1. measurements of the absorption resonance integrals by reactor oscillator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.; Kocic, A.

    1965-12-01

    Experimental values of resonance integrals for silver vary significantly dependent on authors. That is why we have chosen this sample to measure RI. On the other hand, nuclear fuel (for example natural uranium) still represents an interesting objective for research in reactor physics. Measurements of natural uranium are done as a function of S/M. Measurements were done by amplitude reactor oscillator ROB-1/5 with precision from 0.5% - 2% dependent on the conditions of the oscillator. Measurements were completed at the heavy water reactor RB with 2% enriched uranium fuel [fr

  2. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krcevinac, S; Takac, S [Institut za nuklearne nauke ' Boris Kidric' , Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-01

    The analytical theory of resonance absorption, as well as the numerical Monte Carlo method, allows calculation of the resonance integral. However, it is based on specific approximations so it may be used accurately enough in a limited number of cases. Likewise, insufficiently accurate know ledge of the basic nuclear constants (e.g. resonance parameters, etc.) used as input data in analytical calculation, leads to inaccurate determination of the resonance integral.. Therefore, experimental determination of the effective resonance integral is still indispensable. In some cases the experimental results are used as the exclusive source of information, or as the basis for the semiempirical technique of calculation, and in others as a check of the new theoretical procedures. There are several experimental methods of direct determination of the resonance integral: the activation method (1,2), the reactor oscillator and the danger coefficient method. Indirectly, using the results of critical experiments, it is possible to determine correlated values of the effective resonance integral. The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (S/M) {sup X}. Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (S/M){sup X} ratio. To determine the resonance integral experimentally we used the activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U{sup 2}38. Since, because of the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, besides

  3. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krcevinac, S; Takac, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (s/M). Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (s/M) ratio. The activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U-238 are used to determine the resonance integral experimentally. Since the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, due to the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod, besides other perturbing effects, the method of comparing thermal activations of U-238 and a suitable thermal detector are used to determine the cadmium ratio.

  4. Measurement of the effect of the lattice pitch on the effective resonance integral of natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcevinac, S.; Takac, S.

    1966-04-01

    The present work investigates the dependence of the effective resonance integral on the lattice pitch. Theoretically, the dependence is determined starting from Wigner's rational approximation in which the lattice is characterized by the effective ratio (s/M). Later this allows correlation between the lattice resonance integral and the resonance integral of the single rod (the rod in infinite medium). Using two approximations for Dancoff's factor we give the measured functional dependence of the effective resonance integral on the effective (s/M) ratio. The activation method and the differential technique of measuring absorption distribution in U-238 are used to determine the resonance integral experimentally. Since the effective lattice pitch cannot be defined with certain reliability, due to the use of cadmium in determining the cadmium ratio in the fuel rod, besides other perturbing effects, the method of comparing thermal activations of U-238 and a suitable thermal detector are used to determine the cadmium ratio

  5. Measurement of resonance integral of the 90Sr(n,γ)91Sr reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Toshio; Harada, Hideo; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2001-01-01

    To obtain fundamental data for research on nuclear transmutation method of radioactive wastes, the resonance integral (I 0 ) of the 90 Sr(n,γ) 91 Sr reaction was measured with an activation method. (author)

  6. Measurement and Evaluation of the Activation Resonance Integral of 146Nd, 148Nd and 150Nd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M. D.; Turjanski, R.; Ricabarra, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Values of the ratio of the reduced activation resonance integral to the thermal cross section, I'/σ 0 of 146 Nd, 148 Nd and 150 Nd were determined relative to gold by measuring cadmium ratios. A lithium-drifted germanium gamma ray spectrometer was used to resolve the activities of the irradiated samples. The results are for 146 Nd I'/σ 0 = 1.42±0.1 0 and with an assumed σ 0 = 1.4 barn, I' = 1 .99±0.20; for 148 Nd I'/ σ 0 = 4.22±0.1 4 and with an assumed σ 0 = 2.5 barn, I' = 10.5±0. 9 barn, and for 150 Nd I'/σ 0 = 13.7±0. 8 and with an assumed σ 0 = 1.2 barn, I' = 16.4±2.8. The resolved and unresolved epithermal integrals of 146 Nd, 148 Nd and 150 Nd were calculated. Values of the spectral correction factor were also calculated, so the resonance integral could be obtained from the epithermal integral data measured in our reactor spectrum in this experiment. Epithermal integral and spectral correction factors are listed in the text. The most important result of this investigation is that the 148 Nd activation reduced resonance integral is about half of the previously recommended value and consequently the radiative width for 148 Nd is also about half of the previously accepted value. (author)

  7. Measurement of resonance absorption integrals; Mesure des integrales de resonance d'absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The measurements are carried out by the pile oscillator technique, without cadmium filter., in a spectrum rich in epithermal neutrons. The values are extrapolated to infinite dilution and corrected for the junction function. For the excess on the part in l/V, the following values are found: In: 3200 {+-} 70 b; Hf: 2080 {+-} 50; Ag: 670 {+-} 20; Co: 50 {+-} 5; Cs: 450 {+-} 15; Th: 87 {+-} 4. (author) [French] Les mesures sont effectuees par la methode d'oscillation, sans filtre de cadmium, dans un spectre riche en neutrons epithermiques. Les valeurs sont extrapolees a la dilution infinie et corrigees de la fonction de jonction. On trouve, pour l'exces sur la partie en l/v: In: 3200 {+-} 70 b; Hf: 2080 {+-} 50; Ag: 670 {+-} 20; Co: 50 {+-} 5; Cs: 450 {+-} 15; Th: 87 {+-} 4. (auteur)

  8. Measurement of the effective resonance integral of natural uranium; Merenje efektivnog rezonantnog integrala prirodnog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, V; Kocic, A [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-12-15

    Good understanding of the nuclear properties of the materials in the reactor core is essential for reactor operation. One of the fundamental properties is the resonance absorption of the fuel, which is directly included in the reactor calculation through resonance escape probability and influences the choice of the materials quality in the core. This paper describes the measurement of resonance absorption integral of the natural uranium as a function of the S/M ratio. Improved experiment planning and analysis of results, as well as improvement of the ROB-1 reactor oscillator device related to the interpretation of results and decrease of reactor drift variations during measurement enabled higher precision of results compared to previous experiments. Poznavanje osobina nuklearnih karakteristika materijala koji ulaze u jezgro nuklearnog reaktora predstavlja bitan faktor u njegovom rezimu rada. Jedna od osnovnih je svakako rezonantna apsorpcija goriva, cija velicina - preko faktora rezonantnog izbegavanja - direktno ulazi u proracun nuklearnih reaktora i utice na izbor kvaliteta materijala koji ga sacinjavaju. U radu se opisuje merenje rezonantnog apsorpcionog integrala prirodnog urana u funkciji odnosa S/M. Bolja postavka eksperimenta i interpretacija rezultata, s jedne strane, i poboljsanje uredjaja reaktorskog oscilatora ROB-1 /1/ u pogledu analize podataka i smanjenja promene drifta reaktora u toku merenja, s druge strane, daju znacaj ovom radu u pogledu dobijanja preciznijih rezultata u odnosu na ranije /2/ (author)

  9. The Resonance Integral of Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirlow, K; Johansson, E

    1959-04-15

    The resonance activation integral of gold has been determined, by means of cadmium ratio measurements of thin foils in a neutron beam. Comparison was made with a 1/v detector, and the neutron spectra were measured with a chopper. The resonance integral, RI, is defined as {integral}{sub 0.5}{sup {infinity}}{sigma}{sub r}(E)dE/E, where {sigma}{sub r}(E) is the differenc between the total absorption cross section and the 1/v part. An experimental value of 1490 {+-} 40 barns has been obtained. RI has also been computed from resonance parameter data with the result 1529 {+-} 70 barns.

  10. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  11. Integrated Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Measurements in a Borosilicate Glass Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique is a well-known optical method that can be used to measure the refractive index of organic nano-layers adsorbed on a thin metal film. Although there are many configurations for measuring biomolecular interactions, SPR-based techniques play a central role in many current biosensing experiments, since they are the most suited for sensitive and quantitative kinetic measurements. Here we give some results from the analysis and numerical elaboration of SPR data from integrated optics experiments in a particular borosilicate glass, chosen for its composition offering the rather low refractive index of 1.4701 at 633 nm wavelength. These data regard the flow over the sensing region (metal window of different solutions with refractive indexes in the range of interest (1.3÷1.5 for the detection of contaminants in aqueous solutions. After a discussion of the principles of SPR, of the metal window design optimization by means of optical interaction numerical modeling, and of waveguide fabrication techniques, we give a description of system setup and experimental results. Optimum gold film window thickness and width in this guided-wave configuration has been for the first time derived and implemented on an integrated optic prototype device. Its characterization is given by means of the real time waveguide output intensity measurements, which correspond to the interaction between the sensing gold thin film window and the flowing analyte. The SPR curve was subsequently inferred. Finally, a modified version of the device is reported, with channel waveguides arranged in a Y-junction optical circuit, so that laser source stability requirements are lowered by a factor of 85 dB, making possible the use of low cost sources in practical applications.

  12. The Resonance Integral of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-08-15

    The resonance integral of niobium has been studied by both pile oscillator and activation techniques. A value of 8.15b {+-} 0.65 b was obtained for the infinitely dilute integral. In addition, the variation of the resonance integral with foil thickness has been measured for thicknesses in the range 0.06 mm to 1.36 mm. A separate study of the half-life of the isomeric state in {sup 94}Nb yielded a value T{sub 1/2} = 6.30 - 0.03 m which is about 5 % lower than the value given in literature.

  13. {sup 41}K(n, {gamma}){sup 42}K thermal and resonance integral cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, F.A. Jr.; Maidana, N.L.; Vanin, V.R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Dias, M.S.; Koskinas, M.F. [IPEN-CNEN, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Metrolgia Nuclear; Lopez-Pino, N. [Instituto Superior de Tecnolgias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), Habana (Cuba)

    2012-07-01

    We measured the {sup 41}K thermal neutron absorption and resonance integral cross sections after the irradiation of KNO{sub 3} samples near the core of the IEA-R1 IPEN pool-type research reactor. Bare and cadmium-covered targets were irradiated in pairs with Au-Al alloy flux-monitors. The residual activities were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy with a HPGe detector, with special care to avoid the {sup 42}K decay {beta}{sup -} emission effects on the spectra. The gamma-ray self-absorption was corrected with the help of MCNP simulations. We applied the Westcott formalism in the average neutron flux determination and calculated the depression coefficients for thermal and epithermal neutrons due to the sample thickness with analytical approximations. We obtained 1.57(4) b and 1.02(4) b, for thermal and resonance integral cross sections, respectively, with correlation coefficient equal to 0.39.

  14. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  15. An analytical approximation for resonance integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, C.G. de; Martinez, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    It is developed a method which allows to obtain an analytical solution for the resonance integral. The problem formulation is completely theoretical and based in concepts of physics of general character. The analytical expression for integral does not involve any empiric correlation or parameter. Results of approximation are compared with pattern values for each individual resonance and for sum of all resonances. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Measurements of the thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Nguyen Thi; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Do, Nguyen Van; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun

    2018-06-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross-section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction have been measured relative to that of the monitor reaction 197Au(n,γ)198Au. The measurements were carried out using the neutron activation with the cadmium ratio method. Both the samples and monitors were irradiated with and without cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness. The induced activities of the reaction products were measured with a well calibrated HPGe γ-ray detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the results, the necessary corrections for the counting losses were made. The thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral of the 108Pd(n,γ)109Pd reaction were determined to be σ0,Pd = 8.68 ± 0.41 barn and I0,Pd = 245.6 ± 24.8 barn, respectively. The obtained results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  17. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James

    2011-01-01

    Microfabricated cantilevers are proving their potential as excellent tools for analysis applications. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and testing of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channels. The cantilevers have been devised to measure the density...

  18. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications

  19. Evaluation of temperature dependent neutron resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.; Sahni, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Fourier transform method is extended for evaluating temperature dependent resonance integrals and Doppler coefficients. With the temperature dependent cross-sections, the slowing-down equation is transformed into a Fredholm integral equation of second kind. A method of solution is presented using the familiar Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulae. As a byproduct of the above technique, a fast and accurate method for computing the resonance integral J-function is given. (orig.) [de

  20. Integrated unaligned resonant modulator tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-10-03

    Methods and systems for tuning a resonant modulator are disclosed. One method includes receiving a carrier signal modulated by the resonant modulator with a stream of data having an approximately equal number of high and low bits, determining an average power of the modulated carrier signal, comparing the average power to a predetermined threshold, and operating a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the comparison of the average power and the predetermined threshold. One system includes an input structure, a plurality of processing elements, and a digital control element. The input structure is configured to receive, from the resonant modulator, a modulated carrier signal. The plurality of processing elements are configured to determine an average power of the modulated carrier signal. The digital control element is configured to operate a tuning device coupled to the resonant modulator based on the average power of the modulated carrier signal.

  1. Resonance integral calculations for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.P.H.

    1960-02-01

    Methods of calculation of resonance integrals of finite dilution and temperature are given for both, homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries, together with results obtained from these methods as applied to the design of high temperature reactors. (author)

  2. The resonance integral of thorium metal rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Weitman, J

    1960-03-15

    The resonance integral for thorium metal rods of different diameters has been determined by the activation method. The irradiations took place in the central channel of the reactor R1, where the energy dependence of the neutron flux had earlier been investigated with a fast chopper up to about 1 keV. The absolute calibration was made with gold as a standard. The true resonance integral for gold was taken from the literature as 1,500 {+-} 35 b. The experimental values for thorium were fitted to two alternative expressions with the following results: RI = (1.70 + 15.9{radical}(S/M)) {+-} 5.5%; RI 17.3{radical}(S/M + 0.06) {+-} 5.5 %. The measurements were made for S/M values in the range 0.14 - 0.87 cm{sup 2}/g. The main contribution to the margin of errors arises from the uncertainties in the cross sections used and in the correction for the departure of the neutron energy distribution from the 1/E form.

  3. A numerical method for resonance integral calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanbay, Tayfun; Ozgener, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    A numerical method has been proposed for resonance integral calculations and a cubic fit based on least squares approximation to compute the optimum Bell factor is given. The numerical method is based on the discretization of the neutron slowing down equation. The scattering integral is approximated by taking into account the location of the upper limit in energy domain. The accuracy of the method has been tested by performing computations of resonance integrals for uranium dioxide isolated rods and comparing the results with empirical values. (orig.)

  4. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  5. Measurement of the resonance escape probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, J.P.; Bacher, P.; Lheureux, L.; Moreau, J.; Schmitt, A.P.

    1957-01-01

    The average cadmium ratio in natural uranium rods has been measured, using equal diameter natural uranium disks. These values correlated with independent measurements of the lattice buckling, enabled us to calculate values of the resonance escape probability for the G1 reactor with one or the other of two definitions. Measurements were performed on 26 mm and 32 mm rods, giving the following values for the resonance escape probability p: 0.8976 ± 0.005 and 0.912 ± 0.006 (d. 26 mm), 0.8627 ± 0.009 and 0.884 ± 0.01 (d. 32 mm). The influence of either definition on the lattice parameters is discussed, leading to values of the effective integral. Similar experiments have been performed with thorium rods. (author) [fr

  6. Resonance integral of cylindrical absorber; Rezonantni integral cilindricnog absorbera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slipicevic, K [Elektrotehnicki fakultet, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1968-07-01

    This paper presents the procedure for calculating effective resonance integral for cylindrical rod which enables derivation of improved spatial distribution of source neutron flux. Application of this new expression for penetration factor, simultaneously with Doppler broadening of Breight-Wigner line enabled derivation of new equation for resonance integral which is valid for the whole range of surface-volume ratio of the rod, has correct boundary conditions and gives as special, results same as Wigner and Pomeranchuk. Functions for correcting the effects of interference of potential and resonance dissipation are derived separately.

  7. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seya, Michio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolind, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  8. Resonance integral analytical calculation considering shadowing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, M.A.M.; Martinez, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    It is presented a method for the Resonance Integral Calculation in the fuel and moderator regions, including the shadowing effect. This effect appears due to the presence of several fuel rods in a infinite moderator region. The method is based on the approximations to the J (ξ, β) function and theirs partial derivatives in relation to β. The dependence of the Resonance Integral in the J (ξ, β) comes from the rational approximation to the neutron escape probability. The final results were obtained in a very simple and fast way, and they show the good accuracy of the method. (author)

  9. Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron(2,200 m/s neutron) capture cross section({sigma}{sub 0}) and the resonance integral(I{sub 0}) of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 136}Cs were measured by an activation method. Targets of radioactive cesium, which include {sup 135}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and stable {sup 133}Cs, were irradiated with reactor neutrons within or without a Cd shield case. The ratio of the number of nuclei of {sup 135}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs was measured with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. This ratio and the ratio of activity of {sup 136}Cs to that of {sup 137}Cs were used for deduction of the {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of {sup 135}Cs. The {sigma}{sub 0} and the I{sub 0} of the reaction {sup 135}Cs(n,{sigma}){sup 136}Cs were 8.3 {+-} 0.3 barn and 38.1 {+-} 2.6 barn, respectively. (author)

  10. Inductive measurements of ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, R.C.; Kennewell, K.; Crew, D.C.; Stamps, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The rapid advance in magnetic data storage has driven groundbreaking work in the science that underpins the properties of ferromagnetic materials at high frequencies. Recent work in this area has included the use of precession in order to produce ultra-high speed switching of magnetic elements, the generation of excited dynamical structures by application of inhomogeneous field pulses, and examination of the propagation of localized spin waves. This paper describes explorations of ultra-fast magnetization dynamics being undertaken at The University of Western Australia. We have studied the differences in magnetization dynamics in simple permalloy films when a sample is excited with sharp pulse compared to the to the dynamics generated by the application of a small amplitude continuous wave signal. We have observed a difference in the resonant frequency determined from these two excitations and will propose reasons for the different resonance responses of the system. Using the ultra-fast techniques described above we have measured dynamical properties that are significantly different to the static properties. These results are explained by the dynamical measurements being made on time scales smaller than the characteristic relaxation time. Future applications of these devices will be to examine broadening of line widths and frequency shifts associated with the excitation of magnetostatic modes, factors limiting quasiballistic reversal and differences between the dynamic and static properties of magnetic materials

  11. Integrated, Multi-Scale Characterization of Imbibition and Wettability Phenomena Using Magnetic Resonance and Wide-Band Dielectric Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukul M. Sharma; Steven L. Bryant; Carlos Torres-Verdin; George Hirasaki

    2007-09-30

    The petrophysical properties of rocks, particularly their relative permeability and wettability, strongly influence the efficiency and the time-scale of all hydrocarbon recovery processes. However, the quantitative relationships needed to account for the influence of wettability and pore structure on multi-phase flow are not yet available, largely due to the complexity of the phenomena controlling wettability and the difficulty of characterizing rock properties at the relevant length scales. This project brings together several advanced technologies to characterize pore structure and wettability. Grain-scale models are developed that help to better interpret the electric and dielectric response of rocks. These studies allow the computation of realistic configurations of two immiscible fluids as a function of wettability and geologic characteristics. These fluid configurations form a basis for predicting and explaining macroscopic behavior, including the relationship between relative permeability, wettability and laboratory and wireline log measurements of NMR and dielectric response. Dielectric and NMR measurements have been made show that the response of the rocks depends on the wetting and flow properties of the rock. The theoretical models can be used for a better interpretation and inversion of standard well logs to obtain accurate and reliable estimates of fluid saturation and of their producibility. The ultimate benefit of this combined theoretical/empirical approach for reservoir characterization is that rather than reproducing the behavior of any particular sample or set of samples, it can explain and predict trends in behavior that can be applied at a range of length scales, including correlation with wireline logs, seismic, and geologic units and strata. This approach can substantially enhance wireline log interpretation for reservoir characterization and provide better descriptions, at several scales, of crucial reservoir flow properties that govern oil

  12. Measure and integration theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burckel, Robert B

    2001-01-01

    This book gives a straightforward introduction to the field as it is nowadays required in many branches of analysis and especially in probability theory. The first three chapters (Measure Theory, Integration Theory, Product Measures) basically follow the clear and approved exposition given in the author's earlier book on ""Probability Theory and Measure Theory"". Special emphasis is laid on a complete discussion of the transformation of measures and integration with respect to the product measure, convergence theorems, parameter depending integrals, as well as the Radon-Nikodym theorem. The fi

  13. Detailing the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach of parametric magnetic resonance imaging and invasive physiological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Andreas; Arakelyan, Karen; Hentschel, Jan; Cantow, Kathleen; Flemming, Bert; Ladwig, Mechthild; Waiczies, Sonia; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to detail the relation between renal T2* and renal tissue pO2 using an integrated approach that combines parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative physiological measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Experiments were performed in 21 male Wistar rats. In vivo modulation of renal hemodynamics and oxygenation was achieved by brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), local cortical and medullary tissue pO2, and blood flux were simultaneously recorded together with T2*, T2 mapping, and magnetic resonance-based kidney size measurements (MR-PHYSIOL). Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out on a 9.4-T small-animal magnetic resonance system. Relative changes in the invasive quantitative parameters were correlated with relative changes in the parameters derived from MRI using Spearman analysis and Pearson analysis. Changes in T2* qualitatively reflected tissue pO2 changes induced by the interventions. T2* versus pO2 Spearman rank correlations were significant for all interventions, yet quantitative translation of T2*/pO2 correlations obtained for one intervention to another intervention proved not appropriate. The closest T2*/pO2 correlation was found for hypoxia and recovery. The interlayer comparison revealed closest T2*/pO2 correlations for the outer medulla and showed that extrapolation of results obtained for one renal layer to other renal layers must be made with due caution. For T2* to RBF relation, significant Spearman correlations were deduced for all renal layers and for all interventions. T2*/RBF correlations for the cortex and outer medulla were even superior to those between T2* and tissue pO2. The closest T2*/RBF correlation occurred during hypoxia and recovery. Close correlations were observed between T2* and kidney size during hypoxia and recovery and for occlusion and recovery. In both cases, kidney size correlated well with renal vascular conductance

  14. Neutron capture measurements and resonance parameters of dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S.G.; Kye, Y.U.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M.H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Y.R.; Lee, M.W. [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Research Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.N. [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T.I. [Dong-A University, Department of Physics, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Danon, Y.; Williams, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Troy, NY (United States); Leinweber, G.; Block, R.C.; Barry, D.P.; Rapp, M.J. [Naval Nuclear Laboratory, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Neutron capture yields of dysprosium isotopes ({sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy) were measured using the time-of-flight method with a 16 segment sodium iodide multiplicity detector. The measurements were made at the 25m flight station at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Resonance parameters were obtained using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The neutron capture data for four enriched dysprosium isotopes and one natural dysprosium sample were sequentially fitted. New resonances not listed in ENDF/B-VII.1 were observed. There were 29 and 17 new resonances from {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy isotopes, respectively. Six resonances from {sup 161}Dy isotope, two resonances from {sup 163}Dy, and four resonances from {sup 164}Dy were not observed. The capture resonance integrals of each isotope were calculated with the resulting resonance parameters and those of ENDF/B-VII.1 in the energy region from 0.5 eV to 20 MeV and were compared to the capture resonance integrals with the resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VII.1. A resonance integral value of the natural dysprosium calculated with present resonance parameters was 1405 ± 3.5 barn. The value is ∝ 0.3% higher than that obtained with the ENDF/B-VII.1 parameters. The distributions of the present and ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron widths were compared to a Porter-Thomas distribution. Neutron strength functions for {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were calculated with the present resonance parameters and both values were in between the values of ''Atlas of Neutron Resonances'' and ENDF/B-VII.1. The present radiation width distributions of {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were fitted with the χ{sup 2} distribution by varying the degrees of freedom. (orig.)

  15. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2017-03-15

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce (n, γ){sup 141}Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au and {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For {sup 139}La with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For {sup 140}Ce with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce, though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data. (orig.)

  16. The thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance integrals and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Story, J.S.

    1969-09-01

    The data available up to the end of November 1968 on the thermal neutron absorption cross-sections, resonance absorption integrals, and resonance parameters of silicon and its stable isotopes are collected and discussed. Estimates are given of the mean spacing of the energy levels of the compound nuclei near the neutron binding energy. It is concluded that the thermal neutron absorption cross-section and resonance absorption integral of natural silicon are not well established. The data on these two parameters are somewhat correlated, and three different assessments of the resonance integral are presented which differ over-all by a factor of 230. Many resonances have been detected by charged particle reactions which have not yet been observed in neutron cross-section measurements. One of these resonances of Si 2 8, at E n = 4 ± 5 keV might account for the large resonance integral which is derived, very uncertainly, from integral data. The principal source of the measured resonance integral of Si 3 0 has not yet been located. The thermal neutron absorption cross-section of Si 2 8 appears to result mainly from a negative energy resonance, possibly the resonance at E n = - 59 ± 5 keV detected by the Si 2 8 (d,p) reaction. (author)

  17. Fuzzy measures and integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mesiar, Radko

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 156 (2005), s. 365-370 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/04/1026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : fuzzy measures * fuzzy integral * regular fuzzy integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.039, year: 2005

  18. Measurement of global and local resonance terms

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Calaga, R; Fischer, W; Franchi, A; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Recently, resonance driving terms were successfully measured in the CERN SPS and the BNL RHIC from the Fourier spectrum of beam position monitor (BPM) data. Based on these measurements a new analysis has been derived to extract truly local observables from BPM data. These local observables are called local resonance terms since they share some similarities with the global resonance terms. In this paper we derive these local terms analytically and present experimental measurements of sextupolar global and local resonance terms in RHIC. Nondestructive measurements of these terms using ac dipoles are also presented.

  19. Measuring integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    respond to these needs, patients and providers face the multiple challenges of today's healthcare environment. Decision makers, planners and managers need evidence based policy options and information on the scope of the integrated care challenges they are facing. The US managed care organization Kaiser...... differences were found in the perception of clinical integration in the two settings. More primary care clinicians in the Northern California region of Kaiser Permanente reported being part of a clinical integrated environment than did Danish general practitioners. By measuring the level of clinical...... and performance of the Danish healthcare system and the managed care organization Kaiser Permanente, California, US. 5) To compare primary care clinicians' perception of clinical integration in two healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente, Northern California and the Danish healthcare system. Further to examine...

  20. Vacuum Gap Microstrip Microwave Resonators for 2.5-D Integration in Quantum Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Rupert M.; Henry, Michael David; Schroeder, Katlin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate vacuum gap λ/2 microwave resonators as a route toward higher integration in superconducting qubit circuits. The resonators are fabricated from pieces on two silicon chips bonded together with an In-Sb bond. Measurements of the devices yield resonant frequencies in good agreement with simulations. Furthermore, we discuss creating low loss circuits in this geometry.

  1. Proportional-Integral-Resonant AC Current Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STOJIC, D.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an improved stationary-frame AC current controller based on the proportional-integral-resonant control action (PIR is proposed. Namely, the novel two-parameter PIR controller is applied in the stationary-frame AC current control, accompanied by the corresponding parameter-tuning procedure. In this way, the proportional-resonant (PR controller, common in the stationary-frame AC current control, is extended by the integral (I action in order to enable the AC current DC component tracking, and, also, to enable the DC disturbance compensation, caused by the voltage source inverter (VSI nonidealities and by nonlinear loads. The proposed controller parameter-tuning procedure is based on the three-phase back-EMF-type load, which corresponds to a wide range of AC power converter applications, such as AC motor drives, uninterruptible power supplies, and active filters. While the PIR controllers commonly have three parameters, the novel controller has two. Also, the provided parameter-tuning procedure needs only one parameter to be tuned in relation to the load and power converter model parameters, since the second controller parameter is directly derived from the required controller bandwidth value. The dynamic performance of the proposed controller is verified by means of simulation and experimental runs.

  2. Measuring integrated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2011-02-01

    The positive outcomes of coordination of healthcare services are to an increasing extent becoming clear. However the complexity of the field is an inhibiting factor for vigorously designed trial studies. Conceptual clarity and a consistent theoretical frame-work are thus needed. While researchers respond to these needs, patients and providers face the multiple challenges of today's healthcare environment. Decision makers, planners and managers need evidence based policy options and information on the scope of the integrated care challenges they are facing. The US managed care organization Kaiser Permanente has been put forward as an example for European healthcare systems to follow, although the evidence base is far from conclusive. The thesis has five objectives: 1) To contribute to the understanding of the concept of integration in healthcare systems and to identify measurement methods to capture the multi-dimensional aspects of integrated healthcare delivery. 2) To assess the level of integration of the Danish healthcare system. 3) To assess the use of joint health plans as a tool for coordination between the regional and local level in the Danish healthcare system. 4) To compare the inputs and performance of the Danish healthcare system and the managed care organization Kaiser Permanente, California, US. 5) To compare primary care clinicians' perception of clinical integration in two healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente, Northern California and the Danish healthcare system. Further to examine the associations between specific organizational factors and clinical integration within each system. The literature was systematically searched to identify methods for measurement of integrated healthcare delivery. A national cross-sectional survey was conducted among major professional stake-holders at five different levels of the Danish healthcare system. The survey data were used to allow for analysis of the level of integration achieved. Data from the survey were

  3. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor with polymer transduction layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksendzov, A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    An integrated optics chemical sensor based on a ring resonator with an ethyl cellulose polymer coating has been demonstrated. The measured sensitivity to isopropanol in air is 50 ppm-the level immediately useful for health-related air quality monitoring. The resonator was fabricated using SiO2 and SixNy materials. The signal readout is based on tracking the wavelength of a resonance peak. The resonator layout optimisation for sensing applications is discussed.

  4. Iterative resonance self-shielding methods using resonance integral table in heterogeneous transport lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Kang-Seog

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the iteration methods using resonance integral tables to estimate the effective resonance cross sections in heterogeneous transport lattice calculations. Basically, these methods have been devised to reduce an effort to convert resonance integral table into subgroup data to be used in the physical subgroup method. Since these methods do not use subgroup data but only use resonance integral tables directly, these methods do not include an error in converting resonance integral into subgroup data. The effective resonance cross sections are estimated iteratively for each resonance nuclide through the heterogeneous fixed source calculations for the whole problem domain to obtain the background cross sections. These methods have been implemented in the transport lattice code KARMA which uses the method of characteristics (MOC) to solve the transport equation. The computational results show that these iteration methods are quite promising in the practical transport lattice calculations.

  5. Calculation of resonance integral for fuel cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsak, S.

    1969-01-01

    The procedure for calculating the shielding correction, formulated in the previous paper [6], was broadened and applied for a cluster of cylindrical rods. The sam analytical method as in the previous paper was applied. A combination of Gauss method with the method of Almgren and Porn used for solving the same type of integral was used to calculate the geometry functions. CLUSTER code was written for ZUSE-Z-23 computer to calculate the shielding corrections for pairs of fuel rods in the cluster. Computing time for one pair of fuel rods depends on the number of closely placed rod, and for two closely placed rods it is about 3 hours. Calculations were done for clusters containing 7 and 19 UO 2 rods. results show that calculated values of resonance integrals are somewhat higher than the values obtained by Helstrand empirical formula. Taking into account the results for two rods from the previous paper it can be noted that the calculated and empirical values for clusters with 2 and 7 rods are in agreement since the deviations do not exceed the limits of experimental error (±2%). In case of larger cluster with 19 rods deviations are higher than the experimental error. Most probably the calculated values exceed the experimental ones result from the fact that in this paper the shielding correction is calculated only in the region up to 1 keV [sr

  6. The Dependence of the Resonance Integral on the Doppler Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, J

    1960-12-15

    The Doppler sensitive contributions to the resonance integral for metal and oxide cylinders have been calculated using tables compiled by Adler, Hinman and Nordheim. The temperatures 20, 200, 350, 500 and 650 deg C have been investigated for the pure metal and 20, 300, 600, 900 and 1200 deg C for the oxide. Contributions from the separate resonances in the resolved region and for certain energies in the unresolved region are accounted for in detail. Integration over adequate statistical distributions has been carried out for the resonance parameters in the unresolved region. The increase in the resonance integral at elevated temperatures due to the Doppler effect is given separately in tables and diagrams.

  7. The Effective Resonance Integral of Thorium Oxide Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitman, J

    1962-12-15

    The effective resonance integral of thorium oxide rods has been determined as a function of their surface to mass ratio. The range of S/M values covered is 0.15 - 0.65 cm/g. An experimental technique based on the comparison of activities obtained in thermal and slowing-down neutron fluxes was employed. The shape of the resonance neutron spectrum was determined from measurements with a fast chopper and from calculations, permitting deduction of a correction factor which relates the experimental values to the ideal 1/E case. The results are summarized by the following expression: RI{sub ThO{sub 2}} (5.0 + 15.6{radical}(S/M{sub ThO{sub 2}})) {+-} 5% The main contribution to the margin of error arises from the uncertainties in the 1.5 % spectral correction applied in the 1.5 b '1/v' part deducted and in the 1520 b infinite dilution integral of gold, used as a standard. In order to compare the consistency of Dresner's first equivalence theorem and Nordheim's numerical calculations relative to our results, the resonance integral values for thorium metal rods obtained previously by Hellstrand and Weitman have been recalculated, using recent cross section and spectrum data. The new formula is Rl{sub Th} = (3.3 + 16.1{radical}(S/M{sub Th})) {+-} 5%. It differs from the old one mainly because of the proved non-1/v behaviour of the thorium cross section below the first resonance.

  8. Integrated polymer micro-ring resonators for optical sensing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Girault , Pauline; Lorrain , Nathalie; Poffo , Luiz; Guendouz , Mohammed; Lemaitre , Jonathan; Carré , Christiane; Gadonna , Michel; Bosc , Dominique; Vignaud , Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Micro-resonators (MR) have become a key element for integrated optical sensors due to their integration capability and their easy fabrication with low cost polymer materials. Nowadays, there is a growing need on MRs as highly sensitive and selective functions especially in the areas of food and health. The context of this work is to implement and study integrated micro-ring resonators devoted to sensing applications. They are fabricated by processing SU8 polymer as cor...

  9. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerovnik, Gasper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55 Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55 Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  10. Integrated Microfluidic Sensor System with Magnetostrictive Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Cai; Kosel, Jü rgen; Gooneratne, Chinthaka

    2011-01-01

    The present embodiments describe a method that integrates a magnetostrictive sensor with driving and detecting elements into a microfluidic chip to detect a chemical, biochemical or biomedical species. These embodiments may also measure the properties of a fluid such as viscosity, pH values. The whole system can be referred to lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or micro-total-analysis-systems (.mu.TAS). In particular, this present embodiments include three units, including a microfluidics unit, a magnetostrictive sensor, and driving/detecting elements. An analyzer may also be provided to analyze an electrical signal associated with a feature of a target specimen.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Sensor System with Magnetostrictive Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Cai

    2011-12-08

    The present embodiments describe a method that integrates a magnetostrictive sensor with driving and detecting elements into a microfluidic chip to detect a chemical, biochemical or biomedical species. These embodiments may also measure the properties of a fluid such as viscosity, pH values. The whole system can be referred to lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or micro-total-analysis-systems (.mu.TAS). In particular, this present embodiments include three units, including a microfluidics unit, a magnetostrictive sensor, and driving/detecting elements. An analyzer may also be provided to analyze an electrical signal associated with a feature of a target specimen.

  12. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction using electron linac-based neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Do; Pham, Duc Khue; Kim, Tien Thanh; Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won

    2011-01-01

    The thermal neutron cross-section and the resonance integral of the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction have been measured by the activation method using a 197Au(n,γ) 198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. The high-purity natural Ho and Au foils with and without a cadmium shield case of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated in a neutron field of the Pohang neutron facility. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a calibrated p-type high-purity Ge detector. The correction factors for the γ-ray attenuation ( Fg), the thermal neutron self-shielding ( Gth), the resonance neutron self-shielding ( Gepi) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ( α) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross-section for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction has been determined to be 59.7 ± 2.5 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral for the 165Ho(n,γ) 166gHo reaction is 671 ± 47 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the 197Au(n,γ) 198Au reaction. The present results are, in general, good agreement with most of the previously reported data within uncertainty limits.

  13. Radon integral measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Radon Integral Measurement System (SMIR) is a device designed specially to detect, to count and to store the data of the acquisition of alpha particles emitted by Radon-222 coming from the underground. The system includes a detection chamber, a radiation detector, a digital system with bateries backup and an auxiliary photovoltaic cell. A personal computer fixes the mode in which the system works, transmitting the commands to the system by the serial port. The heart of the system is a microprocesor working with interrupts by hardware. Every external device to the microprocessor sends his own interrupt request and the microprocessor handles the interrupts with a defined priority. The system uses a real time clock, compatible with the microprocessor, to take care of the real timing and date of the acquisition. A non volatile RAM is used to store data of two bytes every 15 minutes along 41 days as a maximum. After the setting up to the system by the computer, it can operate in stand alone way for up 41 days in the working place without the lose of any data. If the memory is full the next data will be written in the first locations of the memory. The memory is divided in pages corresponding every one of this to a different day of the acquisition. The counting time for every acquisition can be programmed by the user from 15 minutes to 65535 minutes but it is recommended to use a small time not to reach the limit of 65535 counts in every acquisition period. We can take information of the system without affecting the acquisition process in the field by using a lap top computer, then the information can be stored in a file. There is a program in the computer that can show the information in a table of values or in a bar graph. (Author)

  14. Integration, measure and probability

    CERN Document Server

    Pitt, H R

    2012-01-01

    Introductory treatment develops the theory of integration in a general context, making it applicable to other branches of analysis. More specialized topics include convergence theorems and random sequences and functions. 1963 edition.

  15. Quantum measure and integration theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudder, Stan

    2009-01-01

    This article begins with a review of quantum measure spaces. Quantum forms and indefinite inner-product spaces are then discussed. The main part of the paper introduces a quantum integral and derives some of its properties. The quantum integral's form for simple functions is characterized and it is shown that the quantum integral generalizes the Lebesgue integral. A bounded, monotone convergence theorem for quantum integrals is obtained and it is shown that a Radon-Nikodym-type theorem does not hold for quantum measures. As an example, a quantum-Lebesgue integral on the real line is considered.

  16. The evaluated neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of fission products with Z = 57-62

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, A.F.; Pisanko, Zh.I.; Novoselov, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron cross sections at a neutron velocity of V=2200 m/s, and resonance integrals for fission products with Z=57-71 are estimated. In obtaining the recommended values the results of the neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for elements used as references were normalized in accordance with the latest adjusted values. In the course of estimation, preference was given to the more accurate methods for obtaining the measured values and to the more recent investigations

  17. The evaluated neutron cross sections and resonance integrals of fission products with Z=63-71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, A.F.; Pisanko, Zh.I.; Novoselov, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron cross sections at a neutron velocity of V=2200 m/s, and the resonance integrals for fission products with Z=63-71 are estimated. In obtaining the recommended values the results were normalized of the neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for elements used as references in accordance with the latest adjusted values. In the course of estimation, preference was given to the more accurate measuring methods and the more recent investigations. Scientific publications up to 1975 have been used

  18. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  19. Measure and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Bercovici, Hari; Pearcy, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the material of a one year course in real analysis. It includes an original axiomatic approach to Lebesgue integration which the authors have found to be effective in the classroom. Each chapter contains numerous examples and an extensive problem set which expands considerably the breadth of the material covered in the text. Hints are included for some of the more difficult problems. .

  20. Measurement of J/ψ resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Jingzhi; Chen Guangpei; Chen Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    The cross sections of e + e - →hadrons, e + e - , μ + μ - have been measured in the vicinity of J/ψ resonance at BES/BEPC. The fit of the observed cross sections gives the new results of J/ψ resonance parameters: the partial widths to hadrons, electrons and muons are Γ h = 74.1 +- 8.1 keV, Γ e = 5.14 +- 0.39 keV and Γ μ = 5.13 +-0.52 keV respectively; the total width Γ = 84.4 +- 8.9 keV; the branching fractions Γ h /Γ = (87.8 +- 0.5)%, Γ e /Γ (6.09 +- 0.33)%, and Γ μ /Γ = (6.08 +- 0.33)%

  1. Integrated refractive index optical ring resonator detector for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M; Suter, Jonathan D; Zourob, Mohammed; Fan, Xudong

    2007-02-01

    We developed a novel miniaturized and multiplexed, on-capillary, refractive index (RI) detector using liquid core optical ring resonators (LCORRs) for future development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) devices. The LCORR employs a glass capillary with a diameter of approximately 100 mum and a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms a ring resonator along which the light circulates in the form of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGM has an evanescent field extending into the capillary core and responds to the RI change due to the analyte conducted in the capillary, thus permitting label-free measurement. The resonating nature of the WGM enables repetitive light-analyte interaction, significantly enhancing the LCORR sensitivity. This LCORR architecture achieves dual use of the capillary as a sensor head and a CE fluidic channel, allowing for integrated, multiplexed, and noninvasive on-capillary detection at any location along the capillary. In this work, we used electro-osmotic flow and glycerol as a model system to demonstrate the fluid transport capability of the LCORRs. In addition, we performed flow speed measurement on the LCORR to demonstrate its flow analysis capability. Finally, using the LCORR's label-free sensing mechanism, we accurately deduced the analyte concentration in real time at a given point on the capillary. A sensitivity of 20 nm/RIU (refractive index units) was observed, leading to an RI detection limit of 10-6 RIU. The LCORR marries photonic technology with microfluidics and enables rapid on-capillary sample analysis and flow profile monitoring. The investigation in this regard will open a door to novel high-throughput CE devices and lab-on-a-chip sensors in the future.

  2. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  3. Integrated MEMS/NEMS Resonant Cantilevers for Ultrasensitive Biological Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent researches implemented in Chinese Academy of Sciences, with achievements on integrated resonant microcantilever sensors. In the resonant cantilevers, the self-sensing elements and resonance exciting elements are both top-down integrated with silicon micromachining techniques. Quite a lot of effort is focused on optimization of the resonance mode and sensing structure for improvement of sensitivity. On the other hand, to enable the micro-cantilevers specifically sensitive to bio/chemical molecules, sensing materials are developed and modified on the cantilever surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM based bottom-up construction and surface functionalization. To improve the selectivity of the sensors and depress environmental noise, multiple and localized surface modifications are developed. The achieved volume production capability and satisfactory detecting resolution to trace-level biological antigen of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP give the micro-cantilever sensors a great promise for rapid and high-resoluble detection.

  4. Determination of space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell and calculation of resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.

    1980-01-01

    Space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell was determined by solving the Boltzmann equation by spherical harmonics method applying P-3 approximation. Computer code SPLET used for these calculations is described. Resonance absorption and calculation of resonance integrals are described as well. Effective resonance integral values for U-238 resonance at 6.7 Ev are calculated for heavy water reactor cell with metal, oxide and carbide fuel elements

  5. Analysis and Modeling of Integrated Magnetics for LLC resonant Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mingxiao; Ouyang, Ziwei; Zhao, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Shunt-inserted transformers are widely used toobtain high leakage inductance. This paper investigates thismethod in depth to make it applicable to integrate resonantinductor for the LLC resonant converters. The analysis andmodel of magnetizing inductance and leakage inductance forshunt...... transformers can provide a significantdifference. The way to obtain the desirable magnetizing andleakage inductance value for LLC resonant converters issimplified by the creation of air gaps together with a magneticshunt. The calculation and relation are validated by finiteelement analysis (FEA) simulations...

  6. Path-integral approach to resonant electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterstetter, M.; Domcke, W.

    1993-01-01

    A path-integral formulation of resonant electron-molecule scattering is developed within the framework of the projection-operator formalism of scattering theory. The formation and decay of resonances is treated in real time as a quantum-mechanical electronic-tunneling process, modified by the coupling of the electronic motion with the nuclear degrees of freedom. It is shown that the electronic continuum can be summed over in the path-integral formulation, resulting formally in the path integral for an effective two-state system with coupling to vibrations. The harmonic-oscillator approximation is adopted for the vibrational motion in the present work. Approximation methods are introduced which render the numerical evaluation of the sum over paths feasible for up to ∼10 3 elementary time slices. The theory is numerically realized for simple but nontrivial models representing the 2 Π g d-wave shape resonance in e - +N 2 collisions and the 2 Σ u + p-wave shape resonance in e - +H 2 collisions, respectively. The accuracy of the path-integral results is assessed by comparison with exact numerical reference data for these models. The essential virtue of the path-integral approach is the fact that the computational effort scales at most linearly with the number of vibrational degrees of freedom. The path-integral method is thus well suited to treat electron collisions with polyatomic molecules and molecular aggregates

  7. Indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated PIN waveguide photodiode readout for resonant cantilever sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siwak, N. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kanakaraju, S.; Richardson, C. J. K. [Laboratory for the Physical Sciences, 8050 Greenmead Drive, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    An integrated photodiode displacement readout scheme for a microelectromechanical cantilever waveguide resonator sensing platform is presented. III-V semiconductors are used to enable the monolithic integration of passive waveguides with active optical components. This work builds upon previously demonstrated results by measuring the displacement of cantilever waveguide resonators with on-chip waveguide PIN photodiodes. The on-chip integration of the readout provides an additional 70% improvement in mass sensitivity compared to off-chip photodetector designs due to measurement stability and minimized coupling loss. In addition to increased measurement stability, reduced packaging complexity is achieved due to the simplicity of the readout design. We have fabricated cantilever waveguides with integrated photodetectors and experimentally characterized these cantilever sensors with monolithically integrated PIN photodiodes.

  8. Magnetic resonance: safety measures and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, I.; Lafuente, J.; Fernandez, C.; Barbero, M.J.; Cascon, E.

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic fields is currently a subject of great controversy. For this reason, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy are constantly under investigation. The source of the risk in MRI is associated with the three types of electromagnetic radiation to which the patient is exposed: the static magnetic field, variable (gradient) magnetic fields and radiofrequency fields. Each is capable of producing significant biological effects when employed at sufficient intensity. Patients exposed to risk sources are those situated within the lines of force of the magnetic field, ellipsoid lines that are arranged around the magnet, representing the strength of the surrounding field. To date, at the intensity normally utilized in MRI(<2T) and respecting the field limit recommendations established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use of this technique no adverse secondary biological effects have been reported. The known biological effects and other possible secondary effects are reviewed, and the recommended safety measures are discussed. (Author)

  9. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied

  10. Integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for parallel magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Sheng, Jinhua

    2012-10-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) is a fast method which requires algorithms for the reconstructing image from a small number of measured k-space lines. The accurate estimation of the coil sensitivity functions is still a challenging problem in parallel imaging. The joint estimation of the coil sensitivity functions and the desired image has recently been proposed to improve the situation by iteratively optimizing both the coil sensitivity functions and the image reconstruction. It regards both the coil sensitivities and the desired images as unknowns to be solved for jointly. In this paper, we propose an integrated variable projection approach (IVAPA) for pMRI, which integrates two individual processing steps (coil sensitivity estimation and image reconstruction) into a single processing step to improve the accuracy of the coil sensitivity estimation using the variable projection approach. The method is demonstrated to be able to give an optimal solution with considerably reduced artifacts for high reduction factors and a low number of auto-calibration signal (ACS) lines, and our implementation has a fast convergence rate. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using a set of in vivo experiment data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An attempt to explain the uranium 238 resonance integral discrepancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.; Grandotto, M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on uranium 238 resonance integral discrepancy were carried out for light water reactor physics. It was shown that using recently published resonance parameters and substituting a multilevel formalism to the usual Breit and Wigner formula reduced the well known discrepancy between two values of the uranium 238 effective resonance integral: the value calculated with the nuclear data and the one deduced from critical experiments. Since the cross section computed with these assumptions agrees quite well with the Oak-Ridge transmission data, it was used to obtain the self-shielding effect and the capture rate in light water lattices. The multiplication factor calculated with this method is found very close to the experimental value. Preliminary results for a set of benchmarks relative to several types of thermal neutron reactors lead to very low discrepancies. The reactivity loss is only 130 x 10 -5 instead of 650 x 10 -5 in the case of the usual libraries and the single level formula

  12. Nonlinear resonance in Duffing oscillator with fixed and integrative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the nonlinear resonance, one of the fundamental phenomena in nonlinear oscillators, in a damped and periodically-driven Duffing oscillator with two types of time-delayed feedbacks, namely, fixed and integrative. Particularly, we analyse the effect of the time-delay parameter and the strength of the ...

  13. Photonic crystal resonator integrated in a microfluidic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Mortensen, Niels Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2008-01-01

    We report on a novel optofluidic system consisting of a silica-based 1D photonic crystal, integrated planar waveguides, and electrically insulated fluidic channels. An array of pillars in a microfluidic channel designed for electrochromatography is used as a resonator for on-column label...

  14. Nonlinear resonance in Duffing oscillator with fixed and integrative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-03-02

    Mar 2, 2012 ... Abstract. We study the nonlinear resonance, one of the fundamental phenomena in nonlinear oscillators, in a damped and periodically-driven Duffing oscillator with two types of time-delayed feedbacks, namely, fixed and integrative. Particularly, we analyse the effect of the time-delay parameter α and the ...

  15. Precision electroweak measurements on the $Z$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, Ivan; Lazeyras, Pierre; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; ten Have, I; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S R; Buchmüller, O L; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Bauerdick, L A T; Blumenschein, U; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Barberio, E; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Burkhardt, H; Feigl, E; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Lutters, G; Meinhard, H; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Mirabito, L; Misiejuk, A; Neugebauer, E; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Schäfer, U; Sieler, U; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Trier, H; Apollonio, M; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pitis, L; He, H; Kim, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Berkelman, K; Cinabro, D; Conway, J S; Cranmer, K; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Johnson, R P; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wear, J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G; Abdallah, J; Abreu, P; Adam, W; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, G; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, C; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Castro, N; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Hondt, J; D'Almagne, B; Dalmau, J; Damgaard, G; Davenport, M; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Diodato, A; Di Simone, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, G; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, M; Fenyuk, A; Fernández, J; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, G; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hennecke, M; Henriques, R; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huber, M; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; 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Kupper, M; Kuwano, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lafoux, H; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lamarche, F; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Larson, W J; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Le Dû, P; Leblanc, P; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Lennert, P; Leroy, C; Lessard, L; Letts, J; Levegrün, S; Levinson, L; Lewis, C; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Lorah, J M; Lorazo, B; Losty, Michael J; Lou, X C; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Luig, A; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Mättig, P; Malik, A; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Maringer, G; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martínez, G; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Matthews, W; Maur, U; McDonald, W J; McGowan, R F; McKenna, J; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McNab, A I; McNutt, J R; McPherson, A C; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Menke, S; Menszner, D; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Middleton, R P; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Mildenberger, J; Miller, D J; Milstene, C; Mir, R; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Moisan, C; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Moss, M W; Mouthuy, T; Murphy, P G; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nguyen, H H; Nijjhar, B; Nisius, R; Nozaki, M; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ogg, M; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oh, H; Okpara, A; Oldershaw, N J; Omori, T; O'Neale, S W; O'Neill, B P; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pálinkás, J; Palmonari, F; Pansart, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Paschievici, P; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pawley, S J; Paz-Jaoshvili, N; Pearce, M J; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pfister, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Pitman, D; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Posthaus, A; Pouladdej, A; del Pozo, L A; Prebys, E; Pritchard, T W; Przybycien, M B; Przysiezniak, H; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Raith, B; Redmond, M W; Rees, D L; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Richards, G E; Rick, H; Rigby, D; Robins, S A; Robinson, D; Rodning, N; Rollnik, A; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossberg, S; Rossi, A M; Rosvick, M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sanghera, S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, M; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schappert, W; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; von der Schmitt, H; Schmitt, S; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schreiber, S; Schröder, M; Schütz, P; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schulz, M; Schumacher, M; Schwarz, J; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Settles, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Shypit, R; Simon, A; Singh, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Smith, T J; Snow, G A; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Starks, M; Steiert, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stier, H E; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strumia, F; Stumpf, L; Surrow, B; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Tecchio, M; Tesch, N; Teuscher, R; Thackray, N J; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Toya, D; Trócsányi, Z L; Tran, P; Trefzger, T; Tresilian, N J; Trigger, I; Tscheulin, M; Tsukamoto, T; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Tysarczyk-Niemeyer, G; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Utzat, P; Vachon, B; Van den Plas, D; Van Kooten, R; VanDalen, G J; Vannerem, P; Vasseur, G; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vincter, M G; Virtue, C J; Vokurka, E H; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Wagner, D L; Wahl, C; Walker, J P; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weber, P; Weisz, S; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Weymann, M; Whalley, M A; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, J A; Wilson, G W; Wingerter, Isabelle; Winterer, V H; Wood, N C; Wotton, S; Wyatt, T R; Yaari, R; Yamashita, S; Yang, Y; Yeaman, A; Yekutieli, G; Yurko, M; Zacek, V; Zacharov, I E; Zer-Zion, D; Zeuner, W; Zivkovic, L; Zorn, G T; Abe, Kenji; Abe, Koya; Abe, T; Abt, I; Acton, P D; Adam, I; Agnew, G; Akagi, T; Akimoto, H; Allen, N J; Ash, W W; Aston, D; Bacchetta, N; Baird, K G; Baltay, C; Band, H R; Barakat, M B; Baranko, G J; Bardon, O; Barklow, T L; Bashindzhagian, G L; Bauer, J M; Bazarko, A O; Bean, A; Bellodi, G; Ben-David, R; Berger, R; Bienz, T; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blaylock, G; Bogart, J R; Bolen, B; Bolton, T; Bower, G R; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Bugg, W M; Burke, D; Burnett, T H; Burrows, P N; Busza, W; Calcaterra, A; Caldwell, D O; Camanzi, B; Carpinelli, M; Cassell, R; Castaldi, R; Castro, A; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Chadwick, George B; Chou, A; Church, E; Claus, R; Cohn, H O; Coller, J A; Convery, M R; Cook, V; Cotton, R; Cowan, R F; Coyne, D G; Crawford, G; de Oliveira, A; Damerell, C J S; Daoudi, M; Dasu, S; De Groot, N; De Sangro, R; De Simone, P; De Simone, S; Dervan, P J; Dima, M; Dong, D N; Doser, Michael; Du, P Y C; Dubois, R; Duboscq, J E; Eisenstein, B I; Elia, R; Erdos, E; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fan, C; Fernández, J P; Fero, M J; Flood, K; Frey, R; Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Furuno, K; Garwin, E L; Gillman, T; Gladding, G; Hallewell, G D; Hart, E L; Hasegawa, Y; Hasuko, K; Hedges, S; Hertzbach, S S; Hildreth, M D; Hitlin, D G; Honma, A; Huber, J S; Huffer, M E; Hughes, E W; Huynh, X; Hwang, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Johnson, R A; Junk, T R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kang, H J; Karliner, I; Kawahara, H; Kelsey, M H; Kendall, H W; Kim, Y D; King, M; King, R; Kofler, R R; Krishna, N M; Kwon, Y; Labs, J F; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Lath, A; Lauber, J A; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Liu, M X; Loreti, M; Lu, A; Lynch, H L; Ma, J; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Masuda, H; Mazzucato, E; McGowan, J F; McKemey, A K; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Mockett, P M; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Mours, B; Müller, D; Müller, G; Murzin, V; Nagamine, T; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Nussbaum, M; Ohnishi, Y; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Osborne, L S; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Park, H; Pavel, T J; Peruzzi, I; Pescara, L; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pieroni, E; Pitts, K T; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Punkar, G; Quigley, J; Ratcliff, B N; Reeves, K; Reeves, T W; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rensing, P E; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schneekloth, U; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Seiden, A; Sen, S; Serbo, V V; Shaevitz, M H; Shank, J T; Shapiro, G; Sherden, D J; Shmakov, K D; Simopoulos, C; Sinev, N B; Smith, S R; Smy, M B; Snyder, J A; Sokoloff, M D; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Steiner, R; Strauss, M G; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, S; Swartz, M; Szumilo, A; Takahashi, T; Taylor, F E; Thaler, J J; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Trandafir, A I; Turk, J D; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Vella, E; Venuti, J P; Verdier, R; Wagner, S R; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Wang, J; Watts, S J; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; White, S L; Wickens, F J; Williams, D A; Williams, D C; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Word, G B; Wright, T R; Wyss, J; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, X Q; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H; Zapalac, G; Zdarko, R W; Zeitlin, C; Zhou, J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. The data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarised beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarised asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, $MZ$ and $GZ$, and its couplings to fermions, for example the $ ho$ parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: egin{eqnarray*} MZ & = & 91.1875 pm 0.0021~GeV \\ GZ & = & 2.4952 pm 0.0023~GeV \\ ho_ell & = & 1.0050 pm 0.0010 \\ swsqeffl & =& 0.23153 pm 0.00016 ,. end{eqnarray*} The number of light neutrino species is determined to be $2.9840pm0.0082$, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the pr...

  16. A semi-automated measuring system of brain diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis based on the integration of coregistration and tissue segmentation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revenaz, Alfredo; Ruggeri, Massimiliano; Laganà, Marcella; Bergsland, Niels; Groppo, Elisabetta; Rovaris, Marco; Fainardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are currently measured by a complex combination of separate procedures. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide a reliable method for reducing analysis complexity and obtaining reproducible results. We implemented a semi-automated measuring system in which different well-known software components for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis are integrated to obtain reliable measurements of DWI and PWI disturbances in MS. We generated the Diffusion/Perfusion Project (DPP) Suite, in which a series of external software programs are managed and harmonically and hierarchically incorporated by in-house developed Matlab software to perform the following processes: 1) image pre-processing, including imaging data anonymization and conversion from DICOM to Nifti format; 2) co-registration of 2D and 3D non-enhanced and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images in fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) space; 3) lesion segmentation and classification, in which FLAIR lesions are at first segmented and then categorized according to their presumed evolution; 4) co-registration of segmented FLAIR lesion in T1 space to obtain the FLAIR lesion mask in the T1 space; 5) normal appearing tissue segmentation, in which T1 lesion mask is used to segment basal ganglia/thalami, normal appearing grey matter (NAGM) and normal appearing white matter (NAWM); 6) DWI and PWI map generation; 7) co-registration of basal ganglia/thalami, NAGM, NAWM, DWI and PWI maps in previously segmented FLAIR space; 8) data analysis. All these steps are automatic, except for lesion segmentation and classification. We developed a promising method to limit misclassifications and user errors, providing clinical researchers with a practical and reproducible tool to measure DWI and PWI changes in MS

  17. Significantly improving nuclear resonance fluorescence non-destructive assay by using the integral resonance transmission method and photofission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, Christopher T.; Hayakawa, Takehito; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) of 239 Pu in spent nuclear fuel or melted fuel using a γ-ray beam is possible using self absorption and the integral resonance transmission method. The method uses nuclear resonance absorption where resonances in 239 Pu remove photons from the beam, and the selective absorption is detected by measuring the decrease in scattering in a witness target placed in the beam after the fuel, consisting of the isotope of interest, namely 239 Pu. The method is isotope specific, and can use photofission or scattered γ-rays to assay the 239 Pu. It overcomes several problems related to NDA of melted fuel, including the radioactivity of the fuel, and the unknown composition and geometry. This talk will explain the general method, and how photofission can be used to assay specific isotopes, and present example calculations. (author)

  18. Low insertion loss SOI microring resonator integrated with nano-taper couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Ou, Haiyan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a microring resonator working at TM mode integrated with nano-taper couplers with 3.6dB total insertion loss. The measured insertion loss of the nano-taper coupler was only 1.3dB for TM mode....

  19. Integrating out resonances in strongly-coupled electroweak scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosell Ignasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accepting that there is a mass gap above the electroweak scale, the Electroweak Effective Theory (EWET is an appropriate tool to describe this situation. Since the EWET couplings contain information on the unknown high-energy dynamics, we consider a generic strongly-coupled scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking, where the known particle fields are coupled to heavier states. Then, and by integrating out these heavy fields, we study the tracks of the lightest resonances into the couplings. The determination of the low-energy couplings (LECs in terms of resonance parameters can be made more precise by considering a proper short-distance behaviour on the Lagrangian with heavy states, since the number of resonance couplings is then reduced. Notice that we adopt a generic non-linear realization of the electroweak symmetry breaking with a singlet Higgs.

  20. Electron Spin Resonance Measurement with Microinductor on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kitagawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of radicals on a chip is demonstrated. The proposed method is based on electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and the measurement of high-frequency impedance of the microinductor fabricated on the chip. The measurement was by using a frequency sweep of approximately 100 MHz. The ESR spectra of di(phenyl-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyliminoazanium (DPPH dropped on the microinductor which is fabricated with CMOS 350-nm technology were observed at room temperature. The volume of the DPPH ethanol solution was 2 μL, and the number of spins on the micro-inductor was estimated at about 1014. The sensitivity is not higher than that of the standard ESR spectrometers. However, the result indicates the feasibility of a near field radical sensor in which the microinductor as a probe head and ESR signal processing circuit are integrated.

  1. Measurement of Optical Feshbach Resonances in an Ideal Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatt, S.; Nicholson, T. L.; Bloom, B. J.; Williams, J. R.; Thomsen, J. W.; Ye, J.; Julienne, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic 88 Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  2. Measurement of optical Feshbach resonances in an ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, S; Nicholson, T L; Bloom, B J; Williams, J R; Thomsen, J W; Julienne, P S; Ye, J

    2011-08-12

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic (88)Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  3. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  4. Electronically Tunable Fully Integrated Fractional-Order Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Tsirimokou, Georgia

    2017-03-20

    A fully integrated implementation of a parallel fractional-order resonator which employs together a fractional order capacitor and a fractional-order inductor is proposed in this paper. The design utilizes current-controlled Operational Transconductance Amplifiers as building blocks, designed and fabricated in AMS 0:35m CMOS process, and based on a second-order approximation of a fractional-order differentiator/ integrator magnitude optimized in the range 10Hz–700Hz. An attractive benefit of the proposed scheme is its electronic tuning capability.

  5. Electronically Tunable Fully Integrated Fractional-Order Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Tsirimokou, Georgia; Psychalinos, Costas; Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2017-01-01

    A fully integrated implementation of a parallel fractional-order resonator which employs together a fractional order capacitor and a fractional-order inductor is proposed in this paper. The design utilizes current-controlled Operational Transconductance Amplifiers as building blocks, designed and fabricated in AMS 0:35m CMOS process, and based on a second-order approximation of a fractional-order differentiator/ integrator magnitude optimized in the range 10Hz–700Hz. An attractive benefit of the proposed scheme is its electronic tuning capability.

  6. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, P.; Ummethala, S.; Pernice, W. H. P., E-mail: wolfram.pernice@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Diewald, S. [Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lewes-Malandrakis, G.; Brink, D.; Heidrich, N.; Nebel, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastr. 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-12-22

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  7. Integrated polymer micro-ring resonators for optical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Pauline; Lorrain, Nathalie; Poffo, Luiz; Guendouz, Mohammed; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Carré, Christiane; Gadonna, Michel; Bosc, Dominique; Vignaud, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    Micro-resonators (MR) have become a key element for integrated optical sensors due to their integration capability and their easy fabrication with low cost polymer materials. Nowadays, there is a growing need on MRs as highly sensitive and selective functions especially in the areas of food and health. The context of this work is to implement and study integrated micro-ring resonators devoted to sensing applications. They are fabricated by processing SU8 polymer as core layer and PMATRIFE polymer as lower cladding layer. The refractive index of the polymers and of the waveguide structure as a function of the wavelength is presented. Using these results, a theoretical study of the coupling between ring and straight waveguides has been undertaken in order to define the MR design. Sub-micronic gaps of 0.5 μm to 1 μm between the ring and the straight waveguides have been successfully achieved with UV (i-lines) photolithography. Different superstrates such as air, water, and aqueous solutions with glucose at different concentrations have been studied. First results show a good normalized transmission contrast of 0.98, a resonator quality factor around 1.5 × 104 corresponding to a coupling ratio of 14.7%, and ring propagation losses around 5 dB/cm. Preliminary sensing experiments have been performed for different concentrations of glucose; a sensitivity of 115 ± 8 nm/RIU at 1550 nm has been obtained with this couple of polymers.

  8. Resonantly enhanced collisional ionization measurements of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Bushaw, B.A.; Gerke, G.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors developed a new laser technique to analyze for radionuclides at extremely low levels. The technique, called resonantly enhanced collisional ionization (RECI), uses two nitrogen-laser pumped dye lasers to excite the target isotope to a high-energy Rydberg state. Atoms in these Rydberg states (within a few hundred wavenumbers in energy from the ionization threshold) efficiently ionize upon colliding with an inert gas and the ions can be detected by conventional means. The principal advantage of resonantly-enhanced collisional ionization is the extreme sensitivity coupled with its relative simplicity and low cost. Actinides typically have an ionization potential of about 6eV (uranium I.P. = 6.2 eV, plutonium I.P. = 5.7 eV). Two-step laser excitation to a state just below threshold requires wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. They showed that when both steps in the excitation process are resonant steps, relatively low-power lasers can populate the Rydberg state with almost unit efficiency. This is because the resonant excitations have much larger cross-sections than do photoionization processes. They also demonstrated that a few torr of a buffer gas will cause most of the excited-state atoms to be ionized

  9. Measurement of elastic modules of structural ceramic by acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Young; Lee Seong Suck; Kim, Young Gil

    1993-01-01

    Elastic moduli of structural ceramic materials, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 , were measured by acoustic resonance method. Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the torsional and flexural resonant frequencies, densities, and the dimensions of the specimen. The results by acoustic resonance method were compared with the results by ultrasonic method and the differences were less than 4%.

  10. Multilevel effect in uranium-238 and thorium-232 effective neutron capture resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.

    1981-01-01

    Until now, there has been a discrepancy between the computed and the measured values of the /sup 238/U effective capture integral. Recently, several new measurements of the resonance parameters were carried out and the use of a multilevel formalism was suggested to compute the /sup 238/U cross sections. This paper shows that the simultaneous use of recent parameters and the Reich-Moore formalism explain the discrepancy. 31 refs

  11. Effect of resonance line shape on precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, A.M.; Smelyanskij, A.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of resonance line shape on the systematic error of precision measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shifts of high resolution (on the center of NMR dispersion line) is analysed. Effect of the device resonance line form-function asymmetry is evaluated; the form-function is determined by configuration of the spectrometer magnetic field and enters the convolution, which describes the resonance line form. It is shown that with the increase of the relaxation line width the form-function effect on the measurement error yields to zero. The form-function effect on measurements and correction of a phase angle of NMR detection is evaluated. The method of semiquantitative evaluation of resonance line and NMR spectrometer parameters, guaranteeing the systematic error of the given infinitesimal, is presented

  12. Coupling thermal atomic vapor to an integrated ring resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, R; Kübler, H; Pfau, T; Löw, R; Gruhler, N; Pernice, W H P

    2016-01-01

    Strongly interacting atom–cavity systems within a network with many nodes constitute a possible realization for a quantum internet which allows for quantum communication and computation on the same platform. To implement such large-scale quantum networks, nanophotonic resonators are promising candidates because they can be scalably fabricated and interconnected with waveguides and optical fibers. By integrating arrays of ring resonators into a vapor cell we show that thermal rubidium atoms above room temperature can be coupled to photonic cavities as building blocks for chip-scale hybrid circuits. Although strong coupling is not yet achieved in this first realization, our approach provides a key step towards miniaturization and scalability of atom–cavity systems. (paper)

  13. Ultrasonic series resonant converter with integrated L-C-T

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, MC

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available primary plate separation, w G bifilar primary 2EOE,NpW(h + To - T;) d C= where d plate width. Fig. 8. SPICE model of discrete component converter ~ 21 B. Spice Simulation The objective of the simulation is to show that the integrated structure... reacts in the same way as a discrete series inductor capacitor and transformer would do, and in turn agrees with the experimental results. Fig. 8 shows the SPICE circuit model of the discrete component series resonant converter. Inductance L...

  14. Analysis and measurement of the stability of dual-resonator oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaed, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the stability of oscillators with dual-resonating tanks. After deriving oscillator models, it is shown that contrary to prior belief, there can be only one stable oscillating state. Sufficient conditions for stable oscillating states are derived and silicon measurement results are used to prove their validity. A fully integrated transmitter for intraocular pressure sensing that leverages the dual-resonator tank is designed and fabricated based on the derived models. An unstable version of the transmitter is also demonstrated to prove the concept of instability in dual-resonator oscillators © 2012 IEEE.

  15. A Study on Measurement Variations in Resonant Characteristics of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Iqbal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonators require fast, accurate, and cost-effective testing for mass production. Among the different test methods, frequency domain analysis is one of the easiest and fastest. This paper presents the measurement uncertainties in electrostatically actuated MEMS resonators, using frequency domain analysis. The influence of the applied driving force was studied to evaluate the measurement variations in resonant characteristics, such as the natural frequency and the quality factor of the resonator. To quantify the measurement results, measurement system analysis (MSA was performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA method. The results demonstrate that the resonant frequency ( f r is mostly affected by systematic error. However, the quality (Q factor strongly depends on the applied driving force. To reduce the measurement variations in Q factor, experiments were carried out to study the influence of DC and/or AC driving voltages on the resonator. The results reveal that measurement uncertainties in the quality factor were high for a small electrostatic force.

  16. Integral measurement system for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Pena E, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Integral measurement system for Radon is an equipment to detect, counting and storage data of alpha particles produced by Radon 222 which is emanated through the terrestrial peel surface. This equipment was designed in the Special Designs Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. It supplies information about the behavior at long time (41 days) on each type of alpha radiation that is present into the environment as well as into the terrestrial peel. The program is formed by an User program, where it is possible to determine the operation parameters of a portable probe that contains, a semiconductor detector, a microprocessor as a control central unit, a real time clock and calendar to determine the occurred events chronology, a non-volatile memory device for storage the acquired data and an interface to establish the serial communications with other personal computers. (Author)

  17. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  18. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  19. "Cul-de-sac" microstrip resonators for high-speed integrated optical commutator switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Nicolas A.; Chen, Mingche

    1993-04-01

    A novel microstrip resonator structure for use with integrated Y-branch optical modulators fabricated in Ti:LiNbO3 is proposed. The legs of the structure are intended to act as the electrodes of the modulator, with light being directed into each of the output waveguides of the Y-branch on alternate half-cycles of the standing wave excited in the resonator; forming an optical commutator switch. Such resonators having Al2O3 substrates were designed, fabricated, and tested. Measurements on one such resonator, operating at 7.12 GHz and having an unloaded quality factor of 123, indicating that 50 V should develop across the ends of its legs for 35 mW dissipated power; the corresponding values, from the model used to design the resonator, were 179, 50 V,and 24 mW, respectively. Using the model it is shown that a similar resonator fabricated on LiNbO3 should be able to develop about 50 V for 100 mW dissipated power at 15 GHz.

  20. Magnetic Barkhausen noise measurement by resonant coil method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capo-Sanchez, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Patricio Lumumba s/n, 90500 Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)], E-mail: jcapo@usp.br; Padovese, L. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes a powerful new technique for nondestructive evaluation of ferromagnetic material. A method has been developed for measuring magnetic Barkhausen signals under different coil resonance frequencies. The measurements allow one to establish the behavior relating the power spectral density maximum and the resonant coil frequency. Time-frequency analysis of Barkhausen signals puts in evidence the tuning regions for each coil, and allows clear identification of each contribution to the Barkhausen signal spectrum. This concept was used in order to evaluate the relation between the degree of plastic deformation in carbon steel samples, and the power spectral density maximum at different resonance frequencies. This result also makes it possible to the selectively modify measurement sensibility to the magnetic Barkhausen signal by using different resonance frequencies.

  1. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-03-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to progressively slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous. Instead, at some ``resonance'' isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at ``off-resonance'' compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error +/-0.05%) experiment that measures the parameters of bacterial growth in minimal media with varying isotopic composition. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, with significant enhancements in kinetics discovered at these conditions. The combined statistics extremely strongly supports the validity of the isotopic resonance phenomenon (p biotechnology, medicine, chemistry and other areas.

  2. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is 149 Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a 235 U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with 6 Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D 2 O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in 149 Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with En

  3. Measurement of magnetization of Ga1−xMnxAs by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagmann, J.A.; Traudt, K.; Zhou, Y.Y.; Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extend ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies of thin layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga 1−x Mn x As to the analysis of the integrated intensity of the resonance in order to obtain information on the total spin in the sample directly involved in ferromagnetically-ordered magnetization. A theoretical model is proposed for the dependences of the FMR integrated intensity and linewidth on the orientation of the applied magnetic field as the field direction is varied from in-plane to normal-to-the-plane of the Ga 1−x Mn x As layer. The strain-induced magnetic anisotropy of Ga 1−x Mn x As presents a significant challenge to conventional FMR linewidth and integrated intensity models. The new model predicts that the integrated FMR intensity is proportional to the saturation magnetization M S of the sample, with the constant of proportionality varying as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles of the applied magnetic field. The angular and temperature behaviors of the integrated intensity and linewidth of the FMR predicted by the proposed model are in good qualitative agreement with measurements. - Highlights: • We extend ferromagnetic resonance to the analysis of total magnetization of thin film Ga 1−x Mn x As. • We formulate a theoretical model for FMR integrated intensity and linewidth. • The model predicts that integrated FMR intensity is proportional to magnetization. • Predictions made by the model are in good qualitative agreement with measurements

  4. Hadronic resonance production measured with the ALICE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic resonances serve as a unique tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter pro- duced in heavy-ion collisions. These properties can be studied by measuring the ratios of hadronic resonance yields to the yields of longer-lived hadrons which can be used to investigate the re- scattering effects and the chemical freeze-out temperature. Resonance measurements in pp and p–Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle the initial- state effects from medium-induced effects. The ALICE Collaboration has measured resonances such as, K ∗ (892) 0 and φ (1020) in pp, p–Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC energies. These resonances are reconstructed via their hadronic decay channel in a wide momentum range at midrapidity. In this work, we present recent results on the transverse momentum spectra, mean transverse momentum, ratios of resonance production relative to that of long-lived hadrons.

  5. Analog implementation of an integral resonant control scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E; Moheimani, S O R; Aphale, S S

    2008-01-01

    Integral resonant control (IRC) has been introduced as a high performance controller design methodology for flexible structures with collocated actuator–sensor pairs. IRC has a simple structure and is capable of achieving significant damping, over several modes, while guaranteeing closed-loop stability of the system in the presence of unmodeled out-of-bandwidth dynamics. IRC can be an ideal controller for various industrial damping applications, if packaged in a simple easy-to-implement electronic module. This work proposes an analog implementation of the IRC scheme using a single Op-Amp circuit. The objective is to show that with simple analog realization of the modified IRC scheme, it is possible to damp a large number of vibration modes. A brief discussion about the modeling, circuit considerations, implementation and experimental results is presented in order to validate the usefulness and practicality of the proposed analog IRC implementation. (technical note)

  6. Measuring the Popular Resonance of Daesh’s Propoganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Marcellino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe an innovative approach to social media analysis, combining corpus linguists and statistical methods to measure the resonance of Daesh's propaganda to a sample population (Eqypt. The findings from this research effort demonstrate that: (1 Daesh's messaging is measurable and distinct from other Salafi groups, such as the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood; (2 while Daesh’s messaging generally do not resonate with Egyptians, its uptake increased in Upper Egypt and the Sinai regions during 2014; and (3 this method can be applied more broadly to measure the spread of violent extremist messaging across regional populations over time.

  7. Differential interferometer for measurement of displacement of laser resonator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macúchová, Karolina; Němcová, Šárka; Hošek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers a description and a technique of a possible optical method of mode locking within a laser resonator. The measurement system is a part of instrumentation of laser-based experiment OSQAR at CERN. The OSQAR experiment aims at search of axions, axion-like particles and measuring of ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence. It uses a laser resonator to enhance the coupling constant of hypothetical photon-to-axion conversion. The developed locking-in technique is based on differential interferometry. Signal obtained from the measurement provide crucial information for adaptive control of the locking-in of the resonator in real time. In this paper we propose several optical setups used for measurement and analysis of mutual position of the resonator mirrors. We have set up a differential interferometer under our laboratory conditions. We have done measurements with hemi-spherical cavity resonator detuned with piezo crystals. The measurement was set up in a single plane. Laser light was directed through half-wave retarder to a polarizing beam splitter and then converted to circular polarization by lambda/4 plates. After reflection at the mirrors, the beam is recombined in a beam splitter, sent to analyser and non-polarizing beam splitter and then inspected by two detectors with mutually perpendicular polarizers. The 90 degrees phase shift between the two arms allows precise analysis of a mutual distance change of the mirrors. Because our setup was sufficiently stable, we were able to measure the piezo constant and piezo hysteresis. The final goal is to adapt the first prototype to 23 m resonator and measure the displacement in two planes.

  8. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As by using sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be isotopic neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Karadag, M; Tan, M; Oezmen, A

    2003-01-01

    Thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions were measured by the activation method. The experimental samples with and without a cylindrical Cd shield case in 1 mm wall thickness were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field of the sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be neutron source. The induced activities in the samples were measured by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with a calibrated reverse-electrode germanium detector. Thermal neutron cross-sections for 2200 m/s neutrons and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions have been obtained relative to the reference values, sigma sub 0 =13.3+-0.1 b and I sub 0 =14.0+-0.3 b for the sup 5 sup 5 Mn(n,gamma) sup 5 sup 6 Mn reaction as a single comparator. The necessary correction factors for gamma attenuation, thermal neutron and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into...

  9. Measurements of the effective total and resonance absorption cross sections for zircaloy-2 and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A; Markovic, V [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1967-04-15

    Zirconium and zircaloy-2 alloy, as constructive materials, have found wide application in reactor technology, especially in heavy water systems for two reasons: a) low neutron absorption cross section, b) good mechanical properties. The thickness of the zirconium and zircaloy-2 for different applications varies from several tenths of a millimeter to about ten millimeters. Therefore, to calculate reactor systems it is desirable to know the effective neutron absorption cross section for the range of thicknesses mention above. The thermal neutron cross sections for these materials are low and no appreciable variation of the effective neutron cross section occurs even for the largest thicknesses. However, this is not true for effective resonance absorption. On the other hand, due to the lack of detailed knowledge of the zirconium resonances, calculations of the effective resonance integrals cannot be performed. Therefore it is necessary to measure the effective total and resonance absorption cross section for zirconium (author)

  10. Measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1989-11-01

    Using the Mark II detector at the SLC, we measure the Z mass and width to be 91.17 ± 0.18 GeV/c 2 and 1.95 +0. 40 -0.30 GeV, respectively. From a fit in which the visible Z width is constrained to its Standard Model value, the number of neutrino species is determined to be 3.0 ± or <4.4 at the 95% confidence level. 13 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Radionuclide measurements using resonantly enhanced collisional ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Bushaw, B.A.; Gerke, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes development of a laser-enhanced collisional ionization method for direct radionuclide measurements that are independent of radioactive decay. The technique uses two nitrogen-laser-pumped dye lasers to selectively excite the target isotope to an electronic state near the ionization threshold. The excited actinide atoms then undergo collisions with a buffer gas and are efficiently ionized. The resulting ions can be detected by conventional methods. The attributes of this approach include highly sensitive isotope analysis with relatively inexpensive lasers and a simple vacuum system. 9 refs., 3 figs

  12. TUZ, Resonance Integrals in Unresolved Region, Various Temperature, From Porter-Thomas Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncir, G.F.

    1969-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: TUZ computes resonance integrals for a wide variety of temperatures, compositions, and geometries for the unresolved resonances. 2 - Method of solution: The resonances are considered to be defined by an average over the Porter-Thomas distribution of neutron widths

  13. Measurement of the Z Resonance Parameters at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lazeyras, Pierre; Lehraus, Ivan; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Spagnolo, P; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Lindahl, A; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; ten Have, I; Hughes, I S; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Raine, C; Reeves, P; O'Shea, V; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Nash, J; Sciabà, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thomson, E; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Keemer, N R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, Terence; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; Bauerdick, L A T; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmelling, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Barberio, E; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Burkhardt, H; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Hess, J; Lutters, G; Meinhard, H; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Mirabito, L; Misiejuk, A; Neugebauer, E; Prange, G; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Schäfer, U; Sieler, U; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Trier, H; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pitis, L; Kim, H; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Cinabro, D; Conway, J S; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Johnson, R P; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wear, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    The properties of the Z resonance are measured from the analysis of 4.5 million Z decays into fermion pairs collected with the \\Aleph\\ detector at L EP. The data are consistent with lepton universality. The resonance parameters are measured to be $\\MZ=(91.1885 \\pm 0.0031)~\\Gevcc$, $\\GZ= (2.4951 \\pm 0.0043)~\\GeV$, $\\spol=(41.559 \\pm 0.058)$~nb and, combining the three lepton flavours $\\Rl= 20.725\\pm 0.039$. The corresponding number of light neutrino species is $N_{\

  14. New methodology for analytical calculation of resonance integrals in an heterogeneous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, T.P.R. de; Martinez, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    A new methodology for analytical calculation of Resonance Integral in a typical fuel cell is presented. The expression obtained for the Resonance Integral presents the advantage of being analytical. Its constituent terms are combinations of the well known function J(xi,β) with its partial derivatives in regard to β. This is a general expression for all types of resonance. The parameters used in this method depend on the resonance type and are obtained as a function of the parameter lambda. A simple expression, depending on resonance parameters is proposed for this variable. (Author) [pt

  15. Measuring the degree of integration for an integrated service network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration involves the coordination of services provided by autonomous agencies and improves the organization and delivery of multiple services for target patients. Current measures generally do not distinguish between agencies' perception and expectation. We propose a method for quantifying the agencies' service integration. Using the data from the Children's Treatment Network (CTN, we aimed to measure the degree of integration for the CTN agencies in York and Simcoe.  Theory and Methods: We quantified the integration by the agreement between perceived and expected levels of involvement and calculated four scores from different perspectives for each agency. We used the average score to measure the global network integration and examined the sensitivity of the global score.  Results: Most agencies' integration scores were less than 65%. As measured by the agreement between every other agency's perception and expectation, the overall integration of CTN in Simcoe and York was 44% (95% CI: 39% - 49% and 52% (95% CI: 48% - 56%, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the global scores were robust.  Conclusion: Our method extends existing measures of integration and possesses a good extent of validity. We can also apply the method in monitoring improvement and linking integration with other outcomes.

  16. Measuring the degree of integration for an integrated service network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration involves the coordination of services provided by autonomous agencies and improves the organization and delivery of multiple services for target patients. Current measures generally do not distinguish between agencies' perception and expectation. We propose a method for quantifying the agencies' service integration. Using the data from the Children's Treatment Network (CTN, we aimed to measure the degree of integration for the CTN agencies in York and Simcoe. Theory and Methods: We quantified the integration by the agreement between perceived and expected levels of involvement and calculated four scores from different perspectives for each agency. We used the average score to measure the global network integration and examined the sensitivity of the global score. Results: Most agencies' integration scores were less than 65%. As measured by the agreement between every other agency's perception and expectation, the overall integration of CTN in Simcoe and York was 44% (95% CI: 39% - 49% and 52% (95% CI: 48% - 56%, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the global scores were robust. Conclusion: Our method extends existing measures of integration and possesses a good extent of validity. We can also apply the method in monitoring improvement and linking integration with other outcomes. 

  17. Measuring resilience in integrated planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apneseth, K.; Wahl, A. M.; Hollnagel, E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how a Resilience Analysis Grid (RAG) can be used to profile the performance of a company in terms of the four abilities that characterize a resilient organization. It describes the development of a new, RAG-based tool founded on Resilience Engineering principles that can...... be used to assess an organization's resilience. The tool was tested in a case study involving a company in the offshore oil and gas industry. The company had decided to adopt an Integrated Operations (IO) approach to operations and maintenance planning and the tool was used to evaluate the impact...... of the Integrated Planning (IPL) process on its resilience....

  18. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of {sup 45}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thi Hien, Nguyen [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Department of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Manwoo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (G{sub th}) and resonance (G{sub epi}) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction, with σ{sub o,Au} = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and I{sub o,Au} = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σ{sub o,Sc} = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be I{sub o,Sc} = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  19. Flexible optical network components based on densely integrated microring resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses the design, realization and characterization of reconfigurable optical network components based on multiple microring resonators. Since thermally tunable microring resonators can be used as wavelength selective space switches, very compact devices with high complexity and

  20. Multilevel resonance analysis of sup 59 Co neutron transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Saussure, G.; Larson, N.M.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Large discrepancies exist between the recent high-resolution neutron transmission data of {sup 59}Co measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and transmissions computed from the resolved resonance parameters of the nuclear data collection ENDF/B-VI. In order to provide new resonance parameters consistent with these data, the transmission measurements have been analyzed with the computer code SAMMY in the energy range 200 eV to 100 keV. The resonance parameters reported in this paper provide an accurate total cross section from 10{sup -5} eV to 100 keV and correctly reproduce the thermal capture cross section. Thermal cross-section values and related quantities are also reviewed here. (author).

  1. ZUT, Resonance Integrals in Resolved Region at Various Temperature, Escape Probability Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncir, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: ZUT computes resonance integrals from resonance parameters for a wide variety of temperatures, compositions, and geometries for the resolved resonances. 2 - Method of solution: The form used permits specification of escape probability as a function of the lump dimension and the mean free path. The absorber term may be treated by the integral method, the narrow resonance or the infinite mass approximation. Moderator terms may be represented either by the full integral method (IM) or the asymptotic (NR) form

  2. Generalized measures and the Feynman path integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.P.; Chebotarev, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Generalizations are obtained for the earlier results by the authors concerning the inclusion of the Feynmann path integral in the momentum representation into the general integration theory. Feynmann path integrals are considered which do not represent T-products. Generalized Feynmann measure in the configuration representation is introduced

  3. Resonance Frequency of Optical Microbubble Resonators: Direct Measurements and Mitigation of Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cosci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the improvements in the sensing capabilities and precision of an Optical Microbubble Resonator due to the introduction of an encaging poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA box. A frequency fluctuation parameter σ was defined as a score of resonance stability and was evaluated in the presence and absence of the encaging system and in the case of air- or water-filling of the cavity. Furthermore, the noise interference introduced by the peristaltic and the syringe pumping system was studied. The measurements showed a reduction of σ in the presence of the encaging PMMA box and when the syringe pump was used as flowing system.

  4. Measurement of Resonance driving terms in the ATF Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Kuroda, S; Naito, T; Okugi, T; Urakawa, J; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of resonance driving terms in the Damping Ring of the Accelerator Test Facility in KEK could help finding possible machine imperfections and even to optimize single particle stability through the minimization of non-linearities. The first experimental attempts of this enterprise are reported in this note.

  5. Resonant-cantilever bio/chemical sensors with an integrated heater for both resonance exciting optimization and sensing repeatability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haitao; Li Xinxin; Gan Xiaohua; Liu Yongjing; Liu Xiang; Xu Pengcheng; Li Jungang; Liu Min

    2009-01-01

    With an integrated resonance exciting heater and a self-sensing piezoresistor, resonant micro-cantilever bio/chemical sensors are optimally designed and fabricated by micromachining techniques. This study is emphasized on the optimization of the integrated heating resistor. Previous research has put the heater at either the cantilever clamp end, the midpoint or the free end. Aiming at sufficiently high and stable resonant amplitude, our research indicates that the optimized location of the thermal-electric exciting resistor is the clamp end instead of other positions. By both theoretical analysis and resonance experiments where three heating resistors are placed at the three locations of the fabricated cantilever, it is clarified that the clamp end heating provides the most efficient resonance excitation in terms of resonant amplitude, Q-factor and resonance stability. Besides, the optimized combination of dc bias and ac voltage is determined by both analysis and experimental verification. With the optimized heating excitation, the resonant cantilever is used for biotin–avidin-specific detection, resulting in a ±0.1 Hz ultra-low noise floor of the frequency signal and a 130 fg mass resolution. In addition to resonance excitation, the heater is used to heat up the cantilever for speed-up desorption after detection that helps rapid and repeated sensing to chemical vapor. The clamp end is determined (by simulation) as the optimal heating location for uniform temperature distribution on the cantilever. Using the resonant cantilever, a rapid and repeated sensing experiment on dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor shows that a short-period heating at the detection interval significantly quickens the signal recovery and enhances the sensing repeatability

  6. RESONANT BPM FOR CONTINUOUS TUNE MEASUREMENT IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KESSELMAN, M.; CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.

    2001-01-01

    A movable Beam Position Monitor (BPM) using shorted stripline Pick-Up Electrode (NE) elements has been resonated using matching stub techniques to achieve a relatively high Q resonance at about 230MHz. This PUE has been used in a feasibility study of phase-locked-loop tune measurement [1], using a lock-in amplifier and variable frequency generator to continuously track betatron tune in RHIC, as well as to observe Schottky signals of the Gold beam. The approach to providing a high Q PUE for difference mode signals, simulation studies, and the results of initial tests will be presented

  7. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  8. Analysis and optimization of acoustic wave micro-resonators integrating piezoelectric zinc oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, O.; Zahr, A. H.; Orlianges, J.-C.; Crunteanu, A.; Chatras, M.; Blondy, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports on the design, simulation, fabrication, and test results of ZnO-based contour-mode micro-resonators integrating piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) layers. The inter-digitated (IDT) type micro-resonators are fabricated on ZnO films and suspended top of 2 μm thick silicon membranes using silicon-on insulator technology. We analyze several possibilities of increasing the quality factor (Q) and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt2) of the devices by varying the numbers and lengths of the IDT electrodes and using different thicknesses of the ZnO layer. We designed and fabricated IDTs of different finger numbers (n = 25, 40, 50, and 80) and lengths (L = 100/130/170/200 μm) for three different thicknesses of ZnO films (200, 600, and 800 nm). The measured Q factor confirms that reducing the length and the number of IDT fingers enables us to reach better electrical performances at resonant frequencies around 700 MHz. The extracted results for an optimized micro-resonator device having an IDT length of 100 μm and 40 finger electrodes show a Q of 1180 and a kt2 of 7.4%. We demonstrate also that the reduction of the ZnO thickness from 800 nm to 200 nm increases the quality factor from 430 to 1600, respectively, around 700 MHz. Experimental data are in very good agreement with theoretical simulations of the fabricated devices

  9. Measurements and applications of neutron multiple scattering in resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Makio

    1977-02-01

    Capture yield of neutrons impinging on a thick material is complicated due to self-shielding and multiple scattering, especially in the resonance region. When the incident neutron energy is equal to a resonance energy of the material, capture probability of the neutron increases with sample thickness and reaches a saturation value P sub(CO). There is a simple relation between P sub(CO) and GAMMA sub(n)/GAMMA and the recoil energy by the Monte-Carlo calculation. To examine validity of the relation, P sub(CO) was measured for 19 resonances in 12 nuclides with thick samples, using a JAERI linac time-of-flight spectrometer with Moxon-Rae type gamma ray detector and transmission type neutron flux monitor. Results of the measurements confirmed the validity. With this relation, the GAMMA sub(n)/GAMMA or GAMMA sub(γ)/GAMMA value can be obtained from the measured P sub(CO), and also the level spins be determined by combining the transmission data. Because of the definition of P sub(CO), determination of the resonance parameters is not sensitive to the sample thickness as far as it is sufficiently thick. (auth.)

  10. Spatially resolved remote measurement of temperature by neutron resonance absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kockelmann, W.; Pooley, D.E. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Deep penetration of neutrons into most engineering materials enables non-destructive studies of their bulk properties. The existence of sharp resonances in neutron absorption spectra enables isotopically-resolved imaging of elements present in a sample, as demonstrated by previous studies. At the same time the Doppler broadening of resonance peaks provides a method of remote measurement of temperature distributions within the same sample. This technique can be implemented at a pulsed neutron source with a short initial pulse allowing for the measurement of the energy of each registered neutron by the time of flight technique. A neutron counting detector with relatively high timing and spatial resolution is used to demonstrate the possibility to obtain temperature distributions across a 100 µm Ta foil with ~millimeter spatial resolution. Moreover, a neutron transmission measurement over a wide energy range can provide spatially resolved sample information such as temperature, elemental composition and microstructure properties simultaneously.

  11. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  12. From VHF to UHF CMOS-MEMS Monolithically Integrated Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teva, Jordi; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Uranga, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of microresonators exhibiting resonance frequencies in the VHF and UHF bands, fabricated using the available layers of the standard and commercial CMOS technology, AMS-0.35mum. The resonators are released in a post-CMOS process cons...

  13. Non-additive measure and integral

    CERN Document Server

    Denneberg, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Non-Additive Measure and Integral is the first systematic approach to the subject. Much of the additive theory (convergence theorems, Lebesgue spaces, representation theorems) is generalized, at least for submodular measures which are characterized by having a subadditive integral. The theory is of interest for applications to economic decision theory (decisions under risk and uncertainty), to statistics (including belief functions, fuzzy measures) to cooperative game theory, artificial intelligence, insurance, etc. Non-Additive Measure and Integral collects the results of scattered and often isolated approaches to non-additive measures and their integrals which originate in pure mathematics, potential theory, statistics, game theory, economic decision theory and other fields of application. It unifies, simplifies and generalizes known results and supplements the theory with new results, thus providing a sound basis for applications and further research in this growing field of increasing interest. It also co...

  14. Resonant frequency and elastic modulus measurements on hardened cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    A new technique for measuring resonant frequency and elastic modulus is described. This has been used on specimens of hardened cement paste containing water with no simulated waste, and the results compared with measurements of ultrasonic pulse velocity, dimensional movements and compressive strength made on the same formulations. In addition, measurements were made on a specimen containing simulated waste which demonstrated the applicability of the new technique for following the development of the mechanical properties of cemented simulant radioactive waste in the laboratory. (U.K.)

  15. The effect of non-uniform fuel rod temperatures on effective resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, A.

    1961-06-01

    The effective resonance integral for heterogeneous lattices can be reduced to the effective resonance integral for an equivalent homogeneous system with a fairly well defined error depending on lump size and geometry. This report investigates the effect of a radial parabolic temperature variation in cylindrical lumps on the equivalent homogeneous effective resonance integral. Also determined is the equivalent uniform temperature to be taken in the usual formulae to allow for non-uniform fuel rod temperature. This effective temperature is found to be T eff. = T s + 4/9 (T c - T s ) where T s and T c are the surface and central temperatures of the lump. (author)

  16. Structural Integrity in Measures of Self Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, A. Jackson; Katzenmeyer, W.G.

    Structural integrity of a measure is defined in terms of its replicability, constancy, invariance, and stability. Work completed in the development and validation of the Self Observation Scales (SOS) Primary Level (Stenner and Katzenmeyer, 1973) serves to illustrate one method of establishing structural integrity. The name of each scale of the SOS…

  17. Complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectric employing composite dielectric resonator technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupka, J.; Zychowicz, T.; Bovtun, Viktor; Veljko, Sergiy

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2006), s. 1883-1888 ISSN 0885-3010 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010213; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0993; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : dielectric resonator * ferroelectrics * microwave measurements Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.729, year: 2006

  18. Measurement of pressure on a surface using bubble acoustic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldham, Ben; Manasseh, Richard; Liffman, Kurt; Šutalo, Ilija D; Illesinghe, Suhith; Ooi, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The frequency response of gas bubbles as a function of liquid ambient pressure was measured and compared with theory. A bubble size with equivalent spherical radius of 2.29 mm was used over a frequency range of 1000–1500 Hz. The ultimate aim is to develop an acoustic sensor that can measure static pressure and is sensitive to variations as small as a few kPa. The classical bubble resonance frequency is known to vary with ambient pressure. Experiments were conducted with a driven bubble in a pressurizable tank with a signal processing system designed to extract the resonant peak. Since the background response of the containing tank is significant, particularly near tank-modal resonances, it must be carefully removed from the bubble response signal. A dual-hydrophone method was developed to allow rapid and reliable real-time measurements. The expected pressure dependence was found. In order to obtain a reasonable match with theory, the classical theory was modified by the introduction of a 'mirror bubble' to account for the influence of a nearby surface. (technical design note)

  19. Set up of a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters on integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, P.

    1996-01-01

    Resonance parameters for actinides play a significant role in the neutronic characteristics of all reactor types. All the major integral parameters strongly depend on the nuclear data of the isotopes in the resonance-energy regions.The author sets up a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters taking into account the self-shielding effects and restricting the cross section deconvolution problem to a limited energy region. (N.T.)

  20. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Mary Ann C; Nurjono, Milawaty; Lim, Yee Wei; Dessers, Ezra; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2016-12-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research. A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones. This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties. We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care integration (33%) and patient

  1. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAUTISTA, MARY ANN C.; NURJONO, MILAWATY; DESSERS, EZRA; VRIJHOEF, HUBERTUS JM

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research.A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones.This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties.We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Context Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Methods Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. Findings From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care

  2. Measurement of isovector giant quadrupole resonance in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, D.A.; Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.; Adler, J.O.; Andersson, B.E.; Hansen, K.; Issaksson, L.; Nilsson, B.; Ruijter, H.; Schroeder, B.; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Crawford, G.I.; Miller, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The 40 Ca(γ,n) reaction was measured using tagged photons in the energy range 25-50 MeV. Neutrons were detected using two 9-element, liquid scintillator, neutron detectors placed at angles of 55 deg and 125 deg at flight path of 3.2 m. The absolute cross section was determined relative to that for D (γ,n)p, which was measured using a heavy water target. The forward/backward asymmetry in the 40 Ca (γ, n) cross section, resulting from E1/E2 interference has been used to locate and parametrize the isovector giant quadrupole resonance (IVQR). 6 refs., 2 figs

  3. Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a system failure is a concept supported by the finding of consistent extramotor as well as motor cerebral pathology. The functional correlates of the structural changes detected using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry have not been extensively studied. A group of 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was compared to healthy control subjects using a multi-modal neuroimaging approach comprising T(1)-weighted, diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography, a grey matter connection network was defined based upon the prominent corticospinal tract and corpus callosum involvement demonstrated by white matter tract-based spatial statistics. This 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-specific' network included motor, premotor and supplementary motor cortices, pars opercularis and motor-related thalamic nuclei. A novel analysis protocol, using this disease-specific grey matter network as an input for a dual-regression analysis, was then used to assess changes in functional connectivity directly associated with this network. A spatial pattern of increased functional connectivity spanning sensorimotor, premotor, prefrontal and thalamic regions was found. A composite of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures also allowed the qualitative discrimination of patients from controls. An integrated structural and functional connectivity approach therefore identified apparently dichotomous processes characterizing the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cerebral network failure, in which there was increased functional connectivity within regions of decreased structural connectivity. Patients with slower rates of disease progression showed connectivity measures with values closer to healthy controls, raising the possibility that functional connectivity increases might not simply represent a

  4. A near-field scanning microwave microscope based on a superconducting resonator for low power measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, S E; Danilov, A V; Adamyan, A; Kubatkin, S E

    2013-02-01

    We report on the design and performance of a cryogenic (300 mK) near-field scanning microwave microscope. It uses a microwave resonator as the near-field sensor, operating at a frequency of 6 GHz and microwave probing amplitudes down to 100 μV, approaching low enough photon population (N ∼ 1000) of the resonator such that coherent quantum manipulation becomes feasible. The resonator is made out of a miniaturized distributed fractal superconducting circuit that is integrated with the probing tip, micromachined to be compact enough such that it can be mounted directly on a quartz tuning-fork, and used for parallel operation as an atomic force microscope (AFM). The resonator is magnetically coupled to a transmission line for readout, and to achieve enhanced sensitivity we employ a Pound-Drever-Hall measurement scheme to lock to the resonance frequency. We achieve a well localized near-field around the tip such that the microwave resolution is comparable to the AFM resolution, and a capacitive sensitivity down to 6.4 × 10(-20) F/Hz, limited by mechanical noise. We believe that the results presented here are a significant step towards probing quantum systems at the nanoscale using near-field scanning microwave microscopy.

  5. Measuring cross-border regional STI integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, T

    2016-07-01

    Earlier quantitative studies on cross-border regional integration processes have commonly neglected science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators: even the most notable example of a composite indicator approach to measuring cross-border regional integration, i.e. the Oresund index, lacks a sub-category for STI. Consequently, by ignoring cross-border innovation and knowledge flows, the Oresund integration index fails to take into account one of the most important drivers of economic growth in cross-border regions. Therefore, a new composite STI indicator (sub-category) was introduced to strengthen the Oresund integration index. This was compiled from patent, publication and collaborative R&D project data. The findings show that this index performs reasonably well in depicting STI integration, while at the same time remaining simple and straightforward enough to be adopted in other crossborder regions. (Author)

  6. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging: Reproducing typical autopsy heart measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Hatch, Gary M; Flach, Patricia M; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of cardiac postmortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) to perform routine measurements of the ventricular wall thicknesses and the heart valves and to assess if imaging measurements are consistent with traditional autopsy measurements. In this retrospective study, 25 cases with cardiac PMMR and subsequent autopsy were included. The thicknesses of the myocardial walls as well as the circumferences of all heart valves were measured on cardiac PMMR and compared to autopsy measurements. Paired samples T-test and the Wilcoxon-Signed rank test, were used to compare autopsy and cardiac PMMR measurements. For exploring correlations, the Pearson's Correlation coefficient and the Spearman's Rho test were used. Cardiac PMMR measurements of the aortic and pulmonary valve circumferences showed no significant differences from autopsy measurements. The mitral and tricuspid valves circumferences differed significantly from autopsy measurements. Left myocardial and right myocardial wall thickness also differed significantly from autopsy measurements. Left and right myocardial wall thickness, and tricuspid valve circumference measurements on cardiac PMMR and autopsy, correlated strongly and significantly. Several PMMR measurements of cardiac parameters differ significantly from corresponding autopsy measurements. However, there is a strong correlation between cardiac PMMR measurements and autopsy measurements in the majority of these parameters. It is important to note that myocardial walls are thicker when measured in situ on cardiac PMMR than when measured at autopsy. Investigators using post-mortem MR should be aware of these differences in order to avoid false diagnoses of cardiac pathology based on cardiac PMMR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Control of integrated micro-resonator wavelength via balanced homodyne locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jonathan A; Lentine, Anthony L; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L

    2014-05-05

    We describe and experimentally demonstrate a method for active control of resonant modulators and filters in an integrated photonics platform. Variations in resonance frequency due to manufacturing processes and thermal fluctuations are corrected by way of balanced homodyne locking. The method is compact, insensitive to intensity fluctuations, minimally disturbs the micro-resonator, and does not require an arbitrary reference to lock. We demonstrate long-term stable locking of an integrated filter to a laser swept over 1.25 THz. In addition, we show locking of a modulator with low bit error rate while the chip temperature is varied from 5 to 60° C.

  8. High Frequency LLC Resonant Converter with Magnetic Shunt Integrated Planar Transformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mingxiao; Ouyang, Ziwei; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2018-01-01

    High Frequency LLC requires a smaller resonant inductance which is usually implemented by transformer leakage inductance. However, this small resonant inductance is difficult to deal with a wide input voltage range. This paper proposes a new method to implement a larger resonant inductance by using...... a magnetic shunt integrated into planar transformer. The switching frequency can be greatly narrowed by designing a smaller inductance ratio of magnetizing inductance to resonant inductance. Since this method can well deal with a wide input voltage range without adding extra inductor and increasing the size...... of the transformer, the power density can be improved. The precise leakage inductance calculation method for this transformer and detailed LLC converter design procedure are presented. A 280-380V and 48V-100W half bridge LLC resonant converter with 1 MHz resonant frequency is built to verify the design methodology....

  9. Racetrack resonator as a loss measurement platform for photonic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adam M; DeRose, Christopher T; Lentine, Anthony L; Starbuck, Andrew; Pomerene, Andrew T S; Norwood, Robert A

    2015-11-02

    This work represents the first complete analysis of the use of a racetrack resonator to measure the insertion loss of efficient, compact photonic components. Beginning with an in-depth analysis of potential error sources and a discussion of the calibration procedure, the technique is used to estimate the insertion loss of waveguide width tapers of varying geometry with a resulting 95% confidence interval of 0.007 dB. The work concludes with a performance comparison of the analyzed tapers with results presented for four taper profiles and three taper lengths.

  10. Design of a Miniaturized X-Band Diplexer Based on Novel One-Third-Mode Substrate Integrated Resonator Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Kang, Wei; Wu, Wen

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized diplexer designed with two novel one-third-mode substrate integrated resonator (OTMSIR) filters has been presented. The one-third triangular resonator cavity with two transmission zeros (TZs) and two transmission poles is investigated. TZs are implemented by taking cross couplings of lower order modes in this design. The diplexer is then obtained by integrating two different sizes of OTMSIR filters with a common T-junction structure. A X-band diplexer operating at 10 GHz and 11.5 GHz is designed on a substrate with a dielectric constant of 3.55 to verify the above design concept. This novel structure features more compact size, better transmission performance, higher out of band rejection and easier integration compared with other circuits. A good agreement is obtained between the simulations and the measured results.

  11. Longitudinal and transverse electric field measurements in resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Dechun; Chen Linfeng; Zheng Xiaoyue

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents a measuring technique for the electric field distribution of high order modes in resonant cavities. A perturbing bead-like cage made with metallic wires are developed for S-band field measurements, which can be used to detect a small electric field component in the presence of other strong electric or magnetic field components (That means high sensitivity and high directivity). In order to avoid orientation error for the cage with very high directivity, two parallel threads were used for supporting the perturbing cage. A simple mechanical set-up is described. The cage can be driven into the cavity on-axis or off-axis in any azimuth for the longitudinal and transverse electric field measurements

  12. Introduction to Measure Theory and Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, Luigi; Mennucci, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This textbook collects the notes for an introductory course in measure theory and integration. The course was taught by the authors to undergraduate students of the Scuola Normale Superiore, in the years 2000-2011. The goal of the course was to present, in a quick but rigorous way, the modern point of view on measure theory and integration, putting Lebesgue's Euclidean space theory into a more general context and presenting the basic applications to Fourier series, calculus and real analysis. The text can also pave the way to more advanced courses in probability, stochastic processes or geomet

  13. Resonance integral analytical calculation considering shadowing effect. Calculo analitico da integral de ressonancia considerando o efeito de sombreamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, M A.M. [NUCLEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martinez, A S [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1990-01-01

    It is presented a method for the Resonance Integral Calculation in the fuel and moderator regions, including the shadowing effect. This effect appears due to the presence of several fuel rods in a infinite moderator region. The method is based on the approximations to the J ({xi}, {beta}) function and theirs partial derivatives in relation to {beta}. The dependence of the Resonance Integral in the J ({xi}, {beta}) comes from the rational approximation to the neutron escape probability. The final results were obtained in a very simple and fast way, and they show the good accuracy of the method. (author).

  14. Non-integrability of first order resonances in Hamiltonian systems in three degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ognyan

    2012-02-01

    The normal forms of the Hamiltonian 1:2: ω resonances to degree three for ω = 1, 3, 4 are studied for integrability. We prove that these systems are non-integrable except for the discrete values of the parameters which are well known. We use the Ziglin-Morales-Ramis method based on the differential Galois theory.

  15. Actinides integral measurements on FCA assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, Takehiko; Okajima, Shigeaki

    1984-01-01

    Actinide integral measurements were performed on eight assemblies of FCA where neutron energy spectra were shifted systematically from soft to hard in order to evaluate and modify the nuclear cross section data of major actinides. Experimental values on actinide fission rates and sample reactivity worths are compared with the calculated values using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (or IV) data sets. (author)

  16. Volume measurement of multiple sclerosis lesions with magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, D.A.G.; Tofts, P.S.; Miller, D.H.; Du Boulay, G.H.; Feinstein, A.; Harvey, I.; Brenner, R.; McDonald, W.I.; Sacares, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to visualise multiple sclerosis lesions in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging suggests an important role in monitoring the course of the disease. In order to help the long-term assessment of prospective treatments, a semi-automated technique for measuring lesion volume has been developed to provide a quantitative index of disease progression. Results are presented from a preliminary study with a single patient and compared to measurements taken from lesion outlines traced by a neuroradiologist, two neurologists and a technician. The semi-automated technique achieved a precision of 6% compared to a range of 12-33% for the manual tracing method. It also reduced the human interaction time from at least 60 min to 15 min. (orig.)

  17. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry system for measurement of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pibida, L.; McMahon, C.A.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Bushaw, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) system has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for sensitive and selective determination of radio-cesium in the environment. The overall efficiency was determined to be 4x10-7 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of 108 for both 135Cs and 137Cs with respect to 133Cs. RIMS isotopic ratio measurements of 135Cs/ 137Cs were performed on a nuclear fuel burn-up sample and compared to measurements on a similar system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Results of preliminary RIMS investigations on a freshwater lake sediment sample are also discussed

  18. Application of nuclear resonance scattering for in vivo measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielopolski, L.; Vartsky, D.; Cohn, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear resonance scattering is applied in our laboratory to measure hepatic and cardiac iron overload. For iron analysis, a gaseous source of 4 mg MnCl 2 is introduced into an evacuated quartz vial. Following irradiation in a nuclear reactor, 56 Mn decays by beta emission to the 847-keV level of 56 Fe, which subsequently decays to the ground state of 56 Fe with a 7 ps half-life. The principal aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of the iron chelation therapy. Serial measurements over a time period of 6 to 12 months of a given patient will enable us to see how the iron is removed from the critical organs

  19. Measurement of Charged Pions from Neutrino-produced Nuclear Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Clifford N. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A method for identifying stopped pions in a high-resolution scintillator bar detector is presented. I apply my technique to measure the axial mass MΔAfor production of the Δ(1232) resonance by neutrino, with the result MΔA = 1.16±0.20 GeV (68% CL) (limited by statistics). The result is produced from the measured spectrum of reconstructed momentum-transfer Q2. I proceed by varying the value of MΔA in a Rein-Sehgal-based Monte Carlo to produce the best agreement, using shape only (not normalization). The consistency of this result with recent reanalyses of previous bubble-chamber experiments is discussed.

  20. A Unilateral Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensor for Nondestructive Wood Moisture Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Deng-jie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (UMR sensor was designed to measure wood moisture nondestructively. The sensor consisted of a unilateral magnet, an anti-eddy current module, a radiofrequency (RF coil and an impedance matching and tuning circuit. The sensor produced a static magnetic field of 71.1 mT (resonant frequency:3.027 MHz in a 50 mm×50 mm plane locating 75 mm above the sensor's surface. Preliminary nondestructive measurement of wood moisture was carried out with the sensor. The moisture distribution in the radical direction of a cylindrical wood sample was scanned. Variations in transverse relaxation time (T2 from the bark to core were obtained. Evaporation of moisture during wood drying was also measured with the UMR sensor. Experimental results showed that:the peak of long T2 component in the T2 spectrum moved to left and the peak integral area decreased gradually during drying. The integral area was proportional to the moisture content of the sample. The work presents a portable UMR device for wood research which may potentially be used for nondestructive moisture measurement on living trees in situ.

  1. Measuring ac losses in superconducting cables using a resonant circuit:Resonant current experiment (RESCUE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Däumling, Manfred; Olsen, Søren Krüger; Rasmussen, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    be recorded using, for example, a digital oscilloscope. The amplitude decay of the periodic voltage or current accurately reflects the power loss in the system. It consists of two components-an ohmic purely exponential one (from leads, contacts, etc.), and a nonexponential component originating from......A simple way to obtain true ac losses with a resonant circuit containing a superconductor, using the decay of the circuit current, is described. For the measurement a capacitor is short circuited with a superconducting cable. Energy in the circuit is provided by either charging up the capacitors...... with a certain voltage, or letting a de flow in the superconductor. When the oscillations are started-either by opening a switch in case a de is flowing or by closing a switch to connect the charged capacitors with the superconductor-the current (via a Rogowski coil) or the voltage on the capacitor can...

  2. Expected count rate for the Self- Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry measurements of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossa, Riccardo [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200 - B2400 Mol (Belgium); Universite libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles - Service de Metrologie Nucleaire, CP 165/84, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 - B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Borella, Alessandro; Van der Meer, Klaas [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200 - B2400 Mol (Belgium); Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas [Universite libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles - Service de Metrologie Nucleaire, CP 165/84, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50 - B1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive neutron technique that aims at a direct quantification of {sup 239}Pu in the fuel assemblies by measuring the attenuation of the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu mass is estimated by calculating the SINRD signature, that is the ratio between the neutron flux integrated over the fast energy region and around the 0.3 eV resonance region. The SINRD measurement approach considered in this study consists in introducing a small neutron detector in the central guide tube of a PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. In order to measure the neutron flux in the energy regions defined in the SINRD signature, different detector types are used. The response of a bare {sup 238}U fission chamber is considered for the determination of the fast neutron flux, while other thermal-epithermal detectors wrapped in neutron absorbers are envisaged to measure the neutron flux around the resonance region. This paper provides an estimation of the count rate that can be achieved with the detector types proposed for the SINRD measurement. In the first section a set of detectors are evaluated in terms of count rate and sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content, in order to identify the optimal measurement configuration for each detector type. Then a study is performed to increase the count rate by increasing the detector size. The study shows that the highest count rate is achieved by using either {sup 3}He or {sup 10}B proportional counters because of the high neutron efficiency of these detectors. However, the calculations indicate that the biggest contribution to the measurement uncertainty is due to the measurement of the fast neutron flux. Finally, similar sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content is obtained by using the different detector types for the measurement of the neutron flux close to the resonance region. Therefore, the count rate associated to each detector type

  3. Measurement of coherent π0 photoproduction on 3He and 3H in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellinghausen, B.; Gassen, H.J.; Reese, E.; Reichelt, T.; Stipp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Neutral pion photoproduction has been measured on 3 He and 3 H nuclei in the Δ(1,232) resonance region. Resonance averaged cross-sections are presented as a function of momentum transfer and compared to theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  4. Photo-Detectors Integrated with Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. L. Figueiredo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on photo-detectors consisting of an optical waveguide that incorporates a resonant tunneling diode (RTD. Operating at wavelengths around 1.55 μm in the optical communications C band we achieve maximum sensitivities of around 0.29 A/W which is dependent on the bias voltage. This is due to the nature of RTD nonlinear current-voltage characteristic that has a negative differential resistance (NDR region. The resonant tunneling diode photo-detector (RTD-PD can be operated in either non-oscillating or oscillating regimes depending on the bias voltage quiescent point. The oscillating regime is apparent when the RTD-PD is biased in the NDR region giving rise to electrical gain and microwave self-sustained oscillations Taking advantage of the RTD’s NDR distinctive characteristics, we demonstrate efficient detection of gigahertz (GHz modulated optical carriers and optical control of a RTD GHz oscillator. RTD-PD based devices can have applications in generation and optical control of GHz low-phase noise oscillators, clock recovery systems, and fiber optic enabled radio frequency communication systems.

  5. Sound Transmission Loss Through a Corrugated-Core Sandwich Panel with Integrated Acoustic Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Zalewski, Bart F; Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the effect of structurally integrated resonators on the transmission loss of a sandwich panel. The sandwich panel has facesheets over a corrugated core, which creates long aligned chambers that run parallel to the facesheets. When ports are introduced through the facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as low-frequency acoustic resonators. By integrating the resonators within the structure they contribute to the static load bearing capability of the panel while also attenuating noise. An analytical model of a panel with embedded resonators is derived and compared with numerical simulations. Predictions show that acoustic resonators can significantly improve the transmission loss of the sandwich panel around the natural frequency of the resonators. In one configuration with 0.813 m long internal chambers, the diffuse field transmission loss is improved by more than 22 dB around 104 Hz. The benefit is achieved with no added mass or volume relative to the baseline structure. The embedded resonators are effective because they radiate sound out-of-phase with the structure. This results in destructive interference, which leads to less transmitted sound power.

  6. Measuring rare and exclusive Higgs boson decays into light resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Andrew S.; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kuttimalai, Silvan; Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Department of Physics, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    We evaluate the LHC's potential of observing Higgs boson decays into light elementary or composite resonances through their hadronic decay channels. We focus on the Higgs boson production processes with the largest cross sections, pp → h and pp → h + jet, with subsequent decays h → ZA or h → Zη{sub c}, and comment on the production process pp → hZ. By exploiting track-based jet substructure observables and extrapolating to 3000 fb{sup -1} we find BR(h → ZA) ≅ BR(h → Zη{sub c}) measurements and can constrain large parts of the currently allowed parameter space. (orig.)

  7. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures) and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation), are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  8. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation, are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  9. Path integral measure for gravitational interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Fujikawa

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that the path-integral variables as well as the local measure for gravitational interactions are uniquely specified if one imposes the anomaly-free condition on the Becchi-Rouet-Stora supersymmetry associated with general coordinate transformations. This prescription is briefly illustrated for the Einstein gravity and supergravity in four space-time dimensions and the relativistic string theory in two dimensions.

  10. Measurements of the Z boson resonance parameters at SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearty, C.

    1989-07-01

    This paper presents the measurement by the Mark II experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider of the parameters of the Z boson resonance. The results are updated from those presented at the SLAC Summer Institute to include all data presented in the most recent Mark II publication, consisting of 19 nb -1 of data at ten different center-of-mass energies between 89.2 and 93.0 GeV. The resonance parameters are extracted by measuring the Z production cross section at a series of center-of-mass energies (scan points) near the Z peak, then fitting these data with the theoretical cross section. The four major aspects of the analysis are the determination at each scan point of the center-of-mass energy (E), the integrated luminosity, the number of Z decays and the expected cross section as a function of the resonance parameters, such as mass and width. I will discuss each of these steps in turn, after a brief description of the Mark II detector, then conclude with the results of the analysis. 7 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Investigations of a voltage-biased microwave cavity for quantum measurements of nanomechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxinol, Francisco; Hao, Hugo; Lahaye, Matt

    2015-03-01

    Quantum electromechanical systems incorporating superconducting qubits have received extensive interest in recent years due to their promising prospects for studying fundamental topics of quantum mechanics such as quantum measurement, entanglement and decoherence in new macroscopic limits, also for their potential as elements in technological applications in quantum information network and weak force detector, to name a few. In this presentation we will discuss ours efforts toward to devise an electromechanical circuit to strongly couple a nanomechanical resonator to a superconductor qubit, where a high voltage dc-bias is required, to study quantum behavior of a mechanical resonator. Preliminary results of our latest generation of devices integrating a superconductor qubit into a high-Q voltage biased microwave cavities are presented. Developments in the circuit design to couple a mechanical resonator to a qubit in the high-Q voltage bias CPW cavity is discussed as well prospects of achieving single-phonon measurement resolution. National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1056423 and Grant No. DMR-1312421.

  12. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-01

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called "dynamic source triggering," between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  13. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britun, Nikolay, E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Michiels, Matthieu [Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called “dynamic source triggering,” between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  14. Biophysical dose measurement using electron paramagnetic resonance in rodent teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.F.H.; Rink, W.J.; Boreham, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of human tooth enamel has been widely used in measuring radiation doses in various scenarios. However, there are situations that do not involve a human victim (e.g. tests for suspected environmental overexposures, measurements of doses to experimental animals in radiation biology research, or chronology of archaeological deposits). For such cases we have developed an EPR dosimetry technique making use of enamel of teeth extracted from mice. Tooth enamel from both previously irradiated and unirradiated mice was extracted and cleaned by processing in supersaturated KOH aqueous solution. Teeth from mice with no previous irradiation history exhibited a linear EPR response to the dose in the range from 0.8 to 5.5 Gy. The EPR dose reconstruction for a preliminarily irradiated batch resulted in the radiation dose of (1.4±0.2) Gy, which was in a good agreement with the estimated exposure of the teeth. The sensitivity of the EPR response of mouse enamel to gamma radiation was found to be half of that of human tooth enamel. The dosimetric EPR signal of mouse enamel is stable up at least to 42 days after exposure to radiation. Dose reconstruction was only possible with the enamel extracted from molars and premolars and could not be performed with incisors. Electron micrographs showed structural variations in the incisor enamel, possibly explaining the large interfering signal in the non-molar teeth

  15. A resonant absorption measurement in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leun, C. van der; Burhoven Jaspers, N.C.

    1966-01-01

    A resonant absorption measurement at the 1966 keV proton resonance in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al leads to an absolute determination of the resonance strength, (2J+1)ΓpΓγ/Γ, of 5.6±1.8 eV. Normalization of previously published strengths of 120 resonances in the reaction 26Mg(p, γ)27Al, reduces these

  16. Experiences in integrated leak rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During a hypothetical design basis accident for nuclear power plants, the reactor containment system is relied upon to maintain radioactive exposure limits below acceptable limits. Integrated leak rate testing is a means of verifying that the leakage of radioactivity material from the reactor containment will be below allowable limits. Leakage rate computations are based on the ideal gas law. The absolute method of leakage rate testing utilizing mass point method of data analysis is recommended. Integrated leak rate testing data is obtained from pressure, drybulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, and flow measuring systems. Test data does not support the usual leakage (flow) - pressure square root relationship. The major source of potential leakage from the reactor containment is reactor containment isolation valves

  17. Video integrated measurement system. [Diagnostic display devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, B.; Eilbert, L.; Finando, S.; Fukuda, F.

    1982-06-01

    A Video Integrated Measurement (VIM) System is described which incorporates the use of various noninvasive diagnostic procedures (moire contourography, electromyography, posturometry, infrared thermography, etc.), used individually or in combination, for the evaluation of neuromusculoskeletal and other disorders and their management with biofeedback and other therapeutic procedures. The system provides for measuring individual diagnostic and therapeutic modes, or multiple modes by split screen superimposition, of real time (actual) images of the patient and idealized (ideal-normal) models on a video monitor, along with analog and digital data, graphics, color, and other transduced symbolic information. It is concluded that this system provides an innovative and efficient method by which the therapist and patient can interact in biofeedback training/learning processes and holds considerable promise for more effective measurement and treatment of a wide variety of physical and behavioral disorders.

  18. Micro-resonators based on integrated polymer technology for optical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Girault , Pauline; Lemaitre , Jonathan; Guendouz , Mohammed; Lorrain , Nathalie; Poffo , Luiz; Gadonna , Michel; Bosc , Dominique

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Research on sensors has experienced a noticeable development over the last decades especially in label free optical biosensors. However, compact sensors without markers for rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection of various substances induces a significant research of new technological solutions. The context of this work is the development of a sensor based on easily integrated and inexpensive micro-resonator (MR) component in integrated optics, highly sensitive and ...

  19. INTER, ENDF/B Thermal Cross-Sections, Resonance Integrals, G-Factors Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: INTER calculates thermal cross sections, g-factors, resonance integrals, fission spectrum averaged cross sections and 14.0 MeV (or other energy) cross sections for major reactions in an ENDF-6 or ENDF-5 format data file. Version 7.01 (Jan 2005): set success flag after return from beginning. 2 - Method of solution: INTER performs integrations by using the trapezoidal rule

  20. Resonant tunneling measurements of size-induced strain relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Can Deniz

    Lattice mismatch strain available in such semiconductor heterostructures as Si/SiGe or GaAs/AlGaAs can be employed to alter the electronic and optoelectronic properties of semiconductor structures and devices. When deep submicron structures are fabricated from strained material, strained layers relax by sidewall expansion giving rise to size- and geometry-dependent strain gradients throughout the structure. This thesis describes a novel experimental technique to probe the size-induced strain relaxation by studying the tunneling current characteristics of strained p-type Si/SiGe resonant tunneling diodes. Our current-voltage measurements on submicron strained p-Si/SiGe double- and triple-barrier resonant tunneling structures as a function of device diameter, D, provide experimental access to both the average strain relaxation (which leads to relative shifts in the tunneling current peak positions) and strain gradients (which give rise to a fine structure in the current peaks due to inhomogeneous strain-induced lateral quantization). We find that strain relaxation is significant, with a large fraction of the strain energy relaxed on average in D ≤ 0.25 m m devices. Further, the in-plane potentials that arise from inhomogeneous strain gradients are large. In the D ˜ 0.2 m m devices, the corresponding lateral potentials are approximately parabolic exceeding ˜ 25 meV near the perimeter. These potentials create discrete hole states in double-barrier structures (single well), and coupled hole states in triple-barrier structures (two wells). Our results are in excellent agreement with finite-element strain calculations in which the strained layers are permitted to relax to a state of minimum energy by sidewall expansion. Size-induced strain relaxation will undoubtedly become a serious technological issue once strained devices are scaled down to the deep submicron regime. Interestingly, our calculations predict and our measurements are consistent with the appearance of

  1. Influence of the resonance integral value on the fuel cycle characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziani, G; Trauwaert, E

    1972-04-24

    The problem that is considered here is to determine what can be done about a variation in resonance integral when the complete geometry of the reactor and of the fuel elements are fixed, leaving as only free parameters the amount of heavy metal and the enrichment to put in the fuel pins.

  2. Resonance integral calculations for isolated rods containing oxides of 238U and 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, V.C.; Marable, J.H.

    1980-02-01

    Results of resonance integral calculations for UO 2 and ThO 2 isolated rods are discussed. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-IV cross-section data and the multigroup transport code ANISN. The findings reported demonstrate by comparison with semiempirical relationships (based on experimentally derived results) the suitability of the method used for determining resonance integrals. The calculations were based on a cylindrical rod in an H 2 O moderator of large radius. Multigroup cross sections were obtained by a MINX-SPHINX-AMMPX sequence, and ANISN was used to account for the neutron flux and capture rates. A special approach was used to determine a neutron source distribution such that the flux in the moderator region was forced to behave in an asymptotic way; thus, the ideal resonance integral experiment could be calculated. The UO 2 resonance integrals calculated were in exceptionally good agreement with experimental values based on isolated rods. The ThO 2 results were approximately 6% lower than experimental values, and efforts to understand the discrepancy are discussed. 8 figures, 7 tables

  3. Magnetically integrated high step-up resonant DC-DC converter for distributed photovoltaic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinnikov, Dmitri; Chub, Andrii; Liivik, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    In this paper magnetically integrated resonant single-switch quasi-Z-source DC-DC converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for the low-cost photovoltaic microconverter. The derivation of the topology and its basic operation principle are explained. Generalized design guidelines...

  4. Monolithic integration of a resonant tunneling diode and a quantum well semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, I.; Kan, S. C.; Griffel, G.; Wu, S. W.; Sa'Ar, A.

    1991-01-01

    A monolithic integration of a double barrier AlAs/GaAs resonant tunneling diode and a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well laser is reported. Negative differential resistance and negative differential optical response are observed at room temperature. The device displays bistable electrical and optical characteristics which are voltage controlled. Operation as a two-state optical memory is demonstrated.

  5. Thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the 1994 handbook of chemistry and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1994-01-01

    A re-evaluation of all thermal neutron cross sections and neutron resonance integrals has been performed, utilizing the previous database of the ''Barn Book'' and all of the more recently published experiments. Only significant changes or previously undetermined values are recorded in this report. The source for each value is also recorded in the accompanying table

  6. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  7. Friction of polymer hydrogels studied by resonance shear measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Tanabe, Tadao; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Kurihara, Kazue

    2015-08-21

    The friction between an elastomer and a hard surface typically has two contributors, i.e., the interfacial and deformation components. The friction of viscoelastic hydrogel materials has been extensively studied between planar gel and planar substrate surfaces from the viewpoint of an interfacial interaction. However, the geometry of the contact in practical applications is much more complex. The contribution of geometric and elastic deformation terms of a gel to friction could not be neglected. In this study, we used resonance shear measurements (RSMs) for characterizing the shear response of a glass sphere on a flat polymer hydrogel, a double network (DN) gel of 2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and N,N-dimethylacrylamide. The contact mechanics conformed to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory. The observed resonance curves exhibited rather sharp peaks when the DN gel and the silica sphere were brought into contact, and their intensity and frequency increased with the increase in the normal load. We proposed a simple physical model of the shearing system, and the elastic (k2) and viscous (b2) parameters of the interface between a silica sphere and a flat DN gel were obtained. The friction force from elastic deformation and viscous dissipation terms was then estimated using the obtained parameters. It was revealed that the elastic parameter (k2) increased up to 1780 N m(-1) at a normal load of 524 mN, while the viscous parameter (b2) was zero or quite low (friction force between a flat DN gel and a silica sphere in air was dominated by the elastic term due to the local deformation by contact with the silica sphere. By adding water, the elastic parameter (k2) remained the same, while the viscous parameter (b2) slightly increased. However, the viscous term fviscous was still much smaller than felastic. To the best of our knowledge, this study was the first quantitative estimation of the contribution of the elastic deformation term to the friction in the case

  8. Evaluation of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals of protactinium, americium, curium, and berkelium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanova, T.S.

    1994-12-01

    Data on the thermal neutron fission and capture cross-sections as well as their corresponding resonance integrals are reviewed and analysed. The data are classified according to the form of neutron spectra under investigation. The weighted mean values of the cross-sections and resonance integrals for every type of neutron spectra were adopted as evaluated data. (author). 87 refs, 2 tabs

  9. Quality measurements of resonance cavities in behalf of investigation of microwave properties of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekkers, G.; Ridder, M. de.

    1988-01-01

    A method for investigating conducting properties at microwave frequencies of superconducting materials by means of quality measurements of a resonance cavity is described. The method is based on the direct relationship of the quality factor of a resonance circuit, in this case a resonance cavity, with the losses in the circuit. In a resonance cavity these losses are caused by the material properties of the resonance cavity. Therefore quality measurements yield, essentially, a possibility for investigation of conducting properties of materials. The underlying theory of the subject, the design of a special resonance cavity, the measuring methods and the accuracy in the relation of the measured quality factor and the specific conductivity of the material is presented. refs.; figs.; tabs

  10. Measurement of the profile and intensity of the solar He I lambda 584-A resonance line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, J. O.; Hartmann, U. G.; Judge, D. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity and profile of the helium resonance line at 584 A from the entire disk of the sun was investigated by using a rocket-borne helium-filled spectrometer and a curve-of-growth technique. The line profile was found to be accurately represented by a Gaussian profile with full width at half maximum of 122 + or - 10 mA, while the integrated intensity was measured to be 2.6 + or - 1.3 billion photons/s per sq cm at solar activity levels of F(10.7) = 90.8 x 10 to the -22nd per sq m/Hz and Rz = 27. The measured line width is in good agreement with previous spectrographic measurements, but the integrated intensity is larger than most previous photoelectric measurements. However, the derived line center flux of 20 + or - 10 billion photons/s per sq cm/A is in good agreement with values inferred from airglow measurements.

  11. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  12. Wireless passive polymer-derived SiCN ceramic sensor with integrated resonator/antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yu, Yuxi; San, Haisheng; Wang, Yansong; An, Linan

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic sensor based on cavity radio frequency resonator together with integrated slot antenna. The effect of the cavity sensor dimensions on the Q-factor and resonant frequency is investigated by numerical simulation. A sensor with optimal dimensions is designed and fabricated. It is demonstrated that the sensor signal can be wirelessly detected at distances up to 20 mm. Given the high-temperature stability of the SiCN, the sensor is very promising for high-temperature wireless sensing applications.

  13. Measurement of intrafractional prostate motion using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mah, Dennis; Freedman, Gary; Milestone, Bart; Hanlon, Alexandra; Palacio, Elizabeth; Richardson, Theresa; Movsas, Benjamin; Mitra, Raj; Horwitz, Eric; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the three-dimensional intrafractional prostate motion over typical treatment time intervals with cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine MRI) studies. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with prostate cancer were scanned supine in an alpha cradle cast using cine MRI. Twenty sequential slices were acquired in the sagittal and axial planes through the center of the prostate. Each scan took ∼9 min. The posterior, lateral, and superior edges of the prostate were tracked on each frame relative to the initial prostate position, and the size and duration of each displacement was recorded. Results: The prostate displacements were (mean ± SD): 0.2 ± 2.9 mm, 0.0 ± 3.4 mm, and 0.0 ± 1.5 mm in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and medial-lateral dimensions respectively. The prostate motion appeared to have been driven by peristalsis in the rectum. Large displacements of the prostate (up to 1.2 cm) moved the prostate both anteriorly and superiorly and in some cases compressed the organ. For such motions, the prostate did not stay displaced, but moved back to its original position. To account for the dosimetric consequences of the motion, we also calculated the time-averaged displacement to be ∼1 mm. Conclusions: Cine MRI can be used to measure intrafractional prostate motion. Although intrafractional prostate motions occur, their effects are negligible compared to interfractional motion and setup error. No adjustment in margin is necessary for three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

  14. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  −100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  −0.967 kHz hPa −1 , namely  −0.69 ppm hPa −1 , which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW. (paper)

  15. Integrated phononic crystal resonators based on adiabatically-terminated phononic crystal waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Dehghannasiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we demonstrate a new design for integrated phononic crystal (PnC resonators based on confining acoustic waves in a heterogeneous waveguide-based PnC structure. In this architecture, a PnC waveguide that supports a single mode at the desired resonance frequencies is terminated by two waveguide sections with no propagating mode at those frequencies (i.e., have mode gap. The proposed PnC resonators are designed through combining the spatial-domain and the spatial-frequency domain (i.e., the k-domain analysis to achieve a smooth mode envelope. This design approach can benefit both membrane-based and surface-acoustic-wave-based architectures by confining the mode spreading in k-domain that leads to improved electromechanical excitation/detection coupling and reduced loss through propagating bulk modes.

  16. Electroweak coupling measurements from polarized Bhabha scattering at the Z0 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, K.T.

    1994-03-01

    The cross section for Bhabha scattering (e + e - → e + e - ) with polarized electrons at the center of mass energy of the Z 0 resonance has been measured with the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center during the 1992 and 1993 runs. The electroweak couplings of the electron are extracted. At small angles the measurement is done in the SLD Silicon/Tungsten Luminosity Monitor (LMSAT). A detailed description of the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the LMSAT is provided. The integrated luminosity for 1992 is measured to be L = 420.86±2.56 (stat)±4.23 (sys) nb -1 . The luminosity asymmetry for polarized beams is measured to be A LR (LUM) = (1.7 ± 6.4) x 10 -3 . The large angle polarized Bhabha scattering reveals the effective electron vector and axial vector couplings to the Z 0 through the measurement of the Z 0 → e + e - partial width, Γ ee , and the parity violation parameter, A e . From the combined 1992 and 1993 data the effective electron vector and axial vector couplings are measured to be bar g v e = -0.0495±0.0096±0.0030, and bar g α e = -0.4977±0.0035±0.0064 respectively. The effective weak mixing angle is measured to be sin 2 θ W eff = 0.2251±0.0049±0.0015. These results are compared with other experiments

  17. Waste assay measurement integration system user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, K.C.; Hempstead, A.R.; Becker, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Assay Measurement Integration System (WAMIS) is being developed to improve confidence in and lower the uncertainty of waste characterization data. There are two major components to the WAMIS: a data access and visualization component and a data interpretation component. The intent of the access and visualization software is to provide simultaneous access to all data sources that describe the contents of any particular container of waste. The visualization software also allows the user to display data at any level from raw to reduced output. Depending on user type, the software displays a menuing hierarchy, related to level of access, that allows the user to observe only those data sources s/he has been authorized to view. Access levels include system administrator, physicist, QA representative, shift operations supervisor, and data entry. Data sources are displayed in separate windows and presently include (1) real-time radiography video, (2) gamma spectra, (3) passive and active neutron, (4) radionuclide mass estimates, (5) total alpha activity (Ci), (6) container attributes, (7) thermal power (w), and (8) mass ratio estimates for americium, plutonium, and uranium isotopes. The data interpretation component is in the early phases of design, but will include artificial intelligence, expert system, and neural network techniques. The system is being developed on a Pentium PC using Microsoft Visual C++. Future generations of WAMIS will be UNIX based and will incorporate more generically radiographic/tomographic, gamma spectroscopic/tomographics, neutron, and prompt gamma measurements

  18. Towards a fully integrated optical gyroscope using whispering gallery modes resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrane, T.; Jager, J.-B.; Jager, T.; Calvo, V.; Léger, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    Since the developments of lasers and the optical fibers in the 70s, the optical gyroscopes have been subject to an intensive research to improve both their resolution and stability performances. However the best optical gyroscopes currently on the market, the ring laser gyroscope and the interferometer fiber optic gyroscope are still macroscopic devices and cannot address specific applications where size and weight constraints are critical. One solution to overcome these limitations could be to use an integrated resonator as a sensitive part to build a fully Integrated Optical Resonant Gyroscope (IORG). To keep a high rotation sensitivity, which is usually degraded when downsizing this kind of optical sensors based on the Sagnac effect, the resonator has to exhibit a very high quality factor (Q): as detailed in equation (1) where the minimum rotation rate resolution for an IORG is given as a function of the resonator characteristics (Q and diameter D) and of the global system optical system characteristics (i.e. SNR and bandwidth B), the higher the Q×D product, the lower the resolution.

  19. Techniques and processes for the measurement of the resonances of small single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, A.; Stekel, A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Visscher, W.M.; Bell, T.; Lei, M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical resonances of small oriented single crystals of materials of interest to basic science and engineering can be used to determine all the elastic moduli and the ultrasonic attenuation of these materials. To measure the resonances of the samples without introducing the resonances of the measuring system requires that the transducers be non-resonant at the frequencies of interest, and that they be well isolated from their mounts. However, for samples near 1 mm in the largest dimension, the transducer design problem becomes sever, and the signals become weak. In addition, no resonances can be missed, and, often, the symmetry class of the resonances must be known. We outline here appropriate transducer, electronics, and system designs to circumvent these problems. 10 refs., 4 figs

  20. Electron beam asymmetry measurements from exclusive pi0 electroproduction in the Delta(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Joo

    2003-05-01

    The polarized longitudinal-transverse structure function sigma_LT'in the p(e,e'p)pi^0 reaction has been measured for the first time in the Delta(1232) resonance region for invariant mass W = 1.1 - 1.3 GeV and at four-momentum transfer Q^2 = 0.40 and 0.65 GeV^2. Data were taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using longitudinally polarized electrons at an energy of 1.515 GeV. This newly measured sigma_LT' provides new and unique information on the interference between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes in the Delta(1232) resonance region. The comparison to recent phenomenological calculations shows sensitivity to the description of non-resonant amplitudes and higher resonances.

  1. Ferromagnetic linewidth measurements employing electrodynamic model of the magnetic plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, Jerzy; Aleshkevych, Pavlo; Salski, Bartlomiej; Kopyt, Pawel

    2018-02-01

    The mode of uniform precession, or Kittel mode, in a magnetized ferromagnetic sphere, has recently been proven to be the magnetic plasmon resonance. In this paper we show how to apply the electrodynamic model of the magnetic plasmon resonance for accurate measurements of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth ΔH. Two measurement methods are presented. The first one employs Q-factor measurements of the magnetic plasmon resonance coupled to the resonance of an empty metallic cavity. Such coupled modes are known as magnon-polariton modes, i.e. hybridized modes between the collective spin excitation and the cavity excitation. The second one employs direct Q-factor measurements of the magnetic plasmon resonance in a filter setup with two orthogonal semi-loops used for coupling. Q-factor measurements are performed employing a vector network analyser. The methods presented in this paper allow one to extend the measurement range of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth ΔH well beyond the limits of the commonly used measurement standards in terms of the size of the samples and the lowest measurable linewidths. Samples that can be measured with the newly proposed methods may have larger size as compared to the size of samples that were used in the standard methods restricted by the limits of perturbation theory.

  2. Time-Lapse Measurement of Wellbore Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, A.

    2017-12-01

    Well integrity is becoming more important as wells are used longer or repurposed. For CO2, shale gas, and other projects it has become apparent that wells represent the most likely unintended migration pathway for fluids out of the reservoir. Comprehensive logging programs have been employed to determine the condition of legacy wells in North America. These studies provide examples of assessment technologies. Logging programs have included pulsed neutron logging, ultrasonic well mapping, and cement bond logging. While these studies provide examples of what can be measured, they have only conducted a single round of logging and cannot show if the well has changed over time. Recent experience with time-lapse logging of three monitoring wells at a US Department of Energy sponsored CO2 project has shown the full value of similar tools. Time-lapse logging has shown that well integrity changes over time can be identified. It has also shown that the inclusion of and location of monitoring technologies in the well and the choice of construction materials must be carefully considered. Two of the wells were approximately eight years old at the time of study; they were constructed with steel and fiberglass casing sections and had lines on the outside of the casing running to the surface. The third well was 68 years old when it was studied and was originally constructed as a production well. Repeat logs were collected six or eight years after initial logging. Time-lapse logging showed the evolution of the wells. The results identified locations where cement degraded over time and locations that showed little change. The ultrasonic well maps show clearly that the lines used to connect the monitoring technology to the surface are visible and have a local effect on cement isolation. Testing and sampling was conducted along with logging. It provided insight into changes identified in the time-lapse log results. Point permeability testing was used to provide an in-situ point

  3. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  4. A Series-Fed Linear Substrate-Integrated Dielectric Resonator Antenna Array for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Gong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series-fed linear substrate-integrated dielectric resonator antenna array (SIDRAA is presented for millimeter-wave applications, in which the substrate-integrated dielectric resonator antenna (SIDRA elements and the feeding structure can be codesigned and fabricated using the same planar process. A prototype 4 × 1 SIDRAA is designed at Ka-band and fabricated with a two-layer printed circuit board (PCB technology. Four SIDRAs are implemented in the Rogers RT6010 substrate using the perforation technique and fed by a compact substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW through four longitudinal coupling slots within the Rogers RT5880 substrate. The return loss, radiation patterns, and antenna gain were experimentally studied, and good agreement between the measured and simulated results is observed. The SIDRAA example provides a bandwidth of about 10% around 34.5 GHz for 10 dB return loss and stable broadside radiation patterns with the peak gain of 10.5–11.5 dBi across the band.

  5. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  6. Electrothermal piezoresistive cantilever resonators for personal measurements of nanoparticles in workplace exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Wu, Wenze; Uhde, Erik; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost and low-power piezoresistive cantilever resonators with integrated electrothermal heaters are developed to support the sensing module enhancement of the second generation of handheld cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle (NP) detector (CANTOR-2). These sensors are used for direct-reading of exposure to carbon engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) at indoor workplaces. The cantilever structures having various shapes of free ends are created using silicon bulk micromachining technologies (i.e, rectangular, hammer-head, triangular, and U-shaped cantilevers). For a complete wearable CANTOR-2, all components of the proposed detector can be grouped into two main units depending on their packaging placements (i.e., the NP sampler head and the electronics mounted in a handy-format housing). In the NP sampler head, a miniaturized electrophoretic aerosol sampler and a resonant silicon cantilever mass sensor are employed to collect the ENPs from the air stream to the cantilever surfaces and measuring their mass concentration, respectively. After calibration, the detected ENP mass concentrations of CANTOR-2 show a standard deviation from fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS, TSI 3091) of 8-14%.

  7. Single-frequency, fully integrated, miniature DPSS laser based on monolithic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, G.; Sotor, J.; Krzempek, K.; Soboń, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2014-02-01

    We present a single frequency, stable, narrow linewidth, miniature laser sources operating at 532 nm (or 1064 nm) based on a monolithic resonators. Such resonators utilize birefringent filters formed by YVO4 beam displacer and KTP or YVO4 crystals to force single frequency operation at 532 nm or 1064 nm, respectively. In both configurations Nd:YVO4 gain crystal is used. The resonators dimensions are 1x1x10.5 mm3 and 1x1x8.5 mm3 for green and infrared configurations, respectively. Presented laser devices, with total dimensions of 40x52x120 mm3, are fully equipped with driving electronics, pump diode, optical and mechanical components. The highly integrated (36x15x65 mm3) low noise driving electronics with implemented digital PID controller was designed. It provides pump current and resonator temperature stability of ±30 μA@650 mA and ±0,003ºC, respectively. The laser parameters can be set and monitored via the USB interface by external application. The developed laser construction is universal. Hence, the other wavelengths can be obtained only by replacing the monolithic resonator. The optical output powers in single frequency regime was at the level of 42 mW@532 nm and 0.5 W@1064 nm with the long-term fluctuations of ±0.85 %. The linewidth and the passive frequency stability under the free running conditions were Δν < 100 kHz and 3ṡ10-9@1 s integration time, respectively. The total electrical power supply consumption of laser module was only 4 W. Presented compact, single frequency laser operating at 532 nm and 1064 nm may be used as an excellent source for laser vibrometry, interferometry or seed laser for fiber amplifiers.

  8. Diagnostic measurements of CUEBIT based on the dielectronic resonance process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, E.; Kimmel, T. D.; Brandenburg, K. H.; Wilson, R. K.; Gall, A. C.; Harriss, J. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation of x-ray radiation from the new Clemson University Electron Beam Ion Trap (CUEBIT). The analysis of the emitted dielectronic recombination x-ray photons from highly charged argon ions allowed us to probe parameters specific to the ion cloud inside the machine. Argon dielectronic resonances could provide a standard method to cross-compare the electron beam and ion cloud characteristics of different devices

  9. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  10. Overtones of isoscalar giant resonances studied in direct particle decay measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; van den Berg, AM; Csatlos, M; Csige, L; Davids, B; Garg, U; Gulyas, J; Harakeh, MN; de Huu, MA; Krasznahorkay, A; Sohler, D; Wortche, HJ

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), which is the lowest-energy overtone mode of the isoscalar giant resonances, has been studied in some medium-heavy and heavy nuclei in coincidence measurements. The observation of the direct nucleon decay channels significantly helped to enhance giant

  11. Series elasticity of the human triceps surae muscle : Measurement by controlled-release vs. resonance methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    With a newly developed Controlled-Release Ergometer the complete characteristic of the series elastic component can be measured in human muscles. Previous estimates were based on the resonance method: muscle elasticity was assessed from the resonance frequency of the muscle elasticity connected to a

  12. Getting elections right? Measuring electoral integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Holding elections has become a global norm. Unfortunately, the integrity of elections varies strongly, ranging from “free and fair” elections with genuine contestation to “façade” elections marred by manipulation and fraud. Clearly, electoral integrity is a topic of increasing concern. Yet electoral

  13. Decomposition approaches to integration without a measure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greco, S.; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, F.; Sipeky, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 1 (2016), s. 37-47 ISSN 0165-0114 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Choquet integral * Decision making * Decomposition integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/mesiar-0457408.pdf

  14. Comparison among T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, modified dixon method, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in measuring bone marrow fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Gong, Xiuqun; Weiss, Jessica; Jin, Ye

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies are utilizing different magnetic resonance (MR) methods to quantify bone marrow fat due to its potential role in osteoporosis. Our aim is to compare the measurements of bone marrow fat among T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), modified Dixon method (also called fat fraction MRI (FFMRI)), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Contiguous MRI scans were acquired in 27 Caucasian postmenopausal women with a modified Dixon method (i.e., FFMRI). Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) of T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction of the L3 vertebra and femoral necks were quantified using SliceOmatic and Matlab. MRS was also acquired at the L3 vertebra. Correlation among the three MR methods measured bone marrow fat fraction and BMAT ranges from 0.78 to 0.88 (P BMAT measured by T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction measured by modified FFMRI is 0.86 (P < 0.001) in femoral necks. There are good correlations among T1-weighted MRI, FFMRI, and MRS for bone marrow fat quantification. The inhomogeneous distribution of bone marrow fat, the threshold segmentation of the T1-weighted MRI, and the ambiguity of the FFMRI may partially explain the difference among the three methods.

  15. Comparison among T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Modified Dixon Method, and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Measuring Bone Marrow Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An increasing number of studies are utilizing different magnetic resonance (MR methods to quantify bone marrow fat due to its potential role in osteoporosis. Our aim is to compare the measurements of bone marrow fat among T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, modified Dixon method (also called fat fraction MRI (FFMRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Methods. Contiguous MRI scans were acquired in 27 Caucasian postmenopausal women with a modified Dixon method (i.e., FFMRI. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT of T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction of the L3 vertebra and femoral necks were quantified using SliceOmatic and Matlab. MRS was also acquired at the L3 vertebra. Results. Correlation among the three MR methods measured bone marrow fat fraction and BMAT ranges from 0.78 to 0.88 in the L3 vertebra. Correlation between BMAT measured by T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction measured by modified FFMRI is 0.86 in femoral necks. Conclusion. There are good correlations among T1-weighted MRI, FFMRI, and MRS for bone marrow fat quantification. The inhomogeneous distribution of bone marrow fat, the threshold segmentation of the T1-weighted MRI, and the ambiguity of the FFMRI may partially explain the difference among the three methods.

  16. Simulation of electron spin resonance spectroscopy in diverse environments: An integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Barone, Vincenzo

    2009-12-01

    We discuss in this work a new software tool, named E-SpiReS (Electron Spin Resonance Simulations), aimed at the interpretation of dynamical properties of molecules in fluids from electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. The code implements an integrated computational approach (ICA) for the calculation of relevant molecular properties that are needed in order to obtain spectral lines. The protocol encompasses information from atomistic level (quantum mechanical) to coarse grained level (hydrodynamical), and evaluates ESR spectra for rigid or flexible single or multi-labeled paramagnetic molecules in isotropic and ordered phases, based on a numerical solution of a stochastic Liouville equation. E-SpiReS automatically interfaces all the computational methodologies scheduled in the ICA in a way completely transparent for the user, who controls the whole calculation flow via a graphical interface. Parallelized algorithms are employed in order to allow running on calculation clusters, and a web applet Java has been developed with which it is possible to work from any operating system, avoiding the problems of recompilation. E-SpiReS has been used in the study of a number of different systems and two relevant cases are reported to underline the promising applicability of the ICA to complex systems and the importance of similar software tools in handling a laborious protocol. Program summaryProgram title: E-SpiReS Catalogue identifier: AEEM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL v2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 311 761 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 039 531 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C (core programs) and Java (graphical interface) Computer: PC and Macintosh Operating system: Unix and Windows Has the code been vectorized or

  17. Integrability of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with Feshbach resonance management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dun; Luo Honggang; Chai Huayue

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter we study the integrability of a class of Gross-Pitaevskii equations managed by Feshbach resonance in an expulsive parabolic external potential. By using WTC test, we find a condition under which the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is completely integrable. Under the present model, this integrability condition is completely consistent with that proposed by Serkin, Hasegawa, and Belyaeva [V.N. Serkin, A. Hasegawa, T.L. Belyaeva, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 074102]. Furthermore, this integrability can also be explicitly shown by a transformation, which can convert the Gross-Pitaevskii equation into the well-known standard nonlinear Schroedinger equation. By this transformation, each exact solution of the standard nonlinear Schroedinger equation can be converted into that of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which builds a systematical connection between the canonical solitons and the so-called nonautonomous ones. The finding of this transformation has a significant contribution to understanding the essential properties of the nonautonomous solitons and the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensates by using the Feshbach resonance technique

  18. Measurement of the resonance escape probability; Mesure de l'absorption resonnante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, J P; Bacher, P; Lheureux, L; Moreau, J; Schmitt, A P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    The average cadmium ratio in natural uranium rods has been measured, using equal diameter natural uranium disks. These values correlated with independent measurements of the lattice buckling, enabled us to calculate values of the resonance escape probability for the G1 reactor with one or the other of two definitions. Measurements were performed on 26 mm and 32 mm rods, giving the following values for the resonance escape probability p: 0.8976 {+-} 0.005 and 0.912 {+-} 0.006 (d. 26 mm), 0.8627 {+-} 0.009 and 0.884 {+-} 0.01 (d. 32 mm). The influence of either definition on the lattice parameters is discussed, leading to values of the effective integral. Similar experiments have been performed with thorium rods. (author) [French] Nous avons mesure le rapport cadmium moyen dans des barres d'uranium a l'aide de disques d'uranium naturel de meme diametre que ces dernieres. Ces mesures nous ont permis, conjointement avec des mesures de Laplacien du reseau, de determiner deux facteurs antitrappes du reacteur G1 correspondant a deux definitions exposees. Les mesures ont ete faites sur deux diametres de barres 26 et 32 mm. Resultats: 0.8976 {+-} 0.005 and 0.912 {+-} 0.006 (d. 26 mm), 0.8627 {+-} 0.009 and 0.884 {+-} 0.01 (d. 32 mm). L'influence de ces deux definitions sur les divers parametres du reseau, est discutee. La determination de 'p' pour un diametre de barres d'uranium de 26 mm, et les mesures de variation de Laplacien, nous ont permis de calculer une valeur de l'integrale effective correspondant a chaque definition. Les mesures analogues faites sur des barres de thorium sont egalement indiquees. (auteur)

  19. Integration of Resonant Coil for Wireless Power Transfer and Implantable Antenna for Signal Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wook Seo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the integration of the resonant coil for wireless power transfer (WPT and the implantable antenna for physiological signal transfer. The integration allows for a compact biomedical implantable system such as electrocardiogram (ECG recorder and pacemaker. While the resonant coils resonate at the frequency of 13.56 MHz for the WPT, the implantable antenna works in the medical implant communications service (MICS band of 402–405 MHz for wireless communications. They share the narrow substrate area of a bar-type shape; the coil has the current path on the outer part of the substrate and the meandered planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA occupies the inside of the coil. To verify the potentials of the proposed structure, a prototype is fabricated and tested in vitro. The power transfer efficiency (PTE of about 20% is obtained at a distance of 15 mm and the antenna gain of roughly −40 dBi is achieved.

  20. Driving a mechanical resonator into coherent states via random measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ll; Wu, L-A; Chhajlany, R W; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    We propose dynamical schemes to engineer coherent states of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled to an ancillary, superconducting flux qubit. The flux qubit, when repeatedly projected on to its ground state, drives the MR into a coherent state in probabilistic, albeit heralded fashion. Assuming no operations on the state of the MR during the protocol, coherent states are successfully generated only up to a certain value of the displacement parameter. This restriction can be overcome at the cost of a one-time operation on the initial state of the MR. We discuss the possibility of experimental realization of the presented schemes. (paper)

  1. Integrated nanohole array surface plasmon resonance sensing device using a dual-wavelength source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo, C; Vincent, S; Choudhury, A I K; Campbell, J; Gordon, R; Brolo, A G; Sinton, D

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a compact integrated nanohole array-based surface plasmon resonance sensing device. The unit includes a LED light source, driving circuitry, CCD detector, microfluidic network and computer interface, all assembled from readily available commercial components. A dual-wavelength LED scheme was implemented to increase spectral diversity and isolate intensity variations to be expected in the field. The prototype shows bulk sensitivity of 266 pixel intensity units/RIU and a limit of detection of 6 × 10 −4 RIU. Surface binding tests were performed, demonstrating functionality as a surface-based sensing system. This work is particularly relevant for low-cost point-of-care applications, especially those involving multiple tests and field studies. While nanohole arrays have been applied to many sensing applications, and their suitability to device integration is well established, this is the first demonstration of a fully integrated nanohole array-based sensing device.

  2. MEASURING INFORMATION INTEGR-ATION MODEL FOR CAD/CMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A CAD/CMM workpiece modeling system based on IGES file is proposed. The modeling system is implemented by using a new method for labelling the tolerance items of 3D workpiece. The concept-"feature face" is used in the method. First the CAD data of workpiece are extracted and recognized automatically. Then a workpiece model is generated, which is the integration of pure 3D geometry form with its corresponding inspection items. The principle of workpiece modeling is also presented. At last, the experiment results are shown and correctness of the model is certified.

  3. Resonant frequencies and Q factors of dielectric parallelepipeds by measurement and by FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueman, C.W. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Mishra, S.R.; Larose, C.L. [David Florida Lab., Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the measurement and computation of the resonant frequencies and the associated Q factors of dielectric parallelepipeds made of high-permittivity, low-loss ceramic materials. Each resonance peak is measured separately with a fine frequency step. A curve-fitting method is used to accurately estimate the resonant frequency and 3 dB bandwidth from the somewhat noisy measured data. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to compute the initial portion of the backscattered field due to a Gaussian pulse plane wave. The time response is then extended to zero value by Prony`s method. The measured and computed data is compared for a parallelepiped resonator of permittivity 37.84.

  4. New design of a triplexer using ring resonator integrated with directional coupler based on photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaw-Dong; Shih, Tien-Tsorng; Lee, Jian-Jang

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we proposed the design of directional coupler integrated with ring resonator based on two-dimensional photonic crystals (2D PCs) to develop a triplexer filter. It can be widely used as the fiber access network element for multiplexer-demultiplexer wavelength selective in fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) communication systems. The directional coupler is chosen to separate the wavelengths of 1490nm and 1310nm. The ring resonator separates the wavelength of 1550nm. The transmission efficiency is larger than 90%. Besides, the total size of propose triplexer is only 19μm×12μm. We present simulation results using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the proposed structure.

  5. Neutron Transmission and Capture Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Neodymium from 1eV to 500 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DP Barry; MJ Trbovich; Y Danon; RC Block; RE Slovacek

    2005-01-01

    Neodymium is a 235 U fission product and is important for reactor neutronic calculations. The aim of the present work is to improve upon the existing neutron cross section data of neodymium. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-off-light technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute LINAC laboratory using metallic neodymium samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a 16-segment NaI multiplicity detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15-m and 25-m flight stations, respectively, with 6 Li glass scintillation detectors. After the data were collected and reduced, resonance parameters were determined by combined fitting of the transmission and capture data with the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The resonance parameters for all naturally occurring neodymium isotopes were deduced within the energy range of 1 eV to 500 eV. The resulting resonance parameters were used to calculate the capture resonance integrals from this energy. The RPI parameters gave a resonance integral value of 32 ± 1 barns that is approximately 7% lower than that obtained with the ENDF-B/VI parameters. The current measurements significantly reduce the uncertainties on the resonance parameters when compared with previously published parameters

  6. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small bar magnets. NMR spectroscopy .... that the integrated area for the methylene .... in a network of spins. .... Schematic representation of the type of short (broken arrows) and medium-range .... we can define between cities and towns in the.

  7. Using Micromechanical Resonators to Measure Rheological Properties and Alcohol Content of Model Solutions and Commercial Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. Hoogenboom

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  8. Measurements of the anomalous RF surface resistance of niobium using a dielectric resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, D.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Jacques, E.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The surface resistance of high and low residual resistance ratio (RRR) niobium plates at 4.2 K and 1.8 K has been measured as a function of many processing and testing parameters. A dielectric resonator was used instead of a resonant cavity. This resonator offered the ability to make many, sensitive measurements with an efficient use of time and helium. It was found that the surface resistance, R s , of RRR = 190 niobium increased noticeably from the theoretical value if the cooling rate was slower than ∼ 10 K/min. (author)

  9. Invited Article: Electrically tunable silicon-based on-chip microdisk resonator for integrated microwave photonic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics with advantages of small footprint, compatibility with the mature CMOS fabrication technology, and its potential for seamless integration with electronics is making a significant difference in realizing on-chip integration of photonic systems. A microdisk resonator (MDR with a strong capacity in trapping and storing photons is a versatile element in photonic integrated circuits. Thanks to the large index contrast, a silicon-based MDR with an ultra-compact footprint has a great potential for large-scale and high-density integrations. However, the existence of multiple whispering gallery modes (WGMs and resonance splitting in an MDR imposes inherent limitations on its widespread applications. In addition, the waveguide structure of an MDR is incompatible with that of a lateral PN junction, which leads to the deprivation of its electrical tunability. To circumvent these limitations, in this paper we propose a novel design of a silicon-based MDR by introducing a specifically designed slab waveguide to surround the disk and the lateral sides of the bus waveguide to suppress higher-order WGMs and to support the incorporation of a lateral PN junction for electrical tunability. An MDR based on the proposed design is fabricated and its optical performance is evaluated. The fabricated MDR exhibits single-mode operation with a free spectral range of 28.85 nm. Its electrical tunability is also demonstrated and an electro-optic frequency response with a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of ∼30.5 GHz is measured. The use of the fabricated MDR for the implementation of an electrically tunable optical delay-line and a tunable fractional-order temporal photonic differentiator is demonstrated.

  10. Hybrid integrated sensor for position measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, B.; Schott, H.; Just, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of an integrated two-dimensional position sensitive photodetector are presented. The optoelectronic device used as sensitive element in the circuit is a full area position sensitive photodiode (PPD) with high linearity over the full sensitive area. The PPD is integrated with the analog electronics in a hybrid circuit using thick film technology. The analog electronics includes the signal amplification and the signal conditioning to form the output signals proportional to the light beam center position at the sensor surface and an output signal proportional to the light beam intensity. Using hybrid integration a new position sensitive transducer is developed giving output signals, transmiting in large distances without problems and driving directly actuators in any control system

  11. Improved measurements of elastic properties at acoustic resonant frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Ritchie, I.G.; Shillinglaw, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    The choice of specimens of rectangular cross section for determination of dynamic elastic moduli by the resonant bar technique is often dictated by specimen fabrication problems. The specimen of rectangular cross section lends itself to accurate determination of elastic vibration shapes by a method in which a simple noncontacting optical transducer is used. The unequivocal indexing of the various vibration modes obtained in this way more than compensates for the added computational difficulties associated with rectangular geometry. The approximations used in the calculations of Young's modulus and the shear modulus for bars of rectangular cross section are tested experimentally and it is shown that high precision can be obtained. Determinations of changes in dynamic elastic moduli with temperature or stress are also described. (author)

  12. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    stroke volume was calculated as the difference between end-diastolic and end-systolic volume and compared to left ventricular stroke volume and to stroke volume determined simultaneously by a classical indicator dilution technique. There was good agreement between right ventricular stroke volume......Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...... determined by MRI and by the indicator dilution method and between right and left ventricular stroke volume determined by MRI. Thus, MRI gives reliable values not only for left ventricular volumes, but also for right ventricular volumes. By MRI it is possible to obtain volumes from both ventricles...

  13. Electroweak coupling measurements from polarized Bhabha scattering at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, K.T.

    1994-03-01

    The cross section for Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) with polarized electrons at the center of mass energy of the Z{sup 0} resonance has been measured with the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center during the 1992 and 1993 runs. The electroweak couplings of the electron are extracted. At small angles the measurement is done in the SLD Silicon/Tungsten Luminosity Monitor (LMSAT). A detailed description of the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the LMSAT is provided. The integrated luminosity for 1992 is measured to be L = 420.86{plus_minus}2.56 (stat){plus_minus}4.23 (sys) nb{sup {minus}1}. The luminosity asymmetry for polarized beams is measured to be A{sub LR}(LUM) = (1.7 {plus_minus} 6.4) {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. The large angle polarized Bhabha scattering reveals the effective electron vector and axial vector couplings to the Z{sup 0} through the measurement of the Z{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} partial width, {Gamma}{sub ee}, and the parity violation parameter, A{sub e}. From the combined 1992 and 1993 data the effective electron vector and axial vector couplings are measured to be {bar g}{sub v}{sup e} = {minus}0.0495{plus_minus}0.0096{plus_minus}0.0030, and {bar g}{sub {alpha}}{sup e} = {minus}0.4977{plus_minus}0.0035{plus_minus}0.0064 respectively. The effective weak mixing angle is measured to be sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2251{plus_minus}0.0049{plus_minus}0.0015. These results are compared with other experiments.

  14. Measuring Restriction Sizes Using Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews a new concept in magnetic resonance as applied to cellular and biological systems. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be used to infer information about restriction sizes of samples being measured. The measurements rely on the apparent diffusion coefficient changing with diffusion times as measurements move from restricted to free diffusion regimes. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE measurements are limited in the ability to shorten diffusion times and thus are limited in restriction sizes which can be probed. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE measurements could provide shorter diffusion times so smaller restriction sizes could be probed.

  15. The feasibility study of Dragon Ⅰ using for temperature measurement of resonance neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yanjun; Ma Jingfang; Ai Jie; Fan Ruifeng

    2010-01-01

    The temperature measurement using neutron resonance spectrum can be used for temperature measurement of shock wave, but the high intensity pulsed neutron source is needed. This paper calculates the neutron transmission spectrum through resonance sample (contained 182 W), which produced by the current electron beam of Dragon Ⅰ impacting uranium target. The 4.155 eV and 21.06 eV resonance drop of 182 W can be seen from the transmission spectrum. Then, according to the experiment condition of Los Alamos, the neutron resonance spectrum of Dragon Ⅰ have been computed. Dragon Ⅰ can be used for temperature measurement using neutron spectrum, comparing this simulated result and the experiment result of Los Alamos. (authors)

  16. The Tracking Resonance Frequency Method for Photoacoustic Measurements Based on the Phase Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    One of the major issues in the use of the resonant photoacoustic cell is the resonance frequency of the cell. The frequency is not stable, and its changes depend mostly on temperature and gas mixture. This paper presents a new method for tracking resonance frequency, where both the amplitude and phase are calculated from the input samples. The stimulating frequency can be adjusted to the resonance frequency of the cell based on the phase. This method was implemented using a digital measurement system with an analog to digital converter, field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a microcontroller. The resonance frequency was changed by the injection of carbon dioxide into the cell. A theoretical description and experimental results are also presented.

  17. Conformally integrated stent cell resonators for wireless monitoring of peripheral artery disease

    KAUST Repository

    Viswanath, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and in vitro evaluation of magnetoelastic sensors intended for wireless monitoring of tissue accumulation in peripheral artery stents. The sensors, shaped like stent cells, are fabricated from 28-μm thick foils of magnetoelastic Ni-Fe alloy and are conformally integrated with the stent. The typical sensitivity to viscosity is 427 ppm/cP over a 1.1-8.6 cP range. The sensitivity to mass loading is typically 63,000-65000 ppm/mg with resonant frequency showing an 8.1% reduction for an applied mass that is 15% of the unloaded mass of the sensor. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  19. Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Refresher Course in. Experimental Physics. Refresher Course on. Advanced in Biophysics. IISc Young Science. Fellowship Programme. Inside Back Cover. Flowering Trees. (Credit: K Sankara Rao,IISc,. Bangalore). 97. 83. Classics. REFLECTIONS. 71 Integrative Microbiology – The Third Golden Age. Moselio Schaechter.

  20. Image-based overlay measurement using subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, M. S.; van der Lans, M. J.; Sadeghian, H.

    2018-03-01

    Image Based Overlay (IBO) measurement is one of the most common techniques used in Integrated Circuit (IC) manufacturing to extract the overlay error values. The overlay error is measured using dedicated overlay targets which are optimized to increase the accuracy and the resolution, but these features are much larger than the IC feature size. IBO measurements are realized on the dedicated targets instead of product features, because the current overlay metrology solutions, mainly based on optics, cannot provide sufficient resolution on product features. However, considering the fact that the overlay error tolerance is approaching 2 nm, the overlay error measurement on product features becomes a need for the industry. For sub-nanometer resolution metrology, Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is widely used, though at the cost of very low throughput. The semiconductor industry is interested in non-destructive imaging of buried structures under one or more layers for the application of overlay and wafer alignment, specifically through optically opaque media. Recently an SPM technique has been developed for imaging subsurface features which can be potentially considered as a solution for overlay metrology. In this paper we present the use of Subsurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy (SSURFM) used for IBO measurement. We used SSURFM for imaging the most commonly used overlay targets on a silicon substrate and photoresist. As a proof of concept we have imaged surface and subsurface structures simultaneously. The surface and subsurface features of the overlay targets are fabricated with programmed overlay errors of +/-40 nm, +/-20 nm, and 0 nm. The top layer thickness changes between 30 nm and 80 nm. Using SSURFM the surface and subsurface features were successfully imaged and the overlay errors were extracted, via a rudimentary image processing algorithm. The measurement results are in agreement with the nominal values of the programmed overlay errors.

  1. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). This analyzer indicates an increase in ion temperature from ∼20 eV before ICRH to ∼150 eV during ICRH, with ∼60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial integral of n i T i as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma potential is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat, as the plasma conditions varied over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U

  2. Path integral measure for first-order and metric gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aros, Rodrigo; Contreras, Mauricio; Zanelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    The equivalence between the path integrals for first-order gravity and the standard torsion-free, metric gravity in 3 + 1 dimensions is analysed. Starting with the path integral for first-order gravity, the correct measure for the path integral of the metric theory is obtained

  3. Chip-integrated optical power limiter based on an all-passive micro-ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Siqi; Dong, Jianji; Zheng, Aoling; Zhang, Xinliang

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in silicon nanophotonics has dramatically advanced the possible realization of large-scale on-chip optical interconnects integration. Adopting photons as information carriers can break the performance bottleneck of electronic integrated circuit such as serious thermal losses and poor process rates. However, in integrated photonics circuits, few reported work can impose an upper limit of optical power therefore prevent the optical device from harm caused by high power. In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a feasible integrated scheme based on a single all-passive micro-ring resonator to realize the optical power limitation which has a similar function of current limiting circuit in electronics. Besides, we analyze the performance of optical power limiter at various signal bit rates. The results show that the proposed device can limit the signal power effectively at a bit rate up to 20 Gbit/s without deteriorating the signal. Meanwhile, this ultra-compact silicon device can be completely compatible with the electronic technology (typically complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology), which may pave the way of very large scale integrated photonic circuits for all-optical information processors and artificial intelligence systems.

  4. The Use of Helmholtz Resonance for Measuring the Volume of Liquids and Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive E. Davies

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was undertaken to ascertain the potential of using Helmholtz resonance for volume determination and the factors that may influence accuracy. The uses for a rapid non-interference volume measurement system range from agricultural produce and mineral sampling through to liquid fill measurements. By weighing the sample the density can also measured indirectly.

  5. 1 million-Q optomechanical microdisk resonators for sensing with very large scale integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermouet, M.; Sansa, M.; Banniard, L.; Fafin, A.; Gely, M.; Allain, P. E.; Santos, E. Gil; Favero, I.; Alava, T.; Jourdan, G.; Hentz, S.

    2018-02-01

    Cavity optomechanics have become a promising route towards the development of ultrasensitive sensors for a wide range of applications including mass, chemical and biological sensing. In this study, we demonstrate the potential of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) with state-of-the-art low-loss performance silicon optomechanical microdisks for sensing applications. We report microdisks exhibiting optical Whispering Gallery Modes (WGM) with 1 million quality factors, yielding high displacement sensitivity and strong coupling between optical WGMs and in-plane mechanical Radial Breathing Modes (RBM). Such high-Q microdisks with mechanical resonance frequencies in the 102 MHz range were fabricated on 200 mm wafers with Variable Shape Electron Beam lithography. Benefiting from ultrasensitive readout, their Brownian motion could be resolved with good Signal-to-Noise ratio at ambient pressure, as well as in liquid, despite high frequency operation and large fluidic damping: the mechanical quality factor reduced from few 103 in air to 10's in liquid, and the mechanical resonance frequency shifted down by a few percent. Proceeding one step further, we performed an all-optical operation of the resonators in air using a pump-probe scheme. Our results show our VLSI process is a viable approach for the next generation of sensors operating in vacuum, gas or liquid phase.

  6. Resonant passive–active vibration absorber with integrated force feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Brodersen, Mark L; Krenk, Steen

    2016-01-01

    A general format of a two-terminal vibration absorber is constructed by placing a passive unit in series with a hybrid unit, composed of an active actuator in parallel with a second passive element. The displacement of the active actuator is controlled by an integrated feedback control with the difference in force between the two passive elements as input. This format allows passive and active contributions to be combined arbitrarily within the hybrid unit, which results in a versatile absorber format with guaranteed closed-loop stability. This is demonstrated for resonant absorbers with inertia realized passively by a mechanical inerter or actively by the integrated force feedback. Accurate calibration formulae are presented for two particular absorber configurations and the performance is subsequently demonstrated with respect to both equal modal damping and effective response reduction. (technical note)

  7. Photonic crystal ring resonator based optical filters for photonic integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a two Dimensional (2D) Photonic Crystal Ring Resonator (PCRR) based optical Filters namely Add Drop Filter, Bandpass Filter, and Bandstop Filter are designed for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). The normalized output response of the filters is obtained using 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and the band diagram of periodic and non-periodic structure is attained by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The size of the device is minimized from a scale of few tens of millimeters to the order of micrometers. The overall size of the filters is around 11.4 μm × 11.4 μm which is highly suitable of photonic integrated circuits

  8. A Determination of the 2200 m/s Absorption Cross Section and Resonance Integral of Arsenic by Pile Oscillator Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, E K; Bladh, R

    1969-02-15

    Pile oscillator measurements of heavy-water solutions of As, B, Mn and In have been carried out in two different neutron spectra in the R0 reactor. For B, Mn and In the 2200 m/s cross section values recommended in BNL-325 are given to within 1.5 % or less, while for As the stated uncertainty is 5 %. In the present work the BNL values for B, Mn and In were used to derive weighted mean calibration constants for the reactor, which were then in turn used for obtaining self-consistent cross section values for all four elements. The values thus obtained for B, Mn and In were within experimental error of the recommended BNL values. The absorption cross section for As is in good agreement with a recently published value for the activation cross section. The value for the resonance integral of As, derived from the present measurements, is in better agreement with calculations from resonance parameters than values reported earlier.

  9. A Determination of the 2200 m/s Absorption Cross Section and Resonance Integral of Arsenic by Pile Oscillator Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, E.K.; Bladh, R.

    1969-02-01

    Pile oscillator measurements of heavy-water solutions of As, B, Mn and In have been carried out in two different neutron spectra in the R0 reactor. For B, Mn and In the 2200 m/s cross section values recommended in BNL-325 are given to within 1.5 % or less, while for As the stated uncertainty is 5 %. In the present work the BNL values for B, Mn and In were used to derive weighted mean calibration constants for the reactor, which were then in turn used for obtaining self-consistent cross section values for all four elements. The values thus obtained for B, Mn and In were within experimental error of the recommended BNL values. The absorption cross section for As is in good agreement with a recently published value for the activation cross section. The value for the resonance integral of As, derived from the present measurements, is in better agreement with calculations from resonance parameters than values reported earlier

  10. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated

  11. On-resonance deformation effect measurements: A probe of order within chaos in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.D.; Gould, C.R.; Gould, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    The statistics of on-resonance measurements of the deformation effect cross section σ 02 in unpolarized neutron transmission through an aligned 165 Ho target is discussed. Under the standard Porter-Thomas assumption about reduced partial width amplitudes, the sign of σ 02 is random at s-wave resonances with d-wave admixtures. Motivated by the observation of sign correlations in epithermal parity-violation studies, conditions under which a doorway state will give rise to σ 02 close-quote s of nonrandom sign are identified. Oblate shape isomers lying at excitation energies in the isolated resonance regime could meet these conditions. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  12. Inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry for the measurement of a resonator's state using a qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Sergey; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2013-03-01

    We consider theoretically a superconducting qubit - nanomechanical resonator system, which was realized recently by LaHaye et al. [Nature 459, 960 (2009)]. We formulate and solve the inverse Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg problem, where we assume the driven qubit's state to be known (i.e. measured by some other device) and aim to find the parameters of the qubit's Hamiltonian. In particular, for our system the qubit's bias is defined by the nanomechanical resonator's displacement. This may provide a tool for monitoring the nanomechanical resonator 's position. [S. N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. B 85, 094502 (2012).

  13. Towards measuring the off-resonant thermal noise of a pendulum mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Leonhardt, V; Kloevekorn, P; Willke, B; Lück, H B; Danzmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal noise is one of the dominant noise sources in interferometric length measurements and can limit the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors. Our goal is to analyse the off-resonant thermal noise of a high Q pendulum. Therefore we interferometrically detect the length changes of a 2.3 cm long optical resonator, which for good seismic isolation consists of two multiple stage pendulums. We are able to lock the length of this optical resonator to a frequency-stabilized laser beam and as a result get the spectral density of the differential mirror movement.

  14. Study of 234U(n,f) Resonances Measured at the CERN n_TOF Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Cidoncha, E; Paradela, C; Tarrío, D; Leong, L S; Audouin, L; Tassan-Got, L; Praena, J; Berthier, B; Ferrant, L; Isaev, S; Le Naour, C; Stephan, C; Trubert, D; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Bečvář, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S.; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krtička, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of the resolved resonance region for the U-234(n,f) cross section data measured at the CERN n\\_TOF facility. The resonance parameters in the energy range from 1 eV to 1500 eV have been obtained with the SAMMY code by using as initial parameters for the fit the resonance parameters of the JENDL-3.3 evaluation. In addition, the statistical analysis has been accomplished, partly with the SAMDIST code, in order to study the level spacing and the Mehta-Dyson correlation.

  15. Printed circuit board permittivity measurement using waveguide and resonator rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Land, Sjoerd; Tereshchenko, O.V.; Ramdani, Mohamed; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Perdriau, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the frequency dependent complex permittivity of Printed Circuit Board (PCB) substrates is important in modern electronics. In this paper, two methods for measuring the permittivity are applied to the same Flame Resistant (FR4) substrate and the results are compared. The reference measurement

  16. Grid Based Integration Technologies of Virtual Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D P; He, L S; Yang, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel integrated architecture of measurement system for the new requirements of measurement collaboration, measurement resource interconnection and transparent access etc in the wide-area and across organization in the context of a grid. The complexity of integration on a grid arises from the scale, dynamism, autonomy, and distribution of the measurement resources. The main argument of this paper is that these complexities should be made transparent to the collaborative measurement, via flexible reconfigurable mechanisms and dynamic virtualization services. The paper is started by discussing the integration-oriented measurement architecture which provides collaborative measurement services to distributed measurement resources and then the measurement mechanisms are discussed which implements the transparent access and collaboration of measurement resources by providing protocols, measurement schedule and global data driven model

  17. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Malvar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators.

  18. Micro-resonators based on integrated polymer technology for optical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Pauline; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Guendouz, Mohammed; Lorrain, Nathalie; Poffo, Luiz; Gadonna, Michel; Bosc, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Research on sensors has experienced a noticeable development over the last decades especially in label free optical biosensors. However, compact sensors without markers for rapid, reliable and inexpensive detection of various substances induce a significant research of new technological solutions. The context of this work is the development of a sensor based on easily integrated and inexpensive micro-resonator (MR) component in integrated optics, highly sensitive and selective mainly in the areas of health and food. In this work, we take advantage of our previous studies on filters based on micro-resonators (MR) to experiment a new couple of polymers in the objective to use MR as a sensing function. MRs have been fabricated by processing SU8 polymer as core and PMATRIFE polymer as cladding layer of the waveguide. The refractive index contrast reaches 0.16 @ 1550 nm. Sub-micronic ring waveguides gaps from 0.5 to 1 μm have been successfully achieved with UV (i-line) photolithography. This work confirms our forecasts, published earlier, about the resolution that can be achieved. First results show a good extinction coefficient of ~17 dB, a quality factor around 104 and a finesse of 12. These results are in concordance with the theoretical study and they allow us to validate our technology with this couple of polymers. Work is going on with others lower cladding materials that will be used to further increase refractive index contrast for sensing applications.

  19. Coherent versus incoherent resonant emission: an experimental method for easy discrimination and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccherini, S.; Colocci, M.; Gurioli, M.; Bogani, F.

    1998-11-01

    The distinction between the coherent and the incoherent component of the radiation emitted from resonantly excited material systems is difficult experimentally, particularly when ultra-short optical pulses are used for excitation. We propose an experimental procedure allowing an easy measurement of the two components. The method is completely general and applicable to any kind of physical system; its feasibility is demonstrated on the resonant emission from excitons in a semiconductor quantum well.

  20. Financial integration in the European Union. Measurement and determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, J.J.G.

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this study addresses the measurement of financial integration in the European Union (EU). First, we present empirical evidence on the degree of financial integration as measured with interest parity conditions. Second, the study applies an error-correction model of

  1. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenmin Chen; Xiang Wu; Liying Liu; Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs). To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE) in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the...

  2. Measurement of gastric emptying by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Akira; Kiyota, Keisuke; Takazakura, Ryutaro; Inokuchi, Hideto [Osaka Saiseikai Noe Hospital (Japan); Murata, Kiyoshi; Morita, Rikushi

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish a new method of measuring gastric emptying using MR imaging in human. Gastric emptying was measured in 6 healthy male volunteers aged from 28 to 43 years, using MR imaging and RI. The measurements were performed after the oral administration of liquid meal containing glucose, protein and fat. The MR imaging was performed with 0.5T superconducting magnet machine, and consecutive 12 transaxial T1 weighted spin echo images (TR/TE=300/17) of the upper abdomen were recorded every 10 minutes for more than 1 hour. Gastric emptying curves and their T1/2 values obtained by MR imaging and RI method were correlated well in 5 of 6 cases. We concluded that a non-invasive and radiation free method using MR imaging was proved to be a useful tool for measuring gastric emptying. (author).

  3. Spin measurements for 147Sm+n resonances: Further evidence for nonstatistical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the spins J of resonances in the 147 Sm(n,γ) reaction by measuring multiplicities of γ-ray cascades following neutron capture. Using this technique, we were able to determine J values for all but 14 of the 141 known resonances below E n =1 keV, including 41 firm J assignments for resonances whose spins previously were either unknown or tentative. These new spin assignments, together with previously determined resonance parameters, allowed us to extract level spacings (D 0,3 =11.76±0.93 and D 0,4 =11.21±0.85 eV) and neutron strength functions (10 4 S 0,3 =4.70±0.91 and 10 4 S 0,4 =4.93±0.92) for J=3 and 4 resonances, respectively. Furthermore, cumulative numbers of resonances and cumulative reduced neutron widths as functions of resonance energy indicate that very few resonances of either spin have been missed below E n =700 eV. This conclusion is strengthened by the facts that, over this energy range, Wigner distributions calculated using these D 0 values agree with the measured nearest-neighbor level spacings to within the experimental uncertainties, and that the Δ 3 values calculated from the data also agree with the expected values. Because a nonstatistical effect recently was reported near E n =350 eV from an analysis of 147 Sm(n,α) data, we divided the data into two regions; 0 n n n 0 distribution for resonances below 350 eV is consistent with the expected Porter-Thomas distribution. However, we found that Γ n 0 data in the 350 n 2 distribution having ν≥2 We discuss possible explanations for these observed nonstatistical effects and their possible relation to similar effects previously observed in other nuclides

  4. Design and first measurements of an alternative calorimetry chamber for the HZB quadrupole resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Keckert, Sebastian; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The systematic research on superconducting thin films requires dedicated testing equipment. The Quadrupole Resonator (QPR) is a specialized tool to characterize the superconducting RF properties of circular planar samples. A calorimetric measurement of the RF surface losses allows the surface resistance to be measured with sub nano-ohm resolution. This measurement can be performed over a wide temperature and magnetic field range, at frequencies of 433, 866 and 1300 MHz. The system at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) is based on a resonator built at CERN and has been optimized to lower peak electric fields and an improved resolution. In this paper the design of an alternative calorimetry chamber is presented, providing flat samples for coating which are easy changeable. All parts are connected by screwing connections and no electron beam welding is required. Furthermore this design enables exchangeability of samples between the resonators at HZB and CERN. First measurements with the new design show ambiguous r...

  5. DINS measurements on VESUVIO in the Resonance Detector configuration: proton mean kinetic energy in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Andreani, Carla; Filabozzi, Alessandra; Senesi, Roberto; Gorini, Giuseppe; Perelli-Cippo, Enrico; Tardocchi, Marco; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.

    2006-04-01

    Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) measurements have been performed on a liquid water sample at two different temperatures and pressures. The experiments were carried out using the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. This experiment represents the first DINS measurement from water using the Resonance Detector configuration, employing yttrium-aluminum-perovskite scintillator and a 238U analyzer foil. The maximum energy of the scattered neutrons was about 70 eV, allowing to access an extended kinematic space with energy and wave vector transfers at the proton recoil peak in the range 1 eV <= hbarω <= 20 eV and 25 Å-1 <= q <= 90 Å-1, respectively. Comparison with DINS measurements on water performed in the standard Resonance Filter configuration indicates the potential advantages offered by the use of Resonance Detector approach for DINS measurements at forward scattering angles.

  6. Measurement of the tau polarisation at the Z resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fenandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassaed, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1993-09-01

    Using 18.8 pb-1 of data collected in 1990 and 1991, ALEPH has measured the tau polarisation in the decay modes τ→ ev bar v, τ→μ v bar v, τ→πν, τ→ρν and τ→ a 1ν, using both the individual tau decay kinematics and the event acollinearity. The measurement of the tau polarisation as a function of the production polar angle yields the two parameters A τ and A e , where A l =2 g {/v l } g {/A l }/( g {/v l })2+( g {/A l })2] The results A τ=0.143±0.023 and A e =0.120±0.026 are consistent with the hypothesis of electron-tau universality. Assuming universality yields a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin2θ{/w eff}=0.2332±0.0022.

  7. Dosimetry with alanine/electron spin resonance. Measuring and evaluating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.

    2007-02-01

    In the first part of the present report a short outline of the theoretical foundations in view of the parameters and evaluation programs described in the following is given. The second part described the measurement procedures and the handling of the measuring data including the applied data formats. In the third part the collection SPAD of MATLAB programs is described, which are necessary for the processing of the measurment data and the subsequent evaluations. Routine evaluations can by means of the present graphic user surface simply be performed. But the described routines can (and shall) be used also as kit in order to solve special evaluation problems. The third part closes with a listing of all programs including the online available aid texts. All functions were tested both under MATLAB 6 and under MATLAB 7

  8. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NJ Drindak; JA Burke; G Leinweber; JA Helm; JG Hoole; RC Block; Y Danon; RE Slovacek; BE Moretti; CJ Werner; ME Overberg; SA Kolda; MJ Trbovich; DP Barry

    2005-01-01

    Epithermal neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed using the time-of-flight method at the RPI linac using metallic Nb samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-meter flight station with a 16-section sodium iodide multiplicity detector and the transmission measurements at the 25-meter flight station with a Li-6 glass scintillation detector. Resonance parameters were determined for all resonances up to 500eV with a combined analysis of capture and transmission data using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The present results are compared to those presented in ENDF/B-VI, updated through Release 3

  9. Brain volume measurement using three-dimensional magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to validate accurate measurement method of human brain volume using three dimensional (3D) MRI data on a workstation, and to establish optimal correcting method of human brain volume on diagnosis of brain atrophy. 3D MRI data were acquired by fast SPGR sequence using 1.5 T MR imager. 3D MRI data were segmented by region growing method and 3D image was displayed by surface rendering method on the workstation. Brain volume was measured by the volume measurement function of the workstation. In order to validate the accurate measurement method, phantoms and a specimen of human brain were examined. Phantom volume was measured by changing the lower level of threshold value. At the appropriate threshold value, percentage of error of phantoms and the specimen were within 0.6% and 0.08%, respectively. To establish the optimal correcting method, 130 normal volunteers were examined. Brain volumes corrected with height weight, body surface area, and alternative skull volume were evaluated. Brain volume index, which is defined as dividing brain volume by alternative skull volume, had the best correlation with age (r=0.624, p<0.05). No gender differences was observed in brain volume index in contrast to in brain volume. The clinical usefulness of this correcting method for brain atrophy diagnosis was evaluated in 85 patients. Diagnosis by 2D spin echo MR images was compared with brain volume index. Diagnosis of brain atrophy by 2D MR image was concordant with the evaluation by brain volume index. These results indicated that this measurement method had high accuracy, and it was important to set the appropriate threshold value. Brain volume index was the appropriate indication for evaluation of human brain volume, and was considered to be useful for the diagnosis of brain atrophy. (author)

  10. On the internal resonant modes in marching-on-in-time solution of the time domain electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2013-08-01

    Internal resonant modes are always observed in the marching-on-in-time (MOT) solution of the time domain electric field integral equation (EFIE), although \\'relaxed initial conditions,\\' which are enforced at the beginning of time marching, should in theory prevent these spurious modes from appearing. It has been conjectured that, numerical errors built up during time marching establish the necessary initial conditions and induce the internal resonant modes. However, this conjecture has never been proved by systematic numerical experiments. Our numerical results in this communication demonstrate that, the internal resonant modes\\' amplitudes are indeed dictated by the numerical errors. Additionally, it is shown that in a few cases, the internal resonant modes can be made \\'invisible\\' by significantly suppressing the numerical errors. These tests prove the conjecture that the internal resonant modes are induced by numerical errors when the time domain EFIE is solved by the MOT method. © 2013 IEEE.

  11. On the internal resonant modes in marching-on-in-time solution of the time domain electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei; Bagci, Hakan; Lu, Mingyu

    2013-01-01

    Internal resonant modes are always observed in the marching-on-in-time (MOT) solution of the time domain electric field integral equation (EFIE), although 'relaxed initial conditions,' which are enforced at the beginning of time marching, should in theory prevent these spurious modes from appearing. It has been conjectured that, numerical errors built up during time marching establish the necessary initial conditions and induce the internal resonant modes. However, this conjecture has never been proved by systematic numerical experiments. Our numerical results in this communication demonstrate that, the internal resonant modes' amplitudes are indeed dictated by the numerical errors. Additionally, it is shown that in a few cases, the internal resonant modes can be made 'invisible' by significantly suppressing the numerical errors. These tests prove the conjecture that the internal resonant modes are induced by numerical errors when the time domain EFIE is solved by the MOT method. © 2013 IEEE.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the truncus pulmonalis. Principles of magnetic resonance flux measurements for pulmonal hypertension diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolmaali, N.

    2006-01-01

    This book gives a detailed introduction into the use of magnetic resonance flux measurements for the examination of pulmonal circulation. It presents the results of phantom experiments and evaluates and verifies sequence techniques optimised for the examination of the pulmonary circulation. This is followed by a description of an elegant experimental design for the quantification of pulmonal hypertension which is unique in its kind. The model can predict the consequences of acute, resistance-related pulmonal hypertension in a reproducible and reversible manner. It thus provides a means of evaluating pulmonal applications of magnetic resonance imaging. The idea for these studies and its implementation are an outstanding example of teamwork and interdisciplinary cooperation. Applying the results to the patient after the statistical analysis is only a small step. The book presents the results of extensive normal value studies which will make it possible to use the measurement technology in paediatric cardiology. Its range of application also includes congenital heart defects, especially ventricular septal defects and primary as well as secondary forms of pulmonal hypertension. It is not only suitable for primary diagnostics but also for post-treatment follow-up and assessment of patients' progress

  13. Spin-flip measurements in the proton inelastic scattering on 12C and giant resonance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, R.; D'Erasmo, G.; Ferrero, F.; Pantaleo, A.; Pignanelli, M.

    1975-01-01

    Differential cross sections and spin-flip probabilities (SFP) for the inelastic scattering of protons, exciting the 2 + state at 4.43 MeV in 12 C, have been measured at several incident energies between 15.9 and 37.6 MeV. The changes in the shape of the SFP angular distributions are rather limited, while the absolute values show a pronounced increase, resonant like, in two energy regions centered at about 20 and 29 MeV. The second resonance reproduces very closely the energy dependence of the E2 giant quadrupole strength found in a previous experiment. The resonance at 20 MeV should correspond to a substructure of the E1 giant dipole resonance. (Auth.)

  14. Quantum Measurement Backaction and Upconverting Microwave Signals with Mechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. W.

    The limits of optical measurement and control of mechanical motion are set by the quantum nature of light. The familiar shot noise limit can be avoided by increasing the optical power, but at high enough powers, the backaction of the randomly-arriving photons' radiation pressure can grow to become the dominant force on the system. This thesis will describe an experiment showing how backaction limits the laser cooling of macroscopic drumhead membranes, as well as work on how these membranes can be used to upconvert microwave signals to optical frequencies, potentially preserving the fragile quantum state of the upconverted signal.

  15. Measurement of hepatic steatosis based on magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, Adam; Jańczyk, Wojciech; Chełstowska, Sylwia; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan

    2017-08-01

    The subject of this work is the usage of digital image processing to measure hepatic steatosis. To calculate this value manually it requires a lot of time and precision from the radiologist. In order to resolve this issue, a C++ application has been created. This paper describes the algorithms that have been used to solve the problem. The next chapter presents the application architecture and introduces graphical user interface. The last section describes all the tests which have been carried out to check the correctness of the results.

  16. New measurement of neutron capture resonances of 209Bi

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillode Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kappeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, Alberto; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-01-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Bi209 has been measured at the CERN n TOF facility by employing the pulse-height-weighting technique. Improvements over previous measurements are mainly because of an optimized detection system, which led to a practically negligible neutron sensitivity. Additional experimental sources of systematic error, such as the electronic threshold in the detectors, summing of gamma-rays, internal electron conversion, and the isomeric state in bismuth, have been taken into account. Gamma-ray absorption effects inside the sample have been corrected by employing a nonpolynomial weighting function. Because Bi209 is the last stable isotope in the reaction path of the stellar s-process, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross section is important for the recycling of the reaction flow by alpha-decays. In the relevant stellar range of thermal energies between kT=5 and 8 keV our new capture rate is about 16% higher than the presently accepted value used for nucleosynthesis calculations. At th...

  17. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    in this model: (i) the dendrites and axons, which are modeled as long cylinders with two diffusion coefficients, parallel (DL) and perpendicular (DT) to the cylindrical axis, and (ii) an isotropic monoexponential diffusion component describing water diffusion within and across all other structures, i.......e., in extracellular space and glia cells. The model parameters are estimated from 153 diffusion-weighted images acquired from a formalin-fixed baboon brain. A close correspondence between the data and the signal model is found, with the model parameters consistent with literature values. The model provides......Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Signal Intensity Ratio Measurement Before Uterine Artery Embolization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvnjak, Stevo; Ravn, Pernille; Green, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , 52 patients were included in this prospective study. The SI ratio before UFE was calculated using circular region of interests placed on the dominant fibroid and the iliac muscle. The SI fibroid-to-iliac muscle ratio was calculated as SI of the dominant fibroid/SI of the iliac muscle on T1-, T2......-, and T1 post-contrast-weighted sequences. The dominant fibroid volume was measured and analyzed before and after UFE. RESULTS: In all, 46 patients who completed the three-month follow-up MRI were available for analysis. The correlation between SI fibroid-to-muscle ratio at the T2-weighted sequence...... positive correlation (r = 0.439, p T2-weighted sequence. The area under curve (AUC) for SI fibroid-to-muscle ratio on T2-weighted sequence was 0.776. For the other parameters, the AUC values were 0.512, 0.671, and 0.578, respectively. CONCLUSION: SI...

  19. Europium resonance parameters from neutron capture and transmission measurements in the energy range 0.01–200 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D.P.; Burke, J.A.; Rapp, M.J.; Block, R.C.; Danon, Y.; Geuther, J.A.; Saglime III, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal samples were sealed and imaged with X-rays to determine sample uniformity. • Eleven new resonances were identified below 100 eV. • The resonance regions of 151 Eu and 153 Eu have been extended from 100 to 200 eV. • The thermal total cross section for 151 Eu was measured, up (9 ± 3)% from ENDF/B-VII.1. • Radiation widths were assigned for all resonances from experimental data. - Abstract: Europium is a good absorber of neutrons suitable for use as a nuclear reactor control material. It is also a fission product in the low-yield tail at the high end of the fission fragment mass distribution. Measurements have been made of the stable isotopes with natural and enriched samples. The linear electron accelerator center (LINAC) at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) was used to explore neutron interactions with europium in the energy region from 0.01 to 200 eV. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique. Two transmission measurements were performed at flight paths of 15 and 25 m with 6 Li glass scintillation detectors. The neutron capture measurements were performed at a flight path of 25 m with a 16-segment sodium iodide multiplicity detector. Resonance parameters were extracted from the data using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A table of resonance parameters and their uncertainties is presented. To prevent air oxidation metal samples were sealed in airtight aluminum cans in an inert environment. Metal samples of natural europium, 47.8 atom% 151 Eu, 52.2 atom% 153 Eu, as well as metal samples enriched to 98.77 atom% 153 Eu were measured. The measured neutron capture resonance integral for 153 Eu is (9.9 ± 0.4)% larger than ENDF/B-VII.1. The capture resonance integral for 151 Eu is (7 ± 1)% larger than ENDF/B-VII.1. Another significant finding from these measurements was a significant increase in thermal total cross section for 151 Eu, up (9 ± 3)% from ENDF/B-VII.1

  20. Measurements of time average series resonance effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.; Kakati, M.

    2011-01-01

    Self-excited plasma series resonance is observed in low pressure capacitvely coupled radio frequency discharges as high-frequency oscillations superimposed on the normal radio frequency current. This high-frequency contribution to the radio frequency current is generated by a series resonance between the capacitive sheath and the inductive and resistive bulk plasma. In this report, we present an experimental method to measure the plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon plasma by modifying the homogeneous discharge model. The homogeneous discharge model is modified by introducing a correction factor to the plasma resistance. Plasma parameters are also calculated by considering the plasma series resonances effect. Experimental measurements show that the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance, which arises in capacitive discharge due to the nonlinear interaction of plasma bulk and sheath, significantly enhances both the Ohmic and stochastic heating. The experimentally measured total dissipation, which is the sum of the Ohmic and stochastic heating, is found to increase significantly with decreasing pressure.

  1. Methodologies for Wind Turbine and STATCOM Integration in Wind Power Plant Models for Harmonic Resonances Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freijedo Fernandez, Francisco Daniel; Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    -domain. As an alternative, a power based averaged modelling is also proposed. Type IV wind turbine harmonic signature and STATCOM active harmonic mitigation are considered for the simulation case studies. Simulation results provide a good insight of the features and limitations of the proposed methodologies.......This paper approaches modelling methodologies for integration of wind turbines and STATCOM in harmonic resonance studies. Firstly, an admittance equivalent model representing the harmonic signature of grid connected voltage source converters is provided. A simplified type IV wind turbine modelling...... is then straightforward. This linear modelling is suitable to represent the wind turbine in the range of frequencies at which harmonic interactions are likely. Even the admittance method is suitable both for frequency and time domain studies, some limitations arise in practice when implementing it in the time...

  2. Thermal neutron capture cross sections resonance integrals and g-factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.

    2003-02-01

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections and resonance integrals of elements and isotopes with atomic numbers from 1 to 83 (as well as 232 Th and 238 U) have been re-evaluated by taking into consideration all known pertinent data published since 1979. This work has been undertaken as part of an IAEA co-ordinated research project on 'Prompt capture gamma-ray activation analysis'. Westcott g-factors for radiative capture cross sections at a temperature of 300K were computed by utilizing the INTER code and ENDF-B/VI (Release 8) library files. The temperature dependence of the Westcott g-factor is illustrated for 113 Cd, 124 Xe and 157 Gd at temperatures of 150, 294 and 400K. Comparisons have also been made of the newly evaluated capture cross sections of 6 Li, 7 Li, 12 C and 207 Pb with those determined by the k 0 method. (author)

  3. Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS): A rapid test for enteric coating thickness and integrity of controlled release pellet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarsi, Anas; Dillon, Amy; McSweeney, Seán; Krüse, Jacob; Griffin, Brendan; Devine, Ken; Sherry, Patricia; Henken, Stephan; Fitzpatrick, Stephen; Fitzpatrick, Dara

    2018-04-12

    There are no rapid dissolution based tests for determining coating thickness, integrity and drug concentration in controlled release pellets either during production or post-production. The manufacture of pellets requires several coating steps depending on the formulation. The sub-coating and enteric coating steps typically take up to six hours each followed by additional drying steps. Post production regulatory dissolution testing also takes up to six hours to determine if the batch can be released for commercial sale. The thickness of the enteric coating is a key factor that determines the release rate of the drug in the gastro-intestinal tract. Also, the amount of drug per unit mass decreases with increasing thickness of the enteric coating. In this study, the coating process is tracked from start to finish on an hourly basis by taking samples of pellets during production and testing those using BARDS (Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy). BARDS offers a rapid approach to characterising enteric coatings with measurements based on reproducible changes in the compressibility of a solvent due to the evolution of air during dissolution. This is monitored acoustically via associated changes in the frequency of induced acoustic resonances. A steady state acoustic lag time is associated with the disintegration of the enteric coatings in basic solution. This lag time is pH dependent and is indicative of the rate at which the coating layer dissolves. BARDS represents a possible future surrogate test for conventional USP dissolution testing as its data correlates directly with the thickness of the enteric coating, its integrity and also with the drug loading as validated by HPLC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mandatory Integration Measures and Differential Inclusion. The Italian Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttitta, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 migrants arriving regularly in Italy must sign an integration agreement and declare their agreement with a ‘Charter of the values’. Insufficient integration (measured through a point-based system) results in deportation. While the point-based system discriminates against the poor, the

  5. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, John P., E-mail: jps13@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Carlson, Benjamin T. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Duggins, Danielle O. [Gordon College, Wenham, MA 01984 (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); De Santis, Stefano [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tencate, Alister J. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  6. Measurements of line overlap for resonant spoiling of x-ray lasing transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Elliott, S.R.; MacGowan, B.J.; Nilsen, J.

    1994-06-01

    High-precision measurements are presented of candidate line pairs for resonant spoiling of x-ray lasing transitions in the nickel-like W 46+ , the neon-like Fe 16+ , and the neon-like La 47+ x-ray lasers. Our measurements were carried out with high-resolution crystal spectrometers, and a typical precision of 20--50 ppM was achieved. While most resonances appear insufficient for effective photo-spoiling, two resonance pairs are identified that provide a good overlap. These are the 4p 1/2 → 3d 3/2 transition in nickel-like W 46+ with the 2p 3/2 → 1s 1/2 transition in hydrogenic Al 12+ , and the 3s 1/2 → 2p 3/2 transition in neon-like La 47+ with the 1 1 S 0 -2 1 P 1 line in heliumlike Ti 20+

  7. Integrated Measurement of Crew Resource Management and Technical Flying Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the findings of a study designed with two objectives: to produce a prototype performance : measurement instrument (PMI) that integrates the assessment of Crew Resource Management (CRM) and technical flying : skills and to investi...

  8. Establishing and integrating performance measures : a TPCB peer exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-31

    This report highlights key recommendations and noteworthy practices identified at Establishing and Integrating Performance Measures Peer Exchange held on April 27-28, 2015 in Dimondale, Michigan and via video teleconference. This event was spon...

  9. Nanogram per milliliter-level immunologic detection of alpha-fetoprotein with integrated rotating-resonance microcantilevers for early-stage diagnosis of heptocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjing; Li, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhixiang; Zuo, Guomin; Cheng, Zhenxing; Yu, Haitao

    2009-02-01

    Nanogram per milliliter-level ultra-low concentration detection of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which is an important marker for heptocellular carcinoma, is in favor of early-stage prognosis and disease diagnosis. On-the-spot rapid detection of such antigens as AFP highly requires innovative micro/nano techniques. To meet this requirement, an advanced resonant microcantilever is developed and used for screening the tumor marker at nanogram per milliliter level. The sensing principle of the resonant microcantilever is measuring frequency-shift versus specific-adsorbed mass. With both electromagnetic resonance-exciting and piezoresistive readout elements on-chip integrated, the microcantilever sensor is operated in a rotating resonance mode to improve sensitivity and resolution to specific mass adsorption. Prior to detection of AFP with previously immobilized anti-AFP antibody, the antigen-antibody specific-binding is confirmed with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay experiment. By implementing the specific reaction in liquid and reading out the sensor signal in lab air environment, the micromechanical sensor has achieved the sensitive scale between 2 and 20 ng/ml. To effectively depress cross-talk signal and improve resolution, the insensitive regions of the cantilever surface are pre-modified with 2-[methoxy (polyethyleneoxy) propyl] trimethoxysilane for nonspecific bio-adsorption minimization. Finally, a better AFP detecting limit than 2 ng/mL is experimentally achieved. The label-free resonant microcantilever sensor is promising in low-cost or even disposable early-stage prognosis and diagnosis of tumors.

  10. Integrating institutional bribery and behavioral measures of bribery

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Richard; Peiffer, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    Bribery involves individuals exchanging material benefits for a service of a public institution. To understand the process of bribery we need to integrate measures of individual behaviour and institutional attributes rather than rely exclusively on surveys of individual perceptions and experience or macro-level corruption indexes of national institutions. This paper integrates institutional and behavioural measures to show that where you live and who you are have independent influence on whet...

  11. Limits of reliability for the measurement of integral count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbeszkorn, L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for exact and approximate calculation of reliability limits of measured nuclear integral count. The formulae are applicable in measuring conditions which assure the Poisson distribution of the counts. The coefficients of the approximate formulae for 90, 95, 98 and 99 per cent reliability levels are given. The exact reliability limits for 90 per cent reliability level are calculated up to 80 integral counts. (R.J.)

  12. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenmin Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs. To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the extraordinary behaviors can be beneficial for applications such as mass sensing. Larger OSE from higher order harmonics of the mechanical modes is also observed. Our work paves a way towards the developing of OSE-based high sensitive mass sensor in MBRs.

  13. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenmin; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2017-09-30

    In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs). To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE) in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the extraordinary behaviors can be beneficial for applications such as mass sensing. Larger OSE from higher order harmonics of the mechanical modes is also observed. Our work paves a way towards the developing of OSE-based high sensitive mass sensor in MBRs.

  14. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array

  15. Energy measurement using a resonator based time-of-flight system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; Clifft, B.; Johnson, K.W.; Lewis, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    A resonant pick-up time-of-flight system has been developed for the precise measurement of beam energy at the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The excellent timing characteristics available with ATLAS beams make it desirable to design the beam transport system to be isochronous. The advantages of the resonant time-of-flight system over other energy analysis systems such as the dispersive magnet system are numerous. The system is non-interceptive and non-destructive and preserves the beam phase space. It is non-dispersive. Path length variations are not introduced into the beam which would reduce the timing resolution. It has a large signal-to-noise ratio when compared to non-resonant beam pick-up techniques. It provides the means to precisely set the linac energy and potentially to control the energy in a feedback loop. Finally, the resonant pick-up time-of-flight system is less expensive than an equivalent magnetic system. It consists of two beam-excited resonators, associated electronics to decode the information, a computer interface to the linac PDP 11/34 control computer, and software to analyze the information and deduce the measured beam energy. This report describes the system and its components and gives a schematic overview

  16. Real analysis measure theory, integration, and Hilbert spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Elias M

    2005-01-01

    Real Analysis is the third volume in the Princeton Lectures in Analysis, a series of four textbooks that aim to present, in an integrated manner, the core areas of analysis. Here the focus is on the development of measure and integration theory, differentiation and integration, Hilbert spaces, and Hausdorff measure and fractals. This book reflects the objective of the series as a whole: to make plain the organic unity that exists between the various parts of the subject, and to illustrate the wide applicability of ideas of analysis to other fields of mathematics and science. After

  17. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Carmignato, Simone

    2015-01-01

    fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young's modulus and related surface parameters.In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever...

  18. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorfman, S.; Simons, Hugh; Iamsasri, T.

    2016-01-01

    and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice...

  19. Reproducibility of 3.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Hepatic Fat Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, Jochem R.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; van Vliet, Andre A.; Wajs, Ewa; Vandenberk, Petra; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Stoker, Jaap

    Purpose: To investigate reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1-MRS) to measure hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC). Materials and Methods: In 24 subjects, HTGC was evaluated using H-1-MRS at 3.0 Tesla. We studied "between-weeks" reproducibility and reproducibility of H-1-MRS

  20. Ultra-Precise Measurement of Distance by Fabry-Perot Resonator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Číp, Ondřej; Petrů, František; Lazar, Josef; Buchta, Zdeněk

    T118, - (2005), s. 45-47 ISSN 0031-8949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP102/02/P122 Keywords : length measurements * laser interferometer * optical resonator Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.661, year: 2004

  1. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hawley, Marilyn E [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I [Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution.

  2. Measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Gennady P; Bishop, Alan R; Chernobrod, Boris M; Hawley, Marilyn E; Brown, Geoffrey W; Tsifrinovich, Vladimir I

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach for measurement of single electron and nuclear spin states is suggested. Our approach is based on optically detected magnetic resonance in a nano-probe located at the apex of an AFM tip. The method provides single electron spin sensitivity with nano-scale spatial resolution

  3. Development of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T., E-mail: sugimoto@ribf.riken.jp [SPring-8 (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Kawamura, H.; Murata, J. [Rikkyo University, Department of Physics (Japan); Nagae, D.; Shimada, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    We have been working on the development of a new technique of atomic-beam resonance method to measure the nuclear moments of unstable nuclei. In the present study, an ion-guiding system to be used as an atomic-beam source have been developed.

  4. A gateless charge integrator for Borexino energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagomarsino, V.; Testera, G.

    1999-01-01

    A gateless charge integrator designed for the energy measurement in the Borexino experiment is described and the results of various tests performed on prototypes are shown. The circuit integrates always its input taking advantage of the AC coupling to the photomultipliers that equalizes to zero the charge associated with each event signal. A double sampling of the integrator output allows to perform a charge measurement in principle without dead time, avoiding the use of gate signals and baseline restoration networks and permitting a precise detection of the fast correlated events (delayed coincidences due to the decay of a nuclide producing a daughter having a lifetime in the tens of ns time range). The precision of the charge measurement is discussed together with the performances of the front end Borexino board where the integrator is mounted

  5. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  6. Relative measurement of the fluxes of thermal, resonant and rapid neutrons in reactor G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Mazancourt, T. de

    1957-01-01

    We sought to determine the behavior of the thermal, resonant and rapid neutron fluxes in the multiplier-reflector transition region, in the two principal directions of the system. We have also measured the variation of these different fluxes in the body of the multiplier medium in a canal filled with graphite and in an empty canal. The results are given in the form of curves representing: - the variation of the ratio of the thermal flux to the rapid flux in axial and radial transitions - the behavior of the thermal and resonant fluxes and the variation of their ratio in the same regions. (author) [fr

  7. Measurement of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and the alpha value for {sup 235}U resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor` ev, Yu V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Georgiev, G P; Stanchik, Kh [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1997-06-01

    Gamma spectra from 1 to 12 multiplicity were measured on th 500 m flight path of the IBR-30 reactor using a 16-section 32 L NaI(Tl) crystal scintillation detector able to hold 2 metallic samples of 90% {sup 235}U and 10% {sup 238}U 0.00137 atoms/b and 0.00411 atoms/b thick. Multiplicity spectra were obtained for resolved resonances in the E = 1-150 eV energy region. They were used to determine the value of {alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f} for 165 resonances of {sup 235}U. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab.

  8. Actinide integral measurements in the CFRMF and integral tests for ENDF/B-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Integral capture and/or fission rates have been reported earlier for several actinides irradiated in the fast neutron field of the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF). These nuclides include 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 242 Pu, 241 Am and 243 Am. This paper forucses on the utilization of these integral data for testing the respective cross sections on ENDF/B-V. Integral cross sections derived from the measured reaction rates are tabulated. Results are presented for cross-section data testing which includes integral testing based on a comparison of calculated and measured integral cross sections and testing based on least-squares-adjustment analyses

  9. Towards an interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of integrated and integrative thinking within organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schörger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research study is located within the context of corporate reporting and is relevant for the agenda of sustainability and sustainable development. The specific context for this study is the South African mining industry, within which three units in the form of three companies, were chosen to provide a coherent case for this study. The sample for the analysis is based on the integrated reports of these companies for the years 2012 and 2013. This gives this research a total sample size of six reports. Based on the research findings an initial interpretive measurement framework to assess the levels of capital integration has been theorised which enables the various stakeholders of an organisation to assess the integrated and integrative thinking capabilities. The level of integration is represented as a maturity scale on which integrated thinking is associated with the lower levels, while integrative thinking is attributed to higher levels of maturity. In the elaborated framework, integrated thinking is perceived as being a prerequisite for integrative thinking. The practical implication of this study is that it provides a potential measurement framework for various organisational stakeholders, including investors, to assess the thinking capabilities that are more likely to lead to long term financial stability and sustainability. The value of this research study is that it provides an initial step towards measuring the level of integrated and integrative thinking capabilities within organisations where no such measurement framework currently exists. The limitations and implications of this research study are that the interpretive measurement framework represents merely an initial step and an ongoing working hypothesis which requires further research to develop its maturity and usefulness.

  10. Pulse advancement and delay in an integrated optical two-port ring-resonator circuit: direct experimental observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Zhuang, L.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    We report experimental observations of the negative-group-velocity (v_g) phenomenon in an integrated-optical two-port ring-resonator circuit. We demonstrate that when the v_g is negative, the (main) peak of output pulse appears earlier than the peak of a reference pulse, while for a positive v_g,

  11. Audiovisual functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals multisensory integration effects in object-related sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrmann, Oliver; Weigelt, Sarah; Altmann, Christian F; Kaiser, Jochen; Naumer, Marcus J

    2010-03-03

    Information integration across different sensory modalities contributes to object recognition, the generation of associations and long-term memory representations. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation to investigate the presence of sensory integrative effects at cortical levels as early as nonprimary auditory and extrastriate visual cortices, which are implicated in intermediate stages of object processing. Stimulation consisted of an adapting audiovisual stimulus S(1) and a subsequent stimulus S(2) from the same basic-level category (e.g., cat). The stimuli were carefully balanced with respect to stimulus complexity and semantic congruency and presented in four experimental conditions: (1) the same image and vocalization for S(1) and S(2), (2) the same image and a different vocalization, (3) different images and the same vocalization, or (4) different images and vocalizations. This two-by-two factorial design allowed us to assess the contributions of auditory and visual stimulus repetitions and changes in a statistically orthogonal manner. Responses in visual regions of right fusiform gyrus and right lateral occipital cortex were reduced for repeated visual stimuli (repetition suppression). Surprisingly, left lateral occipital cortex showed stronger responses to repeated auditory stimuli (repetition enhancement). Similarly, auditory regions of interest of the right middle superior temporal gyrus and sulcus exhibited repetition suppression to auditory repetitions and repetition enhancement to visual repetitions. Our findings of crossmodal repetition-related effects in cortices of the respective other sensory modality add to the emerging view that in human subjects sensory integrative mechanisms operate on earlier cortical processing levels than previously assumed.

  12. Neutron resonances in the compound nucleus: Parity nonconservation to dynamic temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments using epithermal neutrons that interact to form compound-nuclear resonances serve a wide range of scientific applications. Changes in transmission which are correlated to polarization reversal in incident neutrons have been used to study parity nonconservation in the compound nucleus for a wide range of targets. The ensemble of measured parity asymmetries provides statistical information for the extraction of the rms parity-violating mean-square matrix element as a function of mass. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances can also be used to determine the polarization of neutron beams. Finally the motion of target atoms results in an observed temperature-dependent Doppler broadening of resonance line widths. This broadening can be used to determine temperatures on a fast time scale of one microsecond or less

  13. LEP precision electroweak measurements from the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary electroweak measurements from the LEP Collaboration from data taken at the Z{sup 0} resonance are presented. Most of the results presented are based on a total data sample of 12 x 10{sup 6} recorded Z{sup 0} events which included data from the 1993 and 1994 LEP runs. The Z{sup 0} resonance parameters, including hadronic and leptonic cross sections and asymmetries, {tau} polarization and its asymmetry, and heavy-quark asymmetries and partial widths, are evaluated and confronted with the predictions of the Standard Model. This comparison incorporates the constraints provided by the recent determination of the top-quark mass at the Tevatron. The Z{sup 0} resonance parameters are found to be in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction using the Tevatron top-quark mass, with the exception of the partial widths for Z{sup 0} decays to pairs of b and c quarks.

  14. Calculation and measurement of radiation corrections for plasmon resonances in nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Lee, S. Y.; McGovern, O.; Rabin, O.; Mayergoyz, I.

    2013-08-01

    The problem of plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem under the condition that the wavelengths of the incident radiation are much larger than the particle dimensions. As the nanoparticle size increases, the quasistatic condition is no longer valid. For this reason, the accuracy of the electrostatic approximation may be compromised and appropriate radiation corrections for the calculation of resonance permittivities and resonance wavelengths are needed. In this paper, we present the radiation corrections in the framework of the eigenvalue method for plasmon mode analysis and demonstrate that the computational results accurately match analytical solutions (for nanospheres) and experimental data (for nanorings and nanocubes). We also demonstrate that the optical spectra of silver nanocube suspensions can be fully assigned to dipole-type resonance modes when radiation corrections are introduced. Finally, our method is used to predict the resonance wavelengths for face-to-face silver nanocube dimers on glass substrates. These results may be useful for the indirect measurements of the gaps in the dimers from extinction cross-section observations.

  15. Measurement of collisional self broadening of atomic resonance lines in selective reflection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed to measure directly the collisional self broadening rate for a dense atomic vapor from selective reflection spectra. Experimental realization for the atomic D 1 and D 2 resonance lines of Rb confirms a validity of the proposed technique. The deflection of experimentally measured values is not more than 20% from theoretically predicted ones in the atomic number density range of 7· 10 16 - 7· 10 17 cm - 3 . 10 refs

  16. In vivo measurement of phosphorus energy metabolites by topical magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Hiroshi [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki Aichi (Japan); Koizuka, Izumi; Takada, Muneharu; Naruse, Shoji

    1982-12-01

    An apparatus of TMR (topical magnetic resonance) was briefly described, and the technique to use it was shown. The effect of digital filter was demonstrated and measurement of a pulse width was shown using a phantom. Pulse width and /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum measured in a rat head were shown. The /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum well revealed the phosphorus energy metabolites such as creatine phosphoric acid, ATP, and ADP.

  17. One-Port Electronic Detection Strategies for Improving Sensitivity in Piezoelectric Resonant Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxu Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a one-port mechanical resonance detection scheme utilized on a piezoelectric thin film driven silicon circular diaphragm resonator and discusses the limitations to such an approach in degenerate mode mass detection sensors. The sensor utilizes degenerated vibration modes of a radial symmetrical microstructure thereby providing both a sense and reference mode allowing for minimization of environmental effects on performance. The circular diaphragm resonator was fabricated with thickness of 4.5 µm and diameter of 140 µm. A PZT thin film of 0.75 µm was patterned on the top surface for the purposes of excitation and vibration sensing. The device showed a resonant frequency of 5.8 MHz for the (1, 1 mode. An electronic interface circuit was designed to cancel out the large static and parasitic capacitance allowing for electrical detection of the mechanical vibration thereby enabling the frequency split between the sense and reference mode to be measured accurately. The extracted motional current, proportional to the vibration velocity, was fed back to the drive to effectively increase the Q factor, and therefore device sensitivity, by more than a factor of 8. A software phase-locked loop was implemented to automatically track the resonant frequencies to allow for faster and accurate resonance detection. Results showed that by utilizing the absolute mode frequencies as an indication of sensor temperature, the variation in sensor temperature due to the heating from the drive electronics was accounted for and led to an ultimate measurement sensitivity of 2.3 Hz.

  18. One-Port Electronic Detection Strategies for Improving Sensitivity in Piezoelectric Resonant Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongxu; Hedley, John; Keegan, Neil; Spoors, Julia; Gallacher, Barry; McNeil, Calum

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a one-port mechanical resonance detection scheme utilized on a piezoelectric thin film driven silicon circular diaphragm resonator and discusses the limitations to such an approach in degenerate mode mass detection sensors. The sensor utilizes degenerated vibration modes of a radial symmetrical microstructure thereby providing both a sense and reference mode allowing for minimization of environmental effects on performance. The circular diaphragm resonator was fabricated with thickness of 4.5 µm and diameter of 140 µm. A PZT thin film of 0.75 µm was patterned on the top surface for the purposes of excitation and vibration sensing. The device showed a resonant frequency of 5.8 MHz for the (1, 1) mode. An electronic interface circuit was designed to cancel out the large static and parasitic capacitance allowing for electrical detection of the mechanical vibration thereby enabling the frequency split between the sense and reference mode to be measured accurately. The extracted motional current, proportional to the vibration velocity, was fed back to the drive to effectively increase the Q factor, and therefore device sensitivity, by more than a factor of 8. A software phase-locked loop was implemented to automatically track the resonant frequencies to allow for faster and accurate resonance detection. Results showed that by utilizing the absolute mode frequencies as an indication of sensor temperature, the variation in sensor temperature due to the heating from the drive electronics was accounted for and led to an ultimate measurement sensitivity of 2.3 Hz. PMID:27792154

  19. Application of the resonant 52(p,γ)53Mn reaction to the measurement of chromium depth distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Switkowski, Z.E.; Petty, R.J.; Clark, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    A resonance in the 52 Cr(p,γ) 53 Mn reaction has been investigated as a probe for the quantitative determination of chromium depth distributions. The relevant nuclear parameters of this resonance were measured to be: resonance energy, Esub(p)1005.2 +- 0.2 keV, total width GAMMA < 100 eV, and resonance strength, (2J+1)GAMMAsub(p)GAMMAsub(γ)/GAMMA = 0.89 +-0.11 eV. As an example of the use of the nuclear resonance technique, the chromium profile of an electroplated chrome black solar absorber surface has been studied and the results are presented

  20. Silicon-Nitride-based Integrated Optofluidic Biochemical Sensors using a Coupled-Resonator Optical Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei eWANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (SiN is a promising material platform for integrating photonic components and microfluidic channels on a chip for label-free, optical biochemical sensing applications in the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. The chip-scale SiN-based optofluidic sensors can be compact due to a relatively high refractive index contrast between SiN and the fluidic medium, and low-cost due to the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS-compatible fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate SiN-based integrated optofluidic biochemical sensors using a coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW in the visible wavelengths. The working principle is based on imaging in the far field the out-of-plane elastic-light-scattering patterns of the CROW sensor at a fixed probe wavelength. We correlate the imaged pattern with reference patterns at the CROW eigenstates. Our sensing algorithm maps the correlation coefficients of the imaged pattern with a library of calibrated correlation coefficients to extract a minute change in the cladding refractive index. Given a calibrated CROW, our sensing mechanism in the spatial domain only requires a fixed-wavelength laser in the visible wavelengths as a light source, with the probe wavelength located within the CROW transmission band, and a silicon digital charge-coupled device (CCD / CMOS camera for recording the light scattering patterns. This is in sharp contrast with the conventional optical microcavity-based sensing methods that impose a strict requirement of spectral alignment with a high-quality cavity resonance using a wavelength-tunable laser. Our experimental results using a SiN CROW sensor with eight coupled microrings in the 680nm wavelength reveal a cladding refractive index change of ~1.3 × 10^-4 refractive index unit (RIU, with an average sensitivity of ~281 ± 271 RIU-1 and a noise-equivalent detection limit (NEDL of 1.8 ×10^-8 RIU ~ 1.0 ×10^-4 RIU across the CROW bandwidth of ~1 nm.

  1. Surface magnetic anisotropy in glass-coated amorphous microwires as determined from ferromagnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Miquel, H.; Garcia, J.M.; Garcia-Beneytez, J.M.; Vazquez, M.

    2001-01-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance frequency of different Co base glass-coated amorphous magnetic microwires about 3.5 μm in diameter with negative, vanishing and positive magnetostriction has been investigated from power absorption measurements in the microwave frequency range. The experimental technique employed here involves the replacement of the dielectric of a coaxial transmission line by the sample to be measured. From the evolution of the resonance frequency with DC applied magnetic field, the surface magnetic anisotropy field of the microwires has been quantitatively obtained and, as expected, found to depend on the sign and strength of the magnetostriction. Similar values for the surface anisotropy are obtained in comparison with bulk anisotropy as determined from quasi-static hysteresis loops measurements

  2. Measured pulse width of sonoluminescence flashes in the form of resonance radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Asis; Arakeri, Vijay H.

    1998-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the measured flash widths from single and multibubble sonoluminescence are in subnanosecond or even picosecond regime. Here, we provide conclusive evidence for the existence of nanosecond multibubble sonoluminescence. This has become possible by our ability to find a medium from which exclusive sodium D line resonance radiation as a form of sonoluminescence is possible. The measured flash width of this emission is found to be in the range of tens of nanoseconds and is sensitively dependent on experimental parameters. Our finding is important since all the earlier pulse width measurements have been limited to emission with the physical source or species responsible for observed optical radiation not being clearly identified. We propose that the presently observed resonance radiation is from ``soft'' bubble collapse as analyzed by V. Kamath et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 248 (1993)].

  3. Tunable superconducting resonators with integrated trap structures for coupling with ultracold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, Benedikt; Wiedmaier, Dominik; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Bothner, Daniel [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    We intend to investigate a hybrid quantum system where ultracold atomic gases play the role of a long-living quantum memory, coupled to a superconducting qubit via a coplanar waveguide transmission line resonator. As a first step we developed a resonator chip containing a Z-shaped trapping wire for the atom trap. In order to suppress parasitic resonances due to stray capacitances, and to achieve good ground connection we use hybrid superconductor - normal conductor chips. As an additional degree of freedom we add a ferroelectric capacitor making the resonators voltage-tunable. We furthermore show theoretical results on the expected coupling strength between resonator and atomic cloud.

  4. Measuring cross-border regional integration with composite indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    Earlier quantitative studies on cross-border regional integration processes have commonly neglected science, technology and innovation (STI) indicators: even the most notable example of a composite indicator approach to measuring cross-border regional integration, i.e. the Oresund index, lacks...... a sub-category for STI. Consequently, by ignoring cross-border innovation and knowledge flows, the Oresund integration index fails to take into account one of the most important drivers of economic growth in cross-border regions. Therefore, a new composite STI indicator (sub-category) was introduced......-border regions....

  5. Measurements of resonance frequencies on prestressed concrete beams during post-tensioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, P.; Ryden, N.

    2011-01-01

    The reactor containment, which is a concrete structure prestressed vertically and horizontally, is the most essential safety barrier in a nuclear power plant and is designed to withstand a severe internal accident. The safety of the containment depends on the induced compressive stresses in the concrete, however due to various long-term mechanisms the tendon forces will decrease with time. Today, no methods exist for measuring these prestress losses in containments with bonded tendons and thus there is a need for non-destructive methods for estimating the losses in these structures. Recent results from non-linear ultrasonic measurements during uniaxial loading have demonstrated a strong acoustic and elastic effect in concrete. The present research applies resonant acoustic spectroscopy (RAS) during static loading and unloading of three prestressed concrete beams. At each load step multiple modes of vibration are measured using an accelerometer and a small impact source. Measured resonant frequencies increase with increasing compressive stress. The stress dependency of the modulus of elasticity indicates that the change in state of stress in a simple concrete structure can be estimated by simply measuring the resonance frequency

  6. Thermal measurement a requirement for monolithic microwave integrated circuit design

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Richard; Oxley, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal management of structures such as Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) is important, given increased circuit packing densities and RF output powers. The paper will describe the IR measurement technology necessary to obtain accurate temperature profiles on the surface of semiconductor devices. The measurement procedure will be explained, including the device mounting arrangement and emissivity correction technique. The paper will show how the measurement technique has be...

  7. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, G.; Rusponi, S.; Kavich, J.; Rizzini, A. Lodi; Piamonteze, C.; Nolting, F.; Tieg, C.; Thiele, J.-U.; Gambardella, P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni 73 Fe 18 Gd 7 Co 2 ) at the L 3 /L 2 -edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/√(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  8. Expected total counts for the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry measurements of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossa, Riccardo [Belgian nuclear research centre SCK.CEN (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Borella, Alessandro; Van der Meer, Klaas [Belgian nuclear research centre SCK.CEN. Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles. Av. F. D. Roosevelt 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive neutron technique that aims at a direct quantification of {sup 239}Pu in spent fuel assemblies by measuring the attenuation of the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu mass is estimated by calculating the SINRD signature, that is the ratio between the neutron counts in the fast energy region and around the 0.3 eV resonance region. The SINRD measurement approach in this study consisted in introducing a small neutron detector in the central guide tube of a PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. In order to measure the neutron flux in the energy regions defined in the SINRD signature, different detector types were used. The response of a bare {sup 238}U fission chamber is considered for the determination of the fast neutron flux, while other thermal-epithermal detectors wrapped in neutron absorbers are envisaged to measure the neutron flux around the resonance region. This paper provides an estimation of the total neutron counts that can be achieved with the detector types proposed for the SINRD measurement. In the first section a set of detectors are evaluated in terms of total neutron counts and sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content, in order to identify the optimal measurement configuration for each detector type. Then a study is performed to increase the total neutron counts by increasing the detector size. The study shows that the highest total neutron counts are achieved by using either {sup 3}He or {sup 10}B proportional counters because of the high neutron efficiency of these detectors. However, the calculations indicate that the biggest contribution to the measurement uncertainty is due to the measurement of the fast neutron flux. Finally, similar sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content is obtained by using the different detector types for the measurement of the neutron flux close to the resonance region. Therefore, the total neutron counts

  9. Energy saving and recovery measures in integrated urban water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, Gabriele; Sambito, Mariacrocetta

    2017-11-01

    The present paper describes different energy production, recovery and saving measures which can be applied in an integrated urban water system. Production measures are often based on the installation of photovoltaic systems; the recovery measures are commonly based on hydraulic turbines, exploiting the available pressure potential to produce energy; saving measures are based on substitution of old pumps with higher efficiency ones. The possibility of substituting some of the pipes of the water supply system can be also considered in a recovery scenario in order to reduce leakages and recovery part of the energy needed for water transport and treatment. The reduction of water losses can be obtained through the Active Leakage Control (ALC) strategies resulting in a reduction in energy consumption and in environmental impact. Measures were applied to a real case study to tested it the efficiency, i.e., the integrated urban water system of the Palermo metropolitan area in Sicily (Italy).

  10. Innovative Performance Measurement: an Integrative Perspective of Stakeholder's View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Fresno Palmira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Business Process Management (BPM has been increasingly focused as an holistic approach to manage organizations for better organizational effectiveness. BPM involves the use of innovative performance measurement systems to follow up, coordinate, control and improve processes and overall business efficacy and efficiency. In this paper we propose a global holistic perspective of integrated information, combining the view of all stakeholders and both qualitative and quantitative information, as a basic prerequisite for quality of information for better decision making. The paper includes findings from an empirical case study of measuring Parkinson's Disease Neurosurgery process, including stakeholder's view with an integrative perspective.

  11. Measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Schartner, E. P.; Brooks, J. L.; Hutchinson, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin and its derivatives) deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Chronic deficiency of vitamin B12 has been significantly associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. An effective and efficient method for measuring vitamin B12 concentration in human blood would enable ongoing tracking and assessment of this potential modifiable risk factor. In this work we present an optical sensor based on resonance Raman spectroscopy for rapid measurements of vitamin B12 in human blood serum. The measurement takes less than a minute and requires minimum preparation (centrifuging) of the collected blood samples.

  12. Measurement of resonances in 12 C + 4 He through inverse kinematics with thick targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, E.F.; Lizcano, D.; Martinez Q, E.; Fernandez, M.C.; Murillo, G.; Goldberg, V.; Skorodumov, B.B.; Rogachev, G.

    2003-01-01

    The excitation function of elastic scattering for the system 12 C + 4 He to energy from 0.5 to 3.5 MeV in the center of mass system (c.m.) was measured. We use a gassy thick target and the technique of inverse kinematics which allows to make measurements at 180 degrees in c.m. Using the R matrix theory those was deduced parameters of the resonances and the results were compared with measurements reported in the literature made with other techniques. (Author)

  13. Set up of a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters on integral experiments; Mise au point d`une methode d`ajustement des parametres de resonance sur des experiences integrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, P.

    1996-12-18

    Resonance parameters for actinides play a significant role in the neutronic characteristics of all reactor types. All the major integral parameters strongly depend on the nuclear data of the isotopes in the resonance-energy regions.The author sets up a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters taking into account the self-shielding effects and restricting the cross section deconvolution problem to a limited energy region. (N.T.).

  14. Measurement of resonance modes causative of beam position monitor signal noise in vacuum chamber of storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Youngdo; Hwang, Ilmoon; Park, Sungju; Kim, Changbum

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the position reading obtained from the beam position monitor (BPM) mounted at the storage ring can be corrupted by the resonance mode. We carried out a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of vacuum chambers of the storage ring of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) without simplified modeling to measure the frequencies of resonance modes excited in the vacuum chamber. The frequencies of resonance modes obtained by the eigenmode simulation are well matched with the peak frequencies of RF transmission scattering matrix (S 21 ) graph of sector vacuum chamber measured using a network analyzer. It is found that a transverse electric (TE) resonance mode exists in the operation frequency band of BPM and the vertically oriented electric field of TE resonance mode is linked to the BPM position reading noise. Based on this study, we can easily design a vacuum chamber free from the BPM position reading noise caused by the TE resonance mode.

  15. Resonance structure of 32S+n from measurements of neutron total and capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.; Johnson, C.H.; Winters, R.R.; Macklin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron total and capture cross sections of 32 S have been measured up to 1100 keV neutron energy [E/sub exc/( 33 S) =9700 keV]. Spin and parity assignments have been made for 28 of the 64 resonances found in this region. Values of total radiation widths, reduced neutron widths, level spacings, and neutron strength functions have been evaluated for s/sub 1/2/, p/sub 1/2/, p/sub 3/2/, and d/sub 5/2/ levels. Single particle contributions using the valency model account for a significant portion of the total radiation width only for the p/sub 1/2/-wave resonances. A significant number of resonances can be identified with reported levels excited in 32 S(d,p) and 29 Si(α,n) reactions. A calculation of the Maxwellian average cross section appropriate to stellar interiors indicates an average capture cross section at 30 keV, sigma-bar approx. = 4.2(2) mb, a result that is relatively insensitive to the assumed stellar temperature. Direct (potential) capture and the s-wave resonance capture contributions to the thermal capture cross section do not fully account for the reported thermal cross section (530 +- 40 mb) and a bound state is invoked to account for the discrepancy

  16. Fully integrated Q-switch for commercial high-power resonator with solitary XLMA-fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R.; Bachert, C.; Rehmann, G.; Weber, H.; Luxen, R.; Enns, H.; Schenk, M.; Hosdorf, S.; Marfels, S.; Bay, M.; Kösters, A.; Krause, V.; Giesberts, M.; Fitzau, O.; Hoffmann, H.-D.

    2018-02-01

    In surface processing applications the correlation of laser power to processing speed demands a further enhancement of the performance of short-pulsed laser sources with respect to the investment costs. The frequently applied concept of master oscillator power amplifier relies on a complex structure, parts of which are highly sensitive to back reflected amplified radiation. Aiming for a simpler, robust source using only a single ytterbium doped XLMA fiber in a q-switched resonator appears as promising design approach eliminating the need for subsequent amplification. This concept requires a high power-tolerant resonator which is provided by the multikilowatt laser platform of Laserline including directly water-cooled active fiber thermal management. Laserline GmbH and Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology joined their forces1 to upgrade standard high power laser sources for short-pulsed operation exceeding 1 kW of average power. Therefor a compact, modular qswitch has been developed. In this paper the implementation of a polarization independent q-switch into an off-the-shelf multi-kilowatt diodepumped continuous wave fiber source is shown. In this early step of implementation we demonstrated more than 1000 W of average power at pulse lengths below 50 ns FWHM and 7.5 mJ pulse energy. The M2 corresponds to 9.5. Reliability of the system is demonstrated based on measurements including temperature and stability records. We investigated the variation possibilities concerning pulse parameters and shape as well as upcoming challenges in power up-scaling.

  17. Measurements of (p,γ) resonance strengths in the s-d shell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbertink, G.A.P.; Endt, P.M.

    1966-01-01

    Resonace strengths of selected resonances in the Ep=0.3−2.1 MeV region in the (p, γ) reactions on 23Na, 24–24Mg, 27Al, 28–30Si, 31P, 32, 34S, 35, 37Cl, 39, 41K and 40Ca are compared through relative yield measurements, using targets of many different chemical compounds, each containing at least two

  18. Towards integrating environmental performance in divisional performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C Ngwakwe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests an integration of environmental performance measurement (EPM into conventional divisional financial performance measures as a catalyst to enhance managers’ drive toward cleaner production and sustainable development. The approach is conceptual and normative; and using a hypothetical firm, it suggests a model to integrate environmental performance measure as an ancillary to conventional divisional financial performance measures. Vroom’s motivation theory and other literature evidence indicate that corporate goals are achievable in an environment where managers’ efforts are recognised and thus rewarded. Consequently the paper suggests that environmentally motivated managers are important to propel corporate sustainability strategy toward desired corporate environmental governance and sustainable economic development. Thus this suggested approach modestly adds to existing environmental management accounting (EMA theory and literature. It is hoped that this paper may provide an agenda for further research toward a practical application of the suggested method in a firm.

  19. Mars Atmospheric Entry Integrated Navigation with Partial Intermittent Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-shan Lou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal degradation suffered by the vehicle is a combination brownout and blackout during Mars atmospheric entry. The communications brownout means that signal fades and blackout means that the signal is lost completely. The communications brownout and blackout periods are analyzed and predicted with an altitude and velocity profiles. In the brownout period, the range measurements between the vehicle and the orbiters are modeled as intermittent measurements with the radio signal arrival probabilities, which are distributed as a Rayleigh distribution of the electron number density around the entry vehicle. A new integrated navigation strategy during the Mars atmospheric entry phase is proposed to consider the probabilities of the radio measurements in the communications brownout and blackout periods under the IMU/beacon scenario based on the information filter with intermittent measurements. Numerical navigation simulations are designed to show the performance of the proposed navigation strategy under the integrated navigation scenario.

  20. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zamora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm≤1.5° were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79−11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR, which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  1. Design and theoretical analysis of a resonant sensor for liquid density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dezhi; Shi, Jiying; Fan, Shangchun

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of on-line liquid density measurements, a sensor equipped with a tuning fork as the resonant sensitive component is designed in this paper. It is a quasi-digital sensor with simple structure and high precision. The sensor is based on resonance theory and composed of a sensitive unit and a closed-loop control unit, where the sensitive unit consists of the actuator, the resonant tuning fork and the detector and the closed-loop control unit comprises precondition circuit, digital signal processing and control unit, analog-to-digital converter and digital-to-analog converter. An approximate parameters model of the tuning fork is established and the impact of liquid density, position of the tuning fork, temperature and structural parameters on the natural frequency of the tuning fork are also analyzed. On this basis, a tuning fork liquid density measurement sensor is developed. In addition, experimental testing on the sensor has been carried out on standard calibration facilities under constant 20 °C, and the sensor coefficients are calibrated. The experimental results show that the repeatability error is about 0.03% and the accuracy is about 0.4 kg/m(3). The results also confirm that the method to increase the accuracy of liquid density measurement is feasible.

  2. Integral tightness measurements at the Paks-1 nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubner, R.; Techy, Z. (Villamosenergiaipari Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-01-01

    The containment system experiments of the Paks-1 nuclear reactor are described. The integrated tightness measurements of the hermetic system were completed in 1982. The principles and methods and the evaluation of the results of the measurements are discussed. Some features of the filtration characteristics are demonstrated using relative values and a method enabling the description of the physical contents of the characteristics by flow technical functions is outlined.

  3. Prospects for direct measurement of time-integrated Bs mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siccama, I.

    1994-01-01

    This note investigates the prospects of measuring time-integrated B s mixing. Three inclusive decay modes of the B s meson are discussed. For each reconstruction mode, the expected number of events and the different background channels are discussed. Estimates are given for the uncertainty on the mixing parameter χ s . (orig.)

  4. Variational measures and the Kurzweil-Henstock integral

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwabik, Štefan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2009), s. 731-752 ISSN 0139-9918 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : variational measure * Kurzweil-Henstock integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.308, year: 2009

  5. Integration of parametric measures and the statics of masonry panels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucchesi, M.; Šilhavý, Miroslav; Zani, N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2011), s. 33-44 ISSN 1867-6936 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : masonry panels * limit analysis * integration of measures Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.springerlink.com/content/e0086750m731182u/

  6. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  7. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    , corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory...... arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105 +/- 31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate......Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve...

  8. Integrated test plan ResonantSonic drilling system technology demonstration-1995, at the Hanford Site: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLellan, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration test of the ResonantSonic drilling system. This demonstration is part of the Office of Technology Development's Volatile Organic Compound Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). Two main purposes of this demonstration are (1) to continue testing the ResonantSonic drilling system compatibility with the Hanford Site waste characterization programs, and (2) to transfer this method for use at the Hanford Site, other government sites, and the private sector. The ResonantSonic method is a dry drilling technique. Field testing of this method began in July 1993. During the next four months, nine holes were drilled, and continuous core samples were retrieved. Penetration rates were 2 to 3 times the baseline, and the operational downtime rate was less than 10%. Successfully demonstrated equipment refinements included a prototype 300 series ResonantSonic head, a new drill rod design for 18-centimeter diameter pipe, and an automated pipe handling system. Various configurations of sampling equipment and drill bits were tested, depending on geologic conditions. The principal objective of the VOC-Arid ID is to determine the viability of emerging technologies that can be used to characterize, remediate, and/or monitor arid or semiarid sites containing VOCs (e.g., carbon tetrachloride) with or without associated metal and radionuclide contamination

  9. Measurement of resonant and $CP$ components in $\\overline{B}_s^0\\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Iakovenko, Viktor; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luisier, Johan; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polok, Grzegorz; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redford, Sophie; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wiggers, Leo; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-05-14

    The resonant structure of the decay $\\overline{B}_s^0\\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ is studied using data corresponding to 3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from $pp$ collisions by the LHC and collected by the LHCb detector. Five interfering $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ states are required to describe the decay: $f_0(980),~f_0(1500),~f_0(1790),~f_2(1270)$, and $f_2^{\\prime}(1525)$. An alternative model including these states and a non-resonant $J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ component also provides a good description of the data. Based on the different transversity components measured for the spin-2 intermediate states, the final state is found to be compatible with being entirely $CP$-odd. The $CP$-even part is found to be $<2.3$% at 95% confidence level. The $f_0(500)$ state is not observed, allowing a limit to be set on the absolute value of the mixing angle with the $f_0(980)$ of $<7.7^{\\circ}$ at 90% confidence level, consistent with a tetraquark interpretation of the $f_0(980)$ substructure.

  10. Improved method for measuring the electric fields in microwave cavity resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, J.C.; Herrmann, H.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field distribution in microwave cavities is commonly measured by frequency perturbation techniques. For many cavity modes which are important in accelerator applications, the standard bead-pulling technique cannot provide adequate discrimination between fields parallel and perpendicular to the particle trajectory, leading to inaccurate and ambiguous results. A method is described which substantially increases the directivity of the measurements. The method has been successfully used to determine the accelerator-related cavity parameters at frequencies up to three times the fundamental resonant frequency

  11. Measurements of the two-body photodisintegration of 3 He in the Δ(1236) resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassen, H.J.; Hegerath, A.; Loers, W.; Mecking, B.; Noeldeke, G.; Reichelt, T.; Stanek, H.

    1981-07-01

    The 3 He (γ,p) d reaction has been measured in the photon energy region between 200 MeV and 450 MeV at proton c.m. angles between 20 0 and 150 0 . Protons and deuterons were detected in coincidence with two time-of-flight spectromters consisting of scintillation counters; both particles were identified and their energies and angles were measured. The angular distributions show a strong forward peak. The differential cross sections fall off with increasing photon energy without showing a significant influence of the Δ resonance. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of electron paramagnetic resonance using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuki, Kohei; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hangyo, Masanori

    2011-12-05

    We present a frequency-domain electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement system using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. A crossed polarizer technique is utilized to increase the sensitivity in detecting weak ESR signals of paramagnets caused by magnetic dipole transitions between magnetic sublevels. We demonstrate the measurements of ESR signal of paramagnetic copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate with uniaxial anisotropy of the g-factor under magnetic fields up to 10 T. The lineshape of the obtained ESR signals agrees well with the theoretical predictions for a powder sample with the uniaxial anisotropy.

  13. Measurement of inverse pion photoproduction at energies spanning the N(1440) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, A.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Briscoe, W.J.; Arndt, R.A.; Bennhold, C.; Workman, R.L.; Prakhov, S.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Clajus, M.; Marusic, A.; McDonald, S.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Price, J.W.; Tippens, W.B.; Allgower, C.E.; Spinka, H.; Bekrenev, V.; Kulbardis, A.; Kozlenko, N.; Kruglov, S.

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the process π - p→γn have been measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer. Measurements were made at 18 pion momenta from 238 to 748 MeV/c, corresponding to E γ for the inverse reaction from 285 to 769 MeV. The data have been used to evaluate the γn multipoles in the vicinity of the N(1440) resonance. We compare our data and multipoles to previous determinations

  14. Measurement of the average lifetime of the beauty hadrons on the Z resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, D.

    1997-01-01

    From a fit to the impact parameter distribution of inclusive electron and muons from semileptonic b decay, the average lifetime of beauty hadrons produced in e + e - collisions on the Z resonance was measured to be: T B =1.543+-0.016(est)+-0.024(sis)ps Combining this measurement with the earlier semileptonic braching ratio B gamma(B→y ν Χ) the Cabbibo-Kowayashi-Maskawa matrix element vertical barV cb vertical bar is determined to be: vertical barV cb vertical bar=(38.8+-0.8 (exp)+- ''3.0 2 .6 (teor))x10 -3

  15. Measurements of the anomalous RF surface resistance of niobium using a dielectric resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, D.; Bolore, M.; Bonin, B.; Jacques, E.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The surface resistance of high and low RRR niobium plates at 4.2 K and 1.8 K has been measured as a function of many processing and testing parameters. A dielectric resonator was used instead of a resonant cavity. This resonator offered the ability to make many, sensitive measurements with an efficient use of time and helium. It was found that the surface resistance, R s , of RRR=190 niobium increased noticeably from the theoretical value if the cooling rate was slower than∼10 K/min. Fast-cooled plates subsequently warmed to 130 K, and the recooled, showed a larger increase in R s than plates warmed to either 100 K or 160 K. Both chemically polished, and electropolished RRR=190 plates showed the effects of the 'Q-virus'. A heat treatment of 200 deg C made the RRR=190 plates less susceptible to the 'Q-virus'. RRR=30 niobium plates did not show any increase in R s , regardless of treatment. (author)

  16. 2H{ 19F} REDOR for distance measurements in biological solids using a double resonance spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grage, Stephan L.; Watts, Jude A.; Watts, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A new approach for distance measurements in biological solids employing 2H{ 19F} rotational echo double resonance was developed and validated on 2H, 19F- D-alanine and an imidazopyridine based inhibitor of the gastric H +/K +-ATPase. The 2H- 19F double resonance experiments presented here were performed without 1H decoupling using a double resonance NMR spectrometer. In this way, it was possible to benefit from the relatively longer distance range of fluorine without the need of specialized fluorine equipment. A distance of 2.5 ± 0.3 Å was measured in the alanine derivative, indicating a gauche conformation of the two labels. In the case of the imidazopyridine compound a lower distance limit of 5.2 Å was determined and is in agreement with an extended conformation of the inhibitor. Several REDOR variants were compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Composite fluorine dephasing pulses were found to enhance the frequency bandwidth significantly, and to reduce the dependence of the performance of the experiment on the exact choice of the transmitter frequency.

  17. Efficient method for the solution of the energy dependent integral Boltzmann transport equation in the resolved resonance energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, G.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The calculation of neutron-nuclei reaction rates in the lower resolved resonance region (167 eV - 1.855 eV) is considered in this dissertation. Particular emphasis is placed on the calculation of these reaction rates for tight lattices where their accuracy is most important. The results of the continuous energy Monte Carlo code, VIM, are chosen as reference values for this study. The primary objective of this work is to develop a method for calculating resonance reaction rates which agree well with the reference solution, yet is efficient enough to be used by nuclear reactor fuel cycle designers on a production basis. A very efficient multigroup solution of the two spatial region energy dependent integral transport equation is developed. This solution, denoted the Broad Group Integral Method (BGIM), uses escape probabilities to obtain the spatial coupling between regions and uses an analytical flux shape within a multigroup to obtain weighted cross sections which account for the rapidly varying resonance cross sections. The multigroup lethargy widths chosen for the numerical integration of the two region energy-dependent neutron continuity equations can be chosen much wider (a factor of 30 larger) than in the direct numerical integration methods since the analytical flux shape is used to account for fine structure effects. The BGIM solution is made highly efficient through the use of these broad groups. It is estimated that for a 10 step unit cell fuel cycle depletion calculation, the computer running time for a production code such as EPRI-LEOPARD would be increased by only 6% through the use of the more accurate and intricate BGIM method in the lower resonance energy region

  18. Laser-ultrasound spectroscopy apparatus and method with detection of shear resonances for measuring anisotropy, thickness, and other properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Daniel; Moreau, Andre; Dubois, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Bussiere, Jean; Lord, Martin; Padioleau, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting shear resonances includes structure and steps for applying a radiation pulse from a pulsed source of radiation to an object to generate elastic waves therein, optically detecting the elastic waves generated in the object, and analyzing the elastic waves optically detected in the object. These shear resonances, alone or in combination with other information, may be used in the present invention to improve thickness measurement accuracy and to determine geometrical, microstructural, and physical properties of the object. At least one shear resonance in the object is detected with the elastic waves optically detected in the object. Preferably, laser-ultrasound spectroscopy is utilized to detect the shear resonances.

  19. Measurement and resonance analysis of neutron transmissions through four samples of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.; Difilippo, F.C.; Ingle, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate total and partial cross sections for 238 U are important for nuclear reactor design. In the resolved resonance region, energies below 4.0 keV, these cross sections are described in terms of individual resonance parameters of which the neutron widths in the 1.5 to 4.0 keV region from various workers appear discrepant. In order to determine these widths, (0.880 to 100.0 keV) neutron transmissions through 0.076, 0.254, 1.080, and 3.620 cm thick enriched 238 U samples were measured, and (0.880 to 100.0 keV) range transmissions were analyzed

  20. Elastic moduli of faceted aluminum nitride nanotubes measured by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan, G; Cook, R F; Ciobanu, C V; Thayer, T P; Wang, G T; Creighton, J R; Purushotham, K P; Bendersky, L A

    2009-01-01

    A new methodology for determining the radial elastic modulus of a one-dimensional nanostructure laid on a substrate has been developed. The methodology consists of the combination of contact resonance atomic force microscopy (AFM) with finite element analysis, and we illustrate it for the case of faceted AlN nanotubes with triangular cross-sections. By making precision measurements of the resonance frequencies of the AFM cantilever-probe first in air and then in contact with the AlN nanotubes, we determine the contact stiffness at different locations on the nanotubes, i.e. on edges, inner surfaces, and outer facets. From the contact stiffness we have extracted the indentation modulus and found that this modulus depends strongly on the apex angle of the nanotube, varying from 250 to 400 GPa for indentation on the edges of the nanotubes investigated.

  1. Optical and magnetic resonance measurements of a segmented poly(ester urethane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, D.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Bennett, B.L.; Orler, E.B.; Wrobleski, D.A.; Smith, M.E.; Jahan, M.S.; Thomas, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    X-ray-induced damage in Estane(registered trademark)5703 has been studied by luminescence, optical absorption and electron spin resonance techniques in the temperature interval ∼10-300 K. Molecular motion of the polymer soft segment, as determined by viscoelastic measurements, is correlated with features in the glow curve, indicating charge detrapping via thermal destruction of cavity traps. Spectral emission is characterized by four Lorentzian bands with maxima at 2.38, 2.55, 2.74 and 2.93 eV, which are attributed to triplet-to-singlet electronic transitions of the phenyl group in the polymer hard segment. Absorption peaks at 3.97, 4.29 and 4.46 eV are also assigned to transitions within this group. Several radicals with overlapping resonances are induced at 35 K, which, with increasing temperature, evolve into the relatively stable peroxy free-radical at room temperature

  2. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1 in the Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Perry Anthony; Antonov, R.; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Bauer, J.M.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Vincent Breton; Button-Shafer, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; T.E. Chupp; J. Clendenin; C. Comptour; K.P. Coulter; G. Court; Donald Crabb; M. Daoudi; Donal Day; F.S. Dietrich; James Dunne; H. Dutz; R. Erbacher; J. Fellbaum; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; D. Garvey; R. Gearhart; Javier Gomez; P. Grenier; Keith Griffioen; S. Hoeibraten; Emlyn Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; J.R. Johnson; D. Kawall; Andreas Klein; Sebastian Kuhn; M. Kuriki; Richard Lindgren; T.J. Liu; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; Tomoyuki Maruyama; X.K. Maruyama; James Mccarthy; Werner Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; J. Morgenstern; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; C. Prescott; R. Prepost; P. Raines; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; A. Rijllart; Yves Roblin; L. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Ingo Sick; Lee Smith; Tim Smith; M. Spengos; F. Staley; P. Steiner; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; F. Suekane; Z.M. Szalata; Huabin Tang; Y. Terrien; Tracy Usher; Dieter Walz; Frank Wesselmann; J.L. White; K. Witte; C. Young; Brad Youngman; Haruo Yuta; G. Zapalac; Benedikt Zihlmann; Zimmermann, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g 1 p and g 1 d in the region of the nucleon resonances for W 2 2 and Q 2 ≅ 0.5 and Q 2 ≅ 1.2 GeV 2 by inelastically scattering 9.7 GeV polarized electrons off polarized 15 NH 3 and 15 ND 3 targets. We observe significant structure in g 1 p in the resonance region. We have used the present results, together with the deep-inelastic data at higher W 2 , to extract Γ(Q 2 ) (triple b ond) ∫ 0 1 g 1 (x,Q 2 ) dx. This is the first information on the low-Q 2 evolution of Gamma toward the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn limit at Q 2 = 0

  3. Measurement of sup 15 O(. alpha. ,. gamma. ) sup 19 Ne resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnus, P V; Smith, M S; Howard, A J; Parker, P D [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Nuclear Structure Lab.; Champagne, A E [Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1990-01-08

    States in {sup 19}Ne above the {sup 15}O+{alpha} threshold were populated by means of the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne* reaction, and their alpha-particle decays to the {sup 15}O ground state were measured. The branching ratios {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}/{Gamma}{sub total} for the E{sub c.m.}=850-, 1020-, 1971-, 1183- and 1563-keV resonances in {sup 15}O+{alpha} were determined. This information together with alpha-particle and/or gamma-ray partial widths (determined from knowledge of these quantities for the mirror states in {sup 19}F) determines the strengths of these {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne resonances and the {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate for temperatures between 7x10{sup 8} and 3x10{sup 9} K. (orig.).

  4. Consistency among integral measurements of aggregate decay heat power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, H.; Sagisaka, M.; Oyamatsu, K.; Kukita, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Persisting discrepancies between summation calculations and integral measurements force us to assume large uncertainties in the recommended decay heat power. In this paper, we develop a hybrid method to calculate the decay heat power of a fissioning system from those of different fissioning systems. Then, this method is applied to examine consistency among measured decay heat powers of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu at YAYOI. The consistency among the measured values are found to be satisfied for the {beta} component and fairly well for the {gamma} component, except for cooling times longer than 4000 s. (author)

  5. Device for the integral measurement of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheron, Francois.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to devices for the integral determination of ionizing radiations, particularly to the construction of a portable dosemeter. Portable measuring instruments have been suggested in the past, particularly dosemeters in which the discharge of a capacitor under the action of ionizing radiations is measured. Since the charge of a capacitor is not stable owing to dielectric imperfections, these measuring instruments have to be recalibrated at frequent intervals. To overcome this drawback, the invention suggests using the discharge of an electret, electrically charged to a pre-set initial value, under the action of ionizing radiations, as the transducer means of a dosemeter used in conjunction with display or warning systems [fr

  6. Cultural adaptation and translation of measures: an integrated method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidani, Souraya; Guruge, Sepali; Miranda, Joyal; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Varcoe, Colleen

    2010-04-01

    Differences in the conceptualization and operationalization of health-related concepts may exist across cultures. Such differences underscore the importance of examining conceptual equivalence when adapting and translating instruments. In this article, we describe an integrated method for exploring conceptual equivalence within the process of adapting and translating measures. The integrated method involves five phases including selection of instruments for cultural adaptation and translation; assessment of conceptual equivalence, leading to the generation of a set of items deemed to be culturally and linguistically appropriate to assess the concept of interest in the target community; forward translation; back translation (optional); and pre-testing of the set of items. Strengths and limitations of the proposed integrated method are discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Electronics/avionics integrity - Definition, measurement and improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, W.; Rasty, J.; Chen, M.; Kim, Y.

    The authors report on the results obtained from an extensive, three-fold research project: (1) to search the open quality and reliability literature for documented information relative to electronics/avionics integrity; (2) to interpret and evaluate the literature as to significant concepts, strategies, and tools appropriate for use in electronics/avionics product and process integrity efforts; and (3) to develop a list of critical findings and recommendations that will lead to significant progress in product integrity definition, measurement, modeling, and improvements. The research consisted of examining a broad range of trade journals, scientific journals, and technical reports, as well as face-to-face discussions with reliability professionals. Ten significant recommendations have been supported by the research work.

  8. Development of an integrated control and measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manges, W.W.

    1984-03-01

    This thesis presents a tutorial on the issues involved in the development of a minicomputer-based, distributed intelligence data acquisition and process control system to support complex experimental facilities. The particular system discussed in this thesis is under development for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). In the AVLIS program, we were careful to integrate the computer sections of the implementation into the instrumentation system rather than adding them as an appendage. We then addressed the reliability and availability of the system as a separate concern. Thus, our concept of an integrated control and measurement (ICAM) system forms the basis for this thesis. This thesis details the logic and philosophy that went into the development of this system and explains why the commercially available turn-key systems generally are not suitable. Also, the issues involved in the specification of the components for such an integrated system are emphasized

  9. In Search of an Integrative Measure of Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamond H. Madden

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available International trends towards people-centred, integrative care and support require any measurement of functioning and disability to meet multiple aims. The information requirements of two major Australian programs for disability and rehabilitation are outlined, and the findings of two searches for suitable measures of functioning and disability are analysed. Over 30 current measures of functioning were evaluated in each search. Neither search found a generic measure of functioning suitable for these multibillion dollar programs, relevant to a wide range of people with a variety of health conditions and functioning experiences, and capable of indicating support needs, associated costs, progress and outcomes. This unsuccessful outcome has implications internationally for policy-relevant information for disability, rehabilitation and related programs. The paper outlines the features of an Integrative Measure of Functioning (IMF based on the concepts of functioning and environmental factors in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. An IMF would be applicable across a variety of health conditions, settings and purposes, ranging from individual assessment to public health. An IMF could deliver person-centred, policy-relevant information for a range of programs, promoting harmonised language and measurement and supporting international trends in human services and public health.

  10. In search of an integrative measure of functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Rosamond H; Glozier, Nick; Fortune, Nicola; Dyson, Maree; Gilroy, John; Bundy, Anita; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Lukersmith, Sue; Mpofu, Elias; Madden, Richard

    2015-05-26

    International trends towards people-centred, integrative care and support require any measurement of functioning and disability to meet multiple aims. The information requirements of two major Australian programs for disability and rehabilitation are outlined, and the findings of two searches for suitable measures of functioning and disability are analysed. Over 30 current measures of functioning were evaluated in each search. Neither search found a generic measure of functioning suitable for these multibillion dollar programs, relevant to a wide range of people with a variety of health conditions and functioning experiences, and capable of indicating support needs, associated costs, progress and outcomes. This unsuccessful outcome has implications internationally for policy-relevant information for disability, rehabilitation and related programs. The paper outlines the features of an Integrative Measure of Functioning (IMF) based on the concepts of functioning and environmental factors in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). An IMF would be applicable across a variety of health conditions, settings and purposes, ranging from individual assessment to public health. An IMF could deliver person-centred, policy-relevant information for a range of programs, promoting harmonised language and measurement and supporting international trends in human services and public health.

  11. Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Jordan; Soederberg, Daniel; Lundell, Fredrik [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, Stockholm (Sweden); Swerin, Agne [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden-Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least anti r = 0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions. (orig.)

  12. Comparative measurements of independent yields of 239Pu fission fragments induced by thermal and resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundorin, N.A.; Kopach, Y.N.; Telezhnikov, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The independent yields of 239 Pu fission fragments by means of gamma-spectroscopy method were measured for light and heavy groups on the IBR-30 reactor in Dubna. Comparative analysis of experimental data for fission induced by thermal and resonance neutrons was performed. The possibilities to increase the measurement's precision consist of the employment of a HPGe detector with high efficiency and its open-quotes activeclose quotes shielding in the gamma spectrometer, as well as a high speed electronics system. In this way the number of identified fragments will be increased and independent yields will be measured to a precision of 1-3%. Measurements at the source with shorter neutron pulse duration to increase neutron energy resolution will be possible after the reconstruction of a modern neutron source in Dubna in accordance with the IREN project

  13. Precision mass measurements using the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Karthein, Jonas

    This thesis presents the implementation and improvement of the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (PI-ICR) detection technique at the ISOLTRAP experiment, located at the ISOLDE / CERN, with the purpose of on-line high-precision and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Extensive simulation studies were performed with the aim of improving the phase-imaging resolution and finding the optimal position for detector placement. Following the outcome of these simulations, the detector was moved out of a region of electric-field distortion and closer to the center of the Penning trap, showing a dramatic improvement in the quality and reproducibility of the phase-imaging measurements. A new image reconstitution and analysis software for the MCP-PS detector was written in Python and ROOT and introduced in the framework of PI-ICR mass measurements. The state of the art in the field of time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance measurements is illustrated through an analysis of on-line measurements of the mirror nuclei $...

  14. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail.

  15. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG, one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  16. Precision polarization measurements of atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F.; Vieira, D. J.; Zhao, X.

    2011-01-01

    Precision measurement of atomic and nuclear polarization is an essential step for beta-asymmetry measurement of radioactive atoms. In this paper, we report the polarization measurement of Rb atoms in an yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We have prepared a cold cloud of polarized Rb atoms in the YAG dipole trap by optical pumping and achieved an initial nuclear polarization of up to 97.2(5)%. The initial atom distribution in different Zeeman levels is measured by using a combination of microwave excitation, laser pushing, and atomic retrap techniques. The nuclear-spin polarization is further purified to 99.2(2)% in 10 s and maintained above 99% because the two-body collision loss rate between atoms in mixed spin states is greater than the one-body trap loss rate. Systematic effects on the nuclear polarization, including the off-resonance Raman scattering, magnetic field gradient, and background gas collisions, are discussed.

  17. Throughput Measurement of a Dual-Band MIMO Rectangular Dielectric Resonator Antenna for LTE Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Jamal; Jamaluddin, Mohd Haizal; Ahmad Khan, Aftab; Kamarudin, Muhammad Ramlee; Yen, Bruce Leow Chee; Owais, Owais

    2017-01-13

    An L-shaped dual-band multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) rectangular dielectric resonator antenna (RDRA) for long term evolution (LTE) applications is proposed. The presented antenna can transmit and receive information independently using fundamental TE 111 and higher order TE 121 modes of the DRA. TE 111 degenerate mode covers LTE band 2 (1.85-1.99 GHz), 3 (1.71-1.88 GHz), and 9 (1.7499-1.7849 GHz) at f r = 1.8 GHz whereas TE 121 covers LTE band 7 (2.5-2.69 GHz) at f r = 2.6 GHz, respectively. An efficient design method has been used to reduce mutual coupling between ports by changing the effective permittivity values of DRA by introducing a cylindrical air-gap at an optimal position in the dielectric resonator. This air-gap along with matching strips at the corners of the dielectric resonator keeps the isolation at a value more than 17 dB at both the bands. The diversity performance has also been evaluated by calculating the envelope correlation coefficient, diversity gain, and mean effective gain of the proposed design. MIMO performance has been evaluated by measuring the throughput of the proposed MIMO antenna. Experimental results successfully validate the presented design methodology in this work.

  18. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, A. M.; Homer, M. L.; Ksendzov, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  19. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated with th...... with two dyes, fluorescein, and Bodipy 650/665 X, showed good linear behavior over a wide range of concentrations. Minimally detected concentrations were 250 pM for fluorescein and 100 nM for Bodipy....

  20. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Robson, E-mail: robmacedo@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Fernandes, Juliano Lara [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil); Coelho, Otávio Rizzi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age.

  1. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Robson; Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti; Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza

    2013-01-01

    Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age

  2. Irradiance Impact on Pollution by Integrating Nephelometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Perrone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-wavelength integrating nephelometer measurements combined with short- (SW and long-wave (LW irradiance measurements were used to investigate the irradiance effects on the daily evolution of the particulate matter (PM at the ground level, and contribute to the characterization of the land–atmosphere interaction in pollution dispersal. The integrating nephelometer measurements have allowed characterizing the daily changes of the PM optical and microphysical properties by the aerosol scattering coefficient (σp and the scattering Ångström coefficient (å. We found that on a daily basis σp reached the minimum values when the irradiance reached the maximum values, since the convective motions, which favor the particle dispersion at the surface, increase with the irradiance. The å value, which is commonly used as qualitative indicator of the dominant particle size, has allowed evaluating the irradiance effects on the mean particle size distribution at the surface and revealed that the irradiance increase favors mainly the dispersion of the ground-level fine particles. Particle size-distribution measurements supported the last comment. Measurements were performed from 4 to 10 May 2015 when the study site was affected by a Saharan dust outbreak, to also evaluate the impact of long-range transported particles on the daily evolution of the ground-level particle’s properties and the SW and LW irradiance.

  3. Amotivation in schizophrenia: integrated assessment with behavioral, clinical, and imaging measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Daniel H; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Kantrowitz, Jacob J; Katchmar, Natalie; Vandekar, Lillie; Elliott, Mark A; Ruparel, Kosha

    2014-11-01

    Motivational deficits play a central role in disability caused by schizophrenia and constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. Negative symptoms have previously been linked to hypofunction in ventral striatum (VS), a core component of brain motivation circuitry. However, it remains unclear to what extent this relationship holds for specific negative symptoms such as amotivation, and this question has not been addressed with integrated behavioral, clinical, and imaging measures. Here, 41 individuals with schizophrenia and 37 controls performed a brief, computerized progressive ratio task (PRT) that quantifies effort exerted in pursuit of monetary reward. Clinical amotivation was assessed using the recently validated Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). VS function was probed during functional magnetic resonance imaging using a monetary guessing paradigm. We found that individuals with schizophrenia had diminished motivation as measured by the PRT, which significantly and selectively related to clinical amotivation as measured by the CAINS. Critically, lower PRT motivation in schizophrenia was also dimensionally related to VS hypofunction. Our results demonstrate robust dimensional associations between behavioral amotivation, clinical amotivation, and VS hypofunction in schizophrenia. Integrating behavioral measures such as the PRT will facilitate translational efforts to identify biomarkers of amotivation and to assess response to novel therapeutic interventions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Low momentum transfer measurements of pion electroproduction and virtual Compton scattering at the Delta resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Adam [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Non-spherical components of the nucleon wave function are measured through p(e,e'p)π0 experiment at the Δ+(1232) resonance for Q2 = 0.04, 0.09, and 0.13 (GeV=c)2 utilizing the Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) pulsed beam and Hall A spectrometers. The new data extend the measurements of the Coulomb quadrupole amplitude to the lowest momentum transfer ever reached. The results disagree with predictions of constituent quark models and are in reasonable agreement with dynamical calculations that include pion cloud effects, chiral effective field theory and lattice calculations. The reported measurements indicate that improvement is required to the theoretical calculations and provide valuable input that will allow their refinements. The Coulomb to magnetic multipole ratio (CMR) and generalized polarizability (GP) of the nucleon are also measured through virtual Compton scattering (VCS) for Q2 = 0.2(GeV=c)2 utilizing the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) continuous beam and A1 spectrometers. This data represents the first low Q2 GP measurement at the Δ+(1232) resonance. The GP measurement explores a region where previous data and theoretical calculations disagree. The CMR measurement will be the first VCS extraction to compare with world data generated through pion electroproduction. The Dispersion Relation (DR) model used for the VCS extraction provides a new theoretical framework for the data signal and backgrounds that is largely independent from the pion electroproduction models. The independence of the DR from the traditional models provides a strong crosscheck on the ability of the models to isolate the data signal.

  5. Towards Motion-Insensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Dynamic Field Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads

    motion during scanning and update the MRI scanner in real-time such that the imaging volume follows the head motion (prospective motion correction). In this thesis, prospective motion correction is presented where head motion is determined from signals measured with an electroencephalography (EEG) cap......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is frequently used for both clinical diagnosis and brain research. This is due to the great versatility of the technique and the excellent ability to distinguish different types of soft tissue. The image quality is, however, heavily degraded when...

  6. A measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters at the SLC [Stanford Linear Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.

    1989-11-01

    We have measured the resonance parameters of the Z boson using 480 hadronic and Leptonic Z decays collected by the Mark II Detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. We find the Mass to be 91.14 ± 0.12 GeV/c 2 , and the width to be 2.42 +0.45 -0.35 GeV. If we constrain the visible width to its Standard Model value, we find a partial width to invisible decay modes corresponding to 2.8 ± 0.6 neutrino species with a 95% confidence level limit of 3.9. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...... solutions of the same ionic strength. Saturation with a solution that contained divalent ions caused a major shift on the distribution of the relaxation time. The changes were probably due to precipitats forming extra internal surface in the sample. Sonic velocities were relatively low in the MgCl2 solution...

  8. Measures of Morphological Complexity of Gray Matter on Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Control Age Grouping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan D. Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Current brain-age prediction methods using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI attempt to estimate the physiological brain age via some kind of machine learning of chronological brain age data to perform the classification task. Such a predictive approach imposes greater risk of either over-estimate or under-estimate, mainly due to limited training data. A new conceptual framework for more reliable MRI-based brain-age prediction is by systematic brain-age grouping via the implementation of the phylogenetic tree reconstruction and measures of information complexity. Experimental results carried out on a public MRI database suggest the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  9. Measurement of changes in nuclear charge radii of 2r by laser-induced resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Khoang Tkhi Kim Khueh; Chan Kong Tam; Kul'dzhanov, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    The optical isotopic shifts of Zr stable isotopes have been measured in three atomic transitions of type 4d 2 5s 2 → 4d 2 5s5p using the technique of laser-induced resonance fluorescence. The changes of nuclear mean-square charge radius Δ 2 > have been determined. The extracted values of Δ 2 > are compared to predictions of the droplet model. It is shown that the droplet model calculations can be made to agree with the experimental results, if changes of nuclear dynamical octupole deformation and of surface diffuseness parameter are taken into account

  10. Measure of hydrogen concentration profile in materials by resonant nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, R.P.; Zawislak, F.C.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for determining the profile of hydrogen concentration in proximities of the surface of materials, is presented. The preliminary measurements were done, using the Pelletron accelerator at Sao Paulo University (USP), in Brazil, for the resonant-nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F, α γ) 16 O. By using this reaction the technique is sensitive for concentrations above 500 ppm, which could be reduced to 100 ppm through special shieldings and other techniques to reduce the background radiation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Sensitivity analysis of magnetic field measurements for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Cihan; Scheffler, Klaus; Ehses, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical use of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) still requires significant sensitivity improvements. Here, the measurement of the current-induced magnetic field (DBz,c) is improved using systematic efficiency analyses and optimization of multi-echo spin echo...... (MESE) and steady-state free precession free induction decay (SSFP-FID) sequences. Theory and Methods: Considering T1, T2, and T 2 relaxation in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the MR magnitude images, the efficiency of MESE and SSFP-FID MREIT experiments, and its dependence on the sequence...

  12. Resonance parameters for measured keV neutron capture cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrove, A.R. de L

    1969-05-01

    All available neutron capture cross sections in the keV region ({approx} to 100 keV) have been fitted with resonance parameters. Capture cross sections for nuclides with reasonably well known average s-wave parameters, but no measured cross section, have been calculated and tabulated using p-and d- wave strength functions interpolated between fitted values. Several of these nuclides are of interest in the theory of slow nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in stars, and the product of cosmic abundance (due to the s-process) and capture cross section at 30 keV has been plotted versus mass number. (author)

  13. Integral alpha and gamma radiation measurements in dwelling houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripas, B.; Takacs, S.; Somogyi, G.; Nikl, I.

    1984-01-01

    A solid state nuclear track detector method is applied to determine radon and total alpha-exposures (time integral of activity concentrations). The mathematical description of the method of measurement by a passive device equipped with two plastic sheets is presented. Measurements have been carried out in 88 houses over a five-month period and in 20 houses every season for a whole year. Simultaneously with the seasonal measurements of alpha-exposures, the gamma doses were also determined by means of TL dosemeters. The mean exposures due to thoron and its progeny have been estimated by statistical methods. A possible connection between the measured quantities and the lung cancer rates in two settlements were examined. (Author)

  14. Development of the new gamma-ray calorimeter for the measurement of Pigmy Dipole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Mizuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Togano, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    A new γ-ray calorimeter CATANA (CAlorimeter for gamma γ-ray Transition in Atomic Nuclei at high isospin Asynmetry) has been developed to measure highly excited states like the pygmy dipole resonance and the giant dipole resonance. CATANA will be used with the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIBF. The excitation energy spectrum will be reconstructed combining the invariant mass of the reaction products measured by SAMURAI and γ-ray energies from CATANA. CATANA has focused on achieving a high detection efficiency. It is calculated as 56% for 1 MeV γ-rays from beam with a velocity of β = 0.6. The CATANA array consists of 200 CsI(Na) crystals and covers angles from 10 to 120 degrees along the beam axis. In this study, we have tested prototype crystals of CATANA to evaluate their performance. A position dependence of the light input have been measured and compared with a Monte-Carlo simulation based on GEANT4. In this talk, we will report the design of CATANA and the result of the tests and the simulation.

  15. Some resonances between Eastern thought and Integral Biomathics in the framework of the WLIMES formalism for modeling living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Plamen L; Ehresmann, Andrée C

    2017-12-01

    Forty-two years ago, Capra published "The Tao of Physics" (Capra, 1975). In this book (page 17) he writes: "The exploration of the atomic and subatomic world in the twentieth century has …. necessitated a radical revision of many of our basic concepts" and that, unlike 'classical' physics, the sub-atomic and quantum "modern physics" shows resonances with Eastern thoughts and "leads us to a view of the world which is very similar to the views held by mystics of all ages and traditions." This article stresses an analogous situation in biology with respect to a new theoretical approach for studying living systems, Integral Biomathics (IB), which also exhibits some resonances with Eastern thought. Stepping on earlier research in cybernetics 1 and theoretical biology, 2 IB has been developed since 2011 by over 100 scientists from a number of disciplines who have been exploring a substantial set of theoretical frameworks. From that effort, the need for a robust core model utilizing advanced mathematics and computation adequate for understanding the behavior of organisms as dynamic wholes was identified. At this end, the authors of this article have proposed WLIMES (Ehresmann and Simeonov, 2012), a formal theory for modeling living systems integrating both the Memory Evolutive Systems (Ehresmann and Vanbremeersch, 2007) and the Wandering Logic Intelligence (Simeonov, 2002b). Its principles will be recalled here with respect to their resonances to Eastern thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Accurate fluid force measurement based on control surface integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentink, David

    2018-01-01

    Nonintrusive 3D fluid force measurements are still challenging to conduct accurately for freely moving animals, vehicles, and deforming objects. Two techniques, 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a new technique, the aerodynamic force platform (AFP), address this. Both rely on the control volume integral for momentum; whereas PIV requires numerical integration of flow fields, the AFP performs the integration mechanically based on rigid walls that form the control surface. The accuracy of both PIV and AFP measurements based on the control surface integration is thought to hinge on determining the unsteady body force associated with the acceleration of the volume of displaced fluid. Here, I introduce a set of non-dimensional error ratios to show which fluid and body parameters make the error negligible. The unsteady body force is insignificant in all conditions where the average density of the body is much greater than the density of the fluid, e.g., in gas. Whenever a strongly deforming body experiences significant buoyancy and acceleration, the error is significant. Remarkably, this error can be entirely corrected for with an exact factor provided that the body has a sufficiently homogenous density or acceleration distribution, which is common in liquids. The correction factor for omitting the unsteady body force, {{{ {ρ f}} {1 - {ρ f} ( {{ρ b}+{ρ f}} )}.{( {{{{ρ }}b}+{ρ f}} )}}} , depends only on the fluid, {ρ f}, and body, {{ρ }}b, density. Whereas these straightforward solutions work even at the liquid-gas interface in a significant number of cases, they do not work for generalized bodies undergoing buoyancy in combination with appreciable body density inhomogeneity, volume change (PIV), or volume rate-of-change (PIV and AFP). In these less common cases, the 3D body shape needs to be measured and resolved in time and space to estimate the unsteady body force. The analysis shows that accounting for the unsteady body force is straightforward to non

  17. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems using magnetic resonance imaging and Monte Carlo computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. This method uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the anatomical makeup of an individual. A new MRI technique is also employed that is capable of resolving the fat and water content of the human tissue. This anatomical and biochemical information is used to model a mathematical phantom. Monte Carlo methods are then used to simulate the transport of radiation throughout the phantom. By modeling the detection equipment of the in vivo measurement system into the code, calibration factors are generated that are specific to the individual. Furthermore, this method eliminates the need for surrogate human structures in the calibration process. A demonstration of the proposed method is being performed using a fat/water matrix

  18. In vivo measurement of water self diffusion in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1987-01-01

    A new pulse sequence for in vivo diffusion measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. The pulse sequence was tested on phantoms to evaluate the accuracy, reproducibility and inplane variations. The sensitivity of the sequence was tested by measuring the self diffusion...... coefficient of water with different temperatures. This phantom study showed that the water self diffusion could be measured accurately and that the inplane deviation was less than +/- 10 per cent. Seven healthy volunteers were studied with a 10 mm thick slice through the lateral ventricles, clear differences...... between grey and white matter as well as regional differences within the white matter were seen. In two patients with infarction, alternations in water self diffusion were seen in the region of the infarct. Likewise, pronounced changes in brain water self diffusion were observed in a patient with benign...

  19. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty......-two of these patients also underwent measurement of the transverse relaxation time (T2). Only one plaque was evaluated in each patient. Based on prior knowledge, 12 plaques were classified as being 3 mo or less in age, and 7 plaques were classified as being more than 3 mo old. In all 25 plaques, water self......-diffusion was found to be higher than in apparently normal white matter. Furthermore, water self-diffusion was found to be higher in acute plaques compared with chronic plaques. Finally, a slight tendency toward a relationship between the diffusion capability and T2 was found. We believe that an increased diffusion...

  20. A Method for Eddy Current Field Measurement in Permanent Magnet Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Rui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a widely used medical imaging technique. In MRI system, gradient magnetic fields are used to code spatial information. However, the fast-switching electric currents in the gradients coils used to generate gradient fields also induce vortex electric field, often referred as eddy current, in the surrounding metal conductors. In this paper, a method for eddy current field measurement was proposed. Based on the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction, an eddy current field measuring device was designed. Combining hardware acquisition and software processing, the eddy current field was obtained by subtracting the ideal gradient field from the magnetic field measured experimentally, whose waveform could be displayed in real time. The proposed method was verified by experimental results.

  1. Automatic measurement of axial length of human eye using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Kiryu, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of axial length and the evaluation of three dimensional (3D) form of an eye are essential to evaluate the mechanism of myopia progression. We propose a method of automatic measurement of axial length including adjustment of the pulse sequence of short-term scan which could suppress influence of eyeblink, using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which acquires 3D images noninvasively. Acquiring T 2 -weighted images with 3.0 tesla MRI device and eight-channel phased-array head coil, we extracted left and right eye ball images, and then reconstructed 3D volume. The surface coordinates were calculated from 3D volume, fitting the ellipsoid model coordinates with the surface coordinates, and measured the axial length automatically. Measuring twenty one subjects, we compared the automatically measured values of axial length with the manually measured ones, then confirmed significant elongation in the axial length of myopia compared with that of emmetropia. Furthermore, there were no significant differences (P<0.05) between the means of automatic measurements and the manual ones. Accordingly, the automatic measurement process of axial length could be a tool for the elucidation of the mechanism of myopia progression, which would be suitable for evaluating the axial length easily and noninvasively. (author)

  2. A Differential Monolithically Integrated Inductive Linear Displacement Measurement Microsystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Podhraški

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An inductive linear displacement measurement microsystem realized as a monolithic Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC is presented. The system comprises integrated microtransformers as sensing elements, and analog front-end electronics for signal processing and demodulation, both jointly fabricated in a conventional commercially available four-metal 350-nm CMOS process. The key novelty of the presented system is its full integration, straightforward fabrication, and ease of application, requiring no external light or magnetic field source. Such systems therefore have the possibility of substituting certain conventional position encoder types. The microtransformers are excited by an AC signal in MHz range. The displacement information is modulated into the AC signal by a metal grating scale placed over the microsystem, employing a differential measurement principle. Homodyne mixing is used for the demodulation of the scale displacement information, returned by the ASIC as a DC signal in two quadrature channels allowing the determination of linear position of the target scale. The microsystem design, simulations, and characterization are presented. Various system operating conditions such as frequency, phase, target scale material and distance have been experimentally evaluated. The best results have been achieved at 4 MHz, demonstrating a linear resolution of 20 µm with steel and copper scale, having respective sensitivities of 0.71 V/mm and 0.99 V/mm.

  3. Measure and integral an introduction to real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeden, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Now considered a classic text on the topic, Measure and Integral: An Introduction to Real Analysis provides an introduction to real analysis by first developing the theory of measure and integration in the simple setting of Euclidean space, and then presenting a more general treatment based on abstract notions characterized by axioms and with less geometric content.Published nearly forty years after the first edition, this long-awaited Second Edition also:Studies the Fourier transform of functions in the spaces L1, L2, and Lp, 1 p Shows the Hilbert transform to be a bounded operator on L2, as an application of the L2 theory of the Fourier transform in the one-dimensional caseCovers fractional integration and some topics related to mean oscillation properties of functions, such as the classes of Hölder continuous functions and the space of functions of bounded mean oscillationDerives a subrepresentation formula, which in higher dimensions plays a role roughly similar to the one played by the fundamental theor...

  4. Determination of the resonance parameters for 232Th from high resolution transmission and capture measurements at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusegan, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Lobo, G.; Borella, A.; Volev, K.; Janeva, N.

    2003-01-01

    To deduce the resonance parameters for 232 Th in the resolved resonance region, high resolution transmission and capture measurements are being performed. The measurements are performed at the Time-Of-Flight facility GELINA. A comparison of experimental data resulting from capture (top) and transmission (bottom) are shown. The transmission measurements are performed at a 50 m flight path. The neutron are detected with a 0.25' thick lithium glass (NE912) placed in an Al sphere and viewed by a 5' EMI KQB photomultiplier orthogonal to the neutron beam axis. The injection of a stabilised light pulse in the detector during the measurements provided an efficient tool to control to better than 1% the gain of the entire electronics. The experimental set-up includes a sample-changer, placed at 23 m from the neutron source, which is driven by the acquisition system. The determination of the flight path length, was based on transmission of the 6.673 eV resonance of 238 U. We summarise, for the different energy regions of interest, the scheduled measurement conditions: the operation frequency of the accelerator and the target thickness. A simultaneous analysis of the data using REFIT will result in the resonance parameters from 0 to 4 keV. We show the result of a resonance shape analysis for the resonances at 21.8 and 23.5 eV. The resulting resonance parameters are important for the energy calibration and normalisation of the capture measurements in both the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The capture measurements are completed and were performed at a 60 m flight path. The sample consisted of a metallic natural thorium disc of 8 cm diameter and 1.0 mm thick, corresponding to a thickness of 3.176 10 -3 at/b. The neutron flux was measured with an ionisation chamber loaded with three back-to-back layers of about 40 μg/cm 2 10 B. The gamma rays, originating from the 232 Th(n,γ) reaction, were detected by four C 6 D 6 -based liquid scintillators (NE230) placed

  5. Integral image rendering procedure for aberration correction and size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Holger; Ihrig, Andreas; Ebenau, Melanie; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2014-05-20

    The challenge in rendering integral images is to use as much information preserved by the light field as possible to reconstruct a captured scene in a three-dimensional way. We propose a rendering algorithm based on the projection of rays through a detailed simulation of the optical path, considering all the physical properties and locations of the optical elements. The rendered images contain information about the correct size of imaged objects without the need to calibrate the imaging device. Additionally, aberrations of the optical system may be corrected, depending on the setup of the integral imaging device. We show simulation data that illustrates the aberration correction ability and experimental data from our plenoptic camera, which illustrates the capability of our proposed algorithm to measure size and distance. We believe this rendering procedure will be useful in the future for three-dimensional ophthalmic imaging of the human retina.

  6. Molecular resonances in 28SI + 28Si - Wobbling motions observed by angular correlation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uegaki, E.; Abe, Y.

    2014-01-01

    High-spin resonances observed in 28 Si+ 28 Si collisions are studied with a dinuclear molecular model. At high spins, a stable dinuclear configuration of the oblate-oblate system ( 28 Si+ 28 Si) is found to be an equator-equator (E-E) touching one. Normal modes have been investigated around the equilibrium, which are expected to be an origin of a large number of the resonances observed. Analyses of physical quantities are made and compared with the recent experimental data measured at Strasbourg. Since the E-E configuration is slightly triaxial, rotations of the total system induce mixing of K quantum numbers, called wobbling motion, which clearly explains the particle-γ angular correlations observed as well as the misalignments observed in the angular distributions, in a simple and natural way. Furthermore, predictions are given for the angular correlations of the wobbling excited states. The importance of the angular correlation measurements is stressed, which provide identification of the dinuclear configurations by spin orientations of the constituent nuclei 28 Si. (authors)

  7. Integrating patient satisfaction into performance measurement to meet improvement challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J E; Fisher, D L; Endorf-Olson, J J

    2000-05-01

    A Value Compass has been proposed to guide health care data collection. The "compass corners" represent the four types of data needed to meet health care customer expectations: appropriate clinical outcomes, improved functional status, patient satisfaction, and appropriate costs. Collection of all four types of data is necessary to select processes in need of improvement, guide improvement teams, and monitor the success of improvement efforts. INTEGRATED DATA AT BRYANLGH: BryanLGH Medical Center in Lincoln, Nebraska, has adopted multiple performance measurement systems to collect clinical outcome, financial, and patient satisfaction data into integrated databases. Data integration allows quality professionals at BryanLGH to identify quality issues from multiple perspectives and track the interrelated effects of improvement efforts. A CASE EXAMPLE: Data from the fourth quarter of 1997 indicated the need to improve processes related to cesarean section (C-section) deliveries. An interdisciplinary team was formed, which focused on educating nurses, physicians, and the community about labor support measures. Physicians were given their own rates of C-section deliveries. The C-section rate decreased from 27% to 19%, but per-case cost increased. PickerPLUS+ results indicated that BryanLGH obstetric patients reported fewer problems with receiving information than the Picker norm, but they reported more problems with the involvement of family members and friends. The data collected so far have indicated a decrease in the C-section rate and a need to continue to work on cost and psychosocial issues. A complete analysis of results was facilitated by integrated performance management systems. Successes have been easily tracked over time, and the need for further work on related processes has been clearly identified.

  8. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Staahlberg, F.; Thomsen, C.; Moegelvang, J.; Persson, B.; Lund Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve, corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105±31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate that in vivo blood flow measurements made with MRI based on wash-out effects, commonly used in multiple spin echo imaging, do not give reliable absolute values for blood flow in the femoral artery or vein. (orig.)

  9. Neutron Activation Resonance Integrals of 64Zn, 68Zn, 85Rb, 100Mo, 102Ru, 113In, 123Sb, and 180Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M. D.; Turjanski, R.; Ricabarra, G. H.

    1969-01-01

    The ratio of resonance integral to thermal activation cross sections of the isotopes 64 Zn, 68 Zn, 85 Rb, 100 Mo, 102 Ru, 113 In, 123 Sb, and 180 Hf relative to gold has been determined by measuring cadmium ratios. The standard gold or a secondary standard was mixed uniformly in the samples and the activities resolved with a lithium-drift germanium γ-ray spectrometer. Expressed as Westcott S 0 values the results were: 64 Zn = 2.06 ± 0.03, 68 Zn = 3.72 ± 0.14, 85 Rb = 18.4 ± 0.6, 100 Mo = 21.7 ± 0.8, 102 Ru = 3.76 ± 0.03, 113 In = 24.7 ± 0.5, 123 Sb = 28.3 ± 2.1, 180 Hf = 2.17 ± 0.09. All measurements are relative to S 0 = 17.7 for gold. (author)

  10. Integration of an Optical Ring Resonator Biosensor into a Self-Contained Microfluidic Cartridge with Active, Single-Shot Micropumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Geidel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While there have been huge advances in the field of biosensors during the last decade, their integration into a microfluidic environment avoiding external tubing and pumping is still neglected. Herein, we show a new microfluidic design that integrates multiple reservoirs for reagent storage and single-use electrochemical pumps for time-controlled delivery of the liquids. The cartridge has been tested and validated with a silicon nitride-based photonic biosensor incorporating multiple optical ring resonators as sensing elements and an immunoassay as a potential target application. Based on experimental results obtained with a demonstration model, subcomponents were designed and existing protocols were adapted. The newly-designed microfluidic cartridges and photonic sensors were separately characterized on a technical basis and performed well. Afterwards, the sensor was functionalized for a protein detection. The microfluidic cartridge was loaded with the necessary assay reagents. The integrated pumps were programmed to drive the single process steps of an immunoassay. The prototype worked selectively, but only with a low sensitivity. Further work must be carried out to optimize biofunctionalization of the optical ring resonators and to have a more suitable flow velocity progression to enhance the system’s reproducibility.

  11. Vision and dual IMU integrated attitude measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoting; Sun, Changku; Wang, Peng; Lu, Huang

    2018-01-01

    To determination relative attitude between two space objects on a rocking base, an integrated system based on vision and dual IMU (inertial determination unit) is built up. The determination system fuses the attitude information of vision with the angular determinations of dual IMU by extended Kalman filter (EKF) to obtain the relative attitude. One IMU (master) is attached to the measured motion object and the other (slave) to the rocking base. As the determination output of inertial sensor is relative to inertial frame, thus angular rate of the master IMU includes not only motion of the measured object relative to inertial frame but also the rocking base relative to inertial frame, where the latter can be seen as redundant harmful movement information for relative attitude determination between the measured object and the rocking base. The slave IMU here assists to remove the motion information of rocking base relative to inertial frame from the master IMU. The proposed integrated attitude determination system is tested on practical experimental platform. And experiment results with superior precision and reliability show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed attitude determination system.

  12. Estimation of the measurement uncertainty in magnetic resonance velocimetry based on statistical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschewski, Martin; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Gas Turbines and Aerospace Propulsion, Darmstadt (Germany); Freudenhammer, Daniel [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Center of Smart Interfaces, Darmstadt (Germany); Buchenberg, Waltraud B. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Grundmann, Sven [University of Rostock, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Rostock (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Velocity measurements with magnetic resonance velocimetry offer outstanding possibilities for experimental fluid mechanics. The purpose of this study was to provide practical guidelines for the estimation of the measurement uncertainty in such experiments. Based on various test cases, it is shown that the uncertainty estimate can vary substantially depending on how the uncertainty is obtained. The conventional approach to estimate the uncertainty from the noise in the artifact-free background can lead to wrong results. A deviation of up to -75% is observed with the presented experiments. In addition, a similarly high deviation is demonstrated with the data from other studies. As a more accurate approach, the uncertainty is estimated directly from the image region with the flow sample. Two possible estimation methods are presented. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of the measurement uncertainty in magnetic resonance velocimetry based on statistical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschewski, Martin; Freudenhammer, Daniel; Buchenberg, Waltraud B.; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Velocity measurements with magnetic resonance velocimetry offer outstanding possibilities for experimental fluid mechanics. The purpose of this study was to provide practical guidelines for the estimation of the measurement uncertainty in such experiments. Based on various test cases, it is shown that the uncertainty estimate can vary substantially depending on how the uncertainty is obtained. The conventional approach to estimate the uncertainty from the noise in the artifact-free background can lead to wrong results. A deviation of up to -75 % is observed with the presented experiments. In addition, a similarly high deviation is demonstrated with the data from other studies. As a more accurate approach, the uncertainty is estimated directly from the image region with the flow sample. Two possible estimation methods are presented.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement with Dictionary-optimized Sparse Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun-Bao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement (MRIM is an effective way of measuring materials. MRIM has wide applications in physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medical and material science, especially in medical diagnosis. It is feasible to improve the resolution of MR imaging through increasing radiation intensity, but the high radiation intensity and the longtime of magnetic field harm the human body. Thus, in the practical applications the resolution of hardware imaging reaches the limitation of resolution. Software-based super-resolution technology is effective to improve the resolution of image. This work proposes a framework of dictionary-optimized sparse learning based MR super-resolution method. The framework is to solve the problem of sample selection for dictionary learning of sparse reconstruction. The textural complexity-based image quality representation is proposed to choose the optimal samples for dictionary learning. Comprehensive experiments show that the dictionary-optimized sparse learning improves the performance of sparse representation.

  15. Parallel ion flow velocity measurement using laser induced fluorescence method in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Okamoto, Atsushi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ogiwara, Kohei; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Parallel ion flow velocity along a magnetic field has been measured using a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) argon plasma with a weakly-diverging magnetic field. To measure parallel flow velocity in a cylindrical plasma using the LIF method, the laser beam should be injected along device axis; however, the reflection of the incident beam causes interference between the LIF emission of the incident and reflected beams. Here we present a method of quasi-parallel laser injection at a small angle, which utilizes the reflected beam as well as the incident beam to obtain the parallel ion flow velocity. Using this method, we observed an increase in parallel ion flow velocity along the magnetic field. The acceleration mechanism is briefly discussed on the basis of the ion fluid model. (author)

  16. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  17. Integrated CMOS dew point sensors for relative humidity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Nicolo; Baglio, Salvatore; Castorina, Salvatore; Sacco, Vincenzo; Tringali, Cristina

    2004-07-01

    This work deals with the development of integrated relative humidity dew point sensors realized by adopting standard CMOS technology for applications in various fields. The proposed system is composed by a suspended plate that is cooled by exploiting integrated Peltier cells. The cold junctions of the cells have been spread over the plate surface to improve the homogeneity of the temperature distribution over its surface, where cooling will cause the water condensation. The temperature at which water drops occur, named dew point temperature, is a function of the air humidity. Measurement of such dew point temperature and the ambient temperature allows to know the relative humidity. The detection of water drops is achieved by adopting a capacitive sensing strategy realized by interdigited fixed combs, composed by the upper layer of the adopted process. Such a capacitive sensor, together with its conditioning circuit, drives a trigger that stops the cooling of the plate and enables the reading of the dew point temperature. Temperature measurements are achieved by means of suitably integrated thermocouples. The analytical model of the proposed system has been developed and has been used to design a prototype device and to estimate its performances. In such a prototype, the thermoelectric cooler is composed by 56 Peltier cells, made by metal 1/poly 1 junctions. The plate has a square shape with 200 μm side, and it is realized by exploiting the oxide layers. Starting from the ambient temperature a temperature variation of ΔT = 15 K can be reached in 10 ms thus allowing to measure a relative humidity greater than 40%.

  18. Path integral measure and triangulation independence in discrete gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    A path integral measure for gravity should also preserve the fundamental symmetry of general relativity, which is diffeomorphism symmetry. In previous work, we argued that a successful implementation of this symmetry into discrete quantum gravity models would imply discretization independence. We therefore consider the requirement of triangulation independence for the measure in (linearized) Regge calculus, which is a discrete model for quantum gravity, appearing in the semi-classical limit of spin foam models. To this end we develop a technique to evaluate the linearized Regge action associated to Pachner moves in 3D and 4D and show that it has a simple, factorized structure. We succeed in finding a local measure for 3D (linearized) Regge calculus that leads to triangulation independence. This measure factor coincides with the asymptotics of the Ponzano Regge Model, a 3D spin foam model for gravity. We furthermore discuss to which extent one can find a triangulation independent measure for 4D Regge calculus and how such a measure would be related to a quantum model for 4D flat space. To this end, we also determine the dependence of classical Regge calculus on the choice of triangulation in 3D and 4D.

  19. Integral measurement of fission products capture in fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Deidier, Loick.

    1979-12-01

    For the SUPERPHENIX reactor project, it was necessary to know fission products capture with about 10% accuracy in the fast breeder reactor spectra. In this purpose, integral measurements have been carried out on the main separated products by different experimental technics (oscillation, activation and irradiation methods), but particularly on irradiated fuel pins from RAPSODIE and PHENIX reactors in order to directly obtain total effect of fission products. Same tendencies have been observed for both enriched uranium fuel and LMFBR characteristic plutonium fuel. All experimental results have been introduced in CARNAVAL cross section set [fr

  20. Muon decay: Measurement of the integral asymmetry parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltrami, I.; Burkard, H.; Dincklage, R.D. von; Fetscher, W.; Gerber, H.J.; Johnson, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    The positron directional distribution following muon decay is measured. The polarized muons are derived from pion decay in flight and are brought to rest in Be metal. Using the μSR-technique P μ ξ = 1.0027 ± 0.0084 is deduced. The integral asymmetry parameters ξ bears on the mass of the W tilde (wino, the supersymmetrical partner of the gauge boson W), mediating such decay as μ → eν tilde ν tilde. Assuming very light scalar neutrini msub(n tilde) μ a new lower limit on the wino mass msub(w tilde) > 270 GeV/c 2 (90% CL) is inferred. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for measuring electrical conductivity during electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, M; Miklavčič, D; Bajd, F; Serša, I

    2014-01-01

    The electroporation effect on tissue can be assessed by measurement of electrical properties of the tissue undergoing electroporation. The most prominent techniques for measuring electrical properties of electroporated tissues have been voltage–current measurement of applied pulses and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). However, the electrical conductivity of tissue assessed by means of voltage–current measurement was lacking in information on tissue heterogeneity, while EIT requires numerous additional electrodes and produces results with low spatial resolution and high noise. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) is similar to EIT, as it is also used for reconstruction of conductivity images, though voltage and current measurements are not limited to the boundaries in MREIT, hence it yields conductivity images with better spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of the MREIT technique for assessment of conductivity images of tissues undergoing electroporation. Two objects were investigated: agar phantoms and ex vivo liver tissue. As expected, no significant change of electrical conductivity was detected in agar phantoms exposed to pulses of all used amplitudes, while a considerable increase of conductivity was measured in liver tissue exposed to pulses of different amplitudes. (paper)

  2. Direct measurement for organic solvents diffusion using ultra-sensitive optical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir R.; Elias, Catherine M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, novel techniques using ultra-sensitive chemical optical sensor based on whispering gallery modes (WGM) are proposed through two different configurations. The first one will use a composite micro-sphere, when the solvent interacts with the polymeric optical sensors through diffusion the sphere start to swallow that solvent. In turn, that leads to change the morphology and mechanical properties of the polymeric spheres. Also, these changes could be measured by tracking the WGM shifts. Several experiments were carried out to study the solvent induced WGM shift using microsphere immersed in a solvent atmosphere. It can be potentially used for sensing the trace organic solvents like ethanol and methanol. The second configuration will use a composite beam nitrocellulose composite (NC) structure that acts as a sensing element. In this configuration, a beam is anchored to a substrate in one end, and the other end is compressing the polymeric sphere causing a shift in its WGM. When a chemical molecule is attached to the beam, the resonant frequency of the cantilever will be changed for a certain amount. By sensing this certain resonant frequency change, the existence of a single chemical molecule can be detected. A preliminary experimental model is developed to describe the vibration of the beam structure. The resonant frequency change of the cantilever due to attached mass is examined imperially using acetone as an example. Breath diagnosis can use this configuration in diabetic's diagnosis. Since, solvent like acetone concentration in human breath leads to a quick, convenient, accurate and painless breath diagnosis of diabetics. These micro-optical sensors have been examined using preliminary experiments to fully investigate its response. The proposed chemical sensor can achieve extremely high sensitivity in molecular level.

  3. White Matter Integrity in Asperger Syndrome: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Oswald J. N.; Deeley, Quinton; Sundram, Fred; Daly, Eileen M.; Barker, Gareth J.; Jones, Derek K.; van Amelsvoort, Therese A. M. J.; Schmitz, Nicole; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome and autism, is a highly genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. There is a consensus that ASD has a biological basis, and it has been proposed that it is a "connectivity" disorder. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  4. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  5. Measurement of Isobaric Analogue Resonances of 47Ar with the Active-Target Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joshua William

    While the nuclear shell model accurately describes the structure of nuclei near stability, the structure of unstable, neutron-rich nuclei is still an area of active research. One region of interest is the set of nuclei near N=28. The shell model suggests that these nuclei should be approximately spherical due to the shell gap predicted by their magic number of neutrons; however, experiments have shown that the nuclei in this region rapidly become deformed as protons are removed from the spherical 48Ca. This makes 46Ar a particularly interesting system as it lies in a transition region between 48Ca and lighter isotones that are known to be deformed. An experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to measure resonant proton scattering on 46Ar. The resonances observed in this reaction correspond to unbound levels in the 47K intermediate state nucleus which are isobaric analogues of states in the 47Ar nucleus. By measuring the spectroscopic factors of these states in 47Ar, we gain information about the single-particle structure of this system, which is directly related to the size of the N=28 shell gap. Four resonances were observed: one corresponding to the ground state in 47Ar, one corresponding its first excited 1/2- state, and two corresponding to 1/2+ states in either 47Ar or the intermediate state nucleus. However, only a limited amount of information about these states could be recovered due to the low experimental statistics and limited angular resolution caused by pileup rejection and the inability to accurately reconstruct the beam particle track. In addition to the nuclear physics motivations, this experiment served as the radioactive beam commissioning for the Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). The AT-TPC is a new gas-filled charged particle detector built at the NSCL to measure low-energy radioactive beams from the ReA3 facility. Since the gas inside the detector serves as both the tracking medium and

  6. Dynamic Measurement of Tumor Vascular Permeability and Perfusion using a Hybrid System for Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuwei; Elmer, Andreas; Buehlmann, David; Augath, Mark-Aurel; Vats, Divya; Ripoll, Jorge; Rudin, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Assessing tumor vascular features including permeability and perfusion is essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to compare fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based vascular readouts in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice by simultaneous dynamic measurement of tracer uptake using a hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/MRI system. Vascular permeability was measured using a mixture of extravascular imaging agents, GdDOTA and the dye Cy5.5, and perfusion using a mixture of intravascular agents, Endorem and a fluorescent probe (Angiosense). Dynamic fluorescence reflectance imaging (dFRI) was integrated into the hybrid system for high temporal resolution. Excellent correspondence between uptake curves of Cy5.5/GdDOTA and Endorem/Angiosense has been found with correlation coefficients R > 0.98. The two modalities revealed good agreement regarding permeability coefficients and centers-of-gravity of the imaging agent distribution. The FMT/dFRI protocol presented is able to accurately map physiological processes and poses an attractive alternative to MRI for characterizing tumor neoangiogenesis.

  7. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Roque; D’Amato, Roberto; Gómez, Emilio; Domingo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included. PMID:27690052

  8. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part I—Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Calvo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of an error compensation model for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs and its integration into feature measurement is presented. CMMs are widespread and dependable instruments in industry and laboratories for dimensional measurement. From the tip probe sensor to the machine display, there is a complex transformation of probed point coordinates through the geometrical feature model that makes the assessment of accuracy and uncertainty measurement results difficult. Therefore, error compensation is not standardized, conversely to other simpler instruments. Detailed coordinate error compensation models are generally based on CMM as a rigid-body and it requires a detailed mapping of the CMM’s behavior. In this paper a new model type of error compensation is proposed. It evaluates the error from the vectorial composition of length error by axis and its integration into the geometrical measurement model. The non-explained variability by the model is incorporated into the uncertainty budget. Model parameters are analyzed and linked to the geometrical errors and uncertainty of CMM response. Next, the outstanding measurement models of flatness, angle, and roundness are developed. The proposed models are useful for measurement improvement with easy integration into CMM signal processing, in particular in industrial environments where built-in solutions are sought. A battery of implementation tests are presented in Part II, where the experimental endorsement of the model is included.

  9. [Exploration of three-dimensional biometric measurement of emmetropic adult eye-ball by using magnetic resonance imaging technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Ming; Zhou, Yun-Xin; Shi, Ming-Guang

    2008-11-01

    To study biometric measurements of emmetropic adult eyes with magnetic resonance imaging technology (MRI). MRI technology, with super-resolution, hyper-speed imaging and the integration of the thin-scanning layer, is applied to measure the three-dimensional biometric parameters of the eyeball. From January to December, 2003, emmetropic eyes from 31 normal Chinese adults (16 males and 15 females) aged from 18 to 32 years old (23.32 +/- 3.32) were successfully measured to obtain the volume of the eyeball and vitreous cavity; inner dimensions of the eye, including the anterior-posterior, vertical and horizontal diameters. The length of ocular axis was measured by A-echo too. Data was analyzed by SPSS 11.0 statistical software. The volume of the eyeball, anterior chamber, lens and the vitreous cavity is (6.013 +/- 0.449) ml, (0.348 +/- 0.020) ml, (0.183 +/- 0.015) ml, and (5.482 +/- 0.440) ml, respectively. The length of anterior-posterior diameter of the vitreous cavity is (16.008 +/- 0.707) mm. The ocular inner dimensions of horizontal, vertical and anterior-posterior planes were (22.455 +/- 0.983) mm, (23.290 +/- 0.815) mm and (22.619 +/- 0.912) mm, respectively. The length of the ocular axis is (23.10 +/- 0.92) mm (with MRI & Orbscan II) and (23.67 +/- 0.82) mm (with A-echo). The value of the ocular length in emmetropic eye measured with both MRI + Orbscan II and the (A-echo) in the present study is very close to the value of the Bennett-Rabbitts schematic eye (24.09 mm). MRI technology is valuable for obtaining more reliable and precise data in the study of ocular physiology and clinical ophthalmology.

  10. Integrated method for the measurement of trace nitrogenous atmospheric bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Key

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous atmospheric bases are thought to play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their sources, transport, and sinks remain poorly understood. Of the many methods available to measure such compounds in ambient air, few meet the current need of being applicable to the complete range of potential analytes and fewer still are convenient to implement using instrumentation that is standard to most laboratories. In this work, an integrated approach to measuring trace, atmospheric, gaseous nitrogenous bases has been developed and validated. The method uses a simple acid scrubbing step to capture and concentrate the bases as their phosphite salts, which then are derivatized and analyzed using GC/MS and/or LC/MS. The advantages of both techniques in the context of the present measurements are discussed. The approach is sensitive, selective, reproducible, as well as convenient to implement and has been validated for different sampling strategies. The limits of detection for the families of tested compounds are suitable for ambient measurement applications (e.g., methylamine, 1 pptv; ethylamine, 2 pptv; morpholine, 1 pptv; aniline, 1 pptv; hydrazine, 0.1 pptv; methylhydrazine, 2 pptv, as supported by field measurements in an urban park and in the exhaust of on-road vehicles.

  11. High temperature spectral emissivity measurement using integral blackbody method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Spectral emissivity is a critical material's thermos-physical property for heat design and radiation thermometry. A prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method was developed to measure material's spectral emissivity above 1000 °. The system was implemented with an optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, the sample was pushed to the end opening of the tube by a graphite rod which was actuated through a pneumatic cylinder. A linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface through the measurement. The corresponding opto-converted voltage signal was fed and recorded by a digital multi-meter. A physical model was proposed to numerically evaluate the temperature drop along the process. Tube was discretized as several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature profile of the tube was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were calculated and updated along the whole pushing process. The actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage profile and the calculated true temperature, spectral emissivity under this temperature point was calculated.

  12. Integrating measurements of indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, W.H.; Iida, T.; Hashiguchi, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, indoor surveys in Europe and Asia revealed that the dose contribution from thoron and its progeny can equal or even exceed that of radon and its progeny. For measuring thoron and its progeny, several methods had been reported. However, convenient, low-cost and time-integrating measuring methods which are suitable for large-scale surveys are still unavailable. To solve this problem, three integrating measuring methods with allyl diglycol carbonate plastic (CR-39) as detectors have recently been. The results indicated that they are suitable for estimating the indoor thoron and its progeny concentrations when the public exposure to thoron and its progeny is taken into account. Cup monitor - Former types of passive integrating 222 Rn and 220 Rn cup monitors had been reported. Recently, in order to improve the sensitivity of thoron detection, the air exchange rate between the inner and outer cup was enhanced, and the radius of the hemisphere was reduced to 37.5 mm. Furthermore, the procedure of detector exchange was made to be more convenient. Equilibrium-equivalent 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations monitor (EEC monitor) - The measuring system is composed of a monitor head and a diaphragm pump. The total weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg, which makes it portable. The construction of the monitor head and the measuring principle were also reported by the authors. Thoron progeny deposition rate monitor - The monitor is simply constituted a piece of CR-39 covered with thin sheets of absorbers. The thickness of the absorbers are adjusted to let only the α particles emitted from 212 Pb impinge on the detector. The concentrations of thoron progeny are estimated from the deposition rates, assuming that the deposition velocities of thoron progeny are constant in general dwellings. The improved cup monitor has higher sensitivity than former monitors, with a calibration factor of 1.59x10 -3 tracks·cm -2 (Bq·m -3 ·h) -1 for thoron. The accuracy of the ECC

  13. Performance measurement integrated information framework in e-Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Hilaida; Hernandez, Juan Carlos; Vizán, Antonio; Ríos, José

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of Internet technologies has led to e-Manufacturing technologies becoming more widely used and to the development of tools for compiling, transforming and synchronising manufacturing data through the Web. In this context, a potential area for development is the extension of virtual manufacturing to performance measurement (PM) processes, a critical area for decision making and implementing improvement actions in manufacturing. This paper proposes a PM information framework to integrate decision support systems in e-Manufacturing. Specifically, the proposed framework offers a homogeneous PM information exchange model that can be applied through decision support in e-Manufacturing environment. Its application improves the necessary interoperability in decision-making data processing tasks. It comprises three sub-systems: a data model, a PM information platform and PM-Web services architecture. A practical example of data exchange for measurement processes in the area of equipment maintenance is shown to demonstrate the utility of the model.

  14. Integral Criteria for Measuring the Quality of Teacher Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Navickienė

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—To construct the knowledge evaluation quality integral criteria, which allows to ascertain whether the different teachers properly assess the students’ knowledge. The criteria has been tested setting up the educational experiment and examining the six mathematics lecturers’ assessments.Design/methodology/approach—This research involved the Mykolas Romeris University students of Public Administration degree second year and Management of Organizations degree first year. The test questions for students were designed using the mathematical knowledge assessment information system, which allows for closed-ended mathematical test, to obtain statistical data about test takers, to perform quality analysis of the test; in the middle and the end of the semester.Findings—The construction technique for the evaluation quality criteria of the students’ working results assessment, which were performed by six different lecturers, during practical trainings, seminars, laboratory and other sessions is proposed in this article.Research limitations/implications—The constructed evaluation criteria is universal: it does not depend on the particular subject; it can be applied to several groups, courses or lecturers. It depends on three calculated indicators I, S, K, which show in two ways obtained estimates of the measured information compatibility of degrees, marks matching and correlation terms.Practical implications—The integral criteria has been tested examining the six mathematics lecturers’ assessments.Originality/Value—Constructing the criteria have been used the educational measurement models of authors of this article and other researchers, however its’ connection to general (integral criteria, best of authors’ knowledge, is original and have not be researched before.Keywords: knowledge evaluation, quality of teacher evaluation, evaluation of teachers, mathematical modeling.Research type: research paper.

  15. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  16. Measurement of specific heat and specific absorption rate by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gultekin, David H., E-mail: david.gultekin@aya.yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Gore, John C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    We evaluate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method of calorimetry for the measurement of specific heat (c{sub p}) and specific absorption rate (SAR) in liquids. The feasibility of NMR calorimetry is demonstrated by experimental measurements of water, ethylene glycol and glycerol using any of three different NMR parameters (chemical shift, spin-spin relaxation rate and equilibrium nuclear magnetization). The method involves heating the sample using a continuous wave laser beam and measuring the temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter by non-invasive means. The temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter as a function of thermal power yields the ratio of the heat capacity to the respective nuclear thermal coefficient, from which the specific heat can be determined for the substance. The specific absorption rate is obtained by subjecting the liquid to heating by two types of radiation, radiofrequency (RF) and near-infrared (NIR), and by measuring the change in the nuclear spin phase shift by a gradient echo imaging sequence. These studies suggest NMR may be a useful tool for measurements of the thermal properties of liquids.

  17. Regularization of the path integral measure for anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we show that the variation of the integral measure is fully equivalent to the authentic field theoretical treatment for a two-point function. To do this we first examine various ways of solving the factor A(x) in Fujikawa's expression for the functional integral measure. We define the anomaly as A(x)-A f (x), where A f (x) is the Fujikawa factor for the free field. We then propose a regulator which leads to a finite result for any anomaly. We then show that the A(x) can be defined in terms of the proper-time through a splitting procedure. The original Fujikawa prescription for A(x) is shown to be closely related to the proper-time description of the anomaly, initiated by Schwinger. Its equivalence to the authentic field theoretical treatment will be proven as a consequence of these investigations. The ξ-functional regularization for A(x) is also examined. Then we will examine the way to deduce the anomaly from the effective potential by adopting the Φ 4 model as an example. The renormalization group equation for the effective potential is solved exactly to obtain the precise form of the β-function in terms of which we reexpress the result obtained in a previous section for A(x). We discuss the physical significance of the renormalization group equation for the case of broken symmetry

  18. Status of neutron cross sections of transactinium isotopes in the resonance region - linear accelerator measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the status of transactinium isotope cross sections in the resonance region and of resolved resonance parameters is given by summarising the work submitted by fourteen contributors and also by highlighting other work where notable progress has been made in our knowledge of neutron resonance phenomena. (author)

  19. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system for measuring dynamic protein-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Wang, Yao; Song, Yunhong; Wang, Tietao; Li, Changfu; Wei, Yahong; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Shen, Xihui

    2014-05-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important for virtually every biological process, and a number of elegant approaches have been designed to detect and evaluate such interactions. However, few of these methods allow the detection of dynamic and real-time protein-protein interactions in bacteria. Here we describe a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) system based on the bacterial luciferase LuxAB. We found that enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) accepts the emission from LuxAB and emits yellow fluorescence. Importantly, BRET occurred when LuxAB and eYFP were fused, respectively, to the interacting protein pair FlgM and FliA. Furthermore, we observed sirolimus (i.e., rapamycin)-inducible interactions between FRB and FKBP12 and a dose-dependent abolishment of such interactions by FK506, the ligand of FKBP12. Using this system, we showed that osmotic stress or low pH efficiently induced multimerization of the regulatory protein OmpR and that the multimerization induced by low pH can be reversed by a neutralizing agent, further indicating the usefulness of this system in the measurement of dynamic interactions. This method can be adapted to analyze dynamic protein-protein interactions and the importance of such interactions in bacterial processes such as development and pathogenicity. Real-time measurement of protein-protein interactions in prokaryotes is highly desirable for determining the roles of protein complex in the development or virulence of bacteria, but methods that allow such measurement are not available. Here we describe the development of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology that meets this need. The use of endogenous excitation light in this strategy circumvents the requirement for the sophisticated instrument demanded by standard fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Furthermore, because the LuxAB substrate decanal is membrane permeable, the assay can be performed without lysing the bacterial cells

  20. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  1. Measurement of the Auger decay after resonance excitation of Xe 4d and Kr 3d resonance lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, W.; Kalkoffen, G.; Kunz, C.

    1978-03-01

    The Nsub(4,5) 0sub(2,3) 0sub(2,3) Auger spectra from Xe and the Msub(4,5) Nsub(2,3) Nsub(2,3) Auger spectra from Kr are investigated for different photon energies around threshold of ionization. When exciting at the resonance line (4d 9 5s 2 5p 6 6p for Xe and 3d 9 4s 2 4p 6 5p for Kr) we observe the usual Auger multiplet structure to be shifted to higher kinetic energies. Additionally, new lines appear which can be assigned to shake-up processes int he Xe + and Kr + ions. (orig.) [de

  2. Calculation of the fine spectrum and integration of the resonance cross sections in the cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The code BOXER is used for the neutronics calculations of two-dimensional LWR arrays. During the calculation of the group constants of the cells (pin, clad and moderator), the program SLOFIN, a BOXER module, allows taking into account the self-shielding of the resonances. The resonance range is devided into two parts: - above 907 eV the cross sections are condensed into groups by the library code ETOBOX. In SLOFIN, these values are interpolated over the equivalent cross section and the temperature. The interpolation formula chosen gives an accuracy better than 1% for values of the equivalent cross section larger than 5 barns. - between 4 and 907 eV, the cross sections are given in pointwise form as a function of the lethargy. At first a list of pointwise macroscopic cross section is established. Then the fine spectrum in the cell is calculated in 2 or 3 zones by means of the collision probability theory. In the central zone one resonant pseudo-nuclide is considered for the calculation of the scattering source, while the light nuclides are explicitly treated but under the assumption of energy independent cross sections. The fine spectrum is then used as a weihting function for the condensation of the pointwise cross sections of the resonant nuclides into energy groups. The procedure was checked on the basis of the TRX-1 to -4 and BAPL-UO 2 -1 to -3 experiments which are used as benchmarks for the tests of the ENDF/B libraries. The comparisons with other calculation results show that the deviations observed are typical for the basic cross sections. The method proposed shows a good accuracy in the application range foreseen for BOXER. It is also fast enough to be used as a standard method in a cell code. (author)

  3. High-Q Superconducting Coplanar Waveguide Resonators for Integration into Molecule Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    V12C (3.13) 4 and We = V12 (3.14) 4 w 2 L’ finally yielding 2Wm R Q = wo m - w0L= woRC, (3.15) where wo = 1/ vLC is the resonant frequency of the...small. The primary challenge with simulating the microresonators was refining the mesh while remaining under memory limits of the modeling computer. It

  4. New analysis of ηπ tensor resonances measured at the COMPASS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackura, A.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mikhasenko, M.; Pilloni, A.; Mathieu, V.; Nys, J.; Pauk, V.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Fox, G.; JPAC Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    We present a new amplitude analysis of the ηπ D-wave in the reaction π- p → ηπ- p measured by COMPASS. Employing an analytical model based on the principles of the relativistic S-matrix, we find two resonances that can be identified with the a2 (1320) and the excited a2‧ (1700), and perform a comprehensive analysis of their pole positions. For the mass and width of the a2 we find M = (1307 ± 1 ± 6) MeV and Γ = (112 ± 1 ± 8) MeV, and for the excited state a2‧ we obtain M = (1720 ± 10 ± 60) MeV and Γ = (280 ± 10 ± 70) MeV, respectively.

  5. Measuring glucose cerebral metabolism in the healthy mouse using hyperpolarized C-13 magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Anderson, Brian; Karlsson, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian brain relies primarily on glucose as a fuel to meet its high metabolic demand. Among the various techniques used to study cerebral metabolism, C-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows following the fate of C-13-enriched substrates through metabolic pathways. We herein...... glucose is split into 3-carbon intermediates by aldolase. This unique method allows direct detection of glycolysis in vivo in the healthy brain in a noninvasive manner....... demonstrate that it is possible to measure cerebral glucose metabolism in vivo with sub-second time resolution using hyperpolarized C-13 MRS. In particular, the dynamic C-13-labeling of pyruvate and lactate formed from C-13-glucose was observed in real time. An ad-hoc synthesis to produce [2,3,4,6,6-H-2(5), 3...

  6. Measurement and modeling of nitrogen resonance line profiles from an electrodeless discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.R.; Skinner, G.B.; Lifshitz, A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental profiles of the 1200 A resonance triplet of atomic nitrogen were measured for a variety of operating conditions of an end-on electrodeless lamp, and corresponding absorption curves were calculated. Each source profile was determined by fitting parameters to an empirical two-layer model, then convoluting with the instrumental function for comparison with experimental data. Each three-component profile was fitted with three adjustable parameters: an absorption parameter for each of the two layers and a third absorption parameter to adjust for radiation trapping. Curves of absorption as a function of atom concentration, calculated from these profiles, are very similar to the shock tube calibrations of Thielen and Roth in which a source of similar design has been used

  7. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of sound velocity made easy using harmonic resonant frequencies with everyday mobile technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Michael; Kuhn, Jochen; Müller, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Recent articles about smartphone experiments have described their applications as experimental tools in different physical contexts.1-4 They have established that smartphones facilitate experimental setups, thanks to the small size and diverse functions of mobile devices, in comparison to setups with computer-based measurements. In the experiment described in this article, the experimental setup is reduced to a minimum. The objective of the experiment is to determine the speed of sound with a high degree of accuracy using everyday tools. An article published recently proposes a time-of-flight method where sound or acoustic pulses are reflected at the ends of an open tube.5 In contrast, the following experiment idea is based on the harmonic resonant frequencies of such a tube, simultaneously triggered by a noise signal.

  9. A measurement of the resonance parameters of the neutral intermediate vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the Z 0 Boson resonance parameters. The measurement was performed at the Stanford Linear Collider using the Mark II detector. Based on a sample of 480 Hadronic and Leptonic decays, the mass is found to be 91.14 ± 0.12 GeV/c 2 , the total width is 2.42 -0.35 +0.45 GeV, and the peak cross section for all Hadronic events, and for Muon and Tau events with cosθ Thrust < 0. 65 is 45 ± 4 nb. By constraining the visible width to the Standard Model value for 5 quarks and 3 charged leptons, and allowing the invisible width to be a parameter, the width to invisible decay modes is found to be 0.46 ± 0.10 GeV. Assuming this width comes from massless neutrinos, this measurement corresponds to 2.8 ± 0.6 neutrino species. This measurement sets an upper limit of 3.9 neutrino generations at the 95% confidence level, ruling out a fourth generation of Standard Model neutrinos at this level. 54 refs., 65 figs., 11 tabs

  10. Combining fibre optic Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance measurement for tissue characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candefjord, Stefan; Nyberg, Morgan; Ramser, Kerstin; Lindahl, Olof A; Jalkanen, Ville

    2010-01-01

    Tissue characterization is fundamental for identification of pathological conditions. Raman spectroscopy (RS) and tactile resonance measurement (TRM) are two promising techniques that measure biochemical content and stiffness, respectively. They have potential to complement the golden standard-–histological analysis. By combining RS and TRM, complementary information about tissue content can be obtained and specific drawbacks can be avoided. The aim of this study was to develop a multivariate approach to compare RS and TRM information. The approach was evaluated on measurements at the same points on porcine abdominal tissue. The measurement points were divided into five groups by multivariate analysis of the RS data. A regression analysis was performed and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the RS and TRM data. TRM identified one group efficiently (area under ROC curve 0.99). The RS data showed that the proportion of saturated fat was high in this group. The regression analysis showed that stiffness was mainly determined by the amount of fat and its composition. We concluded that RS provided additional, important information for tissue identification that was not provided by TRM alone. The results are promising for development of a method combining RS and TRM for intraoperative tissue characterization

  11. Measurement of Primary and Secondary Stability of Dental Implants by Resonance Frequency Analysis Method in Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Mehran; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is no doubt that the success of the dental implants depends on the stability. The aim of this work was to measure the stability of dental implants prior to loading the implants, using a resonance frequency analysis (RFA) by Osstell mentor device. Methods. Ten healthy and nonsmoker patients over 40 years of age with at least six months of complete or partial edentulous mouth received screw-type dental implants by a 1-stage procedure. RFA measurements were obtained at surgery and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 11 weeks after the implant surgery. Results. Among fifteen implants, the lowest mean stability measurement was for the 4th week after surgery in all bone types. At placement, the mean ISQ obtained with the magnetic device was 77.2 with 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.49, and then it decreased until the 4th week to 72.13 (95% CI = 2.88), and at the last measurement, the mean implant stability significantly (P value implant placement. These suggestions need to be further assessed through future studies. PMID:23737790

  12. Contact-resonance atomic force microscopy for nanoscale elastic property measurements: Spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan, G.; Krylyuk, S.; Davydov, A.V.; Vaudin, M.D.; Bendersky, L.A.; Cook, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the elastic modulus of nanosize systems and nanostructured materials are provided with great accuracy and precision by contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM). As an example of measuring the elastic modulus of nanosize entities, we used the CR-AFM technique to measure the out-of-plane indentation modulus of tellurium nanowires. A size-dependence of the indentation modulus was observed for the investigated tellurium nanowires with diameters in the range 20-150 nm. Over this diameter range, the elastic modulus of the outer layers of the tellurium nanowires experienced significant enhancement due to a pronounced surface stiffening effect. Quantitative estimations for the elastic moduli of the outer and inner parts of tellurium nanowires of reduced diameter are made with a core-shell structure model. Besides localized elastic modulus measurements, we have also developed a unique CR-AFM imaging capability to map the elastic modulus over a micrometer-scale area. We used this CR-AFM capability to construct indentation modulus maps at the junction between two adjacent facets of a tellurium microcrystal. The clear contrast observed in the elastic moduli of the two facets indicates the different surface crystallography of these facets.

  13. Measurement of the Corpus Callosum Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the North of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Zhand, Pouya; Mortazavi Moghadam, Behnoush; Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar

    2011-01-01

    Morphometric measurements of the corpus callosum (CC) are important to have normative values according to sex, age and race/ethnicity. This study was done to measure the size of CC and to identify its gender- and age-related differences in the North of Iran. The size of CC on midsagittal section was measured in 100 (45 males, 55 females) normal subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) admitted to the Kowsar MRI center in Gorgan–Northern Iran. Longitudinal and vertical dimensions of the CC, longitudinal and vertical lengths of the brain and the length of genu and splenium were measured. Data were analyzed by student’s unpaired t test, ANOVA and regression analysis. The anteroposterior length and vertical dimension of the CC, the length of genu and splenium were larger in males than in females, but these differences were not significant. The anteroposterior and vertical lengths of the brain were significantly larger in males than in females (P < 0.05). The length of CC increased with age and regression equations for predicting age were derived from the length of the CC. There was also a positive significant correlation between the anteroposterior length of the CC and the length of the brain and vertical dimension of the CC. This study showed that various CC parameters vary with the values documented in the Caucasian, Indian and Japanese population

  14. Assessment of treatment response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using advanced magnetic resonance imaging measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven C.; Heba, Elhamy; Bettencourt, Ricki; Lin, Grace Y.; Valasek, Mark A.; Lunde, Ottar; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; Loomba, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging derived measures of liver fat and volume are emerging as accurate, non-invasive imaging biomarkers in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Little is known about these measures in relation to histology longitudinally. Aims This study examines this relationship between MRI-derived proton-density fat-fraction (PDFF), total liver volume (TLV), total liver fat index (TLFI), vs. histology in a NASH trial. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 50 patients with biopsy-proven NASH randomized to oral ezetimibe 10mg daily (n=25) vs. placebo (n=25). Baseline and post-treatment anthropometrics, biochemical profiling, MRI, and biopsies were obtained. Results Baseline mean PDFF correlated strongly with TLFI (Spearman’s ρ=0.94, n=45, PMRI-PDFF vs. TLV indicates that 10% reduction in MRI-PDFF predicts 257 mL reduction in TLV. Conclusions MRI-PDFF and TLV strongly correlated with TLFI. Decreases in steatosis were associated with an improvement in hepatomegaly. Lower values of these measures reflect lower histologic-steatosis grades. MRI-derived measures of liver fat and volume may be used as dynamic and more responsive imaging biomarkers in a NASH trial than histology. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01766713. PMID:28116801

  15. Integral Plus Resonant Sliding Mode Direct Power Control for VSC-HVDC Systems under Unbalanced Grid Voltage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An integral plus resonant sliding mode direct power control (IRSMC DPC strategy for voltage source converter high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC systems under unbalanced grid voltage conditions is proposed in this paper. Through detailed instantaneous power flow analysis, a generalized power compensation method, by which the ratio between the amplitude of active and reactive power ripples can be controlled continuously, is obtained. This enables the system to provide flexible power control, so that the desired performance of the system on both the ac and dc sides can be attained under different operating conditions. When the grid voltage is unbalanced, one or both of the active and reactive power terms contain ripples, oscillating at twice the grid frequency, to obtain non-distorted ac current. A power controller consisting of the proportional, integral and resonant control laws is designed using the sliding mode control approach, to achieve accurate power control objective. Simulation studies on a two-terminal VSC-HVDC system using MATLAB/SIMULINK (R2013b, Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the IRSMC DPC strategy. The results show that this strategy ensures satisfactory performance of the system over a wide range of operating conditions.

  16. Decreased integration and information capacity in stroke measured by whole brain models of resting state activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Mohit H; Hacker, Carl D; Siegel, Josh S; Griffa, Alessandra; Hagmann, Patric; Deco, Gustavo; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    While several studies have shown that focal lesions affect the communication between structurally normal regions of the brain, and that these changes may correlate with behavioural deficits, their impact on brain's information processing capacity is currently unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that focal lesions decrease the brain's information processing capacity, of which changes in functional connectivity may be a measurable correlate. To measure processing capacity, we turned to whole brain computational modelling to estimate the integration and segregation of information in brain networks. First, we measured functional connectivity between different brain areas with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects (n = 26), and subjects who had suffered a cortical stroke (n = 36). We then used a whole-brain network model that coupled average excitatory activities of local regions via anatomical connectivity. Model parameters were optimized in each healthy or stroke participant to maximize correlation between model and empirical functional connectivity, so that the model's effective connectivity was a veridical representation of healthy or lesioned brain networks. Subsequently, we calculated two model-based measures: 'integration', a graph theoretical measure obtained from functional connectivity, which measures the connectedness of brain networks, and 'information capacity', an information theoretical measure that cannot be obtained empirically, representative of the segregative ability of brain networks to encode distinct stimuli. We found that both measures were decreased in stroke patients, as compared to healthy controls, particularly at the level of resting-state networks. Furthermore, we found that these measures, especially information capacity, correlate with measures of behavioural impairment and the segregation of resting-state networks empirically measured. This study shows that focal lesions affect the brain's ability to

  17. Magnetic resonance elastography: Feasibility of liver stiffness measurements in healthy volunteers at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannelli, L.; Godfrey, E.; Graves, M.J.; Patterson, A.J.; Beddy, P.; Bowden, D.; Joubert, I.; Priest, A.N.; Lomas, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining liver stiffness measurements with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 3 T in normal healthy volunteers using the same technique that has been successfully applied at 1.5 T. Methods and materials: The study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Eleven volunteers (mean age 35 ± 9 years) with no history of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, or cardiovascular disease were recruited. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol included a gradient echo-based MRE sequence using a 60 Hz pneumatic excitation. The MRE images were processed using a local frequency estimation inversion algorithm to provide quantitative stiffness maps. Adequate image quality was assessed subjectively by demonstrating the presence of visible propagating waves within the liver parenchyma underlying the driver location. Liver stiffness values were obtained using manually placed regions of interest (ROI) outlining the liver margins on the gradient echo wave images, which were then mapped onto the corresponding stiffness image. The mean stiffness values from two adjacent sections were recorded. Results: Eleven volunteers underwent MRE. The quality of the MRE images was adequate in all the volunteers. The mean liver stiffness for the group was 2.3 ± 0.38 kPa (ranging from 1.7–2.8 kPa). Conclusions: This preliminary work using MRE at 3 T in healthy volunteers demonstrates the feasibility of liver stiffness evaluation at 3 T without modification of the approach used at 1.5 T. Adequate image quality and normal MRE values were obtained in all volunteers. The obtained stiffness values were in the range of those reported for healthy volunteers in previous studies at 1.5 T. There was good interobserver reproducibility in the stiffness measurements.

  18. Magnetic resonance elastography: Feasibility of liver stiffness measurements in healthy volunteers at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannelli, L., E-mail: mannellilorenzo@yahoo.it [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Godfrey, E.; Graves, M.J.; Patterson, A.J.; Beddy, P.; Bowden, D.; Joubert, I.; Priest, A.N.; Lomas, D.J. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining liver stiffness measurements with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 3 T in normal healthy volunteers using the same technique that has been successfully applied at 1.5 T. Methods and materials: The study was approved by the local ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Eleven volunteers (mean age 35 {+-} 9 years) with no history of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, or cardiovascular disease were recruited. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol included a gradient echo-based MRE sequence using a 60 Hz pneumatic excitation. The MRE images were processed using a local frequency estimation inversion algorithm to provide quantitative stiffness maps. Adequate image quality was assessed subjectively by demonstrating the presence of visible propagating waves within the liver parenchyma underlying the driver location. Liver stiffness values were obtained using manually placed regions of interest (ROI) outlining the liver margins on the gradient echo wave images, which were then mapped onto the corresponding stiffness image. The mean stiffness values from two adjacent sections were recorded. Results: Eleven volunteers underwent MRE. The quality of the MRE images was adequate in all the volunteers. The mean liver stiffness for the group was 2.3 {+-} 0.38 kPa (ranging from 1.7-2.8 kPa). Conclusions: This preliminary work using MRE at 3 T in healthy volunteers demonstrates the feasibility of liver stiffness evaluation at 3 T without modification of the approach used at 1.5 T. Adequate image quality and normal MRE values were obtained in all volunteers. The obtained stiffness values were in the range of those reported for healthy volunteers in previous studies at 1.5 T. There was good interobserver reproducibility in the stiffness measurements.

  19. Integrated smartphone imaging of quantum dot photoluminescence and Förster resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W. Russ

    2015-06-01

    Smartphones and other mobile devices are emerging as promising analytical platforms for point-of-care diagnostics, particularly when combined with nanotechnology. For example, we have shown that the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are well suited to photoluminescence (PL) detection with a smartphone camera. However, this previous work has utilized an external excitation source for interrogation of QD PL. In this proceeding, we demonstrate that the white-light LED photographic flashes built into smartphones can be optically filtered to yield blue light suitable for excitation of QD PL. Measurements were made by recording video with filtered flash illumination and averaging the frames of the video to obtain images with good signal-to-background ratios. These images permitted detection of green-emitting and red-emitting QDs at levels comparable to those possible with excitation using an external long-wave UV lamp. The optical properties of QDs proved to be uniquely suited to smartphone PL imaging, exhibiting emission that was 1-2 orders magnitude brighter than that of common fluorescent dyes under the same conditions. Excitation with the smartphone flash was also suitable for imaging of FRET between green-emitting QD donors and Alexa Fluor 555 (A555) fluorescent dye acceptors. No significant difference in FRET imaging capability was observed between excitation with the smartphone flash and a long-wave UV lamp. Although the smartphone flash did have some disadvantages compared to an external UV lamp, these disadvantages are potentially offset by the benefit of having excitation and detection integrated into the smartphone.

  20. Rapid and accurate biofuel moisture content gauging using magnetic resonance measurement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervinen, T.

    2013-04-15

    Biomass is extensively utilised in energy production and as a raw material, such as for the production of liquid biofuels. All those processes will benefit if the moisture content of bio material is known in advance as accurately as possible under transient circumstances. Biofuel trade is increasingly based on the calorific value of fuels. In the first step, this also increases the need for rapid and accurate moisture content determination. During the last few years, large biofuel standardisation has been implemented, emphasising biofuel quality control at all stages of the utilisation chain. In principle, the moisture instrumental measurement can be utilised by many technologies and procedures. Typical techniques are infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, radiometric, electrical conductivity, capacitance, and impedance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) and thermal neutron absorption are also applied. The MR measurement principle has been known and utilised already since the early 1950s. It has become the basic instrumental analysis tool in chemistry. It is also well-known as a very accurate method for analysing most compounds, especially substances containing hydrogen. The utilisation of MR metering is expanded extensively to medical diagnostics as a form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the precision of the MR principle, there have for a long time been efforts to apply it in new and different areas, and to make more user-friendly, smaller, and even portable devices. Such a device was designed by Vaisala a few years ago. VTT has utilised Vaisala's MR prototype for approximately one year for moisture content measurement of different biofuels. The first step in the use of an MR device for moisture determination was the definition of its measurement accuracy compared to the standard method (EN 14774). Those tests proved that the absolute precision seems to be comparable to the standard moisture content measurement method. It was also found out that

  1. Measurement of resonance modes causative of beam position monitor signal noise in vacuum chamber of storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Youngdo; Hwang, Ilmoon; Park, Sungju [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changbum, E-mail: chbkim@postech.ac.k [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-11

    It is known that the position reading obtained from the beam position monitor (BPM) mounted at the storage ring can be corrupted by the resonance mode. We carried out a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation of vacuum chambers of the storage ring of the Pohang Light Source (PLS) without simplified modeling to measure the frequencies of resonance modes excited in the vacuum chamber. The frequencies of resonance modes obtained by the eigenmode simulation are well matched with the peak frequencies of RF transmission scattering matrix (S{sub 21}) graph of sector vacuum chamber measured using a network analyzer. It is found that a transverse electric (TE) resonance mode exists in the operation frequency band of BPM and the vertically oriented electric field of TE resonance mode is linked to the BPM position reading noise. Based on this study, we can easily design a vacuum chamber free from the BPM position reading noise caused by the TE resonance mode.

  2. Measurement of portal blood flow in healthy individuals: a comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Juliana Dantas da; Sebastiane, Patricia Moreno; Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inter-observer agreement between Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the quantification of portal blood flow in healthy individuals, as well as evaluating the reproducibility of both methods. Materials and methods: A prospective, transverse, observational and self-paired study was developed evaluating 20 healthy volunteers whose portal blood flow was measured by means of Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging performed by two independent observers. Interobserver and inter method agreements were calculated using the intra class and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results: The agreement between Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging was low (intra class coefficient: 1.9%-18.2%; Pearson's coefficient: 0.1%-13.7%; p=0.565). Mean values for the portal blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were respectively 0.768 l/min and 0.742 l/min. Interobserver agreement for quantification of the portal blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging was respectively reasonable (intra class coefficient: 43.3%; Pearson's coefficient: 43.0%) and excellent (intra class coefficient: 91.4%; Pearson's coefficient: 93.4%). Conclusion: In the present study, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated to be a reliable method for quantifying the portal blood flow, with a higher interobserver agreement than Doppler ultrasonography. The inter method agreement was low. (author)

  3. Motor phenotype and magnetic resonance measures of basal ganglia iron levels in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzeck, Nico; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Eckart, Cindy; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Perry, Richard J; Bain, Peter G; Düzel, Emrah; Husain, Masud

    2013-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease the degree of motor impairment can be classified with respect to tremor dominant and akinetic rigid features. While tremor dominance and akinetic rigidity might represent two ends of a continuum rather than discrete entities, it would be important to have non-invasive markers of any biological differences between them in vivo, to assess disease trajectories and response to treatment, as well as providing insights into the underlying mechanisms contributing to heterogeneity within the Parkinson's disease population. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether Parkinson's disease patients exhibit structural changes within the basal ganglia that might relate to motor phenotype. Specifically, we examined volumes of basal ganglia regions, as well as transverse relaxation rate (a putative marker of iron load) and magnetization transfer saturation (considered to index structural integrity) within these regions in 40 individuals. We found decreased volume and reduced magnetization transfer within the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between tremulous motor phenotype and transverse relaxation rate (reflecting iron load) within the putamen, caudate and thalamus. Our findings suggest that akinetic rigid and tremor dominant symptoms of Parkinson's disease might be differentiated on the basis of the transverse relaxation rate within specific basal ganglia structures. Moreover, they suggest that iron load within the basal ganglia makes an important contribution to motor phenotype, a key prognostic indicator of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. An integrity measure to benchmark quantum error correcting memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaosi; de Beaudrap, Niel; O'Gorman, Joe; Benjamin, Simon C.

    2018-02-01

    Rapidly developing experiments across multiple platforms now aim to realise small quantum codes, and so demonstrate a memory within which a logical qubit can be protected from noise. There is a need to benchmark the achievements in these diverse systems, and to compare the inherent power of the codes they rely upon. We describe a recently introduced performance measure called integrity, which relates to the probability that an ideal agent will successfully ‘guess’ the state of a logical qubit after a period of storage in the memory. Integrity is straightforward to evaluate experimentally without state tomography and it can be related to various established metrics such as the logical fidelity and the pseudo-threshold. We offer a set of experimental milestones that are steps towards demonstrating unconditionally superior encoded memories. Using intensive numerical simulations we compare memories based on the five-qubit code, the seven-qubit Steane code, and a nine-qubit code which is the smallest instance of a surface code; we assess both the simple and fault-tolerant implementations of each. While the ‘best’ code upon which to base a memory does vary according to the nature and severity of the noise, nevertheless certain trends emerge.

  5. Optimization of the German integrated information and measurement system (IMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.; Weiss, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a widespread contamination of the environment in most European countries. In Germany, like in all other countries, it took some time to evaluate the radiological situation, time which is extremely valuable in the early phases of an accident when decisions on countermeasures like sheltering, iodine prophylaxis or evacuation have to be taken. For a better emergency preparedness the Integrated Information and Measurement System (IMIS) has been developed and established in Germany. In case of a widespread contamination of the environment, the system will provide the decision makers with all information necessary to evaluate the radiological situation and to decide on countermeasures. Presently this system is upgraded due to the adoption of the European decision supporting system RODOS and by the improvement of the national information exchange. For this purpose the web based information system ELAN has been developed. The national systems have to be integrated into the European and international communication systems. In this presentation the IMIS system is briefly described and the new features and modules of the system are discussed in greater detail

  6. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10 12 cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Reproducibility of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements of Tendon Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brushoej, C.; Henriksen, B.M.; Albrecht-Beste, E.; Hoelmich, P.; Larsen, K.; Bachmann Nielsen, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intra- and inter-tester reproducibility of measurements of the Achilles tendon, tibialis anterior tendon, and the tibialis posterior tendon in football players using ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Eleven asymptomatic football players were examined. Using a standardized US scanning protocol, the tendons were examined by two observers with US for thickness, width, and cross-sectional area. One observer conducted the procedure twice. The subjects also underwent an MRI examination, and the assessment of tendon size was conducted twice by two observers. Results: The best reproducibility judged by coefficient of variation (CV) and 95% confidence interval was determined for the Achilles tendon on both US and MRI. The variability of US on measurements on the tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior tendons was less than that when using MRI. In 12 out of 18 measurements, there were systematic differences between observers as judged by one-sided F-test. Conclusion: The reproducibility of the three tendons was limited. Precaution should be taken when looking for minor quantitative changes, i.e., training-induced hypertrophy, and when doing so, the Achilles tendon should be used

  9. Measurement of mechanical properties of metallic glass at elevated temperature using sonic resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Zhang, Haifeng; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are fully amorphous multi-component alloys with homogeneous and isotropic structure down to the atomic scale. Some attractive attributes of bulk metallic glasses include high strength and hardness as well as excellent corrosion and wear resistance. However, there are few reports and limited understanding of their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. We used a nondestructive sonic resonance method to measure the Young's modulus and Shear modulus of a bulk metallic glass, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, at elevated temperatures. The measurement system was designed using a laser displacement sensor to detect the sonic vibration produced by a speaker on the specimen in high-temperature furnace. The OMICRON Bode-100 Vector Network Analyzer was used to sweep the frequency and its output was connected to the speaker which vibrated the material in its flexural mode and torsional modes. A Polytec OFV-505 laser vibrometer sensor was used to capture the vibration of the material at various frequencies. The flexural and torsional mode frequency shift due to the temperature variation was used to determine the Young's modulus and Shear modulus. The temperature range of measurement was from 50°C to 350°C. The Young's modulus was found to reduce from 100GPa to 94GPa for the 300°C temperature span. Similarly, the Shear modulus decreased from 38.5GPa at 50°C to 36GPa at 350°C.

  10. Accuracy of signal-to-noise ratio measurement method for magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Akio; Miyai, Akira; Maeda, Fumie; Fukutake, Hiroyuki; Kikumoto, Rikiya

    2003-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a magnetic resonance image is a common measure of imager performance. However, evaluations for the calculation of the SNR use various methods. A problem with measuring SNR is caused by the distortion of noise statistics in commonly used magnitude images. In this study, measurement accuracy was compared among four methods of evaluating SNR according to the size and position of regions of interest (ROIs). The results indicated that the method that used the difference between two images showed the best agreement with the theoretical value. In the method that used a single image, the SNR calculated by using a small size of ROI showed better agreement with the theoretical value because of noise bias and image artifacts. However, in the method that used the difference between two images, a large size of ROI was better in reducing statistical errors. In the same way, the methods that used air noise and air signal were better when applied to a large ROI. In addition, the image subtraction process used to calculate pixel-by-pixel differences in images may reach zero on a minus pixel value when using an image processor with the MRI system and apparatuses associated with it. A revised equation is presented for this case. It is important to understand the characteristics of each method and to choose a suitable method carefully according to the purpose of the study. (author)

  11. Volume measurement of the horizontal extraocular muscles using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Osamu; Nishida, Eri; Murata, Toyotaka; Aoki, Yoshiko; Inatomi, Akihiro; Kani, Kazutaka (Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)); Mabuchi, Norihisa; Furutani, Yoshiaki

    1993-07-01

    The volume of the horizontal extraocular muscles of 11 normal adults and three patients with ophthalmoplegia was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI examinations were carried out with a Signa Advantage, 1.5 tesla superconductive magnetic system manufactured by General Electric. This method employs the spin echo technique with a 3.0 mm gapless slice, a 350 ms. repetition time, and a 17.0 ms. echo time. The MRI films were projected and magnified on Kent paper using an overhead projector. Then the shapes of the horizontal extraocular muscles were traced. The volume of the muscles was measured as the total weight of Kent papers which were cut out from muscle shapes in all the slices. The average volume of the normal medial and lateral rectus muscles was 690[+-]87 mm[sup 3] and 734[+-]77 mm[sup 3], respectively. Two cases of peripheral nerve palsy showed typical atrophy of the paretic muscles. A case of orbital myositis showed typical hypertrophy of the inflamed muscles. This measurement may prove useful in the analysis and evaluation of extraocular muscles, especially in ophthalmoplesia.(author).

  12. Glutathione in the human brain: Review of its roles and measurement by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Caroline D; Williams, Stephen R

    2017-07-15

    We review the transport, synthesis and catabolism of glutathione in the brain as well as its compartmentation and biochemistry in different brain cells. The major reactions involving glutathione are reviewed and the factors limiting its availability in brain cells are discussed. We also describe and critique current methods for measuring glutathione in the human brain using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and review the literature on glutathione measurements in healthy brains and in neurological, psychiatric, neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions In summary: Healthy human brain glutathione concentration is ∼1-2 mM, but it varies by brain region, with evidence of gender differences and age effects; in neurological disease glutathione appears reduced in multiple sclerosis, motor neurone disease and epilepsy, while being increased in meningiomas; in psychiatric disease the picture is complex and confounded by methodological differences, regional effects, length of disease and drug-treatment. Both increases and decreases in glutathione have been reported in depression and schizophrenia. In Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment there is evidence for a decrease in glutathione compared to age-matched healthy controls. Improved methods to measure glutathione in vivo will provide better precision in glutathione determination and help resolve the complex biochemistry of this molecule in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  14. Measuring adsorption, diffusion and flow in chemical engineering: applications of magnetic resonance to porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladden, Lynn F; Mitchell, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques are increasingly used to improve our understanding of the multi-component, multi-phase processes encountered in chemical engineering. This review brings together many of the MR techniques used, and often developed specifically, to study chemical engineering systems and, in particular, processes occurring within porous media. Pulse sequences for relaxometry, pulsed field gradient measurements of diffusion, imaging and velocimetry measurements are described. Recent applications of these MR pulse sequences to microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structures are then reviewed. Considering the microporous and mesoporous systems, we focus attention on studies of rock cores, manufactured materials such as cement and gypsum plaster, and catalysts. When considering macroporous structures, the transport through packed beds of particles typical of fixed-bed catalytic reactors is reviewed; a brief overview of the increasing research interest in gas-solid fluidized beds is also presented. We highlight the field of sparse k-space sampling as an area that is in its infancy and suggest that, combined with Bayesian methods, it will offer new opportunities in both extending the application of high-field MR techniques to chemical engineering and increasing the range of measurements that can be carried out using low-field hardware.

  15. Magnetic resonance elastography of the pancreas: Measurement reproducibility and relationship with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; Schroeder, Samuel; Mo, Xiaokui; Shah, Zarine; Hart, Phil A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-10-01

    To determine magnetic resonance elastography (MRE)-derived stiffness of pancreas in healthy volunteers with emphasis on: 1) short term and midterm repeatability; and 2) variance as a function of age. Pancreatic MRE was performed on 22 healthy volunteers (age range:20-64years) in a 3T-scanner. For evaluation of reproducibility of stiffness estimates, the scans were repeated per volunteer on the same day (short term) and one month apart (midterm). MRE wave images were analyzed using 3D inversion to estimate the stiffness of overall pancreas and different anatomic regions (i.e., head, neck, body, and tail). Concordance and Spearman correlation tests were performed to determine reproducibility of stiffness measurements and relationship to age. A strong concordance correlation (ρ c =0.99; p-value0.81; p45yrs) had significantly higher stiffness compared to the younger group (≤45yrs) (p0.05) in stiffness measurements was observed between different anatomical regions of pancreas, except neck stiffness was slightly lower (ppancreas at month 1. MRE-derived pancreatic stiffness measurements are highly reproducible in the short and midterm and increase linearly with age in healthy volunteers. Further studies are needed to examine these effects in patients with various pancreatic diseases to understand potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Integral and measure from rather simple to rather complex

    CERN Document Server

    Mackevicius, Vigirdas

    2014-01-01

    This book is devoted to integration, one of the two main operations in calculus. In Part 1, the definition of the integral of a one-variable function is different (not essentially, but rather methodically) from traditional definitions of Riemann or Lebesgue integrals. Such an approach allows us, on the one hand, to quickly develop the practical skills of integration as well as, on the other hand, in Part 2, to pass naturally to the more general Lebesgue integral. Based on the latter, in Part 2, the author develops a theory of integration for functions of several variables. In Part 3, within

  17. Measurement of oro-caecal transit time by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savarino, Edoardo; De Cassan, Chiara [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, Padua (Italy); Savarino, Vincenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; Moscatelli, Alessandro [University of Genoa, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Fox, Mark [Queen' s Medical Center, NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    To assess prospectively the agreement of orocaecal transit time (OCTT) measurements by lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in healthy subjects. Volunteers underwent abdominal 1.5-T MRI using axial and coronal single-shot fast-spin-echo T2-weighted sequences, having fasted and after lactulose ingestion (10 g/125 mL). Imaging and H{sub 2} excretion gas-chromatography were performed concurrently every 15 min up to 180 min. MR images were analyzed using semiautomatic segmentation to calculate small bowel gas volume (SBGV) and visually to detect bolus arrival in the caecum. Agreement between MRI- and LHBT-OCTT was assessed. Twenty-eight subjects (17 men/11 women; mean age ± standard deviation 30 ± 8 years) were evaluated. Two H{sub 2} non-producers on LHBT were excluded. OCTT measured by MRI and LHBT was concordant in 18/26 (69 %) subjects (excellent agreement, k = 0.924). Median SBGV was 49.0 mL (interquartile interval 44.1 - 51.6 mL). In 8/26 (31 %) subjects, MRI showed that the lactulose bolus was in the terminal ileum and not the caecum when H{sub 2}E increased on LHBT. Median OCTT measured by MRI was significantly longer than OCTT measured by LHBT [135 min (120 - 150 min) vs. 127.5 min (105 - 150 min); p = 0.008]. Above baseline levels, correlation between [H{sub 2}] and SBGV was significant (r = 0.964; p < 0.001). MRI provides valid measurements of OCTT and gas production in the small bowel. (orig.)

  18. Slot Antenna Integrated Re-Entrant Resonator Based Wireless Pressure Sensor for High-Temperature Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shujing; Lu, Fei; Wu, Guozhu; Wu, Dezhi; Tan, Qiulin; Dong, Helei; Xiong, Jijun

    2017-08-25

    The highly sensitive pressure sensor presented in this paper aims at wireless passive sensing in a high temperature environment by using microwave backscattering technology. The structure of the re-entrant resonator was analyzed and optimized using theoretical calculation, software simulation, and its equivalent lump circuit model was first modified by us. Micro-machining and high-temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) process technologies were applied to fabricate the sensor, solving the common problem of cavity sealing during the air pressure loading test. In addition, to prevent the response signal from being immersed in the strong background clutter of the hermetic metal chamber, which makes its detection difficult, we proposed two key techniques to improve the signal to noise ratio: the suppression of strong background clutter and the detection of the weak backscattered signal of the sensor. The pressure sensor demonstrated in this paper works well for gas pressure loading between 40 and 120 kPa in a temperature range of 24 °C to 800 °C. The experimental results show that the sensor resonant frequency lies at 2.1065 GHz, with a maximum pressure sensitivity of 73.125 kHz/kPa.

  19. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  20. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  1. MEASURE: An integrated data-analysis and model identification facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaidip; Iyer, Ravi K.

    1990-01-01

    The first phase of the development of MEASURE, an integrated data analysis and model identification facility is described. The facility takes system activity data as input and produces as output representative behavioral models of the system in near real time. In addition a wide range of statistical characteristics of the measured system are also available. The usage of the system is illustrated on data collected via software instrumentation of a network of SUN workstations at the University of Illinois. Initially, statistical clustering is used to identify high density regions of resource-usage in a given environment. The identified regions form the states for building a state-transition model to evaluate system and program performance in real time. The model is then solved to obtain useful parameters such as the response-time distribution and the mean waiting time in each state. A graphical interface which displays the identified models and their characteristics (with real time updates) was also developed. The results provide an understanding of the resource-usage in the system under various workload conditions. This work is targeted for a testbed of UNIX workstations with the initial phase ported to SUN workstations on the NASA, Ames Research Center Advanced Automation Testbed.

  2. Experimental flow and perfusion measurement in an animal model with magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, S.O.; Bock, M.; Just, A.

    2001-01-01

    Aim. Validation of non-invasive methods for morphologic and functional imaging of the kidney under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Material and Methods. In chronically instrumented animals (foxhounds) comparative measurements of renal flow and perfusion were performed. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were compared to data obtained from implanted flow probes and total kidney weight post mortem. In the MR system, different degrees of renal artery stenosis could be induced by means of an implanted inflatable cuff. The degree of stenosis was verified with high-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D-CE-MRA) using an intravascular contrast agent. Results. The MR-data agreed well with the invasively obtained results. Artifacts resulting from the implanted flow probes and other devices could be kept to a minimum due to appropriate selection of the probe materials and measurement strategies. Stenoses could be reproduced reliably and quantified from the induced morphologic and functional changes. Conclusion. Morphologic and functional MR techniques are well suited for non-invasive in vivo assessment of renal blood flow physiology. (orig.) [de

  3. Electron spin resonance (ESR dose measurement in bone of Hiroshima A-bomb victim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Explosion of the bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki corresponds to the only historical moment when atomic bombs were used against civilians. This event triggered countless investigations into the effects and dosimetry of ionizing radiation. However, none of the investigations has used the victims' bones as dosimeter. Here, we assess samples of bones obtained from fatal victims of the explosion by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR. In 1973, one of the authors of the present study (SM traveled to Japan and conducted a preliminary experiment on the victims' bone samples. The idea was to use the paramagnetism induced in bone after irradiation to measure the radiation dose. Technological advances involved in the construction of spectrometers, better knowledge of the paramagnetic center, and improvement in signal processing techniques have allowed us to resume the investigation. We obtained a reconstructed dose of 9.46 ± 3.4 Gy from the jawbone, which was compatible with the dose distribution in different locations as measured in non-biological materials such as wall bricks and roof tiles.

  4. A measurement of the (τ) polarization at the Z resonance with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Antonio Wong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The polarization of τ leptons produced in the reaction e+e- → τ+τ- near the peak of the Z° resonance has been measured using a sample of 24904 τ+τ- events, with an estimated background of 1.5%. We have selected 4562 τ → ev$\\bar{v}$ 2218 τ → πv and 5133 τ→ ρv candidates. The mean value obtained is Pτ = -0.176 ± 0.029. This corresponds to a ratio of the neutral current vector to the axial-vector coupling constants of the τ lepton of gV/gAτ = 0.088 ± 0.014. This leads to a value of the electroweak mixing angle of sin2θW = 0.2280 ± 0.0036. This result is in good agreement with previous measurements of the weak mixing angle from the study of the Z° lineshape and the forward-backward asymmetries in the processes Z° → l+l- and Z° → q$\\bar{q}$.

  5. Dew point fast measurement in organic vapor mixtures using quartz resonant sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Liu, Jia; Meng, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    A fast dew point sensor has been developed for organic vapor mixtures by using the quartz crystal with sensitive circuits. The sensor consists of the quartz crystal and a cooler device. Proactive approach is taken to produce condensation on the surface of the quartz crystal, and it will lead to a change in electrical features of the quartz crystal. The cessation of oscillation was measured because this phenomenon is caused by dew condensation. Such a phenomenon can be used to detect the dew point. This method exploits the high sensitivity of the quartz crystal but without frequency measurement and also retains the stability of the resonant circuit. It is strongly anti-interfered. Its performance was evaluated with acetone-methanol mixtures under different pressures. The results were compared with the dew points predicted from the universal quasi-chemical equation to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. Though the maximum deviations of the sensor are less than 1.1 °C, it still has a fast response time with a recovery time of less than 10 s, providing an excellent dehumidifying performance.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of shoulders with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: reliability of measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Demaille-Wlodyka, Samantha; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Paris (France); Drape, Jean-Luc; Diche, Thierry; Minvielle, Francois [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France); Fermanian, Jacques [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker (AP-HP), Paris (France)

    2005-12-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) were compared with those of contralateral healthy shoulders and the reliability of measures assessed. Twenty-six consecutive patients (26 AC and 14 healthy shoulders) were prospectively assessed. The main measurements were thickness of the joint capsule and synovial membrane in the axillary recess and rotator interval in T1-weighted spin-echo sequence enhanced with intravenous (IV) gadolinium chelate (Gd-chelate). Reliability was studied by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean thickness of the axillary recess on the coronal plane was 9.0{+-}2.2 mm in AC shoulders and 0.4{+-}0.7 mm in healthy shoulders. The mean thickness of the rotator interval on the sagittal plane was 8.4{+-}2.8 in AC shoulders and 0.6{+-}0.8 mm in healthy shoulders. Interobserver reliability was good for the axillary recess, with ICC values of 0.84 for the coronal plane, and good for the rotator interval, with ICC values of 0.80 for the sagittal plane. MRI with IV Gd-chelate injection can show, with acceptable reliability, signal and thickness abnormalities of the shoulder joint capsule and synovial membrane in AC. (orig.)

  7. A hollow coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot resonator for liquid dielectric constant measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Zhuang, Yiyang; Chen, Yizheng; Huang, Jie

    2018-04-01

    We report, for the first time, a low-cost and robust homemade hollow coaxial cable Fabry-Pérot resonator (HCC-FPR) for measuring liquid dielectric constant. In the HCC design, the traditional dielectric insulating layer is replaced by air. A metal disk is welded onto the end of the HCC serving as a highly reflective reflector, and an open cavity is engineered on the HCC. After the open cavity is filled with the liquid analyte (e.g., water), the air-liquid interface acts as a highly reflective reflector due to large impedance mismatch. As a result, an HCC-FPR is formed by the two highly reflective reflectors, i.e., the air-liquid interface and the metal disk. We measured the room temperature dielectric constant for ethanol/water mixtures with different concentrations using this homemade HCC-FPR. Monitoring the evaporation of ethanol in ethanol/water mixtures was also conducted to demonstrate the ability of the sensor for continuously monitoring the change in dielectric constant. The results revealed that the HCC-FPR could be a promising evaporation rate detection platform with high performance. Due to its great advantages, such as high robustness, simple configuration, and ease of fabrication, the novel HCC-FPR based liquid dielectric constant sensor is believed to be of high interest in various fields.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of shoulders with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: reliability of measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Demaille-Wlodyka, Samantha; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel; Drape, Jean-Luc; Diche, Thierry; Minvielle, Francois; Fermanian, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) were compared with those of contralateral healthy shoulders and the reliability of measures assessed. Twenty-six consecutive patients (26 AC and 14 healthy shoulders) were prospectively assessed. The main measurements were thickness of the joint capsule and synovial membrane in the axillary recess and rotator interval in T1-weighted spin-echo sequence enhanced with intravenous (IV) gadolinium chelate (Gd-chelate). Reliability was studied by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean thickness of the axillary recess on the coronal plane was 9.0±2.2 mm in AC shoulders and 0.4±0.7 mm in healthy shoulders. The mean thickness of the rotator interval on the sagittal plane was 8.4±2.8 in AC shoulders and 0.6±0.8 mm in healthy shoulders. Interobserver reliability was good for the axillary recess, with ICC values of 0.84 for the coronal plane, and good for the rotator interval, with ICC values of 0.80 for the sagittal plane. MRI with IV Gd-chelate injection can show, with acceptable reliability, signal and thickness abnormalities of the shoulder joint capsule and synovial membrane in AC. (orig.)

  9. Electron spin resonance (ESR) dose measurement in bone of Hiroshima A-bomb victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Explosion of the bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki corresponds to the only historical moment when atomic bombs were used against civilians. This event triggered countless investigations into the effects and dosimetry of ionizing radiation. However, none of the investigations has used the victims’ bones as dosimeter. Here, we assess samples of bones obtained from fatal victims of the explosion by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR). In 1973, one of the authors of the present study (SM) traveled to Japan and conducted a preliminary experiment on the victims’ bone samples. The idea was to use the paramagnetism induced in bone after irradiation to measure the radiation dose. Technological advances involved in the construction of spectrometers, better knowledge of the paramagnetic center, and improvement in signal processing techniques have allowed us to resume the investigation. We obtained a reconstructed dose of 9.46 ± 3.4 Gy from the jawbone, which was compatible with the dose distribution in different locations as measured in non-biological materials such as wall bricks and roof tiles. PMID:29408890

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2018-05-20

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1433-1443.

  11. The Impact of Resonance Frequency Breathing on Measures of Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure, and Mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Steffen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB significantly improves heart rate variability (HRV. Breathing at resonance frequency (RF, approximately 6 breaths/min constitutes a key part of HRVB training and is hypothesized to be a pathway through which biofeedback improves HRV. No studies to date, however, have experimentally examined whether RF breathing impacts measures of HRV. The present study addressed this question by comparing three groups: the RF group breathed at their determined RF for 15 min; the RF + 1 group breathed at 1 breath/min higher than their determined RF for 15 min; and the third group sat quietly for 15 min. After this 15-min period, all groups participated in the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT for 8 min, and then sat quietly during a 10-min recovery period. HRV, blood pressure, and mood were measured throughout the experiment. Groups were not significantly different on any of the measures at baseline. After the breathing exercise, the RF group reported higher positive mood than the other two groups and a significantly higher LF/HF HRV ratio relative to the control group, a key goal in HRVB training (p < 0.05. Additionally, the RF group showed lower systolic blood pressure during the PASAT and during the recovery period relative to the control group, with the RF + 1 group not being significantly different from either group (p < 0.05. Overall, RF breathing appears to play an important role in the positive effect HRVB has on measures of HRV.

  12. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu-Narayan Sonya V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods Forty-three adult patients with a previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot and residual pulmonary regurgitation were investigated with CMR. In each, pulmonary regurgitant fraction was measured from velocity maps transecting the pulmonary trunk, acquired during held expiration, held inspiration, by non-breath-hold acquisition, and also from the difference of right and left ventricular stroke volume measurements. Results Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was lower when measured by velocity mapping in held expiration compared with held inspiration, non-breath-hold or stroke volume difference (30.8 vs. 37.0, 35.6, 35.4%, p = 0.00017, 0.0035, 0.026. The regurgitant volume was lower in held expiration than in held inspiration (41.9 vs. 48.3, p = 0.0018. Pulmonary forward flow volume was larger during held expiration than during non-breath-hold (132 vs. 124 ml, p = 0.0024. Conclusion Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was significantly lower in held expiration compared with held inspiration, free breathing and stroke volume difference. Altered airway pressure could be a contributory factor. This information is relevant if breath-hold acquisition is to be substituted for non-breath-hold in the investigation of patients with a view to re-intervention.

  13. Dynamic performance improvement of standalone battery integrated PMSG wind energy system using proportional resonant controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Kumar Varma Sagiraju

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The load voltage and frequency should be controlled under steady state and transient conditions in off grid applications. Power quality and power management is very important task for rural communities under erratic wind and load conditions. This paper presents a coordinated Proportional resonant (PR and battery energy controller for enhancement of power quality and power management in direct drive standalone wind energy system. The dynamic performance of standalone direct drive Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG is investigated with the proposed control scheme under various operating conditions such as fluctuating wind with step increase and decrease in wind velocity, balanced and unbalanced load conditions. The proposed PR control strategy with battery energy controller also ensures effective power balance between wind and battery source in order to fulfill the load demand. The superiority of the proposed control strategy is confirmed by comparing with the traditional vector control strategy under fluctuating wind and load conditions through MATLAB/SIMULINK platform.

  14. Integrated microfluidic capillary in a waveguide resonator for chemical and biomedical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavuluri, S K; Lopez-Villarroya, R; McKeever, E; Goussetis, G; Desmulliez, M P Y; Kavanagh, D

    2009-01-01

    A novel microfluidic sensing device based on waveguide cavity filters is proposed for the characterisation, detection of cells in solution and chemical substances in micro-litre volumes. The sensor consists of a micromachined microfluidic channel within a waveguide-based resonator localised increased near-fields and could potentially be designed for different frequency regimes to improve the sensitivity. The present sensor has been proposed for fabrication in different manufacturing platforms and an initial prototype with a 100μm micromachined channel that is embedded within an X-band E-plane waveguide has been fabricated and tested. The design methodology for the microfluidic channel and the E-plane filter is also presented.

  15. Development of Integrated Electronics for Readout of High Frequency Micro/Nano-mechanical Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Meng

    Micro størrelse bulk type resonatorer er blevet udviklet gennern de sidste fem år til anvendelse inden for elektronikbranchen til lav strøm og billige alternativer til både passive og aktive komponenter. Dog kan denne type bulk resonator også bruges til bio/kemiske sensorer hvor, da på grund af den...... fri bevægelser omkring sin resonansfrekven. Metodens evne til at måle resonans frekvens, Q-faktor og den parallel kondensator på samme tid er verificeret både teoretisk og eksperimentelt i luft ved høj hastighed. Hertil kommer, at metoden ikke har brug for nogen kompliceret form for feedback som gøre...

  16. Power Take-Off with Integrated Resonator for Energy Extraction from Linear Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a magnetic gear for converting linear motion into rotational motion and vice versa. The present invention converts slow linear irregular oscillating motion of wave energy devices into torque on a high speed shaft for powering a generator while making the wave energy device...... of sea or ocean waves into useful energy, such as electricity. The invention relates to the control and operation of a magnetic gear based motor/generator system. The invention provides a high force density electric powered linear actuator....... resonate with the waves. The invention relates to the field of energy-harvesting from energy sources, where the energy-harvesting requires the extraction of energy from slow and often irregular reciprocating motion of bodies. The present invention relates to a wave power apparatus for converting power...

  17. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  18. High-Resolution Measurement of the {sup 4}He({gamma},n) Reaction in the Giant Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Bjoern

    2003-03-01

    A comprehensive near-threshold {sup 4}He(gamma,n) absolute cross section measurement has been performed at the high-resolution tagged-photon facility MAX-lab located in Lund, Sweden. The 20 < Eg < 45 MeV tagged photons (covering the Giant Dipole Resonance energy region) were directed towards a liquid {sup 4}He target, and knocked-out neutrons were detected in a pair of 60 cm x 60 cm vetoed NE213A liquid scintillator arrays. The intense and varying charge-neutral experimental backgrounds were carefully quantified and removed from the data using a precision fitting procedure. Eight average laboratory angles (30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, and 135 deg) were investigated for eight photon energy bins (25, 27, 29, 31, 35, 36, 39, and 41 MeV), resulting in 64 differential cross sections. These angular distributions were integrated to produce total cross sections as a function of photon energy. The resulting cross sections peak at 1.9 mb at a photon energy of 27 MeV, and fall off to a near-constant value of 1.1 mb by 36 MeV. Further, they are in excellent agreement with those measured by Sims et al. using tagged photons in the Quasi-Deuteron energy region. Overall, the results favor modern theoretical models which are based upon a charge-symmetric nucleon-nucleon force, in marked contrast to the recommendations made by Calarco et al. in 1983 based on the sparse {sup 4}He(gamma,n) data available at the time.

  19. Wafer-scale integration of piezoelectric actuation capabilities in nanoelectromechanical systems resonators

    OpenAIRE

    DEZEST, Denis; MATHIEU, Fabrice; MAZENQ, Laurent; SOYER, Caroline; COSTECALDE, Jean; REMIENS, Denis; THOMAS, Olivier; DEÜ, Jean-François; NICU, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the integration of piezoelectric actuation means on arrays of nanocantilevers at the wafer scale. We use lead titanate zirconate (PZT) as piezoelectric material mainly because of its excellent actuation properties even when geometrically constrained at extreme scale

  20. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, 10/B1D728, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.