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Sample records for resonance imaging detected

  1. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Robert; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Mueck, Michael; Myers, Whittier; Haken, Bernard ten; Seton, H.C.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alex; Clarke, John

    2003-01-01

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  2. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmus, T.; Baur, A.; Hamm, B.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, but only about 10 % of patients die from that cancer. Recent studies suggest that not all patients benefit from a radical therapeutic approach. When prostate cancer is suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can make an important contribution to cancer localization within the prostate. Many studies show that T2-weighted morphologic imaging should be supplemented by multiparametric MRI techniques including diffusion-weighted imaging, contrast-enhanced sequences, and MR spectroscopy. This approach detects aggressive prostate cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. The findings of multiparametric MRI additionally contribute information to the assessment of cancer aggressiveness. The use of these multiparametric MRI techniques will gain an increasing role in the clinical management of prostate cancer patients. They can help in establishing a definitive diagnosis with a minimum of invasiveness and may also contribute to optimal individualized treatment. This review article presents the different techniques of multiparametric MRI and discusses their contribution to the detection of prostate cancer. Moreover, this review outlines an objective approach to image interpretation and structured reporting of MRI findings using the PI-RADS criteria. The review concludes with an outline of approaches to prostate biopsy on the basis of MRI (transrectal ultrasound, direct MRI guidance of tissue sampling, and MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy) and emerging future uses of MRI in the planning of focal treatment options and in the active surveillance of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  4. Real time hybridization studies by resonant waveguide gratings using nanopattern imaging for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle; Kodzius, Rimantas; Yue, Weisheng; Chen, Longqing; Li, Shunbo; Zhang, Xixiang; Bé nisty, Henri; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    2D imaging of biochips is particularly interesting for multiplex biosensing. Resonant properties allow label-free detection using the change of refractive index at the chip surface. We demonstrate a new principle of Scanning Of Resonance on Chip

  5. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body (1). This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons (2, 3) in a static magnetic field B{sub 0}. An applied radiofrequency pulse causes the protons to precess about B{sub 0} at their Larmor frequency {nu}{sub 0} = ({gamma}/2{pi})B{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the gyromagnetic ratio; {gamma}/2{pi} = 42.58 MHz/tesla. The precessing protons generate an oscillating magnetic field and hence a voltage in a nearby coil that is amplified and recorded. The application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients specifies a unique magnetic field and thus an NMR frequency in each voxel of the subject, so that with appropriate encoding of the signals one can acquire a complete image (4). Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems (5). Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. Commercially available 0.2-T systems based on permanent magnets offer both lower cost and a more open access than their higher-field counterparts, at the expense of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. At the still lower field of 0.03 mT maintained by a conventional, room-temperature solenoid, Connolly and co-workers (6, 7) obtain good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by prepolarizing the protons in a field B{sub p} of 0.3 T. Prepolarization (8) enhances the magnetic moment of an ensemble of protons over that produced by the lower precession field; after the polarizing field is removed, the higher magnetic moment produces a correspondingly larger signal during its precession in B{sub 0}. Using the same method, Stepisnik et al. (9) obtained MR images in the Earth's magnetic field ({approx} 50 {micro}T). Alternatively, one can enhance the signal

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olcucuoglu, E.; Tuncbilek, I.; Oztekin, P.; Asal, N.; Yilmaz, O.; Kosar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: The aim of the study is to state breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) diagnostic value of examination of MG (MG), ultrasonography (U.S.) by comparing with the results of a biopsy revealed, and emphasize the value of detecting breast cancer. Materials and methods: 327 patients were included in the breast MRI examination. MG breast MRI and U.S. were performed before the cases, respectively. All tests which are in fact planned no later than two months in between and evaluation were performed by two radiologists. BI-RADS classification was evaluated according to the investigations. As a result of MRI BIRADS 4 and 5 cases that were diagnosed in a biopsy was recommended. Following the recommended BI-RADS 3 biopsies diagnosed as those of the cases were due to the physical examination findings. MG with the results of a biopsy, U.S., and MRI results were compared. Results: The study recommended a biopsy of BIRADS 4 and 5 group, 36 out of 63 cases of breast cancer (32 invasive ductal carcinomas, 2 invasive lobular carcinoma, 1 lymphoma, 1 angiosarcoma) were diagnosed. 16% of patients with BI-RADS 4 group, 94% of BI-RADS 5 group of patients were diagnosed as breast cancer. BI-RADS is a group of breast cancer with axillary adenopathy in a patient with the diagnosis of MRI examination was no diagnostic. False-positive cases in our study were counted for the majority of cases as fibrocystic. Conclusion: MRI sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of tests with the highest rates, while the combination of MG and MRI, were found to be the best non-invasive examination methods

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  8. Extracardiac findings detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, Rolf; Medioni, Nathalie; Santini, Paolo; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and importance of extracardiac findings (ECF) in patients undergoing clinical CMR and to test the hypothesis that the original CMR reading focusing on the heart may underestimate extracardiac abnormalities. 401 consecutive patients (mean age 53 years) underwent CMR at 1.5 T. Main indications were ischaemic heart disease (n = 183) and cardiomyopathy (n = 164). All CMR sequences, including scout images, were reviewed with specific attention to ECF in a second reading by the same radiologist who performed the first clinical reading. Potentially significant findings were defined as abnormalities requiring additional clinical or radiological follow-up. 250 incidental ECF were detected, of which 84 (34%) had potentially significant ECF including bronchial carcinoma (n = 1), lung consolidation (n = 7) and abdominal abnormalities. In 166 CMR studies (41%) non-significant ECF were detected. The number of ECF identified at second versus first reading was higher for significant (84 vs. 47) and non-significant (166 vs. 36) findings (P < 0.00001). About one fifth of patients undergoing CMR were found to have potentially significant ECF requiring additional work-up. The second dedicated reading detected significantly more ECF compared with the first clinical reading emphasising the importance of active search for extracardiac abnormalities when evaluating CMR studies. circle Many patients undergoing cardiac MR have significant extracardiac findings (ECF) circle These impact on management and require additional work-up. circle Wide review of scout and cine sequences will detect most ECFs. circle Education of radiologists is important to identify ECFs on CMR studies. (orig.)

  9. Detection of light images by simple tissues as visualized by photosensitized magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tempel-Brami

    Full Text Available In this study, we show how light can be absorbed by the body of a living rat due to an injected pigment circulating in the blood stream. This process is then physiologically translated in the tissue into a chemical signature that can be perceived as an image by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We previously reported that illumination of an injected photosynthetic bacteriochlorophyll-derived pigment leads to a generation of reactive oxygen species, upon oxygen consumption in the blood stream. Consequently, paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin accumulating in the illuminated area induces changes in image contrast, detectable by a Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD-MRI protocol, termed photosensitized (psMRI. Here, we show that laser beam pulses synchronously trigger BOLD-contrast transients in the tissue, allowing representation of the luminous spatiotemporal profile, as a contrast map, on the MR monitor. Regions with enhanced BOLD-contrast (7-61 fold were deduced as illuminated, and were found to overlap with the anatomical location of the incident light. Thus, we conclude that luminous information can be captured and translated by typical oxygen exchange processes in the blood of ordinary tissues, and made visible by psMRI (Fig. 1. This process represents a new channel for communicating environmental light into the body in certain analogy to light absorption by visual pigments in the retina where image perception takes place in the central nervous system. Potential applications of this finding may include: non-invasive intra-operative light guidance and follow-up of photodynamic interventions, determination of light diffusion in opaque tissues for optical imaging and possible assistance to the blind.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-based detection of glial brain tumors in mice after antiangiogenic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, A.; Gambarota, G.; Hamans, B.C.; Tellingen, O. van; Wesseling, P.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Proper delineation of gliomas using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) poses a problem in neuro-oncology. The blood brain barrier (BBB) in areas of diffuse-infiltrative growth may be intact, precluding extravasation and subsequent MR-based detection of the contrast agent

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  12. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  13. Reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shelton, Julie B; Glasier, Charles M; Phillips, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    It is essential to identify hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) because they are at risk for developmental delay, seizures, or death. The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability of neurohypophyseal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with ONH. Cross-sectional study. One hundred one children with clinical ONH who underwent MRI of the brain and orbits and a detailed pediatric endocrinologic evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed on 1.5-Tesla scanners. The imaging protocol included sagittal T1-weighted images, axial fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery/T2-weighted images, and diffusion-weighted images of the brain. Orbital imaging included fat-saturated axial and coronal images and high-resolution axial T2-weighted images. The MRI studies were reviewed by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists for optic nerve hypoplasia, absent or ectopic posterior pituitary, absent pituitary infundibulum, absent septum pellucidum, migration anomalies, and hemispheric injury. Medical records were reviewed for clinical examination findings and endocrinologic status. All patients underwent a clinical evaluation by a pediatric endocrinologist and a standardized panel of serologic testing that included serum insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and free thyroxine levels. Radiologists were masked to patients' endocrinologic status and funduscopic findings. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI findings for the detection of hypopituitarism. Neurohypophyseal abnormalities, including absent pituitary infundibulum, ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot, and absent posterior pituitary bright spot, occurred in 33 children. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed neurohypophyseal abnormalities in 27 of the 28 children with hypopituitarism (sensitivity, 96%). A

  14. Experimental study on early detection of alloxan-induced pulmonary injury by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awai, Kazuo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Susumu; Fujikawa, Koichi; Utsumi, Toshio; Kajima, Toshio; Azuma, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Katsuhide.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the early detection of alloxan-induced pulmonary injury by magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Permeability edema was induced in ten rats by intravenous injection of alloxan at 100 mg/Kg. T1-and T2-weighted images were acquired in five rats every 30 min for 120 min after alloxan injection. Five rats served as controls. The rats were sacrificed immediately after imaging and examined microscopically. CT images were also acquired in five rats every 30 min for 120 min after alloxan injection. Five rats served as controls. The rats were sacrificed immediately after imaging, and the wet-to-dry ratio of the lung was measured. In T1-weighted images, relative signal intensity from the lung with permeability edema rose from 30 min to 120 min, and was greater than that from normal lung every time. In T2-weighted images, there was no statistically significant difference in relative signal intensity of the lung between permeability edema and the control during 120 min. In CT images, there was also no statistically significant difference in lung density between permeability edema and the control during 120 min. There was no statistically significant difference in the wet-to-dry lung ratio between edematous lung and normal lung. In histological study, mild congestion and interstitial edema were observed in edematous lung. These results suggest the potential capability of MR imaging in detecting the early phase of permeability pulmonary edema. (author)

  15. Effect of background parenchymal enhancement on breast cancer detection with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, M; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) may influence the sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging in breast cancer detection. A total of 180 consecutive women with 194 breast cancers underwent MR imaging examination. Women were assigned to two different groups depending on the degree of BPE. Group 1 consisted of women with minimal or mild BPE and group 2 of women with moderate or marked BPE. The distributions of histotypes of tumors within the two groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Difference in sensitivities of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between the two groups was searched for using the Student t-test. No differences in terms of distributions of histotypes of tumors between the two groups of women were found (P=0.5). The 11% difference in sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between group 1 (91/92; 99%; 95% CI: 94-100%) and group 2 (90/102; 88%; 95% CI: 80-94%) was statistically significant (P=0.0058). The sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging is significantly lower in women with moderate and marked BPE as compared with women with minimal and mild BPE regardless of cancer histotype. BPE could represent a limitation for breast MR imaging interpretation and should be indicated in MR imaging reports. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Hippocampus shape analysis for temporal lobe epilepsy detection in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Zohreh; Azmi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    There are evidences in the literature that Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) causes some lateralized atrophy and deformation on hippocampus and other substructures of the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to high-contrast soft tissue imaging, is one of the most popular imaging modalities being used in TLE diagnosis and treatment procedures. Using an algorithm to help clinicians for better and more effective shape deformations analysis could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this project our purpose is to design, implement and test a classification algorithm for MRIs based on hippocampal asymmetry detection using shape and size-based features. Our method consisted of two main parts; (1) shape feature extraction, and (2) image classification. We tested 11 different shape and size features and selected four of them that detect the asymmetry in hippocampus significantly in a randomly selected subset of the dataset. Then, we employed a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify the remaining images of the dataset to normal and epileptic images using our selected features. The dataset contains 25 patient images in which 12 cases were used as a training set and the rest 13 cases for testing the performance of classifier. We measured accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 76%, 100%, and 70% for our algorithm. The preliminary results show that using shape and size features for detecting hippocampal asymmetry could be helpful in TLE diagnosis in MRI.

  17. Detection of cortical activities on eye movement using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kitahara, Kenji [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Soulie, D.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1997-11-01

    Cortical activity during eye movement was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Horizontal saccadic eye movements and smooth pursuit eye movements were elicited in normal subjects. Activity in the frontal eye field was found during both saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements at the posterior margin of the middle frontal gyrus and in parts of the precentral sulcus and precentral gyrus bordering the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann`s areas 8, 6, and 9). In addition, activity in the parietal eye field was found in the deep, upper margin of the angular gyrus and of the supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann`s areas 39 and 40) during saccadic eye movement. Activity of V5 was found at the intersection of the ascending limb of the inferior temporal sulcus and the lateral occipital sulcus during smooth pursuit eye movement. Our results suggest that functional magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting cortical activity during eye movement. (author)

  18. Detection of cortical activities on eye movement using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kitahara, Kenji; Soulie, D.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Cortical activity during eye movement was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Horizontal saccadic eye movements and smooth pursuit eye movements were elicited in normal subjects. Activity in the frontal eye field was found during both saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements at the posterior margin of the middle frontal gyrus and in parts of the precentral sulcus and precentral gyrus bordering the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 8, 6, and 9). In addition, activity in the parietal eye field was found in the deep, upper margin of the angular gyrus and of the supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 39 and 40) during saccadic eye movement. Activity of V5 was found at the intersection of the ascending limb of the inferior temporal sulcus and the lateral occipital sulcus during smooth pursuit eye movement. Our results suggest that functional magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting cortical activity during eye movement. (author)

  19. Prospective comparison of magnetic resonance imaging to transient elastography and serum markers for liver fibrosis detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Jajamovich, Guido H; Bane, Octavia; Fiel, M Isabel; Chou, Hsin; Schiano, Thomas D; Dieterich, Douglas; Babb, James S; Friedman, Scott L; Taouli, Bachir

    2016-05-01

    Establishing accurate non-invasive methods of liver fibrosis quantification remains a major unmet need. Here, we assessed the diagnostic value of a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in comparison with transient elastography (TE) and blood tests [including ELF (Enhanced Liver Fibrosis) and APRI] for liver fibrosis detection. In this single centre cross-sectional study, we prospectively enrolled 60 subjects with liver disease who underwent multiparametric MRI (DWI, DCE-MRI and MRE), TE and blood tests. Correlation was assessed between non-invasive modalities and histopathologic findings including stage, grade and collagen content, while accounting for covariates such as age, sex, BMI, HCV status and MRI-derived fat and iron content. ROC curve analysis evaluated the performance of each technique for detection of moderate-to-advanced liver fibrosis (F2-F4) and advanced fibrosis (F3-F4). Magnetic resonance elastography provided the strongest correlation with fibrosis stage (r = 0.66, P fibrosis (F2-F4), AUCs were 0.78, 0.82, 0.72, 0.79, 0.71 for MRE, TE, DCE-MRI, DWI and APRI, respectively. For detection of advanced fibrosis (F3-F4), AUCs were 0.94, 0.77, 0.79, 0.79 and 0.70, respectively. Magnetic resonance elastography provides the highest correlation with histopathologic markers and yields high diagnostic performance for detection of advanced liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, compared to DWI, DCE-MRI, TE and serum markers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparison of sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and evoked potentials in the detection of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Medaglini, S.; Locatelli, T.; Magnani, G.; Poggi, A.; Triulzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and the combined use of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential and Median Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the detection of brainstem dysfunction in 54 multiple sclerosis patients. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  1. Detection of stiff nanoparticles within cellular structures by contact resonance atomic force microscopy subsurface nanomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Angeloni, Livia; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; Barteri, Mario; De Angelis, Francesca; Persiconi, Irene; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Rossi, Marco

    2017-05-04

    Detecting stiff nanoparticles buried in soft biological matrices by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques represents a new frontier in the field of scanning probe microscopies, originally developed as surface characterization methods. Here we report the detection of stiff (magnetic) nanoparticles (NPs) internalized in cells by using contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) employed as a potentially non-destructive subsurface characterization tool. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) NPs were internalized in microglial cells from cerebral cortices of mouse embryos of 18 days by phagocytosis. Nanomechanical imaging of cells was performed by detecting the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) of an AFM cantilever held in contact with the sample. Agglomerates of NPs internalized in cells were visualized on the basis of the local increase in the contact stiffness with respect to the surrounding biological matrix. A second AFM-based technique for nanomechanical imaging, i.e., HarmoniX™, as well as magnetic force microscopy and light microscopy were used to confirm the CR-AFM results. Thus, CR-AFM was demonstrated as a promising technique for subsurface imaging of nanomaterials in biological samples.

  2. A novel method based on learning automata for automatic lesion detection in breast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Leila; Azmi, Reza

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. In this way, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful tool for the detection of breast cancer. Breast MRI presently has two major challenges. First, its specificity is relatively poor, and it detects many false positives (FPs). Second, the method involves acquiring several high-resolution image volumes before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. The large volume of data makes the task of interpretation by the radiologist both complex and time-consuming. These challenges have led to the development of the computer-aided detection systems to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the interpretation process. Detection of suspicious regions of interests (ROIs) is a critical preprocessing step in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data evaluation. In this regard, this paper introduces a new automatic method to detect the suspicious ROIs for breast DCE-MRI based on region growing. The results indicate that the proposed method is thoroughly able to identify suspicious regions (accuracy of 75.39 ± 3.37 on PIDER breast MRI dataset). Furthermore, the FP per image in this method is averagely 7.92, which shows considerable improvement comparing to other methods like ROI hunter.

  3. Real time hybridization studies by resonant waveguide gratings using nanopattern imaging for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bougot-Robin, Kristelle

    2013-12-20

    2D imaging of biochips is particularly interesting for multiplex biosensing. Resonant properties allow label-free detection using the change of refractive index at the chip surface. We demonstrate a new principle of Scanning Of Resonance on Chip by Imaging (SORCI) based on spatial profiles of nanopatterns of resonant waveguide gratings (RWGs) and its embodiment in a fluidic chip for real-time biological studies. This scheme allows multiplexing of the resonance itself by providing nanopattern sensing areas in a bioarray format. Through several chip designs we discuss resonance spatial profiles, dispersion and electric field distribution for optimal light-matter interaction with biological species of different sizes. Fluidic integration is carried out with a black anodized aluminum chamber, advantageous in term of mechanical stability, multiple uses of the chip, temperature control and low optical background. Real-time hybridization experiments are illustrated by SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) detection in gyrase A of E. coli K12, observed in evolution studies of resistance to the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. We choose a 100 base pairs (bp) DNA target (∼30 kDa) including the codon of interest and demonstrate the high specificity of our technique for probes and targets with close affinity constants. This work validates the safe applicability of our unique combination of RWGs and simple instrumentation for real-time biosensing with sensitivity in buffer solution of ∼10 pg/mm2. Paralleling the success of RWGs sensing for cells sensing, our work opens new avenues for a large number of biological studies. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media.

  4. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  5. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  6. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  7. Alcoholism detection in magnetic resonance imaging by Haar wavelet transform and back propagation neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yali; Wang, Mengxia; Lima, Dimas

    2018-04-01

    In order to develop a novel alcoholism detection method, we proposed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based computer vision approach. We first use contrast equalization to increase the contrast of brain slices. Then, we perform Haar wavelet transform and principal component analysis. Finally, we use back propagation neural network (BPNN) as the classification tool. Our method yields a sensitivity of 81.71±4.51%, a specificity of 81.43±4.52%, and an accuracy of 81.57±2.18%. The Haar wavelet gives better performance than db4 wavelet and sym3 wavelet.

  8. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y.; Maruyama, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  9. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y. [Shimane Medical Univ., The Fourth Dept. of Internal Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan); Maruyama, R. [Shimane Medical Univ., Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  10. Precision mass measurements using the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Karthein, Jonas

    This thesis presents the implementation and improvement of the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (PI-ICR) detection technique at the ISOLTRAP experiment, located at the ISOLDE / CERN, with the purpose of on-line high-precision and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Extensive simulation studies were performed with the aim of improving the phase-imaging resolution and finding the optimal position for detector placement. Following the outcome of these simulations, the detector was moved out of a region of electric-field distortion and closer to the center of the Penning trap, showing a dramatic improvement in the quality and reproducibility of the phase-imaging measurements. A new image reconstitution and analysis software for the MCP-PS detector was written in Python and ROOT and introduced in the framework of PI-ICR mass measurements. The state of the art in the field of time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance measurements is illustrated through an analysis of on-line measurements of the mirror nuclei $...

  11. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  12. Automated prostate cancer detection via comprehensive multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging texture feature models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalvati, Farzad; Wong, Alexander; Haider, Masoom A.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in North America. Auto-detection of prostate cancer can play a major role in early detection of prostate cancer, which has a significant impact on patient survival rates. While multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) has shown promise in diagnosis of prostate cancer, the existing auto-detection algorithms do not take advantage of abundance of data available in MP-MRI to improve detection accuracy. The goal of this research was to design a radiomics-based auto-detection method for prostate cancer via utilizing MP-MRI data. In this work, we present new MP-MRI texture feature models for radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer. In addition to commonly used non-invasive imaging sequences in conventional MP-MRI, namely T2-weighted MRI (T2w) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), our proposed MP-MRI texture feature models incorporate computed high-b DWI (CHB-DWI) and a new diffusion imaging modality called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI). Moreover, the proposed texture feature models incorporate features from individual b-value images. A comprehensive set of texture features was calculated for both the conventional MP-MRI and new MP-MRI texture feature models. We performed feature selection analysis for each individual modality and then combined best features from each modality to construct the optimized texture feature models. The performance of the proposed MP-MRI texture feature models was evaluated via leave-one-patient-out cross-validation using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 40,975 cancerous and healthy tissue samples obtained from real clinical MP-MRI datasets. The proposed MP-MRI texture feature models outperformed the conventional model (i.e., T2w+DWI) with regard to cancer detection accuracy. Comprehensive texture feature models were developed for improved radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer using MP-MRI. Using a

  13. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  14. Mechanical detection and mode shape imaging of vibrational modes of micro and nanomechanical resonators by dynamic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, A S; GarcIa-Sanchez, D; Perez-Murano, F; Bachtold, A; Black, J; Bokor, J; Esplandiu, M J; Aguasca, A

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method based on the use of higher order bending modes of the cantilever of a dynamic force microscope to characterize vibrations of micro and nanomechanical resonators at arbitrarily large resonance frequencies. Our method consists on using a particular cantilever eigenmode for standard feedback control in amplitude modulation operation while another mode is used for detecting and imaging the resonator vibration. In addition, the resonating sample device is driven at or near its resonance frequency with a signal modulated in amplitude at a frequency that matches the resonance of the cantilever eigenmode used for vibration detection. In consequence, this cantilever mode is excited with an amplitude proportional to the resonator vibration, which is detected with an external lock-in amplifier. We show two different application examples of this method. In the first one, acoustic wave vibrations of a film bulk acoustic resonator around 1.6 GHz are imaged. In the second example, bending modes of carbon nanotube resonators up to 3.1 GHz are characterized. In both cases, the method provides subnanometer-scale sensitivity and the capability of providing otherwise inaccessible information about mechanical resonance frequencies, vibration amplitude values and mode shapes

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD

  16. Vibration-synchronized magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of myocardial elasticity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgeti, Thomas; Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hirsch, Sebastian; Krefting, Dagmar; Klatt, Dieter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-01

    Vibration synchronized magnetic resonance imaging of harmonically oscillating tissue interfaces is proposed for cardiac magnetic resonance elastography. The new approach exploits cardiac triggered cine imaging synchronized with extrinsic harmonic stimulation (f = 22.83 Hz) to display oscillatory tissue deformations in magnitude images. Oscillations are analyzed by intensity threshold-based image processing to track wave amplitude variations over the cardiac cycle. In agreement to literature data, results in 10 volunteers showed that endocardial wave amplitudes during systole (0.13 ± 0.07 mm) were significantly lower than during diastole (0.34 ± 0.14 mm, P magnetic resonance imaging improves the temporal resolution of magnetic resonance elastography as it overcomes the use of extra motion encoding gradients, is less sensitive to susceptibility artifacts, and does not suffer from dynamic range constraints frequently encountered in phase-based magnetic resonance elastography. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The performance of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z X; Chen, S L; Wang, Q Q; Liu, B; Zhu, J; Shen, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury through a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search was conducted before 1 April 2014. All studies comparing magnetic resonance imaging results with arthroscopy or open surgery findings were reviewed, and 25 studies that satisfied the eligibility criteria were included. Data were pooled to yield pooled sensitivity and specificity, which were respectively 0.83 and 0.82. In detection of central and peripheral tears, magnetic resonance imaging had respectively a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 and 0.88 and a pooled specificity of 0.97 and 0.97. Six high-quality studies using Ringler's recommended magnetic resonance imaging parameters were selected for analysis to determine whether optimal imaging protocols yielded better results. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these six studies were 0.92 and 0.82, respectively. The overall accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging was acceptable. For peripheral tears, the pooled data showed a relatively high accuracy. Magnetic resonance imaging with appropriate parameters are an ideal method for diagnosing different types of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for the detection, localisation, and characterisation of prostate cancer: recommendations from a European consensus meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, L.; Ahmed, H.U.; Allen, C.; Barentsz, J.O.; Carey, B.; Futterer, J.J.; Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Hoskin, P.J.; Kirkham, A.; Padhani, A.R.; Persad, R.; Puech, P.; Punwani, S.; Sohaib, A.S.; Tombal, B.; Villers, A.; Meulen, J. van der; Emberton, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) may have a role in detecting clinically significant prostate cancer in men with raised serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Variations in technique and the interpretation of images have contributed to inconsistency in its reported

  19. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Taylor

    Full Text Available Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  20. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander J; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L; Six, Joseph S; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Thomas, Neil R; Auer, Dorothee P; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  1. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  2. Value of magnetic resonance imaging for the noninvasive detection of stenosis in coronary artery bypass grafts and recipient coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, Susan E.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kunz, Patrik; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Lamb, Hildo J.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; de Roos, Albert

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potential noninvasive diagnostic tool to detect coronary artery bypass graft stenosis, but its value in clinical practice remains to be established. We investigated the value of MRI in detecting stenotic grafts, including recipient vessels. METHODS

  3. Detection of pericardial inflammation with late-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan; Verbeken, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    To examine the value of late-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of pericardial inflammation. Late-enhancement cardiac MRI was performed in 16 patients with clinical suspicion of pericardial disease. Pericardial effusion, pericardial thickening and pericardial enhancement were assessed. MRI findings were compared with those of definitive pericardial histology (n=14) or microbiology (n=2). A control group of 12 patients with no clinical evidence of pericardial disease were also imaged with the same MRI protocol. Sensitivity and specificity for late-enhancement MRI detection of pericardial inflammation was of 100%. There was MRI late enhancement of the pericardial layers in all five patients with histological/microbiological evidence of inflammatory pericarditis. MRI demonstrated no pericardial thickening and no MRI late enhancement with or without a pericardial effusion in any of the five patients with histological evidence of a normal pericardium. MRI detected pericardial thickening in the absence of both pericardial effusion and late enhancement in all six patients with histological evidence of chronic fibrosing pericarditis. The 12 control subjects showed no evidence of pericardial MRI late enhancement. These findings demonstrate that MRI late enhancement can be used to visualize pericardial inflammation in patients with clinical suspicion of pericardial disease. (orig.)

  4. Detection of Botulinum Toxin Muscle Effect in Humans Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Qualitative Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Michael W; Villanueva, Mark; Creelman, Carly; Telhan, Gaurav; Nestor, Jaclyn; Hentel, Keith D; Ballon, Douglas; Dyke, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Although important for dosing and dilution, there are few data describing botulinum toxin (BT) movement in human muscle. To better understand BT movement within human muscle. Proof-of-concept study with descriptive case series. Outpatient academic practice. Five subjects with stroke who were BT naive with a mean age of 60.4 ± 14 years and time poststroke of 4.6 ± 3.7 years. Three standardized injections were given to the lateral gastrocnemius muscle (LGM): 2 contained 25 units (U) of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) in 0.25 mL of saline solution and the third 0.25 mL of saline solution only. The tibialis anterior muscle (TAM) was not injected in any subject. A leg magnetic resonance image was obtained at baseline, 2 months, and 3 months later with a 3.0 Tesla Siemens scanner. Three muscles, the LGM, lateral soleus muscle (LSM), and TAM, were manually outlined on the T2 mapping sequence at each time point. A histogram of T2 relaxation times (T2-RT) for all voxels at baseline was used to calculate a mean and standard deviation (SD) T2-RT for each muscle. Botulinum toxin muscle effect (BTME) at 2 months and 3 months was defined as a subject- and muscle-specific T2-RT voxel threshold ≥3 SD above the baseline mean at or near BT injection sites. BTME volume for each leg magnetic resonance imaging slice at 3 time points and 3 muscles for all subjects. One subject missed the 3-month scan, leaving 18 potential observations of BTME. Little to no BTME effect was seen in the noninjected TAM. A BTME was detected in the LGM in 13 of 18 possible observations, and no effect was detected in 5 observations. Possible BTME effect was seen in the LSM in 3 subjects due to either diffusion through fascia or needle misplacement. Volume of BTME, as defined here, appeared to be substantially greater than the 0.25-mL injection volume. This descriptive case series is among the first attempts to quantify BTME within human muscle. Our findings are preliminary and are limited by a few

  5. Smart nanoprobes for ultrasensitive detection of breast cancer via magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaemin; Yang, Jaemoon; Seo, Sung-Baek; Haam, Seungjoo; Ko, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min

    2008-01-01

    Antibody-conjugated hydrophilic magnetic nanocrystals for use as smart nanoprobes were developed for ultrasensitive detection of breast cancer via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MnFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals (MNCs) for use as MR imaging contrast agents were synthesized by thermal decomposition to take advantage of their MR signal enhancement effect. The MNC surfaces were then modified with amphiphilic tri-block copolymers (dicarboxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)), not only allowing the MNCs to transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, but also increasing the colloidal stability of the MNCs by masking poly(ethylene glycol). The physicochemical properties of the synthesized hydrophilic magnetic nanocrystals (HMNCs) were fully investigated. Trastuzumab (TZ), a monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2/neu), was further conjugated on the surface of HMNCs to specifically target HER2/neu over-expressed breast cancer cells. MR imaging analysis of target cells treated with TZ-conjugated HMNCs (TZ-HMNCs) clearly demonstrated their potential as high-performance nanoprobes for selective imaging.

  6. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  7. Comparison of breast cancer detection by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Miho I.; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ohsumi, Shozo; Sugata, Shigenori; Kataoka, Masaaki; Takashima, Shigemitsu

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer-detecting ability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) was investigated by comparing the breast cancer detection rates of DW-MRI and mammography (MMG). The subjects were 48 women who had breast cancer (53 cancer lesions) who underwent DW-MRI before surgery. Altogether, 41 lesions were invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), 7 were noninvasive ductal carcinoma (NIDC) and 5 were ''others.'' The breast cancer detection rates by MMG and DW-MRI were 84.9% and 94.3% (P -3 , 1.50±0.24 x 10 -3 , 1.12±0.25 x 10 -3 , and 2.01±0.29 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for IDC, NIDC, others, and normal breast, respectively, showing that the values of IDC and NIDC were significantly different from that of the normal breast (P<0.001 each). A significant difference was also noted between IDC and NIDC (P<0.001). DW-MRI may be useful for detecting breast cancer in a wide age group of women, including young women with dense mammary glands. (author)

  8. Detection of Breast Microcalcifications Under Ultrasound Using Power Doppler and Acoustic Resonance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weinstein, Susan

    2003-01-01

    .... Our goal with our current project was to utilize breast sonography coupled with the technique of acoustic resonance to image and evaluate the breast micorcalcifications in patients prior to biopsy...

  9. Gadolinium-porphyrins: new potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two new porphyrin-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents, Gd-hematoporphyrin (Gd-H and Gd-tetra-carboranylmethoxyphenyl-porphyrin (Gd-TCP were synthesized and tested in nude mice with human melanoma (MM-138 xenografts as new melanoma contrast agents. METHODS: Subcutaneous xenografts of human melanoma cells (MM-138 were studied in 30 (five groups of six nude mice. The effect of different contrast agents (Gd-TCP, Gd-H, GdCl3 and Gd-DTPA on proton relaxation times was measured in tumors and other organs. T1 values, signal enhancement and the Gd concentration for different contrast agent solutions were also investigated. RESULTS: The porphyrin agents showed higher relaxivity compared to the clincal agent, Gd-DTPA. A significant 16% and 21% modification in T1 relaxation time of the water in human melanoma tumors grafted in the nude mice was revealed 24 hours after injection of Gd-TCP and Gd-H, respectively. The percentage of injected Gd localized to the tumor measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES was approximately 21% for Gd-TCP and 28% for Gd-H which were higher than that of Gd-DTPA (10%. CONCLUSIONS: The high concentration of Gd in the tumor is indicative of a selective retention of the compounds and indicates that Gd-TCP and Gd-H are promising MR imaging contrast agents for melanoma detection. Gd-porphyrins have considerable promise for further diagnostic applications in magnetic resonance imaging. KEY WORDS: MRI, porphyrin-based contrast agent, hematoporphyrin, melanoma.

  10. Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging: detection speed, sensitivity, and portability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Youjun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor is a powerful tool for studying the kinetics of biomolecular interactions because they offer unique real-time and label-free measurement capabilities with high detection sensitivity. In the past two decades, SPR technology has been successfully commercialized and its performance has continuously been improved with lots of engineering efforts. In this review, we describe the recent advances in SPR technologies. The developments of SPR technologies focusing on detection speed, sensitivity, and portability are discussed in details. The incorporation of imaging techniques into SPR sensing is emphasized. In addition, our SPR imaging biosensors based on the scanning of wavelength by a solid-state tunable wavelength filter are highlighted. Finally, significant advances of the vast developments in nanotechnology-associated SPR sensing for sensitivity enhancements are also reviewed. It is hoped that this review will provide some insights for researchers who are interested in SPR sensing, and help them develop SPR sensors with better sensitivity and higher throughput.

  11. Recent advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging: detection speed, sensitivity, and portability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Youjun; Hu, Rui; Wang, Lei; Gu, Dayong; He, Jianan; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Ho, Ho-Pui; Li, Xuejin; Qu, Junle; Gao, Bruce Zhi; Shao, Yonghong

    2017-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is a powerful tool for studying the kinetics of biomolecular interactions because they offer unique real-time and label-free measurement capabilities with high detection sensitivity. In the past two decades, SPR technology has been successfully commercialized and its performance has continuously been improved with lots of engineering efforts. In this review, we describe the recent advances in SPR technologies. The developments of SPR technologies focusing on detection speed, sensitivity, and portability are discussed in details. The incorporation of imaging techniques into SPR sensing is emphasized. In addition, our SPR imaging biosensors based on the scanning of wavelength by a solid-state tunable wavelength filter are highlighted. Finally, significant advances of the vast developments in nanotechnology-associated SPR sensing for sensitivity enhancements are also reviewed. It is hoped that this review will provide some insights for researchers who are interested in SPR sensing, and help them develop SPR sensors with better sensitivity and higher throughput.

  12. Prostate cancer detection by prebiopsy 3.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Sachiyo; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Mishima, Takao; Kurokawa, Hiroaki; Sakaida, Noriko; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic value of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to assess the features of prostate cancer detectable by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI. From January 2007 through to December 2008, 116 patients who were examined by prebiopsy 3.0-Tesla MRI underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. Prostate specimens were examined to see whether the largest cancer area was the same as the area indicated on the MRI. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify variables predictive of agreement between MRI and histopathological findings. Sixty-six (56.9%) patients were suspected of having prostate cancer on the basis of MRI findings. In 49 of these patients (74.2%), it was considered that there was agreement between the abnormal area on the MRI and the index tumor. Univariate analysis revealed that there were significant differences in abnormal digital rectal examination, capsular penetration, the diameter of the index tumor of the radical prostatectomy specimen, and the Gleason scores of the biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens. Multivariate analysis revealed that the Gleason score of the radical prostatectomy specimen was associated with the accurate detection of the prostate cancer by MRI (P=0.0177). In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla MRI tends to accurately diagnose prostate cancer with high tumor burden and aggressiveness. Multimodal examination (T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging) is recommended for the diagnosis of prostate cancer using 3.0-Tesla MRI. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging goes postmortem: noninvasive detection and assessment of myocardial infarction by postmortem MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackowski, Christian; Warntjes, Marcel J.B.; Persson, Anders; Berge, Johan; Baer, Walter

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the performance of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (pmMRI) in identification and characterization of lethal myocardial infarction in a non-invasive manner on human corpses. Before forensic autopsy, 20 human forensic corpses were examined on a 1.5-T system for the presence of myocardial infarction. Short axis, transversal and longitudinal long axis images (T1-weighted; T2-weighted; PD-weighted) were acquired in situ. In subsequent autopsy, the section technique was adapted to short axis images. Histological investigations were conducted to confirm autopsy and/or radiological diagnoses. Nineteen myocardial lesions were detected and age staged with pmMRI, of which 13 were histologically confirmed (chronic, subacute and acute). Six lesions interpreted as peracute by pmMRI showed no macroscopic or histological finding. Five of the six peracute lesions correlated well to coronary pathology, and one case displayed a severe hypertrophic alteration. pmMRI reliably demonstrates chronic, subacute and acute myocardial infarction in situ. In peracute cases pmMRI may display ischemic lesions undetectable at autopsy and routine histology. pmMRI has the potential to substantiate autopsy and to counteract the loss of reliable information on causes of death due to the recent disappearance of the clinical autopsy. (orig.)

  14. Numerical study of remote detection outside the magnet with travelling wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, M; Vázquez, F; Solís-Nájera, S; Rodriguez, A O

    2015-01-01

    The use of the travelling wave approach for high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging has been used recently with very promising results. This approach offer images one with greater field-of-view and a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio using a circular waveguide. This scheme has been proved to be successful at 7 T and 9.4 T with whole-body imager. Images have also been acquired with clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems whose resonant frequencies were 64 MHz and 128 MHz. These results motivated the use of remote detection of the magnetic resonance signal using a parallel-plate waveguide together with 3 T clinical scanners, to acquired human leg images. The cut-off frequency of this waveguide is zero for the principal mode, allowing us to overcome the barrier of transmitting waves at lower frequency than 300 MHz or 7 T for protons. These motivated the study of remote detection outside the actual magnet. We performed electromagnetic field simulations of a parallel-plate waveguide and a phantom. The signal transmission was done at 128 MHz and using a circular surface coil located almost 200 cm away for the magnet isocentre. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the magnetic field of the principal mode propagate inside a waveguide outside the magnet. Numerical results were compared with previous experimental-acquired image data under similar conditions

  15. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo; Giacobbe, Alessandro; Muto, Giovanni; Regge, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  16. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Giacobbe, Alessandro [San Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Department of Urology, Turin (Italy); Muto, Giovanni [University Campus Biomedico, Department of Urology, Rome (Italy); Regge, Daniele [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); University of Torino, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Department of Surgical Sciences, Turin (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  17. Renal damage after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, Shinichiro; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Yoshigoe, Fukuo

    1988-08-01

    The acute effects of extracorporeal Shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology of the renal parenchyma were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in 15 kidneys, before and immediately after (within 24 hours) ESWL in 11 cases. The renal parenchymal damages were observed by MRI as the changes of signal itensity of renal cortex and medulla, perirenal fluid, loss of corticomedullar differentiation, and other renal traumas. Loss of corticomedullar differentiation was seen in 9/11 cases and peripheral fluid of the kidney was seen in 4/11 cases. Irregular and edematous changes of renal capsula were seen in 5/11 cases. Obvious abnormal findings indicated renal trauma were not observed in this study. Several MRI findings may transient and reversible changes and the morpholigic changes detected by MRI may attributed to renal parenchymal obstruction and edema and decreasing of renal capillary flow, such as in renal contusion. It is concluded that MRI is very sensitive and the best technique to detect the effects and clinical trouble of ESWL.

  18. Renal damage after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Shinichiro; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Yoshigoe, Fukuo

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of extracorporeal Shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology of the renal parenchyma were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in 15 kidneys, before and immediately after (within 24 hours) ESWL in 11 cases. The renal parenchymal damages were observed by MRI as the changes of signal itensity of renal cortex and medulla, perirenal fluid, loss of corticomedullar differentiation, and other renal traumas. Loss of corticomedullar differentiation was seen in 9/11 cases and peripheral fluid of the kidney was seen in 4/11 cases. Irregular and edematous changes of renal capsula were seen in 5/11 cases. Obvious abnormal findings indicated renal trauma were not observed in this study. Several MRI findings may transient and reversible changes and the morpholigic changes detected by MRI may attributed to renal parenchymal obstruction and edema and decreasing of renal capillary flow, such as in renal contusion. It is concluded that MRI is very sensitive and the best technique to detect the effects and clinical trouble of ESWL. (author)

  19. Cranial anatomy and detection of ischemic stroke in the cat by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Kistler, J.P.; Vielma, J.; Brady, T.J.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Goldman, M.R.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cat heads were obtained using a small, experimental imaging system. As a prelude to the study of experimental ischemic brain infarction, the normal cat head was imaged for identification of anatomical features. Images of one cat which had undergone ligation of the middle cerebral artery three weeks previously showed brain changes associated with chronic ischemic stroke and compared favorably with findings on computed tomography (CT). The NMR images have millimetric spatial resolution. NMR parameters inherent in the tissues provide intensity variations and are sufficiently sensitive to yield contrast resolution surpassing that of CT

  20. Adrenal gland abnormalities detected by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, A A; El Desouky, S M; Awadallah, M Y; Megahed, D E

    2017-03-01

    Adrenal infarction is a rare complication of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The purpose of the current study is to detect and study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of adrenal glands in APS patients. In a cross-sectional study, the data of 20 patients with primary or secondary APS were compared to 20 SLE patients without antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) syndrome (controls). MRI of the abdomen showing the adrenal glands was performed. Of the patients, 80% were females with a mean age 32.45 ± 9.93 years, and mean disease duration of 46.65 ± 58.71 months. Adrenal gland abnormalities in the MRI study were detected in 35 % of APS patients vs. no abnormalities detected in the SLE controls. Adrenal gland enlargement was found in all patients (35 %). Capsular enhancement (infarction or hemorrhagic infarction) was found in 5 patients, increased stranding of the surrounding fat planes (inflammatory process) in 4 patients and increased signal on T1WI and T2WI (hemorrhage) in 3 patients. In patients with adrenal gland involvement, 71.4 % had triple aPL positivity compared to 23.1 % in patients with normal adrenal findings (p = 0.04). Adrenal gland abnormalities on MRI were detected in 35 % of the APS patients (whether primary or secondary); thus, increased focus on management is needed. This percentage is not small and needs to be focused on in terms of management.

  1. Nonhemorrhagic brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in closed head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Hiraide, Atsushi; Yoshioka, Toshiji; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Ichimura, Teruhisa; Saito, Akira; Ohno, Yoshioki.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 83 closed head injured patients in whom CT failed to detect focal intra or extraaxial hematoma and/or apparent brain contusion. The patients were divided into three groups on the basis of unconsciousness duration: Group 1 comprised 50 patients diagnosed as having classical cerebral concussion; group 2 comprised 19 patients who presented to the hospital with 6-hr unconsciousness and was recovered within a week; and group 3 comprised 14 patients whose unconsciousness persisted for a week or more. There was no CT evidence of abnormal findings for group 1; and intraventricular hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage were visualized on CT in 26% and 16%, respectively, for group 2 and 71% and 14% for group 3. Intraaxial nonhemorrhagic lesions were detected on T2-weighted MRI. According to high signal intensity, diffuse axonal injury and cortical contusion could be distinguished; i.e., in the former the corpus callosum, basal ganglia, or brain stem showed a high signal intensity, and in the latter the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobe adjacent to the skull showed a low signal intensity. T2-weighted MRI revealed cortical contusion in 6% for group 1, 37% for group 2, and 14% for group 3; and diffuse axonal injury in 42% for group 2 and 79% for group 3. For 62 patients with normal CT findings, diffuse axonal injury was detected in 88%. There was a good correlation between intraventricular hemorrhage on CT and diffuse axonal injury on MRI. In conclusion, T2-weighted MRI was significantly superior to CT in detecting nonhemorrhagic lesions, and it was of great help for predicting neurologic recovery in closed head injured patients without apparent focal lesions on CT. (N.K.)

  2. Detection of mycotoxins using imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made in the development of biosensors that can be used to detect mycotoxins. One technology that has been extensively tested is surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In 2003 a multi-toxin method was reported that detected aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisin B1 ...

  3. Simultaneous detection of transgenic DNA by surface plasmon resonance imaging with potential application to gene doping detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Simona; Ermini, Maria Laura; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Mascini, Marco; Bogani, Patrizia; Minunni, Maria

    2011-08-15

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was used as the transduction principle for the development of optical-based sensing for transgenes detection in human cell lines. The objective was to develop a multianalyte, label-free, and real-time approach for DNA sequences that are identified as markers of transgenosis events. The strategy exploits SPRi sensing to detect the transgenic event by targeting selected marker sequences, which are present on shuttle vector backbone used to carry out the transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. Here, we identified DNA sequences belonging to the Cytomegalovirus promoter and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein gene. System development is discussed in terms of probe efficiency and influence of secondary structures on biorecognition reaction on sensor; moreover, optimization of PCR samples pretreatment was carried out to allow hybridization on biosensor, together with an approach to increase SPRi signals by in situ mass enhancement. Real-time PCR was also employed as reference technique for marker sequences detection on human HEK cells. We can foresee that the developed system may have potential applications in the field of antidoping research focused on the so-called gene doping.

  4. Can magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0-Tesla reliably detect patients with endometriosis? Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Maarten G; Steensma, Anneke B; van Santbrink, Evert J; Willemssen, Francois E; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Hunink, Myriam G; Spronk, Sandra; Laven, Joop S; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an optimized 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol is sensitive and specific enough to detect patients with endometriosis. This was a prospective cohort study with consecutive patients. Forty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of endometriosis underwent 3.0-Tesla MRI, including a T2-weighted high-resolution fast spin echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 ×1.5 mm³) and a 3D T1-weighted high-resolution gradient echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 × 2.0 mm³). Two radiologists reviewed the dataset with consensus reading. During laparoscopy, which was used as reference standard, all lesions were characterized according to the revised criteria of the American Fertility Society. Patient-level and region-level sensitivities and specificities and lesion-level sensitivities were calculated. Patient-level sensitivity was 42% for stage I (5/12) and 100% for stages II, III and IV (25/25). Patient-level specificity for all stages was 100% (3/3). The region-level sensitivity and specificity was 63% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity per lesion was 61% (90% for deep lesions, 48% for superficial lesions and 100% for endometriomata). The detection rate of obliteration of the cul-the-sac was 100% (10/10) with no false positive findings. The interreader agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa=1 per patient, 0.65 per lesion and 0.71 for obliteration of the cul-the-sac). An optimized 3.0-Tesla MRI protocol is accurate in detecting stage II to stage IV endometriosis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  6. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in detection of breast cancer recurrence: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel Marie

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer recurrence can be difficult as a result of the presence of scar tissue in the breast. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be superior to traditional imaging in diagnosis of recurrence because of its ability to differentiate malignancy from scarring. Current guidelines on investigation of suspected breast cancer recurrence recommend MRI when other investigations have equivocal findings. We performed the first systematic review on this topic.

  7. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detects recurrent isolated vertigo caused by cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Li; Luo, Man; Li, Jiaoxing; Li, Weidong; Sheng, Wenli

    2015-06-01

    The etiology of isolated vertigo has been a substantial diagnostic challenge for both neurologists and otolaryngologists. This study was designed to detect recurrent isolated vertigo due to cerebral hypoperfusion using perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI). We recruited isolated vertigo patients whose clinical condition was suspected to be caused by hypodynamics of the brain; these individuals formed the case group. We generated two additional groups: a negative group composed of vertigo patients whose symptoms were caused by problems associated with the ear and a healthy control group. Each subject underwent PWI, and seven regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit time (MTT) were obtained from each ROI. We further calculated the absolute difference of relative parameter values between two mirrored ROIs. The significant difference in the relative MTT from the mirrored cerebellar ROI (|rMTTleft-right|) of the case group was larger than those from the negative and healthy control groups (p = 0.026 and p = 0.038, respectively). Signal differences in |rrCBVleft-right| and |rrCBFleft-right| were not found among the three groups. In summary, disequilibrium in the rMTT of the bilateral cerebellum in the case group implied that hypoperfusion of the posterior circulation could trigger recurrent isolated vertigo and could be shown efficiently using PWI.

  8. Brain Activity in Patients With Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Detected by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Asanori; Kise, Norimoto; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Kondo, Shunsuke; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Ganaha, Akira; Suzuki, Mikio

    2017-05-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is considered a focal dystonia. However, the detailed pathophysiology of SD remains unclear, despite the detection of abnormal activity in several brain regions. The aim of this study was to clarify the pathophysiological background of SD. This is a case-control study. Both task-related brain activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging by reading the five-digit numbers and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measured by 150 T2-weighted echo planar images acquired without any task were investigated in 12 patients with adductor SD and in 16 healthy controls. The patients with SD showed significantly higher task-related brain activation in the left middle temporal gyrus, left thalamus, bilateral primary motor area, bilateral premotor area, bilateral cerebellum, bilateral somatosensory area, right insula, and right putamen compared with the controls. Region of interest voxel FC analysis revealed many FC changes within the cerebellum-basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex loop in the patients with SD. Of the significant connectivity changes between the patients with SD and the controls, the FC between the left thalamus and the left caudate nucleus was significantly correlated with clinical parameters in SD. The higher task-related brain activity in the insula and cerebellum was consistent with previous neuroimaging studies, suggesting that these areas are one of the unique characteristics of phonation-induced brain activity in SD. Based on FC analysis and their significant correlations with clinical parameters, the basal ganglia network plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SD. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging in traumatic brain injury lesion detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, B.H.J.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Goraj, B.M.; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compares inter-rater-reliability, lesion detection and clinical relevance of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR), T2*-gradient recalled echo (T2*-GRE) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Methods: Three

  10. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  11. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  14. Real time detection of antibody-antigen interaction using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong-Yan; Yang Li-Quan; Ning Ting-Yin; Liu Wei-Min; Sun Jia-Yu; Wang Peng-Fei; Meng Lan; Nie Jia-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance (LSCI-SPR) instrument integrated with a wavelength-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor and a laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is built to detect the bonding process of human IgG and fluorescent-labeled affinity purified antibodies in real time. The shifts of resonant wavelength at different reaction time stages are obtained by SPR, corresponding well with the changes of the fluorescence intensity collected by using LSCM. The instrument shows the merits of the combination and complementation of the SPR and LSCM, with such advantages as quantificational analysis, high spatial resolution and real time monitor, which are of great importance for practical applications in biosensor and life science. (general)

  15. Detection of cerebral atrophy in type- II diabetes mellitus by magnetic resonance imaging of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, G.; Khan, N.; Aziz, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects many systems in the body. Cerebral atrophy is one of the complications of diabetes and research is on going to find out its aetiopathological factors. The main aim of the study was to determine the frequency of cerebral atrophy in type-II diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Methods: One hundred diabetic patients (Random blood sugar >126 mg/dl) were recruited in this study after the informed consent from every patient. Duration of diabetes was five years and more in all the patients as determined by their glycosylated haemoglobin which was >6 in all the patients. All the patients were undergone MRI of brain using 1.5 Tesla power magnetic resonance imaging machine of Picker Company. Evan's index, a specific parameter for measurement of cerebral atrophy was calculated on MR images and was used in this study. Results: In male group the frequency of cerebral atrophy was 22 (47%) and in female group it was found to be 23 (43%). When we study the overall population the frequency was found to be 45 (45%). The results are well in concordance with the previous data published on this issue. Conclusions: Cerebral atrophy, a complication of long standing diabetes is quite frequent in our population and is well diagnosed by MRI. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Comparison of radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wei; Feng Feng; Yang Hongzen; Jiang Ming; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and radiography in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Design and subjects. Nine volunteers and 24 patients were recruited. Radiography, CT, and MR imaging were completed within a 1-week period in 24 patients with AS. In precontrast MR examination, spin-echo T1, fast spin-echo T2, and gradient echo with rephasing T2* images were obtained without fat saturation using a 0.3-T imager for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast MR examination was performed using the same precontrast SE T1 sequence for patients with AS. Results and conclusions. MR imaging directly showed the normal cartilage in all 16 sacroiliac joints of the 8 volunteers. In the 24 patients with AS, cartilage abnormalities were observed in 42 sacroiliac joints. More diagnoses of sacroiliitis were made using MR and CT imaging than using radiography (P<0.001). Therefore, low-field-strength MR can be useful in detecting early sacroiliitis in patients with AS. MR imaging was able to reveal early cartilage changes and bone marrow edema, which could not be found by either CT or radiography. (orig.)

  19. High incidence of microbleeds in hemodialysis patients detected by T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shunichi; Uomizu, Kenji; Kajiya, Yoriko; Tajitsu, Kenichiro; Kusumoto, Kazuhiro; Hirano, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    The incidence and characteristics of microbleeds in hemodialysis (HD) patients were investigated to elucidate the clinical significance with T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The 57 patients with chronic renal failure maintained by HD had no previous history of stroke. The control group consisted of 53 patients without previous history of stroke or chronic renal failure. The incidence and the number of microbleeds were assessed in the HD and control groups. The findings of microbleeds with T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo MR imaging were compared with those of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MR imaging in HD patients. The incidence of microbleeds was significantly greater in the HD patients compared with the control patients. T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging revealed a total of 44 microbleeds in 11 HD patients. T 2 -weighted imaging demonstrated 13 of 44 microbleeds as hyperintensity, whereas T 1 -weighted imaging demonstrated 12 lesions as hypointensity. T 2 - and T 1 -weighted imagings did not demonstrate any findings in 31 and 32 lesions, respectively. T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo MR imaging is effective to detect microbleeds which may be a predictor of intracerebral hemorrhage in HD patients and should be included in the protocol for the study of cerebrovascular disease, because T 2 - and T 1 -weighted MR imaging recognizes microbleeds as lacunar infarction. (author)

  20. Detection of renal arteries with fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tello, R.; Mitchell, P.J.; Witte, D.J.; Thomson, K.R. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Radiology

    1998-08-01

    With the increasing use of non-invasive imaging with MR and volumetric CT to evaluate renal arteries, the ability to accurately detect the number and state of native renal arteries becomes critical if conventional angiography is to be supplanted in these settings. The present study evaluated the utility of a fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted sequence to detect the number and course of renal arteries and their ostia compared to conventional angiography. Ten patients underwent conventional catheter angiography either for renal artery stenosis evaluation or as potential renal donors. Each patient then had an MR study of the renal arteries and kidneys with FSE MR (TR = 4000 ms, TE = 102 ms, eight- echo train length, 5-mm-thick interleaved 128 phase encodes, superior and inferior saturation pulses, number of excitations (NEX) = 4, on a 1.5-T superconducting magnet). Images were reviewed by two `blinded` radiologists and renal arteries were counted and their ostia were evaluated. Results were compared with angiography and inter- and intra-observer statistics were calculated. All 10 patients underwent MR successfully, nine for renal artery stenosis (RAS) evaluation and one was a renal donor. A total of 24 renal arteries were imaged in 19 kidneys. Fast spin-echo MR is 95% accurate (95%CI: 88-100%) in detection of renal arteries, with no statistical difference between FSE MR and catheter angiography (McNemar P = 0.0). Inter- and intra-observer statistics demonstrate good-to-excellent agreement in renal artery detection (kappa: 0.63-0.90). In one case of RAS evaluation an incidental adrenal mass was detected as the aetiology of the patient`s hypertension. Fast spin-echo MR can be a useful adjunct as part of the imaging for renal arteries with MRI. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 16 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Detection of renal arteries with fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, R.; Mitchell, P.J.; Witte, D.J.; Thomson, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    With the increasing use of non-invasive imaging with MR and volumetric CT to evaluate renal arteries, the ability to accurately detect the number and state of native renal arteries becomes critical if conventional angiography is to be supplanted in these settings. The present study evaluated the utility of a fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted sequence to detect the number and course of renal arteries and their ostia compared to conventional angiography. Ten patients underwent conventional catheter angiography either for renal artery stenosis evaluation or as potential renal donors. Each patient then had an MR study of the renal arteries and kidneys with FSE MR (TR = 4000 ms, TE = 102 ms, eight- echo train length, 5-mm-thick interleaved 128 phase encodes, superior and inferior saturation pulses, number of excitations (NEX) = 4, on a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Images were reviewed by two 'blinded' radiologists and renal arteries were counted and their ostia were evaluated. Results were compared with angiography and inter- and intra-observer statistics were calculated. All 10 patients underwent MR successfully, nine for renal artery stenosis (RAS) evaluation and one was a renal donor. A total of 24 renal arteries were imaged in 19 kidneys. Fast spin-echo MR is 95% accurate (95%CI: 88-100%) in detection of renal arteries, with no statistical difference between FSE MR and catheter angiography (McNemar P = 0.0). Inter- and intra-observer statistics demonstrate good-to-excellent agreement in renal artery detection (kappa: 0.63-0.90). In one case of RAS evaluation an incidental adrenal mass was detected as the aetiology of the patient's hypertension. Fast spin-echo MR can be a useful adjunct as part of the imaging for renal arteries with MRI. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  4. Comparative in vivo mucoadhesion studies of thiomer formulations using magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, K; Greindl, M; Kremser, C; Wolf, C; Debbage, P; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2006-09-28

    The aim of this study was to compare different oral delivery systems based on the thiolated polymer polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) and to provide evidence for the validity of the hypothesis that unhydrated polymers provide better mucoadhesion in vivo. To achieve dry polymer application, a new, experimental dosage form named Eutex (made of Eudragit L100-55 and latex) capsule has been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the point of release of the thiolated polymer from the application forms via the positive magnetic resonance signal from a gadolinium complex (Gd-DTPA). In vivo mucoadhesion was determined by ascertaining the residence time of the fluorescence-tagged thiomer on intestinal mucosa after 3 h. Results showed that in comparison to conventional application forms the Eutex capsules led to 1.9-fold higher mucoadhesive properties of PCP-Cys when compared to application with a conventional enteric-coated capsule, and to 1.4-fold higher mucoadhesion when compared to administration with an enteric-coated tablet of the thiomer. The findings of this study should contribute to the understanding of mucoadhesion and mucoadhesion influencing parameters in vivo and should therefore be of considerable interest for the development of future mucoadhesive oral drug delivery dosage forms.

  5. Development of surface plasmon resonance imaging for detection of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac) using specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Wangkam, Thidarat; Huangkamhang, Nongluck; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Himananto, Orawan; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2011-01-15

    An immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) using a specific monoclonal antibody 11E5 (MAb 11E5) was developed for the detection of the seed-borne bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), which causes fruit blotch in watermelons and cantaloupes, and compared to the conventional ELISA technique. The 1:40 mixed self-assembled monolayer (mixed SAM) surface was used for the immobilized MAb 11E5 on sensor surface for the detection of Aac. Both whole cells and broken cells of Aac were tested by using direct and sandwich detection assay. The limit of detection (LOD) of Aac using the SPR imaging technique and a direct detection assay was 10(6)cfu/ml and a subsequent amplification of the SPR signal using a polyclonal antibody (PAb) lowered the LOD to 5×10(5) cfu/ml. The LOD for the ELISA technique was 5×10(4) cfu/ml for the detection of Aac, which was slightly better than that for the SPR technique. However, the sensor surface based on SPR imaging offered a major advantage in terms of surface regeneration, allowing at least five cycles with a shorter time assay, multi-channel analysis with an application on multiplex detection, and an ease of the surface usage for the detection of Aac in the naturally infected plant. The surface was tested against the naturally infected sample and showed good selectivity toward the Aac bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Detection of Myometrial Invasion in Endometrial Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masroor, I.; Hussain, Z.; Taufiq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DWMRI) in the detection of myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer taking histopathology as gold standard. Study Design: Cross-sectional validation study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Radiology, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2012. Methodology: DWMRI (b-value = 50,400 and 800 s/mm2) was performed in 85 patients of biopsy-proven endometrial carcinoma before hysterectomy using body and spine coil at 1.5 Tesla. DWI was evaluated for presence of myometrial invasion by tumor with histopathology as gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, the negative predictive value and positive predictive value and accuracy of DWI were assessed against the gold standard. Results: On DWI, superficial myometrial invasion was found in 42 patients and deep myometrial invasion in 43. On histopathology, superficial myometrial invasion was found in 53 patients and deep myometrial invasion in 32. Hence sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for the assessment of myometrial invasion by endometrial tumor on DW images was 90 percentage, 73 percentage, 67 percentage, 92 percentage and 80 percentage, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in detection of myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer was 80 percentage. Conclusion: DWI is highly accurate in assessing myometrial invasion and can be used as an adjunct to routine MRI for pre-operative evaluation of myometrial invasion of endometrial cancer. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  8. Dynamic subtraction magnetic resonance venography: a new real time imaging technique for the detection of dural sinus thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, C.; Birchall, D.; Connolly, D.; English, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Requests for imaging suspected dural sinus thrombosis are increasing. Conventional magnetic imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) are often used to detect venous sinus thrombosis, but these techniques are prone to technical problems. Catheter angiography is sometimes required as the final arbiter in the evaluation of the dural venous sinuses. Recent technical developments in MR scanning have allowed the development of dynamic subtraction MRA. This technique is beginning to be applied to the assessment of intracranial vascular malformations. We have recently applied the technique to the imaging of the dural venous sinuses, and describe our early experience with the technique. Imaging was performed on a Philips Intera 1.5T scanner with gradient strength 33 mT and slew rate 130 T/m/sec. T1-weighed fast field echo imaging was performed (flip angle 400, TR 1.5 msec) during bolus injection of gadolinium (5ml gadolinium followed by a 10 ml saline chaser) at 5-6 ml/sec using a MRI-compatible pump injector. Slice thickness depended on the plane of acquisition, but was between 100- 150 mm. Images were acquired in three orthogonal projections in each case, using 3 separate contrast injections. Mask images were obtained before the arrival of contrast, and subtracted reconstructed images were obtained in real time, providing a dynamic display of the intracranial circulation including the dural venous sinuses. Frame rate was 1 frame per 0.8 seconds. We will present dynamic MR angiographic images in a number of patients. Normal appearances and those seen in venous sinus thrombosis will be presented in the video display. Dynamic MR venography is a new technique for the imaging of dural venous sinuses. In our practice, it has proved a valuable adjunct for the imaging of patients with dural venous sinus thrombosis. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  10. Texture analysis of cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging to detect nonviable segments in patients with chronic myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroza, Andrés; López-Lereu, María P; Monmeneu, José V; Gavara, Jose; Chorro, Francisco J; Bodí, Vicente; Moratal, David

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the ability of texture analysis to differentiate between infarcted nonviable, viable, and remote segments on cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study included 50 patients suffering chronic myocardial infarction. The data were randomly split into training (30 patients) and testing (20 patients) sets. The left ventricular myocardium was segmented according to the 17-segment model in both cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) MRI. Infarcted myocardium regions were identified on LGE in short-axis views. Nonviable segments were identified as those showing LGE ≥ 50%, and viable segments those showing 0 cine images. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was trained with different combination of texture features to obtain a model that provided optimal classification performance. The best classification on testing set was achieved with local binary patterns features using a 2D + t approach, in which the features are computed by including information of the time dimension available in cine sequences. The best overall area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were: 0.849, sensitivity of 92% to detect nonviable segments, 72% to detect viable segments, and 85% to detect remote segments. Nonviable segments can be detected on cine MRI using texture analysis and this may be used as hypothesis for future research aiming to detect the infarcted myocardium by means of a gadolinium-free approach. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  12. Brain 'Embolism' Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Commissurotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Paulo; Qanadli, Salah D.; Strumza, Pierre; Kacher, Safia; Aberkane, Linda; Aubry, Pierre; Rigaud, Michel; Lacombe, Pascal; Raffestin, Bernadette

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The common finding of thrombi between the bifoil balloons when they were extracted after mitral dilation prompted us to look for evidence of minor brain embolisms using the sensitive technique of BMRI (brain magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging). Methods: BMRI was performed within 48 hr before and after a percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy (PMBC) in each of the 63 patients in this study. Results: There was evidence (hyperintensity foci: HI) of a previous asymptomatic brain embolism in 38 of 63 patients before PMBC and a new HI appeared in 18 of 63 patients after the procedure. New HI signals were found exclusively in the white matter in 8 of 18 patients and in only 3 of 18 were HI signs larger than 1 cm. One patient, with an HI signal >1 cm in the thalamus and another 8; 4, patients from western countries vs the others) were not statistically significant, probably because the number of patients in each subgroup was low. Patients in atrial fibrillation had slightly more (not significant) HI before PMBC (15/20, 75%) than patients in sinus rhythm (23/43, 53%), but after PMBC their HI frequencies were similar (atrial fibrillation: 5/20, 25%; sinus rhythm: 13/43, 30%). Conclusion: Brain microembolism is frequent during PMBC, but is often anatomically limited and free from clinical signs in most cases. Brain embolism seems to be related mainly to the procedure itself and not the features of the patient

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging detects placental hypoxia and acidosis in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Bobek

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction as a result of dysregulation of anti-angiogenic molecules secreted by the placenta leads to the maternal hypertensive response characteristic of the pregnancy complication of preeclampsia. Structural abnormalities in the placenta have been proposed to result in altered placental perfusion, placental oxidative stress, cellular damage and inflammation and the release of anti-angiogenic compounds into the maternal circulation. The exact link between these factors is unclear. Here we show, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a tool to examine placental changes in mouse models of perturbed pregnancies, that T 2 contrast between distinct regions of the placenta is abolished at complete loss of blood flow. Alterations in T 2 (spin-spin or transverse relaxation times are explained as a consequence of hypoxia and acidosis within the tissue. Similar changes are observed in perturbed pregnancies, indicating that acidosis as well as hypoxia may be a feature of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and may play a prominent role in the signalling pathways that lead to the increased secretion of anti-angiogenic compounds.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging detects significant sex differences in human myocardial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds Lina M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology responsible for the significant outcome disparities between men and women with cardiac disease is largely unknown. Further investigation into basic cardiac physiological differences between the sexes is needed. This study utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based multiparametric strain analysis to search for sex-based differences in regional myocardial contractile function. Methods End-systolic strain (circumferential, longitudinal, and radial was interpolated from MRI-based radiofrequency tissue tagging grid point displacements in each of 60 normal adult volunteers (32 females. Results The average global left ventricular (LV strain among normal female volunteers (n = 32 was significantly larger in absolute value (functionally better than in normal male volunteers (n = 28 in both the circumferential direction (Male/Female = -0.19 ± 0.02 vs. -0.21 ± 0.02; p = 0.025 and longitudinal direction (Male/Female = -0.14 ± 0.03 vs. -0.16 ± 0.02; p = 0.007. Conclusions The finding of significantly larger circumferential and longitudinal LV strain among normal female volunteers suggests that baseline contractile differences between the sexes may contribute to the well-recognized divergence in cardiovascular disease outcomes. Further work is needed in order to determine the pathologic changes that occur in LV strain between women and men with the onset of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Detection of hepatic VX2 carcinomas with ferucarbotran-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rabbits: Comparison of nine pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Min Ju; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Jongmee; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic performance of a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, in order to identify the most effective ferucarbotran-enhanced sequence for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas in rabbits. Methods: Fifteen rabbits with experimentally induced 135 VX2 carcinomas in the liver underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI using the following nine pulse sequences: a fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with two echo times (TE) (proton density- and T2-weighted images), four different T2*-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state) (FMPGR) with the combination of three TEs (9, 12, 15 ms, respectively) and two flip angles (20 deg., 80 deg., respectively), T2*-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR), T1-weighted FMPSPGR, and dynamic T1-weighted FMPSPGR. All images were reviewed by three radiologists with quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio of the proton density-weighted FSE sequence was significantly higher than those of the others (p o ) images were superior to those of the others and for the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm, the sensitivities of these sequences were less than 30%. Conclusion: Ferucarbotran-enhanced T2- and proton density-weighted FSE and T2*-weighed FMPGR (TE/flip angle, 12/20 o ) images were found to be the most effective pulse sequences for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas but these sequences were limited in the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm in size

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  18. Detection and Evaluation of Renal Injury in Burst Wave Lithotripsy Using Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philip C; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Cunitz, Bryan W; Blomgren, Philip M; Johnson, Cynthia D; Park, Joshua S H; Bailey, Michael R; Lee, Donghoon; Harper, Jonathan D; Sorensen, Mathew D

    2017-08-01

    Burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) is a transcutaneous technique with potential to safely and effectively fragment renal stones. Preclinical investigations of BWL require the assessment of potential renal injury. This study evaluates the capabilities of real-time ultrasound and MRI to detect and evaluate BWL injury that was induced in porcine kidneys. Ten kidneys from five female farm pigs were treated with either a 170 or 335 kHz BWL transducer using variable treatment parameters and monitored in real-time with ultrasound. Eight kidneys were perfusion fixed and scanned with a 3-Tesla MRI scanner (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and susceptibility-weighted imaging), followed by processing via an established histomorphometric technique for injury quantification. In addition, two kidneys were separately evaluated for histologic characterization of injury quality. Observed B-mode hyperechoes on ultrasound consistent with cavitation predicted the presence of BWL-induced renal injury with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in comparison to the histomorphometric technique. Similarly, MRI detected renal injury with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100% and was able to identify the scale of lesion volumes. The injuries purposefully generated with BWL were histologically similar to those formed by shock wave lithotripsy. BWL-induced renal injury can be detected with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity by real-time ultrasound and post-treatment ex vivo MRI. No injury occurred in this study without cavitation detected on ultrasound. Such capabilities for injury detection and lesion volume quantification on MRI can be used for preclinical testing of BWL.

  19. Unsupervised detection, quantification and localization of white matter hyper-intensities in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, Sebastien

    1998-01-01

    White matter hyper-intensities (WMH) are punctual ischemic areas, related to arteriosclerosis, visible on T2- and PD-weighted MRI. They are present on elderly normal subjects, and their proportion vary between 27 to 83 % from study to study. This strong variability in their counting is especially caused by human observation, so an unsupervised detection tool is necessary. The method is based on the analysis of Tl-weighted MRI in sagittal orientation, and of T2- and PD-weighted MRI in transaxial orientation of a single subject. Detection of WMH is based on a segmentation phase, and contains a large number of pre- and post-processing. First, a correction of inhomogeneities due to instrumentation is applied, with the modelization of the intensity variations appearing on a homogenous object. and the Computing a correction matrix. The three MRI modalities are then placed in a single referential, using a MRI-PET registration method. The brain is segmented on the Tl-weighted MRI, resulting in a mask used to segment the two others modalities after registration. A multispectral bayesian segmentation algorithm extracts the white matter (WM) and objects likely to be WMH. A set of morphological operations generate an image representing WM and potential WMH. A second segmentation of this image, in two classes, results in a WMH mask. It is then possible to list the WMH, their size, their shape, and their position in the MRI referential. At last, the coordinates of the WMH centers of mass are placed into Talairach space, allowing statistical analysis on a large number of subjects. This method has been in part applied on a data base of 850 subjects. The four steps (correction of inhomogeneities, registration, segmentation of the brain and detection of AC and PC landmarks) result in a global success rate of 90 %. (author) [fr

  20. Radiation Dose–Dependent Hippocampal Atrophy Detected With Longitudinal Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, Tyler M.; Karunamuni, Roshan [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Bartsch, Hauke [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Kaifi, Samar [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Krishnan, Anitha Priya [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Dalia, Yoseph; Burkeen, Jeffrey; Murzin, Vyacheslav; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Kuperman, Joshua; White, Nathan S. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Brewer, James B. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Farid, Nikdokht [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McDonald, Carrie R. [Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy (RT) to the brain, patients often experience memory impairment, which may be partially mediated by damage to the hippocampus. Hippocampal sparing in RT planning is the subject of recent and ongoing clinical trials. Calculating appropriate hippocampal dose constraints would be improved by efficient in vivo measurements of hippocampal damage. In this study we sought to determine whether brain RT was associated with dose-dependent hippocampal atrophy. Methods and Materials: Hippocampal volume was measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 52 patients who underwent fractionated, partial brain RT for primary brain tumors. Study patients had high-resolution, 3-dimensional volumetric MRI before and 1 year after RT. Images were processed using software with clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration and Conformité Européene marking for automated measurement of hippocampal volume. Automated results were inspected visually for accuracy. Tumor and surgical changes were censored. Mean hippocampal dose was tested for correlation with hippocampal atrophy 1 year after RT. Average hippocampal volume change was also calculated for hippocampi receiving high (>40 Gy) or low (<10 Gy) mean RT dose. A multivariate analysis was conducted with linear mixed-effects modeling to evaluate other potential predictors of hippocampal volume change, including patient (random effect), age, hemisphere, sex, seizure history, and baseline volume. Statistical significance was evaluated at α = 0.05. Results: Mean hippocampal dose was significantly correlated with hippocampal volume loss (r=−0.24, P=.03). Mean hippocampal volume was significantly reduced 1 year after high-dose RT (mean −6%, P=.009) but not after low-dose RT. In multivariate analysis, both RT dose and patient age were significant predictors of hippocampal atrophy (P<.01). Conclusions: The hippocampus demonstrates radiation dose–dependent atrophy after treatment for brain

  1. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  2. Ultrasonography versus magnetic resonance imaging in detecting and grading common extensor tendon tear in chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Bachta

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic performance and reliability of ultrasonography (US in detecting and grading common extensor tendon (CET tear in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis (LE, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as the reference standard.The study comprised fifty-eight chronic LE patients. Each patient underwent US and MRI. CET status was classified as: high-grade tear (≥50% thickness, low-grade tear (<50% thickness, suspected tear (possible but not evident tear, no tear. Additionally, the following dichotomous scale was used: confirmed or unconfirmed CET tear. Relative US parameters (versus MRI for detecting CET tear included: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy. The agreement between US and MRI findings was measured using the weighted Cohen kappa coefficient (κ.US showed moderate agreement with MRI in detecting and grading CET tear (κ = 0.49. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CET tear detecting by US were 64.52%, 85.19%, and 72.73%, respectively. PPV and NPV of US were 83.33% and 67.65%, respectively. No patient with unconfirmed CET tear on US had high-grade CET tear on MRI.Ultrasonography is a valuable imaging modality that can be used as a screening tool to exclude high-grade CET tear in chronic LE patients. Once a tear is evident on US, MRI should be considered to assess precisely the extent of tendon injury.

  3. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  4. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borens, Bruno [Polyclinique Santa Maria, Nice (France); Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques [Erasme Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels (Belgium); Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta [Erasme Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); El Bouchaibi, Said [Epicura, Ath (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  5. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borens, Bruno; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques; Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta; El Bouchaibi, Said

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm"2) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10"-"3 mm"2/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10"-"3 mm"2/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic sensitivity of radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Corey R; Cook, Cristi R; Cook, James L

    2015-01-01

    Radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography are commonly used for diagnosis of shoulder osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans (OC/OCD) in dogs, however there is a lack of published information on the relative diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities for detecting shoulder OC/OCD in a group of dogs, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Inclusion criteria were history and clinical findings consistent with osteochondrosis and/or osteochondritis dissecans involving at least one shoulder. With informed client consent, both shoulders for all included dogs were examined using standardized radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, and arthroscopy protocols. One of three veterinary surgeons recorded clinical and arthroscopic findings without knowledge of diagnostic imaging findings. One of two veterinary radiologists recorded diagnostic imaging findings without knowledge of clinical and arthroscopic findings. Eighteen client-owned dogs (n = 36 shoulders) met inclusion criteria. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (correct classification rate) values for detecting presence or absence of shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans were as follows: radiography (88.5%, 90%, 88.9%), ultrasonography (92%, 60%, 82.6%), and MRI (96%, 88.9%, 94.4%). Odds of a correct diagnosis for MRI were 3.2 times more than ultrasonography and two times more than radiography. For MRI detection of lesions, the sagittal T2 or PD-FAT SAT sequences were considered to be most helpful. For radiographic detection of lesions, the additional supinated-mediolateral and pronated-mediolateral projections were considered to be most helpful. Findings from the current study support more evidence-based diagnostic imaging recommendations for dogs with clinically suspected shoulder osteochondrosis or osteochondritis dissecans. © 2014 American College of

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in breast cancer detection: possibilities beyond the conventional theoretical framework for data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkic, Karen E-mail: karen.belkic@radfys.ki.se

    2004-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) is a promising method for breast cancer diagnosis, providing, in addition to the anatomic picture, complementary biochemical and physiologic information in the form of spectra. It should be able to identify key biochemical changes before the tumour becomes detectable by other functional imaging methods that rely upon single markers not entirely sensitive or specific for malignant activity. MRSI is potentially well suited for screening and repeated monitoring since it entails no radiation exposure. There are, however, limitations to current applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and MRSI. Many of these can be directly related to reliance upon the conventional data analytical method, i.e. the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which has low resolution, poor signal/noise (S/N) in clinical signals, supplies only shape spectra and requires fitting, which is non-unique, so that the number of metabolites must be guessed in advance. This can lead to spurious peaks (over-fitting) and true metabolites being undetected (under-fitting). These limitations of the FFT can be circumvented by recent mathematical advances in signal processing via e.g. the Fast Pade Transform (FPT). As a high resolution, non-linear, stable parametric method, the FPT substantially improves S/N, and fulfills stringent requirements for tumour diagnostics: no post-processing fitting, provides precise numerical results for all peak parameters, and specifies the exact number of metabolites (including those that overlap) from the encoded data. We illustrate in a realistic synthesized model problem similar to MRS that the FPT can identify overlapping peaks that are entirely missed by the FFT, and we give an example from in vivo MRS of the superior resolving power of the FPT compared to FFT at short acquisition time. We also perform detailed paired and logistic regression analyses of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data on extracted breast specimens

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    After only a few years, MR imaging has proved to be an important method for imaging disorders of the musculoskeletal tissues. The images are characterized by great inherent contrast, excellent spatial resolution, and exquisite anatomic display - major reasons why MR imaging compares favorably with other imaging methods, such as radionuclide bone scanning and CT. MR imaging is particularly sensitive to bone marrow alterations and is very effective for detection and characterization of a wide variety of soft tissue conditions. Advances in surface coil technology will increase the usefulness of MR imaging in the evaluation of articular disease. In addition, chemical shift imaging and spectroscopy will add physiologic information to the anatomic features demonstrated by proton imaging

  12. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles as new, smart contrast agents for cancer early detection using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouffouk, Fouzi; Simão, Teresa; Dornelles, Daniel F; Lopes, André D; Sau, Pablo; Martins, Jorge; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Alrokayan, Salman A; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; dos Santos, Nuno R

    2015-01-01

    Early cancer detection is a major factor in the reduction of mortality and cancer management cost. Here we developed a smart and targeted micelle-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), able to turn on its imaging capability in the presence of acidic cancer tissues. This smart contrast agent consists of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles formed by self-assembly of a diblock copolymer (poly(ethyleneglycol-b-trimethylsilyl methacrylate)), loaded with a gadolinium hydrophobic complex ((t)BuBipyGd) and exploits the acidic pH in cancer tissues. In vitro MRI experiments showed that (t)BuBipyGd-loaded micelles were pH-sensitive, as they turned on their imaging capability only in an acidic microenvironment. The micelle-targeting ability toward cancer cells was enhanced by conjugation with an antibody against the MUC1 protein. The ability of our antibody-decorated micelles to be switched on in acidic microenvironments and to target cancer cells expressing specific antigens, together with its high Gd(III) content and its small size (35-40 nm) reveals their potential use for early cancer detection by MRI.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  18. Detecting Vascular-Targeting Effects of the Hypoxic Cytotoxin Tirapazamine in Tumor Xenografts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, Lauren J.; Baker, Jennifer; Kyle, Alastair H.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Reinsberg, Stefan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether vascular-targeting effects can be detected in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: MR images of HCT-116 xenograft-bearing mice were acquired at 7 Tesla before and 24 hours after intraperitoneal injections of tirapazamine. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses were performed to evaluate changes in tumor perfusion using two biomarkers: the volume transfer constant (K trans ) and the initial area under the concentration-time curve (IAUC). We used novel implanted fiducial markers to obtain cryosections that corresponded to MR image planes from excised tumors; quantitative immunohistochemical mapping of tumor vasculature, perfusion, and necrosis enabled correlative analysis between these and MR images. Results: Conventional histological analysis showed lower vascular perfusion or greater amounts of necrosis in the central regions of five of eight tirapazamine-treated tumors, with three treated tumors showing no vascular dysfunction response. MRI data reflected this result, and a striking decrease in both K trans and IAUC values was seen with the responsive tumors. Retrospective evaluation of pretreatment MRI parameters revealed that those tumors that did not respond to the vascular-targeting effects of tirapazamine had significantly higher pretreatment K trans and IAUC values. Conclusions: MRI-derived parameter maps showed good agreement with histological tumor mapping. MRI was found to be an effective tool for noninvasively monitoring and predicting tirapazamine-mediated central vascular dysfunction.

  19. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  20. The effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on kidney and adjacent tissue detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiko, Yasushi; Hirose, Tomonobu; Yoshida, Masahiko; Saito, Isao

    1995-01-01

    Etracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) using YACHIYODA SZ1 was performed on 12 patients with renal stones and the effect on the kidney and adjacent tissue was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) before and after treatment. Some changes were seen in 6 of the 12 (50%) patients; perirenal fluid collection in 2 of the 12 (16.7%) patients, subcapsular hematoma in 2 of the 12 (16.7%) patients, renal enlargement in 5 of the 12 (31.3%) patients, increased signal intensity in perirenal tissue in 6 of the 12 (50%) patients, and loss of the corticomedullary junction in 2 out of 9 patients (22%). These findings indicated fewer changes in the kidney after ESWL using YACHIYODA SZ1 than in the other reports. MRI is also concluded to be effective to detect the changes of the kidney after ESWL. (author)

  1. The effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on kidney and adjacent tissue detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiko, Yasushi; Hirose, Tomonobu; Yoshida, Masahiko; Saito, Isao [Tokyo Kyosai Hospital (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    Etracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) using YACHIYODA SZ1 was performed on 12 patients with renal stones and the effect on the kidney and adjacent tissue was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) before and after treatment. Some changes were seen in 6 of the 12 (50%) patients; perirenal fluid collection in 2 of the 12 (16.7%) patients, subcapsular hematoma in 2 of the 12 (16.7%) patients, renal enlargement in 5 of the 12 (31.3%) patients, increased signal intensity in perirenal tissue in 6 of the 12 (50%) patients, and loss of the corticomedullary junction in 2 out of 9 patients (22%). These findings indicated fewer changes in the kidney after ESWL using YACHIYODA SZ1 than in the other reports. MRI is also concluded to be effective to detect the changes of the kidney after ESWL. (author).

  2. Vessel Wall Inflammation of Takayasu Arteritis Detected by Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Association with Disease Distribution and Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kato

    Full Text Available The assessment of the distribution and activity of vessel wall inflammation is clinically important in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a useful tool, but the clinical utility of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in Takayasu arteritis has yet to be determined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of LGE in assessing vessel wall inflammation and disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.We enrolled 49 patients with Takayasu arteritis who had undergone 1.5 T MRI. Patients were divided into Active (n = 19 and Inactive disease (n = 30 groups. The distribution of vessel wall inflammation using angiography and LGE was assessed by qualitative analysis. In 79% and 63% of patients in Active and Inactive groups, respectively, greater distribution of vessel wall inflammation was observed with LGE than with conventional angiography. MRI values of pre- and post-contrast signal-to-noise ratios (SNR, SNR increment (post-SNR minus pre-SNR, pre- and post-contrast contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR, and CNR increment (post-CNR minus pre-CNR were evaluated at arterial wall sites with the highest signal intensity using quantitative analysis of post-contrast LGE images. No statistically significant differences in MRI parameters were observed between Active and Inactive groups. Contrast-enhanced MRI was unable to accurately detect active disease.Contrast-enhanced MRI has utility in detecting the distribution of vessel wall inflammation but has less utility in assessing disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.

  3. Postoperative quality of life outcome and employment in patients undergoing resection of epileptogenic lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, Kouzo; Akiyama, Yasuhiko; Nagai, Hidemasa; Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Takada, Daikei; Daisu, Mitsuhiro; Nagasako, Noriko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    The long-term postoperative improvement of quality of life (QOL) and employment were investigated in patients undergoing resection of epileptogenic lesions detected by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to identify the associated preoperative factors. Thirty of 47 patients who underwent lesionectomy between 1987-2001 replied to questionnaires. Patients with extratemporal resection outnumbered those with temporal lobe resection. The mean follow-up period was 12.4±3.7 years. An arbitrary score for quantitatively assessing QOL was assigned. The mean increases in QOL score points were significantly higher in the late childhood onset group than those in the early childhood onset group, and were also significantly higher in the temporal resection group and extratemporal resection of non-dysplastic cortical pathology group than in the extratemporal resection of dysplastic cortical pathology group. Postoperative QOL improvement and occupational status of patients depended on the completeness of seizure control. Resection of lesions detected by MR imaging in patients with intractable epilepsy resulted in effective long-term QOL improvement and postoperative occupational status. Favorable outcome was related mainly to the pathology of the epileptogenic lesions, whether the lesion site was temporal or extratemporal, and the completeness of seizure control. (author)

  4. In vivo detection of activated platelets allows characterizing rupture of atherosclerotic plaques with molecular magnetic resonance imaging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik von Elverfeldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early and non-invasive detection of platelets on micro atherothrombosis provides a means to identify unstable plaque and thereby allowing prophylactic treatment towards prevention of stroke or myocardial infarction. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI of activated platelets as early markers of plaque rupture using targeted contrast agents is a promising strategy. In this study, we aim to specifically image activated platelets in murine atherothrombosis by in vivo mMRI, using a dedicated animal model of plaque rupture. METHODS: An antibody targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS on the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-receptor of activated platelets was conjugated to microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO to form the LIBS-MPIO contrast agent causing a signal-extinction in T2*-weighted MRI. ApoE(-/- mice (60 weeks-old were fed a high fat diet for 5 weeks. Using a small needle, the surface of their carotid plaques was scratched under blood flow to induce atherothrombosis. In vivo 9.4 Tesla MRI was performed before and repetitively after intravenous injection of either LIBS-MPIO versus non-targeted-MPIO. RESULTS: LIBS-MPIO injected animals showed a significant signal extinction (p<0.05 in MRI, corresponding to the site of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis in histology. The signal attenuation was effective for atherothrombosis occupying ≥ 2% of the vascular lumen. Histology further confirmed significant binding of LIBS-MPIO compared to control-MPIO on the thrombus developing on the surface of ruptured plaques (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: in vivo mMRI detected activated platelets on mechanically ruptured atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE(-/- mice with a high sensititvity. This imaging technology represents a unique opportunity for noninvasive detection of atherothrombosis and the identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques with the ultimate promise to prevent strokes and myocardial infarctions.

  5. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  6. Detection and Elimination of Oncogenic Signaling Networks in Premalignant and Malignant Cells with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    proton resonance frequency TR- relaxation time GRE- gradient echo MT- magnetization transfer 6 FSE- fast spin echo 7 3. Overall Progress Summary...support project. – SBA certified 8(a)/Small Disadvantaged Business, HUBZone, and 8(m)/Economically Disadvantaged Woman owned, technology services

  7. Detection and Elimination of Oncogenic Signalling Networks in Premalignant and Malignant Cells with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    proton resonance frequency TR- relaxation time GRE- gradient echo MT- magnetization transfer 6 FSE- fast spin echo 7 3. Overall Progress Summary...support project. – SBA certified 8(a)/Small Disadvantaged Business, HUBZone, and 8(m)/Economically Disadvantaged Woman owned, technology services

  8. The Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Combination With Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Improving Tumor Detection for Early Cervical Carcinoma Treated With Fertility-Sparing Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiulei; Wang, Ling; Li, Yong; Song, Peiji

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for improving tumor detection in young patients treated with fertility-sparing surgery because of early cervical carcinoma. Fifty-four patients with stage Ia or Ib1 cervical carcinoma were enrolled into this study. Magnetic resonance examinations were performed for these patients using conventional MRI (including T1-weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) and DWI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of cervical carcinoma were analyzed quantitatively and compared with that of adjacent epithelium. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 2 sets of MRI sequences were calculated on the basis of histologic results, and the diagnostic ability of conventional MRI/DWI combinations was compared with that of conventional MRI. The mean ADC value from cervical carcinoma (mean, 786 × 10 mm/s ± 100) was significantly lower than that from adjacent epithelium (mean, 1352 × 10 mm/s ± 147) (P = 0.01). When the threshold ADC value set as 1010 × 10 mm/s, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating cervical carcinoma from nontumor epithelium were 78.2% and 67.2%, respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of conventional MRI for tumor detection were 76.0% and 70.4%, whereas the sensitivity and accuracy of conventional MRI/DWI combinations were 91.7% and 90.7%, respectively. Conventional MRI/DWI combinations revealed a positive predictive value of 97.8% and only 4 false-negative findings. The addition of DWI to conventional MRI considerably improves the sensitivity and accuracy of tumor detection in young patients treated with fertility-sparing surgery, which supports the inclusion quantitative analysis of ADC value in routine MRI protocol before fertility-sparing surgery.

  9. Detection and Characterization of Focal Hepatic lesions using Magnetic resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulgarin, Luis G; Delgado, Jorge Andres; Toro Nancy

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective one year study was performed from June 2006 to June 2007. A total of ten focal liver lesions in 60 patients were examined, describing their magnetic resonance (MR) characteristics, using T1, T2 and dynamic Gd-enhanced T1 weighted sequences with and without fat suppression. Lesions were classified into benign or malignant tumors and a diagnosis was proposed. Specific diagnoses such as simple cyst, abscess, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cholangiocarcinoma were reported.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fusion Guided Targeted Biopsy Evaluated by Transperineal Template Saturation Prostate Biopsy for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Ashkan; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Donati, Olivio F; Rizzi, Gianluca; Rupp, Niels J; Wettstein, Marian S; Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Eberli, Daniel

    2018-02-21

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy against that of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy to detect prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 415 men who consecutively presented for prostate biopsy between November 2014 and September 2016 at our tertiary care center. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3 Tesla device without an endorectal coil, followed by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy with the BiopSee® fusion system. Additional fusion guided targeted biopsy was done in men with a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, defined as Likert score 3 to 5. Any Gleason pattern 4 was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. The detection rates of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided targeted biopsy were compared with the detection rate of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy using the McNemar test. We obtained a median of 40 (range 30 to 55) and 3 (range 2 to 4) transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and fusion guided targeted biopsy cores, respectively. Of the 124 patients (29.9%) without a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 32 (25.8%) were found to have clinically significant prostate cancer on transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy. Of the 291 patients (70.1%) with a Likert score of 3 to 5 clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 129 (44.3%) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging fusion guided targeted biopsy, in 176 (60.5%) by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and in 187 (64.3%) by the combined approach. Overall 58 cases (19.9%) of clinically significant prostate cancer would have been missed if fusion guided targeted biopsy had been performed exclusively. The sensitivity of

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  13. Early detection of neuropathophysiology using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in asymptomatic cats with feline immunodeficiency viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucy, Daniel S; Brown, Mark S; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Thompson, Jesse; Bachand, Annette M; Morges, Michelle; Elder, John H; Vandewoude, Sue; Kraft, Susan L

    2011-08-01

    HIV infection results in a highly prevalent syndrome of cognitive and motor disorders designated as HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Neurologic dysfunction resembling HAD has been documented in cats infected with strain PPR of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), whereas another highly pathogenic strain (C36) has not been known to cause neurologic signs. Animals experimentally infected with equivalent doses of FIV-C36 or FIV-PPR, and uninfected controls were evaluated by magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DW-MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) at 17.5-18 weeks post-infection, as part of a study of viral clade pathogenesis in FIV-infected cats. The goals of the MR imaging portion of the project were to determine whether this methodology was capable of detecting early neuropathophysiology in the absence of outward manifestation of neurological signs and to compare the MR imaging results for the two viral strains expected to have differing degrees of neurologic effects. We hypothesized that there would be increased diffusion, evidenced by the apparent diffusion coefficient as measured by DW-MRI, and altered metabolite ratios measured by MRS, in the brains of FIV-PPR-infected cats relative to C36-infected cats and uninfected controls. Increased apparent diffusion coefficients were seen in the white matter, gray matter, and basal ganglia of both the PPR and C36-infected (asymptomatic) cats. Thalamic MRS metabolite ratios did not differ between groups. The equivalently increased diffusion by DW-MRI suggests similar indirect neurotoxicity mechanisms for the two viral genotypes. DW-MRI is a sensitive tool to detect neuropathophysiological changes in vivo that could be useful during longitudinal studies of FIV.

  14. Prospective comparative study of spiral computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoker, J.; Romijn, M. G.; de Man, R. A.; Brouwer, J. T.; Weverling, G. J.; van Muiswinkel, J. M.; Zondervan, P. E.; Laméris, J. S.; Ijzermans, J. N. M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often detected at a relatively late stage when tumour size prohibits curative surgery. Screening to detect HCC at an early stage is performed for patients at risk. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare prospectively the diagnostic accuracy and

  15. Magnetization Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Noninvasively Detects Renal Fibrosis in Swine Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Ferguson, Christopher M; Woollard, John R; Zhu, Xiangyang; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-11-01

    Renal fibrosis is a useful biomarker for diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic interventions of renal diseases but often requires invasive testing. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging (MT-MRI), which evaluates the presence of macromolecules, offers a noninvasive tool to probe renal fibrosis in murine renal artery stenosis (RAS) at 16.4 T. In this study, we aimed to identify appropriate imaging parameters for collagen detection at 3.0 T MRI and to test the utility of MT-MRI in measuring renal fibrosis in a swine model of atherosclerotic RAS (ARAS). To select the appropriate offset frequency, an MT-MRI study was performed on a phantom containing 0% to 40% collagen I and III with offset frequencies from -1600 to +1600 Hz and other MT parameters empirically set as pulse width at 16 milliseconds and flip angle at 800 degrees. Then selected MT parameters were used in vivo on pigs 12 weeks after sham (n = 8) or RAS (n = 10) surgeries. The ARAS pigs were fed with high-cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. The MT ratio (MTR) was compared with ex vivo renal fibrosis measured using Sirius-red staining. Offset frequencies at 600 and 1000 Hz were selected for collagen detection without direct saturation of free water signal, and subsequently applied in vivo. The ARAS kidneys showed mild cortical and medullary fibrosis by Sirius-red staining. The cortical and medullary MTRs at 600 and 1000 Hz were both increased. Renal fibrosis measured ex vivo showed good linear correlations with MTR at 600 (cortex: Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.87, P 3.0 T. Therefore, MT-MRI may potentially be clinically applicable and useful for detection and monitoring of renal pathology in subjects with RAS.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  17. In vivo detection of c-MET expression in a rat hepatocarcinogenesis model using molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Tesiram, Yasvir A; Abbott, Andrew; Saunders, Debbie; Blindauer, Rebecca; Herlea, Oana; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA)-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. SPIO-anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T(2) values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3) cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO-anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  18. In Vivo Detection of c-MET Expression in a Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Model Using Molecularly Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheal A. Towner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO–anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. SPIO–anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T2 values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3 cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO–anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  19. Morphological hippocampal markers for automated detection of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment converters in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Luca; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pievani, Michela; Reiber, Johan H C; Ganzola, Rossana; Milles, Julien

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of hippocampal shape-based markers for automatic detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment converters (MCI-c). Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of 50 AD subjects, 50 age-matched controls, 15 MCI-c, and 15 MCI-non-converters (MCI-nc) were taken. Manual delineations of both hippocampi were obtained from normalized images. Fully automatic shape modeling was used to generate comparable meshes for both structures. Repeated permutation tests, run over a randomly sub-sampled training set (25 controls and 25 ADs), highlighted shape-based markers, mostly located in the CA1 sector, which consistently discriminated ADs and controls. Support vector machines (SVMs) were trained, using markers from either one or both hippocampi, to automatically classify control and AD subjects. Leave-1-out cross-validations over the remaining 25 ADs and 25 controls resulted in an optimal accuracy of 90% (sensitivity 92%), for markers in the left hippocampus. The same morphological markers were used to train SVMs for MCI-c versus MCI-nc classification: markers in the right hippocampus reached an accuracy (and sensitivity) of 80%. Due to the pattern recognition framework, our results statistically represent the expected performances of clinical set-ups, and compare favorably to analyses based on hippocampal volumes.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We sought to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T detects more brain lesions in acute optic neuritis (ON) than MRI at 1.5 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Twenty-eight patients with acute ON were scanned at both field-strengths using fast-fluid-attenuated inversion recov...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  2. Computer-Aided Detection in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrius, M. D.; Van Ooijen, P.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview on the accuracy of the discrimination between benign and malignant breast lesions on MRI with and without the use of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system. One investigator selected relevant articles based on title and abstract. Ten articles were

  3. Automatic Brain Tumor Detection in T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Bartušek, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2013), s. 223-230 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain tumor * Brain tumor detection * Symmetry analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2013

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of central nervous system involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotot, P.M.; Sansonetti, P.J.; Levillain, R.; Cabanis, E.A.; Lavayssiere, R.; Sandoz-Tronca, C.

    1988-01-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement, whether primary by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV - itself, or secondary (toxoplasmosis or lymphoma) is remarkably frequent in AIDS, in 40 to 70% of cases, depending upon the author. In order to study the natural history of this illness, a cohort of 25 asymptomatic seropositive patients have been established. Every 6 months these patients undergo biological and clinical examinations, as well as Magnetic Resonance brain scans. After two examinations at a 6 month's interval, the first results are reported. Out of these 25 cases, 9 present anomalies: One patient with diffuse cerebral atrophy and 8 others with high signal intensity areas on T2 weighted sequences, like those of the Multiple Sclerosis. No relationship could be demonstrated between the existence of these lesions and various criteria such as age, sex, risk factors and T4 cells count. The nature of these lesions is not lear. They certainly indicate early involvement of the CNS after primary infection by the HIV virus. They may either represent scars of the primary infection or early alterations announcing developing encephalopathy [fr

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of lipid-rich necrotic core in carotid atheroma in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Victoria Eleanor; Patterson, Andrew J.; Sadat, Umar; Bowden, David J.; Tang, Tjun Y.; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that knowing the morphology of carotid atheroma improves current risk stratification for predicting subsequent thrombo-embolic events. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) ex vivo studies have shown that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can detect lipid-rich necrotic core (LR/NC) and fibrous cap. This study aims to establish if this is achievable in vivo. Twenty-six patients (mean age 73 years, range 54-87 years) with moderate to severe carotid stenosis confirmed on ultrasound were imaged. An echo-planar DWI sequence was performed along with standard high-resolution MR imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were evaluated. Two independent readers reported the mean ADC values from regions of interest defining LR/NCs and fibrous caps. For subjects undergoing carotid endarterectomy (n = 19), carotid specimens were obtained and stained using Nile red. The mean ADC values were 1.0 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (±SD 0.3 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and 0.7 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (±SD 0.2 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively; the difference was significant (p < 0.0001). The intra-class correlation coefficients summarising the agreement between the two independent readers were 0.84 and 0.60 for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively. Comparison of quantitative ADC values and histology (by subjective grading of lipid content) showed a significant correlation: heavier lipid staining matched lower ADC values (r = -0.435, p = 0.005). This study indicates that DWI can be used to distinguish LR/NC and the fibrous cap. The study also suggests that the mean ADC value may be linearly related to subjective graded LR/NC content determined by histology. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of lipid-rich necrotic core in carotid atheroma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Victoria Eleanor; Patterson, Andrew J.; Sadat, Umar; Bowden, David J.; Tang, Tjun Y.; Gillard, Jonathan H. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Graves, Martin J.; Priest, Andrew N. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Skepper, Jeremy N. [University of Cambridge, Multi-imaging Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kirkpatrick, Peter J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Research has shown that knowing the morphology of carotid atheroma improves current risk stratification for predicting subsequent thrombo-embolic events. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) ex vivo studies have shown that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can detect lipid-rich necrotic core (LR/NC) and fibrous cap. This study aims to establish if this is achievable in vivo. Twenty-six patients (mean age 73 years, range 54-87 years) with moderate to severe carotid stenosis confirmed on ultrasound were imaged. An echo-planar DWI sequence was performed along with standard high-resolution MR imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were evaluated. Two independent readers reported the mean ADC values from regions of interest defining LR/NCs and fibrous caps. For subjects undergoing carotid endarterectomy (n = 19), carotid specimens were obtained and stained using Nile red. The mean ADC values were 1.0 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ({+-}SD 0.3 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.7 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ({+-}SD 0.2 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively; the difference was significant (p < 0.0001). The intra-class correlation coefficients summarising the agreement between the two independent readers were 0.84 and 0.60 for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively. Comparison of quantitative ADC values and histology (by subjective grading of lipid content) showed a significant correlation: heavier lipid staining matched lower ADC values (r = -0.435, p = 0.005). This study indicates that DWI can be used to distinguish LR/NC and the fibrous cap. The study also suggests that the mean ADC value may be linearly related to subjective graded LR/NC content determined by histology. (orig.)

  7. Optimization of input parameters of supra-threshold stochastic resonance image processing algorithm for the detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors on PET/CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Saroha, Kartik; Patel, C.D.; Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Administration of diuretics increases the urine output to clear radioactive urine from kidneys and bladder. Hence post-diuretic pelvic PET/CT scan enhances the probability of detection of abdomino-pelvic tumor. However, it causes discomfort in patients and has some side effects also. Application of supra threshold stochastic resonance (SSR) image processing algorithm on Pre-diuretic PET/CT scan may also increase the probability of detection of these tumors. Amount of noise and threshold are two variable parameters that effect the final image quality. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of these two variable parameters on the detection of abdomen-pelvic tumor

  8. Detection of dysbaric osteonecrosis in military divers using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolte, H.; Heller, M.; Reuter, M.; Koch, A.; Tetzlaff, K.; Bettinghausen, E.

    2005-01-01

    This was a controlled cross-sectional study to investigate the prevalence of dysbaric osteonecrosis (DON) in military divers. MRI examinations of the large joints and adjacent bones were performed in a cross-sectional group of 32 highly experienced military divers and 28 non-divers matched for age and anthropometric data. Additional plain radiographs and follow-up controls were performed in all persons with signs certain or suspicious of DON. In two subject groups (one of divers and one of non-divers), lesions characteristic of DON were detected. From this controlled study, it may be concluded that MRI is a highly sensitive method to detect signs of osteonecrosis. It could be shown that the prevalence of bone lesions characteristic of osteonecrosis in highly experienced military divers is not higher than in non-diving subjects of comparable age. The outcome of this comparably small study group fits to the results of previous extensive studies performed with radiographs. The detected low incidence of DON in this collective may be due to the fact that military divers follow stricter selection criteria, decompression schemes and medical surveillance than commercial divers. (orig.)

  9. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles as new, smart contrast agents for cancer early detection using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouffouk F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fouzi Mouffouk,1,* Teresa Simão,2,* Daniel F Dornelles,2 André D Lopes,3 Pablo Sau,4 Jorge Martins,2,5 Khalid M Abu-Salah,6 Salman A Alrokayan,6 Ana M Rosa da Costa,3 Nuno R dos Santos2 1Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait; 2IBB – Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, CBME – Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine, 3CIQA-Algarve Chemistry Research Center, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, Faro, Portugal; 4Centro Radiológico Computarizado SA (CERCO, Seville, Spain; 5Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, Faro, Portugal; 6King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Early cancer detection is a major factor in the reduction of mortality and cancer management cost. Here we developed a smart and targeted micelle-based contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, able to turn on its imaging capability in the presence of acidic cancer tissues. This smart contrast agent consists of pH-sensitive polymeric micelles formed by self-assembly of a diblock copolymer (poly(ethyleneglycol-b-trimethylsilyl methacrylate, loaded with a gadolinium hydrophobic complex (tBuBipyGd and exploits the acidic pH in cancer tissues. In vitro MRI experiments showed that tBuBipyGd-loaded micelles were pH-sensitive, as they turned on their imaging capability only in an acidic microenvironment. The micelle-targeting ability toward cancer cells was enhanced by conjugation with an antibody against the MUC1 protein. The ability of our antibody-decorated micelles to be switched on in acidic microenvironments and to target cancer cells expressing specific antigens, together with its high Gd(III content and its small size (35–40 nm reveals

  10. Stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging to detect coronary artery lesions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijarnsorn, Chodchanok; Noga, Michelle; Schantz, Daryl; Pepelassis, Dion; Tham, Edythe B

    2017-05-01

    Stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is used widely in adult ischemic heart disease, but data in children is limited. We sought to evaluate feasibility, accuracy and prognostic value of stress CMR in children with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress CMR was reviewed from two pediatric centers over 5 years using a standard pharmacologic protocol. Wall motion abnormalities, perfusion deficits and late enhancement were correlated with coronary angiogram (CAG) when available, and clinical status at 1 year follow-up for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE; coronary revascularization, non-fatal myocardial infarction and death due to CAD) was recorded. Sixty-four stress perfusion CMR studies in 48 children (10.9 ± 4.8 years) using adenosine; 59 (92%) and dipyridamole; 5 (8%), were reviewed. Indications were Kawasaki disease (39%), post arterial switch operation (12.5%), post heart transplantation (12.5%), post anomalous coronary artery repair (11%), chest pain (11%), suspected myocarditis or CAD (3%), post coronary revascularization (3%), and others (8%). Twenty-six studies were performed under sedation. Of all studies performed, 66% showed no evidence of ischemia or infarction, 28% had perfusion deficits and 6% had late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) without perfusion deficit. Compared to CAG, the positive predictive value (PPV) of stress CMR was 80% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 88%. At 1 year clinical follow-up, the PPV and NPV of stress CMR to predict MACE were 78 and 98%. Stress-perfusion CMR, in combination with LGE and wall motion-analysis is a feasible and an accurate method of diagnosing CAD in children. In difficult cases, it also helps guide clinical intervention by complementing conventional CAG with functional information.

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  13. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  17. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears using a microscopy coil. Noninvasive detection without intraarticular contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitachi, Shin; Takase, Kei; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Tanaka, Minoru; Tojo, Yuichi; Tabata, Shiro; Majima, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears by comparing the method to conventional MRI and MRI arthrography. A total of 68 shoulders were prospectively studied using a 1.5-T MRI unit. Conventional MRI scans were obtained with a surface coil and high-resolution MRI scans with a microscopy coil. MRI arthrography was performed in 28 shoulders using a surface coil. MRI evaluation of tears of rotator cuff tendons was compared with arthroscopic findings and surgical results. The surgery revealed 40 full-thickness tears, 13 partial-thickness tears, and 15 intact cuffs. In all, 35 (88%) full-thickness tears were correctly diagnosed on conventional MRI and 40 (100%) on high-resolution MRI. MR arthrography delineated 11 of 12 (92%) full-thickness tears. Altogether, 5 (38%) of the partial-thickness tears were detected on conventional MRI, and 12 (92%) were clearly demonstrated on high-resolution MRI. MRI arthrography depicted three (60%) of five partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI showed higher sensitivity than conventional MRI (P<0.05) and had values equivalent to those of MRI arthrography for diagnosing partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil is a feasible, noninvasive technique for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. (author)

  18. In vitro molecular magnetic resonance imaging detection and measurement of apoptosis using superparamagnetic iron oxide + antibody as ligands for nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapley, P. L.; Witiw, C.; Rich, K.; Niccoli, S.; Tassotto, M. L.; Th'ng, J.

    2012-11-01

    Recent research in cell biology as well as oncology research has focused on apoptosis or programmed cell death as a means of quantifying the induced effects of treatment. A hallmark of late-stage apoptosis is nuclear fragmentation in which DNA is degraded to release nucleosomes with their associated histones. In this work, a method was developed for detecting and measuring nucleosome concentration in vitro with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The indirect procedure used a commercially available secondary antibody-superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particle complex as a contrast agent that bound to primary antibodies against nucleosomal histones H4, H2A and H2B. Using a multiple-echo spin-echo sequence on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner, significant T2 relaxation enhancement as a function of in vitro nucleosomal concentration was measured. In addition, clustering or aggregation of the contrast agent was demonstrated with its associated enhancement in T2 effects. The T2 clustering enhancement showed a complex dependence on relative concentrations of nucleosomes, primary antibody and secondary antibody + SPIO. The technique supports the feasibility of using MRI measurements of nucleosome concentration in blood as a diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tool in the management of cancer.

  19. Study of Immobilization Procedure on Silver Nanolayers and Detection of Estrone with Diverged Beam Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abdulhalim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An immobilization protocol was developed to attach receptors on smooth silver thin films. Dense and packed 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA was used to avoid uncontrolled sulfidization and harmful oxidation of silver nanolayers. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS were added to make the silver surfaces reactive. A comparative study was carried out with different immersion times of silver samples in 11-MUA solutions with different concentrations to find the optimum conditions for immobilization. The signals, during each step of the protocol, were analyzed with a refractometer based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR effect and luminescence techniques. Molecular interactions at the surfaces between the probe and target at the surface nanolayer shift the SPR signal, thus indicating the presence of the substance. To demonstrate specific biosensing, rabbit anti-estrone polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody was immobilized through a linker on 47 nm silver layer deposited on SF11 glass. At the final stage, the representative endocrine disruptor—estrone—was attached and detected in deionized water with a diverging beam SPR imaging sensor.

  20. Assessment of total placenta previa by magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography to detect placenta accreta and its variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Nuri; Turan, Volkan; Ergenoglu, Mete; Yeniel, Ozgur; Sever, Ahmet; Kazandi, Mert; Zekioglu, Osman

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the importance of ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting placental adherence defects. Patients diagnozed with total placenta previa (n = 40) in whom hysterectomy was performed due to placental adherence defects (n = 20) or in whom the placenta detached spontaneously after a Cesarean delivery (n = 20) were included into the study between June 2008 and January 2011, at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Ege University (lzmir Turkey). Gray-scale US was used to check for any placental lacunae, sub-placental sonolucent spaces or a placental mass invading the vesicouterine plane and bladder Intra-placental lacunar turbulent blood flow and an increase in vascularization in the vesicouterine plane were evaluated with color Doppler mode. Subsequently all patients had MRI and the results were compared with the histopathologic examinations. The sensitivity of MRI for diagnosis of placental adherence defects before the operation was 95%, with a specificity of 95%. In the presence of at least one diagnostic criterion, the sensitivity and specificity of US were 87.5% and 100% respectively, while the sensitivity of color Doppler US was 62.5% with a specificity of 100%. Currently MRI appears to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of placenta accreta. None of the ultrasonographic criteria is solely sufficient to diagnose placental adherence defects, however they assist in the diagnostic process.

  1. T cell homing to tumors detected by 3D-coordinated positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Ralf; Petersen, Mikkel; Petersen, Charlotte Christie

    2007-01-01

    of magnetic resonance imaging with the high sensitivity and spatial accuracy of positron emission tomography. We have used this technique, together with determination of tissue radioactivity, flow cytometry, and microscopy, to characterize and quantitate the specific accumulation of transferred CD8+ T cells...

  2. Multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor assay for the detection of Fusarium toxins in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain Fusarium species (F. graminearum and F. verticilloides in particular) infest grains and can produce a wide range of fungal (myco)-toxins, causing huge economic losses worldwide. A reproducible and sensitive imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) assay was developed and validated for three ...

  3. Gold nanoparticle-enhanced multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) detection of Fusarium mycotoxins in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid, sensitive and multiplexed imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor assay was developed and validated for three Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA) and T-2 toxin. The iSPR assay was based on a competitive inhibition format with secondary antibodies (Ab2) conjug...

  4. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA-directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  5. Gaussian mixture models for detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Javier; Velasco, Nelson; Alvarez, Charlens; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological condition characterized by a triad of signs: stereotyped behaviors, verbal and non-verbal communication problems. The scientific community has been interested on quantifying anatomical brain alterations of this disorder. Several studies have focused on measuring brain cortical and sub-cortical volumes. This article presents a fully automatic method which finds out differences among patients diagnosed with autism and control patients. After the usual pre-processing, a template (MNI152) is registered to an evaluated brain which becomes then a set of regions. Each of these regions is the represented by the normalized histogram of intensities which is approximated by mixture of Gaussian (GMM). The gray and white matter are separated to calculate the mean and standard deviation of each Gaussian. These features are then used to train, region per region, a binary SVM classifier. The method was evaluated in an adult population aged from 18 to 35 years, from the public database Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Highest discrimination values were found for the Right Middle Temporal Gyrus, with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) the curve of 0.72.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part I: Normal anatomy, imaging technique, and osseous abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Part I of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses normal elbow anatomy and the technical factors involved in obtaining high-quality magnetic resonance images of the elbow. Part I also discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with osseous abnormalities of the elbow. With proper patient positioning and imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the osseous structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and can be used to evaluate the size, location, stability, and viability of the osteochondritis dissecans fragment. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early stress injury to the proximal ulna in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect radiographically occult fractures of the elbow in both children and adults. Magnetic resonance imaging is also useful in children to further evaluate elbow fractures which are detected on plain-film radiographs. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  10. Visual assessment of brain magnetic resonance imaging detects injury to cognitive regulatory sites in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Alan; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Fonarow, Gregg C; Harper, Ronald M; Woo, Mary A

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients exhibit depression and executive function impairments that contribute to HF mortality. Using specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis procedures, brain changes appear in areas regulating these functions (mammillary bodies, hippocampi, and frontal cortex). However, specialized MRI procedures are not part of standard clinical assessment for HF (which is usually a visual evaluation), and it is unclear whether visual MRI examination can detect changes in these structures. Using brain MRI, we visually examined the mammillary bodies and frontal cortex for global and hippocampi for global and regional tissue changes in 17 HF and 50 control subjects. Significantly global changes emerged in the right mammillary body (HF 1.18 ± 1.13 vs control 0.52 ± 0.74; P = .024), right hippocampus (HF 1.53 ± 0.94 vs control 0.80 ± 0.86; P = .005), and left frontal cortex (HF 1.76 ± 1.03 vs control 1.24 ± 0.77; P = .034). Comparison of the visual method with specialized MRI techniques corroborates right hippocampal and left frontal cortical, but not mammillary body, tissue changes. Visual examination of brain MRI can detect damage in HF in areas regulating depression and executive function, including the right hippocampus and left frontal cortex. Visual MRI assessment in HF may facilitate evaluation of injury to these structures and the assessment of the impact of potential treatments for this damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of ruptured coronary plaques in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H P Jansen

    Full Text Available X-ray coronary angiography (XCA is the current gold standard for the assessment of lumen encroaching coronary stenosis but XCA does not allow for early detection of rupture-prone vulnerable plaques, which are thought to be the precursor lesions of most acute myocardial infarctions (AMI and sudden death. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance coronary vessel wall imaging (CE-MRCVI for the detection of culprit lesions in the coronary arteries.16 patients (13 male, age 61.9±8.6 years presenting with sub-acute MI underwent CE-MRCVI within 24-72h prior to invasive XCA. CE-MRCVI was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo inversion recovery sequence (3D IR TFE 40±4 minutes following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA on a 3T MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel cardiac coil.14 patients were found to have culprit lesions (7x LAD, 1xLCX, 6xRCA as identified by XCA. Quantitative CE-MRCVI correctly identified the culprit lesion location with a sensitivity of 79% and excluded culprit lesion formation with a specificity of 99%. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR of culprit lesions (9.7±4.1 significantly exceeded CNR values of segments without culprit lesions (2.9±1.9, p<0.001.CE-MRCVI allows the selective visualization of culprit lesions in patients immediately after myocardial infarction (MI. The pronounced contrast uptake in ruptured plaques may represent a surrogate biomarker of plaque activity and/or vulnerability.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  14. Resonance detection of Moessbauer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The resonance detection method as compared with the usual method of registering Moessbauer spectra has a number of advantages, one of which is the increase of resolution of the Moessbauer spectrum. The method is based on the modulation of a secondary radiation of a converter tuned in the resonance with the Moessbauer gamma-quantum source. The resonance detection method with account of supression, secondary radiation outgoing from the converter is investigated. The converter represents a substrate enriched by the Moessbauer isotope placed either inside the gas counter, or coupled with any other detecting device. Analytical expressions for Moessbauer spectrum parameters: effect, area and width of the spectral line are derived. It is shown that the joint application of usual and resonance detection methods for registering the Moessbauer spectrum allows one to determine parameters of the source, converter and the investigated absorber

  15. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  16. Accuracy of CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography imaging to detect lesions preoperatively in patients undergoing surgery for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seastedt, Kenneth P; Trencheva, Koiana; Michelassi, Fabrizio; Alsaleh, Doaa; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Sonoda, Toyooki; Lee, Sang W; Nandakumar, Govind

    2014-12-01

    CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography have emerged as first-line imaging technologies for the evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in Crohn's disease. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of these imaging modalities to identify Crohn's disease lesions preoperatively. This was a retrospective chart review. The study was conducted at a single institution. Seventy-six patients with Crohn's disease with preoperative CT enterography and/or magnetic resonance enterography were included in the study. The number of stenoses, fistulas, and abscesses on CT enterography and/or magnetic resonance enterography before surgery were compared with operative findings. Forty patients (53%) were women, 46 (60%) underwent surgery for recurrent Crohn's disease, and 46 (57%) had previous abdominal surgery. Thirty-six (47%) had a preoperative CT enterography and 43 (57%) had a preoperative magnetic resonance enterography. CT enterography sensitivity was 75% for stenosis and 50% for fistula. MRE sensitivity was 68% for stenosis and 60% for fistula. The negative predictive values of CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography for stenosis were very low (54% and 65%) and were 85% and 81% for fistula. CT enterography had 76% accuracy for stenosis and 79% for fistula; magnetic resonance enterography had 78% accuracy for stenosis and 85% for fistula. Both were accurate for abscess. False-negative rates for CT enterography were 50% for fistula and 25% for stenosis. False-negative rates for magnetic resonance enterography were 40% for fistula and 32% for stenosis. Unexpected intraoperative findings led to modification of the planned surgical procedure in 20 patients (26%). This study was limited by its small sample size, its retrospective nature, and that some studies were performed at outside institutions. CT enterography and magnetic resonance enterography in patients with Crohn's disease were accurate for the identification of abscesses but not for

  17. Diagnostic Utility of US for Detecting Rotator Cuff Tears in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: With a good agreement with MRI, US was shown to be a highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality in detecting full-thickness RCTs for patients with RA who have shoulder pain, but appeared to have lower sensitivity in detecting partial-thickness RCTs compared with MRI.

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  5. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  6. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-12-22

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  7. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  8. Increased detection rate of syringomyelia by whole spine sagittal magnetic resonance images: Based on the data from military conscription of Korean young males

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Seok; Oh, Chang Hyun [Seoul Regional Military Manpower Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyeong Chun; Park, Chong Oon; Kim, Yeo Ju [Inha Univ. Hospital/College of Medicine/Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    We compared the detection rate of syringomyelia according to the type of magnetic resonance (MR) images among the Korean military conscription. Among the total of 238910 examinees (males aged 18 to 32 years old) from January 2008 to December 2011, the examinees with conventional single lesion MR images (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) with and without whole spine sagittal T2 weighted MR images (WSST2I) totaled 1206 cases, and syringomyelia was observed in 24 cases. The detection rate of syringomyelia according to the MR protocol (the presence of WSST2I or not) was done through analysis by annually and the clinical characters of syringomyelia was reviewed. The estimated prevalence of syringomyelia was approximately 10.0 cases per 100000 people. The detection rate was increased annually when the WSST2I proportion was increased (from 3.4 to 14.9 cases per 100000 persons, r = 0.939, p = 0.018). Clinical character of syringomyelia was ambiguous with other spinal diseases. The most affected spinal level was C5 to C7 (83%), and most cases were non communicating syringomyelia with benign central canal widening (79%). Whole spine sagittal MR image is useful to detect coexisting spinal diseases such as syringomyelia, and most syringomyelia in young males was benign hydromyelia. A whole spine sagittal MR image is recommended to increase the detection of syringomyelia.

  9. Assessing the Accuracy and Reliability of Root Crack and Fracture Detection in Teeth Using Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans, Tyler J.

    Introduction: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has the potential to aid in determining the presence and extent of cracks/fractures in teeth due to more advantageous contrast, without ionizing radiation. An MRI technique called Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT) has overcome many of the inherent difficulties of conventional MRI with detecting fast-relaxing signals from densely mineralized dental tissues. The objectives of this in vitro investigation were to develop MRI criteria for root crack/fracture identification in teeth and to establish intra- and inter-rater reliabilities and corresponding sensitivity and specificity values for the detection of tooth-root cracks/fractures in SWIFT MRI and limited field of view (FOV) CBCT. Materials and Methods: MRI-based criteria for crack/fracture appearance was developed by an MRI physicist and 6 dentists, including 3 endodontists and 1 Oral and Maxillofacial (OMF) radiologist. Twenty-nine human adult teeth previously extracted following clinical diagnosis by a board-certified endodontist of a root crack/fracture were frequency-matched to 29 non-cracked controls. Crack/fracture status confirmation was performed with magnified visual inspection, transillumination and vital staining. Samples were scanned with two 3D imaging modalities: 1) SWIFT MRI (10 teeth/scan) via a custom oral radiofrequency (RF) coil and a 90cm, 4-T magnet; 2) Limited FOV CBCT (1 tooth/scan) via a Carestream (CS) 9000 (Rochester, NY). Following a training period, a blinded 4-member panel (3 endodontists, 1 OMF radiologist) evaluated the images with a proportion randomly re-tested to establish intra-rater reliability. Overall observer agreement was measured using Cohen's kappa and levels of agreement judged using the criteria of Landis and Koch. Sensitivity and specificity were computed with 95% confidence interval (CI); statistical significance was set at alpha ≤ 0.05. Results: MRI-based crack/fracture criteria were defined as 1-2 sharply

  10. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  11. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  12. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)); Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A. (Dept. of Radiology of Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Ozturk, E. (Dept. of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Karatoprak, O. (Dept. of Orthopeadic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey))

    2009-02-15

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  13. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C.; Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A.; Ozturk, E.; Karatoprak, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  14. The value of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of the bleeding source in non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhages: a comparison with conventional digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummel, Nina; Lutz, Juergen; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Linn, Jennifer [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is currently regarded as the gold standard in detecting underlying vascular pathologies in patients with intracerebral haemorrhages (ICH). However, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic workup of ICHs has considerably increased in recent years. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and yield of MRI for the detection of the underlying aetiology in ICH patients. Sixty-seven consecutive patients with an acute ICH who underwent MRI (including magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DSA during their diagnostic workup) were included in the study. Magnetic resonance images were retrospectively analysed by two independent neuroradiologists to determine the localisation and cause of the ICH. DSA was used as a reference standard. In seven patients (10.4%), a DSA-positive vascular aetiology was present (one aneurysm, four arteriovenous malformations, one dural arteriovenous fistula and one vasculitis). All of these cases were correctly diagnosed by both readers on MRI. In addition, MRI revealed the following probable bleeding causes in 39 of the 60 DSA-negative patients: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (17), cavernoma (9), arterial hypertension (8), haemorrhagic transformation of an ischaemic infarction (3) and malignant brain tumour with secondary ICH (2). Performing MRI with MRA proved to be an accurate diagnostic tool in detecting vascular malformations in patients with ICH. In addition, MRI provided valuable information regarding DSA-negative ICH causes, and thus had a high diagnostic yield in ICH patients. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axel, L

    1989-01-01

    The basis principles of MRI are reviewed in order to understand how blood flow effects arise in conventional imaging. Then some of the ways these effects have ben used in MRI techniques specifically designed for vascular imaging, are considered. (author)

  16. Identification of threshold prostate specific antigen levels to optimize the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer by magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A; George, Arvin K; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Prostate cancer upgrading with targeted biopsy increases

  17. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  2. Cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging versus ultrasound for the detection of symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Guja, Kip E; Subhas, Naveen; Virk, Mandeep S; Gold, Heather T

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound-based imaging strategies in the evaluation of a hypothetical population with a symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (FTST) tear using formal cost-effectiveness analysis. A decision analytic model from the health care system perspective for 60-year-old patients with symptoms secondary to a suspected FTST tear was used to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of 3 imaging strategies during a 2-year time horizon: MRI, ultrasound, and ultrasound followed by MRI. Comprehensive literature search and expert opinion provided data on cost, probability, and quality of life estimates. The primary effectiveness outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) through 2 years, with a willingness-to-pay threshold set to $100,000/QALY gained (2016 U.S. dollars). Costs and health benefits were discounted at 3%. Ultrasound was the least costly strategy ($1385). MRI was the most effective (1.332 QALYs). Ultrasound was the most cost-effective strategy but was not dominant. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for MRI was $22,756/QALY gained, below the willingness-to-pay threshold. Two-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated that MRI was favored over the other imaging strategies over a wide range of reasonable costs. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, MRI was the preferred imaging strategy in 78% of the simulations. MRI and ultrasound represent cost-effective imaging options for evaluation of the patient thought to have a symptomatic FTST tear. The results indicate that MRI is the preferred strategy based on cost-effectiveness criteria, although the decision between MRI and ultrasound for an imaging center is likely to be dependent on additional factors, such as available resources and workflow. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostate resonance imaging: morphology and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocantos, Jorge A.; Pietrani, Marcelo A.; Paganini, Lisandro

    2007-01-01

    The cancer of prostate is the most frequent neoplasms and the third cause of death in men, although the average of survival of patients it improved, the cancer of prostate is an important problem in health. The majority of these tumors are of slow growth and the early detection allows high probabilities of definitive treatment. The neoplasms of prostate detected at present are smaller than the detected ones 20 years ago behind, nevertheless exist big differences in the aggressiveness of these tumors. The images are very important in the management of prostate cancer, and the magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate is a new tool in the evaluation of prostate cancer [es

  4. Detection of early osteoarthritis in the centrodistal joints of Icelandic horses: Evaluation of radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, C J; Björnsdóttir, S; Ekman, S; Boyde, A; Hansson, K

    2016-01-01

    Validated noninvasive detection methods for early osteoarthritis (OA) are required for OA prevention and early intervention treatment strategies. To evaluate radiography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of early stage OA osteochondral lesions in equine centrodistal joints using microscopy as the reference standard. Prospective imaging of live horses and imaging and microscopy of cadaver tarsal joints. Centrodistal (distal intertarsal) joints of 38 Icelandic research horses aged 27-29 months were radiographed. Horses were subjected to euthanasia approximately 2 months later and cadaver joints examined with low-field MRI. Osteochondral joint specimens were classified as negative or positive for OA using light microscopy histology or scanning electron microscopy. Radiographs and MRIs were evaluated for osteochondral lesions and results compared with microscopy. Forty-two joints were classified OA positive with microscopy. Associations were detected between microscopic OA and the radiography lesion categories; mineralisation front defect (Pradiography and low-field MRI pooled lesion categories, but radiography was often superior when individual lesion categories were compared. Early stage centrodistal joint OA changes may be detected with radiography and low-field MRI. Detection of mineralisation front defects in radiographs may be a useful screening method for detection of early OA in centrodistal joints of young Icelandic horses. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  5. An automatic method for detection and classification of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonances using signal and image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggan, Ciaran

    2014-05-01

    Induction coils permit us to measure the very rapid changes of the magnetic field. In June 2012, the British Geological Survey Geomagnetism team installed two high frequency (100 Hz) induction coil magnetometers at the Eskdalemuir Observatory (55.3° N, 3.2° W, L~3), in the Scottish Borders of the United Kingdom. The Eskdalemuir Observatory is one of the longest running geophysical sites in the UK (beginning operation in 1908) and is located in a rural valley with a quiet magnetic environment. The coils record magnetic field changes over an effective frequency range of about 0.1-40Hz, and encompass phenomena such as the Schumann resonances, magnetospheric pulsations and Ionospheric Alfvén Resonances (IAR). In this study we focus on the IAR, which are related to the vibration of magnetic field lines passing through the ionosphere, believed to be mainly excited by lower atmospheric electrical discharges. The IAR typically manifest as a series of spectral resonances structures (SRS) within the 1-6Hz frequency range, usually appearing a fine bands or fringes in spectrogram plots. The SRS tend to occur daily between 18.00-06.00UT at the Eskdalemuir site, disappearing during the daylight hours. They usually start as a single low frequency before bifurcating into 5-10 separate fringes, increasing in frequency until around midnight. The fringes also widen in frequency before fading around 06.00UT. Occasionally, the fringes decrease in frequency slightly around 03.00UT before fading. In order to quantify the daily, seasonal and annual changes of the SRS, we developed a new method to identify the fringes and to quantify their occurrence in frequency (f) and the change in frequency (Δf). The method uses short time-series of 100 seconds to produce an FFT spectral plot from which the non-stationary peaks are identified using the residuals from a best-fit six order spline. This is repeated for an entire day of data. The peaks from each time-slice are placed into a matrix

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence ...

  7. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian [Department of Surgery, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Jiang Biao, E-mail: wuyulian@medmail.com.c, E-mail: yulianwu2003@yahoo.c [Department of Radiology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2009-09-09

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet {beta}-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into {beta}-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  8. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian; Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren; Jiang Biao

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet β-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into β-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, A.; Bielke, G.; Bockenheimer, S.; Brenner, G.; Dieringer, H.; Esswein, H.; Hopf, H.; Koch, H.; Meves, M.; Nagel, F.; Oberstein, A.; Ostheimer, E.; Pfaff, M.; Schlaps, D.; Schopka, H.J.; Seiderer, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study investigates three points of main interest: (1) The clinical efficacy of MR imaging as a routine method, if possible to be assessed in comparison to comparable imaging methods, and referring to a broad spectrum of available types of equipment and modes of operation, to be expressed in terms of diagnostic value and indication of therapy. (2) Specific economic aspects, considering different sites of operation and application conditions. (3) Results of clinical application with regard to individual cases (patient careers), in order to establish a nationwide basis for economic cost-benefit assessment of this diagnostic tool. Another aspect taken into account whenever available data allow so, is substitutional or additional application of MR imaging. The survey is performed on the basis of data accumulated by more than 21.000 MR examinations, and of data describing the application environment, furnished by 25 users from university hospitals, general hospitals, or private practice. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Adam, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of open configuration MR imaging systems, the vision of MRI-based guidance, control, and monitoring of minimally invasive interventions has evolved from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the very exciting emerging field of interventional MRI. The international authorship provides firsthand experience of all relevant topics. This book will familiarize the reader with the basic principles underlying currently available hardware and software configurations. In addition, technical aspects of thermosensitive imaging, techniques for instrument visualization, and safety aspects are covered. Finally, the book emphasizes both existing and future clinical applications. (orig.)

  11. Activation of lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging in normal subjects and in patients with visual disturbance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Atsushi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

    2002-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during visual stimulation can detect regional cerebral blood flow changes that reflect neural activity in the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex, which are major relay points in the human afferent visual system. FMRI has been used in the clinical evaluation of visual disorders such as homonymous hemianopia and unilateral eye diseases (optic neuritis, amblyopia, and so on). Future development in the data acquisition and data analysis may facilitate the use of fMRI for the management of patients with visual deficits and understanding of the visual disorders. (author)

  12. Activation of lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging in normal subjects and in patients with visual disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during visual stimulation can detect regional cerebral blood flow changes that reflect neural activity in the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex, which are major relay points in the human afferent visual system. FMRI has been used in the clinical evaluation of visual disorders such as homonymous hemianopia and unilateral eye diseases (optic neuritis, amblyopia, and so on). Future development in the data acquisition and data analysis may facilitate the use of fMRI for the management of patients with visual deficits and understanding of the visual disorders. (author)

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    is Professor of Chemistry at. IIT Madras. ... speeding up the CW imaging by special novel methods. How- ever, the ... presence of gradients which are applied in two or three dimen- sions and ... optics and mechanical engineer- ing stands for ...

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomsdorf, H.; Imme, M.; Jensen, D.; Kunz, D.; Menhardt, W.; Ottenberg, K.; Roeschmann, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Tschendel, O.; Wieland, J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1 H and 13 C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs [de

  15. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  16. Asymptomatic cerebrovascular lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus lacking a history of neuropsychiatric events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Kumiko; Yamano, Shigeru; Ikeda, Yukiko [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-10-01

    To clarify the extent of asymptomatic cerebrovascular involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and ultrasonography findings of 100 patients with SLE lacking present or past clinical neurologic deficits were compared with 66 age-matched volunteers to determine the combined intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery, and tests for anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL). Thirty-eight patients, but only 2 controls, showed imaging abnormalities. Among 23 SLE patients with cerebrovascular lesions by MRI who underwent single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), 14 showed hypoperfusion of the lesion. The IMT value and prevalence of aCL did not differ between the 55 SLE patients tested and controls. SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) as assessed by a quantitative clinical index was significantly greater in patients with brain lesions than in those without. The prevalence of asymptomatic brain lesions in SLE patients is high, and shows a relationship to disease activity. (author)

  17. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-10-24

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included the conjugation of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water-soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH-titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate-to-polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM(-1) s(-1). GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor-bearing mice 2 h postinjection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Detection of adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas by magnetic resonance imaging in children and adolescents with cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Dalia; Courkoutsakis, Nickolas A; Oldfield, Edward H; Griffin, Kurt J; Keil, Meg; Patronas, Nickolas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2005-09-01

    We recently showed that pre- and postcontrast spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady-state (SPGR) was superior to conventional pre- and postcontrast T-1 weighted spin echo (SE) acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnostic evaluation of pituitary tumors in adult patients. The present investigation assessed the use of SPGR vs. SE-MRI in the diagnostic evaluation of ACTH-secreting tumors in children and adolescents with Cushing disease. Data were analyzed retrospectively from a series of patients seen over 7 yr (1997-2004). The setting for this study was a tertiary care referral center. Thirty children with Cushing disease (13 females and 17 males with a mean age of 12 +/- 3 yr) were studied. Imaging results were compared with surgical and pathological findings and the clinical outcome. Twenty-eight patients had microadenomas, and two had macroadenomas; the latter were identified by both MRI techniques. Precontrast SE and SPGR-MRI identified four and six of the microadenomas, respectively. Postcontrast SPGR-MRI identified the location of the tumor in 18 of 28 patients, whereas postcontrast SE-MRI identified the location and accurately estimated the size of the tumor in only five patients (P children and adolescents with Cushing disease. Postcontrast SPGR-MRI was superior to SE-MRI and should be used in addition to conventional SE-MRI in the pituitary evaluation of children and adolescents with suspected Cushing disease.

  19. Biodegradable human serum albumin nanoparticles as contrast agents for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watcharin, Waralee; Schmithals, Christian; Pleli, Thomas; Köberle, Verena; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Huebner, Frank; Zeuzem, Stefan; Korf, Hans W; Vogl, Thomas J; Rittmeyer, Claudia; Terfort, Andreas; Piiper, Albrecht; Gelperina, Svetlana; Kreuter, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Tumor visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle-based contrast agents may improve the imaging of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In particular, human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles appear to be a suitable carrier due to their safety and feasibility of functionalization. In the present study HSA nanoparticles were conjugated with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) using carbodiimide chemistry. The nanoparticles had a uniform spherical shape and a diameter of 235±19nm. For better optical visualization in vitro and in vivo, the HSA-Gd nanoparticles were additionally labeled with rhodamine 123. As shown by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the fluorescent nanoparticles were readily taken up by Huh-7 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. After 24h incubation in blood serum, less than 5% of the Gd(III) was released from the particles, which suggests that this nanoparticulate system may be stable in vivo and, therefore, may serve as potentially safe T1 MRI contrast agent for MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  2. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  5. Brain Imaging Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Simrun; Prete, Braedan R J; Wade, Alanna; Hane, Francis T; Albert, Mitchell S

    2018-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129 Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a novel iteration of traditional MRI that relies on detecting the spins of 1 H. Since 129 Xe is a gaseous signal source, it can be used for lung imaging. Additionally, 129 Xe dissolves in the blood stream and can therefore be detectable in the brain parenchyma and vasculature. In this work, we provide detailed information on the protocols that we have developed to image 129 Xe within the brains of both rodents and human subjects. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  7. Dual contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the liver with superparamagnetic iron oxide followed by gadolinium for lesion detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaska, Samantha; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Saini, Sanjay; Hahn, Peter F.; Halpern, Elkan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Iron oxide contrast agents are useful for lesion detection, and extracellular gadolinium chelates are advocated for lesion characterization. We undertook a study to determine if dual contrast enhanced liver imaging with sequential use of ferumoxides particles and gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA can be performed in the same imaging protocol. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen patients underwent dual contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver for evaluation of known/suspected focal lesions which included, metastases (n = 5), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC;n = 3), cholangiocharcinoma(n = 1) and focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH;n = 3). Pre- and post-iron oxide T1-weighted gradient recalled echo (GRE) and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) sequences were obtained, followed by post-Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) multi-phase dynamic T1-weighted out-of-phase GRE imaging. Images were analysed in a blinded fashion by three experts using a three-point scoring system for lesion conspicuity on pre- and post-iron oxide T1 images as well as for reader's confidence in characterizing liver lesions on post Gd-DTPA T1 images. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference in lesion conspicuity was observed on pre- and post-iron oxide T1-GRE images in this small study cohort. The presence of iron oxide did not appreciably diminish image quality of post-gadolinium sequences and did not prevent characterization of liver lesions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that characterization of focal liver lesion with Gd-enhanced liver MRI is still possible following iron oxide enhanced imaging. Kubaska, S. et al. (2001)

  8. Brain abnormalities detected on magnetic resonance imaging of amphetamine users presenting to an emergency department: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatovich, Daniel M; McCoubrie, David L; Song, Swithin J; Rosen, David M; Lawn, Nick D; Daly, Frank F

    2010-09-06

    To determine the prevalence of occult brain abnormalities in magnetic resonance imaging of active amphetamine users. Prospective convenience study in a tertiary hospital emergency department (ED). Patients presenting to the ED for an amphetamine-related reason were eligible for inclusion. We collected demographic data, drug use data, and performed a mini-mental state examination (MMSE). The proportion of patients with an abnormality on their MRI scan. Of 38 patients enrolled, 30 had MRI scans. Nineteen were male and their mean age was 26.7 +/- 5.4 years (range 19-41 years). The mean age of first amphetamine use was 18 years (range 13-26 years). Sixteen patients used crystal methamphetamine (mean amount 2.5 g/week), nine used amphetamine ("speed") (mean amount 2.9 g/week), and 23 used ecstasy (mean amount 2.3 tablets/week). Marijuana was smoked by 26 (mean amount 5.9 g/week), and 28 drank alcohol (mean amount 207 g/week). The median MMSE score was 27/30 (interquartile range, 26-29). Abnormalities on brain MRI scans were identified in six patients, most commonly an unidentified bright object (n = 4). In this pilot study of brain MRI of young people attending the ED with an amphetamine-related presentation, one in five had an occult brain lesion. While the significance of this is uncertain, it is congruent with evidence that amphetamines cause brain injury.

  9. Detection and characteristics of microvascular obstruction in reperfused acute myocardial infarction using an optimized protocol for contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Passos, Valeria Lima; Waltenberger, Johannes; Crijns, Harry J.G.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Backes, Walter H.; Snoep, Gabriel [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kim, Raymond J. [Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, PO Box 3934, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Several cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) techniques are used to detect microvascular obstruction (MVO) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine the prevalence of MVO and gain more insight into the dynamic changes in appearance of MVO, we studied 84 consecutive patients with a reperfused AMI on average 5 and 104 days after admission, using an optimised single breath-hold 3D inversion recovery gradient echo pulse sequence (IR-GRE) protocol. Early MVO (2 min post-contrast) was detected in 53 patients (63%) and late MVO (10 min post-contrast) in 45 patients (54%; p = 0.008). The extent of MVO decreased from early to late imaging (4.3 {+-} 3.2% vs. 1.8 {+-} 1.8%, p < 0.001) and showed a heterogeneous pattern. At baseline, patients without MVO (early and late) had a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) than patients with persistent late MVO (56 {+-} 7% vs. 48 {+-} 7%, p < 0.001) and LVEF was intermediate in patients with early MVO but late MVO disappearance (54 {+-} 6%). During follow-up, LVEF improved in all three subgroups but remained intermediate in patients with late MVO disappearance. This optimised single breath-hold 3D IR-GRE technique for imaging MVO early and late after contrast administration is fast, accurate and allows detection of patients with intermediate remodelling at follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected adaptation and pathology in the distal condyles of the third metacarpus, associated with lateral condylar fracture in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Parkin, T D H; Murray, R C

    2012-11-01

    Lateral condylar (LC) fractures of the third metacarpus (McIII) are a common reason for euthanasia in racehorses, and may be the result of repetitive overloading or cumulative pathological change. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows monitoring of bone and cartilage to detect pathological and adaptive changes that may be precursors of fracture. To describe bone and cartilage MRI features in the distal condyles of McIII of Thoroughbred racehorses, with and without condylar fracture. 1) A greater degree of bone and cartilage adaptation or pathology will be seen in fractured McIIIs compared with their respective contralateral McIIIs. 2) Contralateral McIIIs will have a greater degree of bone and cartilage adaptation or pathology than McIIIs from control horses that did not sustain a LC fracture. The McIIIs from 96 horses subjected to euthanasia at racecourses were divided into 3 groups: Group 1: nonfractured bones from horses without LC fracture; Group 2: nonfractured bones from horses with unilateral LC fracture; and Group 3: fractured bones from horses with unilateral LC fracture. The MR images were examined and graded for bone and cartilage changes. Nine percent of Group 1 (n = 9) and 11% of Group 2 bones (n = 5) had incomplete LC fractures. Focal palmar necrosis was most frequently detected in bones from Group 1 (12%) compared with Groups 2 (9%) and 3 (4%). The prevalence of bone and/or cartilage abnormalities tended to increase from Group 1 to Group 2 to Group 3. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to detect cartilage and bone changes that may be associated with LC fracture. There was no significant difference in bone/cartilage changes between bones from Groups 1 and 2, despite increased pathology in Group 2 bones. Periodic monitoring of bone and/or cartilage changes in distal McIII of Thoroughbred racehorses may help to prevent catastrophic LC fractures. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  14. Rapid magnetic resonance imaging protocol for detecting femoral head avascular necrosis: A case series-it′s utility in the general population in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sanjay Khaladkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is an increasing cause of musculoskeletal disability, common among the younger population, between the third and fifth decade of life, affecting mainly men, thereby requiring prompt diagnosis and early intervention. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to formulate a limited magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examination protocol for detection of avascular necrosis (AVN in clinically suspected cases that can be performed rapidly and will be inexpensive. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients suspected clinically and or on conventional radiography for AVN of the femoral head were referred for MRI hip. MRI hip was done on 1.5 T Siemens Avanto. Of 45, 36 were detected to have AVN (total 58 hips, whereas 9 did not have AVN on MRI. Initially, coronal T1-weighted image (T1WI sequence was obtained as limited MRI protocol, followed by complete MRI examination. Results: Maximum patients belonged to age group 31-40 (30.5%. 32 (88.88% patients were males and 4 (11.11% were females. Bilateral AVN was detected in 44 (61.1% and unilateral in 14 patients (38.8%. Pre collapsed stage (Stages I and II was detected in 18 hips (31.03%, collapsed stage (Stages III and IV was detected in 40 hips (68.9%. Peripheral low-intensity rim was seen on T1WI in all 58 cases of AVN. Double line sign on T2-weighted image was seen in 33/58 (56.8%. Conclusion: Our study concluded that coronal T1W sequence is an easy, rapid and cost-effective method of detecting unilateral or bilateral AVN.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  17. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  18. Comparative Study of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Detection of Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Untreated Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Hoon Ryu, Y.; Yun, M.J.; Suh, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The presence and extent of osteolytic bone lesions in untreated patients with multiple myeloma are important factors in the staging of the disease, and the extent of bone lesions in multiple myeloma cases significantly influences decisions regarding therapy. Recently, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to detect bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of FDG-PET and MRI for the detection of bone marrow infiltration into the spine in untreated patients with multiple myeloma. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients with multiple myeloma underwent both FDG-PET and spine MRI. The examined spinal regions by MRI included 21 thoracic and lumbar spines, one lumbar spine, and 12 cervical spines. The following imaging sequences were performed: T1-weighted spin-echo MRI with and without fat suppression, and T2-weighted spin-echo MRI in the sagittal plane. In the patients with bone marrow abnormalities, an additional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo MR image and a fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo MR image were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of the criteria defined by Durie and Salmon: stage I (n=9), stage II (n=3), and stage III (n=10). The number and location of lesions detected in both FGD-PET and MRI were recorded, and the lesions were compared using the McNemar test. Bone marrow biopsy results, the patient's clinical examinations, and other imaging findings (MRI, FDG-PET, etc.) were used as references. Results: In stages I and II (37 lesions in 12 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 78% (29 of 37 lesions) and 86% (32 of 37 lesions), respectively. However, the difference between the abilities of FDG-PET and MRI to detect lesions was not statistically significant (P=0.317). In stage III (101 lesions in 10 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 80% (81 of 101 lesions) and 92

  19. Comparative Study of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Detection of Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Untreated Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Hoon Ryu, Y.; Yun, M.J.; Suh, J.S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Research Inst. of Radiological Science, and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-05-15

    Background: The presence and extent of osteolytic bone lesions in untreated patients with multiple myeloma are important factors in the staging of the disease, and the extent of bone lesions in multiple myeloma cases significantly influences decisions regarding therapy. Recently, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to detect bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of FDG-PET and MRI for the detection of bone marrow infiltration into the spine in untreated patients with multiple myeloma. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients with multiple myeloma underwent both FDG-PET and spine MRI. The examined spinal regions by MRI included 21 thoracic and lumbar spines, one lumbar spine, and 12 cervical spines. The following imaging sequences were performed: T1-weighted spin-echo MRI with and without fat suppression, and T2-weighted spin-echo MRI in the sagittal plane. In the patients with bone marrow abnormalities, an additional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo MR image and a fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo MR image were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of the criteria defined by Durie and Salmon: stage I (n=9), stage II (n=3), and stage III (n=10). The number and location of lesions detected in both FGD-PET and MRI were recorded, and the lesions were compared using the McNemar test. Bone marrow biopsy results, the patient's clinical examinations, and other imaging findings (MRI, FDG-PET, etc.) were used as references. Results: In stages I and II (37 lesions in 12 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 78% (29 of 37 lesions) and 86% (32 of 37 lesions), respectively. However, the difference between the abilities of FDG-PET and MRI to detect lesions was not statistically significant (P=0.317). In stage III (101 lesions in 10 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 80% (81 of 101 lesions) and

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in ... is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... part of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal ... to: detect a variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with ...

  3. Structural lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in the spine of patients with spondyloarthritis - definitions, assessment system, and reference image set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Maksymowych, Walter P; Pedersen, Susanne J

    2009-01-01

    are assessed at each vertebral endplate at all 23 spinal levels from C2/3 to L5/S1, whereas facet joint lesions are to be assessed by segmental level (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar). CONCLUSION: An anatomy-based set of definitions and an assessment system for structural lesions in the spine of patients......OBJECTIVE: There is no reliable and sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment system for structural lesions in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). We sought to develop and illustrate a detailed anatomy-based set of MRI definitions and an assessment system for structural lesions...... in the spine of patients with SpA. METHODS: MRI definitions of different structural ("chronic") lesions at various anatomical locations in the spine, and an accompanying assessment system, were agreed by consensus within the Canada-Denmark MRI working group. Subsequently, a reference image set...

  4. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected tumor response for locally advanced rectal cancer predicts survival outcomes: MERCURY experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday B; Taylor, Fiona; Blomqvist, Lennart; George, Christopher; Evans, Hywel; Tekkis, Paris; Quirke, Philip; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Moran, Brendan; Heald, Richard; Guthrie, Ashley; Bees, Nicola; Swift, Ian; Pennert, Kjell; Brown, Gina

    2011-10-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study. In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics. On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes. MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

  6. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: usefulness of diffusion sequences in detecting postembolization ischemia in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, E; Ocantos, J; Kohan, A; Kisilevsky, N; Napoli, N; García-Mónaco, R

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the usefulness of diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) sequences before and after prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We analyzed MR studies done before (7-10 days) and after (30 days) PAE in 19 patients with BPH treated with PAE between June 2012 and December 2013. We used 1.5 Tesla scanners with body surface coils. In pre-PAE MR studies, we recorded mean b40 values and minimum (min) and maximum (max) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. In post-PAE MR studies, we recorded b40, b400, and b1000 values and min, mean, and max ADC values. We compared diffusion behavior/ADC before and after PAE and areas without ischemia. We correlated these with decreased prostatic volume (PV). We identified ischemia with contrast in 8 (42.1%) patients. No significant difference was found in mean b40 (p= 0.1650) or in the b40 ratio (p= 0.8868) between patients with ischemia and those without before PAE. Min b40, b40 ratio, and min ADC values differed significantly between ischemic areas and nonischemic areas within patients [p= 0.048 (b40min and ratio) and p= 0.002 (min ADC)]. No significant correlation was found between the percentage decrease in PV and mean b40 (p= 0.8490) or b40 ratio (p=0.8573). Post-PAE ischemia generates objective changes in diffusion and ADC values that enable ischemic sectors to be differentiated from nonischemic sectors. Future studies should analyze whether it is possible to subjectively differentiate between these areas through the visualization of nonischemic sectors and the feasibility of replacing them with contrast to detect ischemia. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Repair of the Zone of Calcified Cartilage with Osteoarthritis through Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Ultrashort Echo Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Li, Shao-Lin; Ma, Ya-Jun; de Tal, Vicki; Li, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Hua

    2018-05-05

    Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality for observing the growth and development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after in vivo transplantation to treat osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is a challenge to accurately monitor the treatment effects of MSCs in the zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) with OA. This is especially true in the physiological and biochemical views that are not accurately detected by MRI contrast agents. In contrast, ultrashort time echo (UTE) MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. A special focus is given to the outlook of the use of UTE MRI to detect repair of the ZCC with OA through MSCs. The limitations of the current techniques for clinical applications and future directions are also discussed. Using the combined keywords: "osteoarthritis", "mesenchymal stem cells", "calcified cartilage", and "magnetic resonance imaging", the PubMed/MEDLINE literature search was conducted up to June 1, 2017. A total of 132 published articles were initially identified citations. Of the 132 articles, 48 articles were selected after further detailed review. This study referred to all the important English literature in full. In contrast, UTE MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. The current studies showed that the ZCC could be described in terms of its histomorphology and biochemistry by UTE MRI. We prospected that UTE MRI has been shown the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs in vivo.

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging combined with T2-weighted images in the detection of small breast cancer: a single-center multi-observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Chen, Jie; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Hai-Yan; Xu, Jian-Rong; Hua, Jia

    2014-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. However, it remains a difficult diagnosis problem to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, especially in small early breast lesions. To assess the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) combined with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for small breast cancer characterization. Fifty-eight patients (65 lesions) with a lesion breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including DWI and histological analysis. Three observers with varying experience levels reviewed MRI. The probability of breast cancer in each lesion on MR images was recorded with a 5-point scale. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were compared by using the Z test; sensitivity and specificity were determined with the Z test after adjusting for data clustering. AUC of T2WI and DWI (Observer 1, 0.95; Observer 2, 0.91; Observer 3, 0.83) was greater than that of T2WI (Observer 1, 0.80; Observer 2, 0.74; Observer 3, 0.70) for all observers (P breast cancer characterization. It should be considered selectively in the preoperative evaluation of patients with small lesions of the breast.

  9. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 2-Hydroxyglutarate Detection by Short Echo Time Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Routine Imaging Study of Brain Glioma at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisi, Girolamo; Filice, Silvano; Michiara, Maria; Crafa, Pellegrino; Lana, Silvia

    The objective of this study was to assess the effective performance of short echo time magnetic resonance spectroscopy (short TE MRS) for 2HG detection as biomarker of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) status in all grade glioma (GL). A total of 82 GL patients were prospectively investigated by short TE MRS at 3.0 T as part of a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study protocol. Spectral analysis was performed using linear combination model. Tumor specimens were diagnosed as IDH mutant or wild type according to the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of brain tumors. Spectra were analyzed for the presence of 2HG. The performance of short TE MRS was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratio on the overall sample and on GL WHO grades II and III and glioblastoma separately. The specificity and sensitivity estimated on the overall sample were 88% and 77%, respectively. In GL WHO grades II and III, 100% specificity and 75% sensitivity were estimated. We reiterate the feasibility to identify IDH status of brain GL using short TE MRS at 3.0 T. The method can correctly detect 2HG as expression of IDH mutation in WHO grades II and III GL with a 100% specificity but a 75% sensitivity. In the evaluation of glioblastoma, short TE MRS performs poorly having a 17% false positive rate.

  11. Possibilities of contrast-free magnetic resonance perfusion imaging for the detection of early brain damage in essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Ostroumova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial spin labeling (ASL is a promising non-invasive method to assess cerebral perfusion, which identifies a decrease in cerebral blood flow (CBF.Objective: to assess cerebral perfusion in middle-aged untreated patients with uncomplicated grade 1–2 hypertension compared to same-age healthy controls.Patients and methods. 33 patients with essential hypertension and 40 healthy individuals (a control group at the age of 40–59 years were examined. 24-hour blood pressure (BP monitoring and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed in different modes (T1 MPRAGE, T2 TSE, T2 FLAIR, DTI, and ASL.Results. White matter hyperintensive changes were found in 7.5% of the healthy individuals and in 51.5% of the hypertensive patients (p = 0.0002. In hypertensive patients, CBF in the cortical plate of anterior frontal regions was significantly (p < 0.001 lower than that in the controls: right CBF, 39.1±5.6 and 45.8±3.2 ml/100 g/min, respectively; left CBF, 39.2±6.2 and 45.2±3.6 ml/100 g/min, respectively. In hypertensive patients with white matter hyperintensive changes, CBF was significantly lower than that in the controls: right CBF, 38.5±5.9 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0001; left CBF, 39.2±6.7 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.002, and in those without these changes, right CBF was 39.5±5.1 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0002; left CBF was 38.9±4.3 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.00002. Correlation analysis revealed significant inverse correlations of CBF with BP and systolic BP variability.Conclusion. Lower cerebral perfusion occurs in middle-aged untreated patients with uncomplicated grade 1–2 hypertension even in the absence of white matter hyperintensity foci. 

  12. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  13. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  14. Smart Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-01-01

    By visualizing bioactive molecules or biological parameters in vivo, molecular imaging is searching for information at the molecular level in living organisms. In addition to contributing to earlier and more personalized diagnosis in medicine, it also helps understand and rationalize the molecular factors underlying physiological and pathological processes. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complexes of paramagnetic metal ions, mostly lanthanides, are commonly used to enhance the intrinsic image contrast. They rely either on the relaxation effect of these metal chelates (T(1) agents), or on the phenomenon of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST agents). In both cases, responsive molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes can be designed to report on various biomarkers of biological interest. In this context, we review recent work in the literature and from our group on responsive T(1) and PARACEST MRI agents for the detection of biogenic metal ions (such as calcium or zinc), enzymatic activities, or neurotransmitter release. These examples illustrate the general strategies that can be applied to create molecular imaging agents with an MRI detectable response to biologically relevant parameters.

  15. Impact of low signal intensity assessed by cine magnetic resonance imaging on detection of poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Orii, Makoto; Hirata, Kumiko; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-05-13

    Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) has been established as a modality to detect myocardial infarction (MI). However, the use of gadolinium contrast is limited in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. Although the signal intensity (SI) of infarct area assessed by cine MRI is low in some patients with prior MI, the prevalence and clinical significance of low SI has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how low SI assessed by cine MRI may relate to the myocardial viability in patients with prior MI. Fifty patients with prior MI underwent both cine MRI and LGE-MRI. The left ventricle was divided into 17 segments. The presence of low SI and the wall motion score (WMS) of each segment were assessed by cine MRI. The transmural extent of infarction was evaluated by LGE-MRI. LGE was detected in 329 of all 850 segments (39%). The low SI assessed by cine MRI was detected in 105 of 329 segments with LGE (32%). All segments with low SI had LGE. Of all 329 segments with LGE, the segments with low SI showed greater transmural extent of infarction (78 [72 - 84] % versus 53 [38 - 72] %, P cine MRI may be effective for detecting poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior MI.

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie G; Itte, Vinay; Rankine, James J; Ridgway, John P; Bourke, Grainne

    2018-03-01

    Identification of root avulsions is of critical importance in traumatic brachial plexus injuries because it alters the reconstruction and prognosis. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging is gaining popularity, but there is limited and conflicting data on its diagnostic accuracy for root avulsion. This cohort study describes consecutive patients requiring brachial plexus exploration following trauma between 2008 and 2016. The index test was magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla and the reference test was operative exploration of the supraclavicular plexus. Complete data from 29 males was available. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 79%. The diagnostic accuracy of a pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 68%. We conclude that pseudomeningocoles were not a reliable sign of root avulsion and magnetic resonance imaging has modest diagnostic accuracy for root avulsions in the context of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries. III.

  17. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  18. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  1. Ultrasensitive and selective gold film-based detection of mercury (II) in tap water using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Ge, Jiechao; Wu, Jiasheng; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pengfei

    2013-09-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01ng/ml for Hg(2+) ions in ultrapure and tap water based on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg(2+)-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg(2+) ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. The coefficients obtained for ultrapure and tap water were 0.99902 and 0.99512, respectively, for the linear part over a range of 0.01-100ng/ml. The results show that the double-effect sensor has potential for practical applications with ultra sensitivity and selectivity, especially in online or real-time monitoring of Hg(2+) ions pollution in tap water with the further improvement of portable LSCI-SPR instrument. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  4. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S. [Academic Medical Center (AMC), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-02-15

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  5. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S.

    2018-01-01

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.B.; Herkes, G.K.; Frith, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  8. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  9. Bone Single Photon Emission/Computed Tomography in the Detection of Sacroiliitis in Seronegative Spondyloarthritis: A Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros Pipikos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA is characterized by chronic inflammation affecting the axial skeleton, entheses and occasionally peripheral joints. The involvement of the sacroiliac joints, sacroiliitis, is considered as a pathognomonic radiographic finding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the method of choice for its early detection. Bone scintigraphy (BS is characterized by high sensitivity in the diagnosis of bone and articular diseases. Limited value of BS in the diagnosis of sacroiliitis may be attributed to the use of planar imaging. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of SPECT in SpA, compared to MRI. Methods: Forty-three patients suffering from inflammatory back pain underwent MRI evaluation of the sacroiliac joints and BS, combined with SPECT in the same region, for the assessment of sacroiliitis. Results: Bone SPECT revealed no findings of sacroiliitis in 11 patients, with total agreement with MRI. Findings of chronic lesions were demonstrated from both modalities in 2 patients. Bone SPECT and MRI findings were in concordance regarding the investigation of active sacroiliitis, with the exception of one patient with mild SPECT findings and negative MRI examination; the diagnosis of AS however, was established one year later, after a positive follow-up MRI. The evaluation of the planar imaging of the whole skeleton and SPECT imaging, revealed additional lesions. Conclusion: Bone SPECT is a reliable imaging method in the diagnosis of active sacroiliitis. Its application on planar BS, an economic and widely available diagnostic technique, appears to be a valuable aid for the clinician.

  10. Efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with the sensitivity encoding technique versus dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, Seishi; Okada, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi; Uemura, Masahiko; Haraikawa, Toyoaki; Hirata, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Kim, Tonsok

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the sensitivity encoding technique (SENSE dynamic MRI) for detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison with double arterial phase dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography (dynamic MDCT). A total of 28 patients with 66 hypervascular HCCs underwent both double arterial SENSE dynamic MRI and dynamic MDCT. The diagnosis of HCC was based on surgical resection (n=7), biopsy (n=10), or a combination of CT during arterial portography (CTAP), CT during hepatic arteriography (CTA), and/or the 6-month follow-up CT (n=49). Based on alternative-free response receiving operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the diagnostic performance for detecting HCC was compared between double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI and double arterial phase dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity, positive predictive value, and mean A Z values for hypervascular HCCs were 72%, 80%, and 0.79, respectively, for SENSE dynamic MRI and 66%, 92%, and 0.78, respectively, for dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity for double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI was higher than that for double arterial phase dynamic MDCT, but the difference was not statistically significant. Double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI is as valuable as double arterial phase dynamic MDCT for detecting hypervascular HCCs. (author)

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is often the best choice for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect ... bone cancer inspect the marrow for leukemia and other diseases ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... weakness, blurry vision or seizures help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple ... There is also a very small chance of skin irritation at the site of the IV tube ... characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo; Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques: current imaging strategies and molecular imaging probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Mani, Venkatesh; Hyafil, Fabien; Amirbekian, Vardan; Aguinaldo, Juan Gilberto S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2007-01-01

    The vulnerability or destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques has been directly linked to plaque composition. Imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, that allow for evaluation of plaque composition at a cellular and molecular level, could further improve the detection of

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  19. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  20. Biparametric 3T Magentic Resonance Imaging for prostatic cancer detection in a biopsy-naïve patient population: a further improvement of PI-RADS v2?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanzione, Arnaldo [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Imbriaco, Massimo, E-mail: mimbriaco@hotmail.com [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Cocozza, Sirio [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Fusco, Ferdinando [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Rusconi, Giovanni; Nappi, Carmela [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Mirone, Vincenzo; Mangiapia, Francesco [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Brunetti, Arturo [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Ragozzino, Alfonso [Department of Radiology, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli (Italy); Longo, Nicola [Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive Sciences and Odontostomatology, University “Federico II”, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Objectives: To prospectively determine the diagnostic accuracy of a biparametric 3T magnetic resonance imaging protocol (BP-MRI) for prostatic cancer detection, compared to a multiparametric MRI protocol (MP-MRI), in a biopsy naïve patient population. Methods: Eighty-two untreated patients (mean age 65 ± 7.6 years) with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer and/or altered prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels underwent a MP-MRI, including T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (with the correspondent apparent diffusion coefficient maps) and dynamic contrast enhanced sequence, followed by prostate biopsy. Two radiologists reviewed both the BP-MRI and the MP-MRI protocols to establish a radiological diagnosis. Receiver operating characteristics curves were obtained to determine the diagnostic performance of the two protocols. Results: The mean PSA level was 8.8 ± 8.1 ng/ml. A total of 34 prostatic tumors were identified, with a Gleason score that ranged from 3 + 3 to 5 + 4. Of these 34 tumors, 29 were located within the peripheral zone and 5 in the transitional zone. BP-MRI and MP-MRI showed a similar performance in terms of overall diagnostic accuracy, with an area under the curve of 0.91 and 0.93, respectively (p = n.s.). Conclusions: BP-MRI prostate protocol is feasible for prostatic cancer detection compared to a standard MP-MRI protocol, requiring a shorter acquisition and interpretation time, with comparable diagnostic accuracy to the conventional protocol, without the administration of gadolinium-based contrast agent.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakihara, Junji; Kanoh, Naoyuki; Hayakawa, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used in the examination of three patients with nasopharyngeal malignant tumor and cranial nerve symptoms. Coronal and saggital sections were very useful for determining skull base invasion. Its high contrast resolution enabled us to visualize several cranial nerves directly. Differentiation between tumor and effusion in the paranasal sinuses was easy especially in T2 weighted images. Bone destruction could also be detected as bone marrow replacement by tumor or as interruption of the black line of compact bone. Local relationships of tumor and large blood vessels were visualized by MRI without invasive contrast enhancing methods. Despite such advantages, in one patient whose symptoms were highly suggestive of cranial invasion, no cranial invasion was detected by CT or MRI. (author)

  2. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  3. Detection and Evaluation of Early Breast Cancer via Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Studies of Mouse Models and Clinical Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Medellin D, Mohsin SK, Hilsenbeck SG, Lamph WW, Gottardis MM, Shirley MA, Kuhn JG et al: 9-cis-Retinoic acid suppresses mammary tumorigenesis in C3...asymptomatic women who were imaged with a 3D bilateral dynamic MR sequence. Breast density was classified independently by one reader on digital x...plane. Digital mammograms acquired on GE Senograph 2000D. Image Analysis: Breast density was classified on mammograms by one reader according to BI

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric neurological disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Aihara, Toshinori; Tanaka, Osamu.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric neurological disease. 17 children between the ages of 2 month and 8.5 year have been examined with MRI. All subjects tolerated the MRI procedure well, although sedation was necessary for young children. Result as follows : (1) MRI does not utilize ionising radiation to produce an image. (2) MRI images more clearly demonstrate cerebral gray and white matter than X-ray CT. (3) Compared with X-ray CT, MRI proved to be advantageous in detection and characterization of the pathology, especially when the abnormality was located along the posterior fossa and spinal canal. It is suggested that these nature of MRI makes it the ideal diagnostic method for children. (author)

  5. Early detection of ventilation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging: an in vivo study in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Skiöld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: High tidal volume (VT ventilation during resuscitation of preterm lambs results in brain injury evident histologically within hours after birth. We aimed to investigate whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can be used for early in vivo detection of ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs. METHODS: Newborn lambs (0.85 gestation were stabilized with a "protective ventilation" strategy (PROT, n = 7: prophylactic Curosurf, sustained inflation, VT 7 mL/kg, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP 5 cmH2O or an initial 15 minutes of "injurious ventilation" (INJ, n = 10: VT 12 mL/kg, no PEEP, late Curosurf followed by PROT ventilation for the remainder of the experiment. At 1 hour, lambs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (Siemens, 3 Tesla. For measures of mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD and fractional anisotropy (FA, 30 direction DTI was performed. Regions of interests encompassed the thalamus, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and the cerebellar vermis. MRS was performed using a localized single-voxel (15×15×20 mm3, echo time 270 ms encompassing suptratentorial deep nuclear grey matter and central white matter. Peak-area ratios for lactate (Lac relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho and creatine (Cr were calculated. Groups were compared using 2-way RM-ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlations. RESULTS: No cerebral injury was seen on structural MR images. Lambs in the INJ group had higher mean FA and lower mean RD in the thalamus compared to PROT lambs, but not in the other regions of interest. Peak-area lactate ratios >1.0 was only seen in INJ lambs. A trend of higher mean peak-area ratios for Lac/Cr and Lac/Cho was seen, which correlated with lower pH in both groups. CONCLUSION: Acute changes in brain diffusion measures and metabolite peak-area ratios were observed after injurious ventilation. Early MRS/DTI is

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Yukio; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive technique for visualization of the cardiovascular system, and is used to evaluate tissue characteristics, cardiac function and blood flow abnormalities, as well as to obtain morphological information. In this paper we presented results of clinical and laboratory research obtained using conventional spin echo MRI with regard to cardiovascular anatomy, tissue characterization and physiology. Furthermore, experience with two new techniques, cine-MRI and volume-selected MR spectroscopy, and their potential clinical usefulness in detecting cardiovascular diseases are documented. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of unicornuate uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, L.; Dorta, M.; Brioschi, D.; Giudici, M.N.; Villa, L. (1st Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Univ. of Milan (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Five patient with a hysterosalpingographic diagnosis of unicornuate uterus underwent resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequently laparoscopy/laparotomy to evaluate the ability of MRI to identify the various subclasses of this malformation. The method was demonstrated to be valid, since in all 5 cases (one subclass A1b, two subclass B) were correctly diagnosed. Compared with laparoscopy, MRI is less expensive, less invasive, and can be performed in women in whom laparoscopic examination is risky. However, unlike laparoscopy, MRI can not detect the presence of minimal and mild endometriosis and does not allow assessment of the tubal conditions. (au).

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  9. Migration of iron-labeled KHYG-1 natural killer cells to subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christiane L; McFadden, Catherine; Chen, Yuhua; Foster, Paula J

    2012-07-01

    A novel cell line of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells, KHYG-1, was examined in vivo for immunotherapy against prostate cancer. The feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking to monitor the fate of injected NK cells following intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration was assessed. PC-3M human prostate cancer cells were injected s.c. into the flank of nude mice (day 0). KHYG-1 NK cells were labeled with an iron oxide contrast agent and injected s.c., i.v. or i.p. on day 8. Mice were imaged by MRI on days 7, 9 and 12. Tumor sections were examined with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistologic staining for NK cells. NK cells were detected in the tumors by histology after all three administration routes. NK cells and fluorescence from the iron label were co-localized. Signal loss was seen in the areas around the tumors and between the tumor lobes in the s.c. group. We are the first to label this cell line of NK cells with an iron oxide contrast agent. Accumulation of NK cells was visualized by MRI after s.c. injection but not after i.v. and i.p. injection.

  10. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessment for detecting brain injury in a prospective cohort of university amateur boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Hart

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: While this neuroimaging and neuropsychological assessment protocol could not detect any evidence of brain injury, one boxer developed seizures and another developed a chronic sub-dural haematoma.

  11. Factors predicting aggressiveness of non-hypervascular hepatic nodules detected on hepatobiliary phase of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Takano, Toru; Suda, Takeshi; Akazawa, Kouhei; Yokoo, Takeshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kamimura, Kenya; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Takamura, Masaaki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Nomoto, Minoru; Terai, Shuji

    2015-04-21

    To establish a prognostic formula that distinguishes non-hypervascular hepatic nodules (NHNs) with higher aggressiveness from less hazardous one. Seventy-three NHNs were detected in gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI) study and confirmed to change 2 mm or more in size and/or to gain hypervascularity. All images were interpreted independently by an experienced, board-certified abdominal radiologist and hepatologist; both knew that the patients were at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma development but were blinded to the clinical information. A formula predicting NHN destiny was developed using a generalized estimating equation model with thirteen explanatory variables: age, gender, background liver diseases, Child-Pugh class, NHN diameter, T1-weighted imaging/T2-weighted imaging detectability, fat deposition, lower signal intensity in arterial phase, lower signal intensity in equilibrium phase, α-fetoprotein, des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, α-fetoprotein-L3, and coexistence of classical hepatocellular carcinoma. The accuracy of the formula was validated in bootstrap samples that were created by resampling of 1000 iterations. During a median follow-up period of 504 d, 73 NHNs with a median diameter of 9 mm (interquartile range: 8-12 mm) grew or shrank by 68.5% (fifty nodules) or 20.5% (fifteen nodules), respectively, whereas hypervascularity developed in 38.4% (twenty eight nodules). In the fifteen shrank nodules, twelve nodules disappeared, while 11.0% (eight nodules) were stable in size but acquired vascularity. A generalized estimating equation analysis selected five explanatories from the thirteen variables as significant factors to predict NHN progression. The estimated regression coefficients were 0.36 for age, 6.51 for lower signal intensity in arterial phase, 8.70 or 6.03 for positivity of hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, 9.37 for des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, and -4.05 for fat

  12. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  13. Validity of ultrasonography and measures of adult shoulder function and reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging as a gold standard.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in detecting inflammatory shoulder changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to determine the agreement between US and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a gold standard.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; Sijbrandij, E. S.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with

  15. Two-Dimensional Edge Detection by Guided Mode Resonant Metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Amirhossein; Tavakol, Mohammad Reza; Karimi-Khoozani, Parisa; Khavasi, Amin

    2018-05-01

    In this letter, a new approach to perform edge detection is presented using an all-dielectric CMOS-compatible metasurface. The design is based on guided-mode resonance which provides a high quality factor resonance to make the edge detection experimentally realizable. The proposed structure that is easy to fabricate, can be exploited for detection of edges in two dimensions due to its symmetry. Also, the trade-off between gain and resolution of edge detection is discussed which can be adjusted by appropriate design parameters. The proposed edge detector has also the potential to be used in ultrafast analog computing and image processing.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  17. Olfactometer for functional resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been developing for twenty years. Indeed, the marketing of high-resolution MRI (5 Tesla and 7 Tesla recently) allowed the study of brain mechanisms. The research work of this PHD was to develop instrumentation for objective studies of brain behavior during a sensory stimulation. We are interested in the study of olfaction. We have designed and built a six-channel olfactometer, synchronized with breathing and controlled by computer. The originality of our work lies in the modularity of our device, which makes it adaptable to a wide range of studies. We also propose a new method to change the intensity of stimulation delivered: the Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). This device has been used in several studies in fMRI. The effectiveness of the PWM is highlighted in a psychophysical study described in this manuscript. (author)

  18. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Sabina Rebe; Bremer, Maria G. E. G.; Haasnoot, Willem; Norde, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  19. Label-Free and Multiplex Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk Using Imaging surface Plasmon Resonance-Based immunosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Haasnoot, W.; Norde, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial drug residues in foods relies greatly on the availability of adequate analytical techniques. Currently, there is a need for a high-throughput screening method with a broad-spectrum detection range. This paper describes the development of a microarray biosensor, based on

  20. Predictive values of BI-RADS® magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Piato, Sebastião; Roveda, Décio; Faria Castro Fleury, Eduardo de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate BI-RADS indicators in the detection of DCIS by MRI. Materials and methods: Prospective observational study that started in 2014 and lasted 24 months. A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated, who presented with suspicious or highly suspicious microcalcifications on screening mammography (BI-RADS categories 4 and 5) and underwent stereotactic-guided breast biopsy, having had an MRI scan performed prior to biopsy. Results: Altogether, 38 cases were characterized as positive for malignancy, of which 25 were DCIS and 13 were invasive ductal carcinoma cases. MRI had a sensitivity of 96%; specificity of 75.67%; positive predictive value (PPV) for DCIS detection of 57.14%; negative predictive value (NPV) in the detection of DCIS of 98.24%; and an accuracy of 80.80%. Conclusion: BI-RADS as a tool for the detection of DCIS by MRI is a powerful instrument whose sensitivity was higher when compared to that observed for mammography in the literature. Likewise, the PPV obtained by MRI was higher than that observed in the present study for mammography, and the high NPV obtained on MRI scans can provide early evidence to discourage breast biopsy in selected cases.

  1. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  3. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting. Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, M.M.; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm 3 vs. 86.9 mm 3 , respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm 3 ) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm 3 and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions. (author)

  4. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting: Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mahmoud M; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Toma, Naoki; Yamamoto, Akitaka; Hirose, Tomofumi; Miura, Youichi; Fujimoto, Masashi; Matsushima, Satoshi; Taki, Waro

    2009-09-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm(3) vs. 86.9 mm(3), respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm(3)) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm(3) and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions.

  5. Detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist joints with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria

    2008-01-01

    , specificity and accuracy (concordance) of MRI for detecting erosions were 61%, 93% and 77%, respectively, while the respective values were 24%, 99% and 63% for radiography. The intramodality agreements when measuring erosion volumes were high for both CT and MRI (Spearman correlation coefficients 0.92 and 0...... sensitivity and good specificity and accuracy for detection of erosions in rheumatoid arthritis and healthy wrist bones, while radiography showed very low sensitivity. The tested volumetric method was highly reproducible and correlated to scores of erosions....... measuring volumes of erosions on CT and MRI is reproducible and correlated to semiquantitative assessments (scores) of erosions on CT, MRI and radiography. METHODS: Seventeen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four healthy control individuals underwent CT, MRI and radiography of one wrist, performed...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugt, R.M. van; Sijbrandij, E.S.; Bijlsma, J.W.J. [Univ. Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1996-03-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. MRI and conventional radiography were performed before MP-pulse therapy and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Two patients showed unilateral changes compatible with AVN. One patient became symptomatic and revealed characteristic radiographic abnormalities. The other patient remained asymptomatic and the MRI appearance returned to normal after 6 months. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugt, R.M. van; Sijbrandij, E.S.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. MRI and conventional radiography were performed before MP-pulse therapy and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Two patients showed unilateral changes compatible with AVN. One patient became symptomatic and revealed characteristic radiographic abnormalities. The other patient remained asymptomatic and the MRI appearance returned to normal after 6 months. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Transperineal Magnetic Resonance Imaging-targeted Biopsy versus Transperineal Template Prostate Mapping Biopsy in the Detection of Localised Radio-recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthabalan, A; Abd-Alazeez, M; Arya, M; Allen, C; Freeman, A; Jameson, C; Kirkham, A; Mitra, A V; Payne, H; Punwani, S; Ramachandran, N; Walkden, M; Emberton, M; Ahmed, H U

    2016-09-01

    Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) may identify radio-recurrent intra-prostatic cancer accurately. We aimed to compare visually directed MRI-targeted biopsies (MRI-TB) to an accurate reference standard - transperineal prostate mapping (TPM) biopsies with 5 mm sampling - in the detection of clinically significant cancer in men with biochemical failure after radiotherapy. A retrospective registry analysis between 2006 and 2014 identified 77 men who had undergone mpMRI followed by MRI-TB and TPM. Clinical significance was set at two definitions of disease. Definition 1 was Gleason ≥ 4+3 and/or maximum cancer core length ≥ 6 mm. Definition 2 was Gleason ≥ 3+4 and/or maximum cancer core length ≥ 4 mm. Of the 77 patients included, the mean age was 70 years (range 61-82; standard deviation 5.03). The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was 14 ng/ml (interquartile range 7.83-32.50). The most frequent EBRT dose given was 74 Gy over 37 fractions. Eight patients had iodine-seed implant brachytherapy or high dose rate brachytherapy. Neoadjuvant/adjuvant hormonal therapy use was reported in 38. The time from EBRT to biochemical recurrence was a median of 60 months (interquartile range 36.75-85.00). The median PSA at the time of mpMRI was 4.68 ng/ml (interquartile range 2.68-7.60). The median time between mpMRI and biopsy was 2.76 months (interquartile range 1.58-4.34). In total, 2392 TPM and 381 MRI-TB cores were taken with 18% and 50% cancer detection, respectively. Detection rates of definition 1 clinically significant cancer were 52/77 (68%) versus 55/77 (71%) for MRI-TB and TPM, respectively. MRI-TB was more efficient requiring 1 core versus 2.8 cores to detect definition 2 cancer. MRI-TB seems to have encouraging detection rates for clinically significant cancer with fewer cores compared with TPM, although TPM had higher detection rates for smaller lower grade lesions. Copyright © 2016 The

  9. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  10. T1 mapping cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to detect myocarditis—Impact of slice orientation on the diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnen, Sebastian, E-mail: s.bohnen@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University Heart Center, General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); Radunski, Ulf K., E-mail: u.radunski@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University Heart Center, General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); Lund, Gunnar K., E-mail: glund@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Tahir, Enver, E-mail: e.tahir@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Avanesov, Maxim, E-mail: m.avanesov@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Stehning, Christian, E-mail: christian.stehning@philips.com [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.schnackenburg@philips.com [Philips Healthcare Germany, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard, E-mail: g.adam@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Blankenberg, Stefan, E-mail: s.blankenberg@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University Heart Center, General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); Muellerleile, Kai, E-mail: kamuellerleile@uke.de [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University Heart Center, General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Background: T1 mapping is a promising diagnostic tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with suspected myocarditis. However, there are currently no data on the potential influence of slice orientation on the diagnostic performance of CMR. Thus, we compared the diagnostic performance of global myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) values to differentiate patients with myocarditis from healthy individuals between different slice orientations. Methods: This study included 48 patients with clinically defined myocarditis and 13 healthy controls who underwent CMR at 1.5 T. A modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery (MOLLI) sequence was used for T1 mapping before and 15 min after administration of 0.075 mmol/kg Gadolinium-BOPTA. T1 mapping was performed on three short and on three long axes slices, respectively. Native T1, post-contrast T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) −BOPTA maps were calculated using a dedicated plug-in written for the OsiriX software and compared between the mean value of three short-axes slices (3SAX), the central short-axis (1SAX), the mean value of three long-axes slices (3LAX), the four-chamber view (4CH), the three-chamber view (3CH) and the two-chamber view (2CH). Results: There were significantly lower native T1 values on 3LAX (1081 ms (1037–1131 ms)) compared to 3SAX (1107 ms (1069–1143 ms), p = 0.0022) in patients with myocarditis, but not in controls (1026 ms (1009–1059 ms) vs. 1039 ms (1023–1055 ms), p = 0.2719). The areas under the curve (AUC) to discriminate between myocarditis and healthy controls by native myocardial T1 were 0.85 (p < 0.0001) on 3SAX, 0.85 (p < 0.0001) on 1SAX, 0.76 (p = 0.0002) on 3LAX, 0.70 (p = 0.0075) on 4CH, 0.72 (p = 0.0020) on 3CH and 0.75 (p = 0.0003) on 2CH. The AUCs for ECV-BOPTA were 0.83 (p < 0.0001) on 3 SAX, 0.82 (p < 0.0001) on 1SAX, 0.77 (p = 0.0005) on 3LAX, 0.71 (p = 0.0079) on 4CH, 0.69 (p = 0.0371) on 3CH and 0.75 (p = 0.0006) on

  11. T1 mapping cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to detect myocarditis—Impact of slice orientation on the diagnostic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnen, Sebastian; Radunski, Ulf K.; Lund, Gunnar K.; Tahir, Enver; Avanesov, Maxim; Stehning, Christian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Adam, Gerhard; Blankenberg, Stefan; Muellerleile, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Background: T1 mapping is a promising diagnostic tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with suspected myocarditis. However, there are currently no data on the potential influence of slice orientation on the diagnostic performance of CMR. Thus, we compared the diagnostic performance of global myocardial T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) values to differentiate patients with myocarditis from healthy individuals between different slice orientations. Methods: This study included 48 patients with clinically defined myocarditis and 13 healthy controls who underwent CMR at 1.5 T. A modified Look-Locker inversion-recovery (MOLLI) sequence was used for T1 mapping before and 15 min after administration of 0.075 mmol/kg Gadolinium-BOPTA. T1 mapping was performed on three short and on three long axes slices, respectively. Native T1, post-contrast T1 and extracellular volume (ECV) −BOPTA maps were calculated using a dedicated plug-in written for the OsiriX software and compared between the mean value of three short-axes slices (3SAX), the central short-axis (1SAX), the mean value of three long-axes slices (3LAX), the four-chamber view (4CH), the three-chamber view (3CH) and the two-chamber view (2CH). Results: There were significantly lower native T1 values on 3LAX (1081 ms (1037–1131 ms)) compared to 3SAX (1107 ms (1069–1143 ms), p = 0.0022) in patients with myocarditis, but not in controls (1026 ms (1009–1059 ms) vs. 1039 ms (1023–1055 ms), p = 0.2719). The areas under the curve (AUC) to discriminate between myocarditis and healthy controls by native myocardial T1 were 0.85 (p < 0.0001) on 3SAX, 0.85 (p < 0.0001) on 1SAX, 0.76 (p = 0.0002) on 3LAX, 0.70 (p = 0.0075) on 4CH, 0.72 (p = 0.0020) on 3CH and 0.75 (p = 0.0003) on 2CH. The AUCs for ECV-BOPTA were 0.83 (p < 0.0001) on 3 SAX, 0.82 (p < 0.0001) on 1SAX, 0.77 (p = 0.0005) on 3LAX, 0.71 (p = 0.0079) on 4CH, 0.69 (p = 0.0371) on 3CH and 0.75 (p = 0.0006) on

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries: protocol for a systematic review of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie G; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Wormald, Justin C R; Ridgway, John P; Tanner, Steven; Rankine, James J; Bourke, Grainne

    2018-05-19

    Adult brachial plexus injuries (BPI) are becoming more common. The reconstruction and prognosis of pre-ganglionic injuries (root avulsions) are different to other types of BPI injury. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being used to identify root avulsions, but the evidence from studies of its diagnostic accuracy are conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review is needed to address uncertainty about the accuracy of MRI and to guide future research. We will conduct a systematic search of electronic databases alongside reference tracking. We will include studies of adults with traumatic BPI which report the accuracy of preoperative MRI (index test) against surgical exploration of the roots of the brachial plexus (reference standard) for detecting either of the two target conditions (any root avulsion or any pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion). We will exclude case reports, articles considering bilateral injuries and studies where the number of true positives, false positives, false negatives and true negatives cannot be derived. The methodological quality of the included studies will be assessed using a tailored version of the QUADAS-2 tool. Where possible, a bivariate model will be used for meta-analysis to obtain summary sensitivities and specificities for both target conditions. We will investigate heterogeneity in the performance of MRI according to field strength and the risk of bias if data permits. This review will summarise the current diagnostic accuracy of MRI for adult BPI, identify shortcomings and gaps in the literature and so help to guide future research. PROSPERO CRD42016049702 .

  13. Significance of clinical evaluation of the metacarpophalangeal joint in relation to synovial/bone pathology in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Millicent A; White, Lawrence M; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D; Chaya, Sam; Lax, Matthew; Salonen, David; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judy A; Pomeroy, Emma; Podbielski, Dominik; Keystone, Edward C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologists base many clinical decisions regarding the management of inflammatory joint diseases on joint counts performed at clinic. We investigated the reliability and accuracy of physically examining the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to detect inflammatory synovitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. MCP joints 2 to 5 in both hands of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were assessed by 5 independent examiners for joint-line swelling (visually and by palpation); joint-line tenderness by palpation (tender joint count, TJC) and stress pain; and by MRI (1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet). Interrater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics, and agreement between examination and corresponding MRI assessment was assessed by Fisher's exact tests (p 0.8) and positive predictive value (= 0.8). For PsA, significant associations exist between TJC and MRI synovitis scores (p < 0.01) and stress pain and MRI edema scores (p < 0.04). Assessment of swelling by palpation was not significantly associated with synovitis or edema as determined by MRI in RA or PsA (p = 0.54-1.0). In inflammatory arthritis, disease activity in MCP joints can be reliably assessed at the bedside by examining for joint-line tenderness (TJC) and visual inspection for swelling. Clinical assessment may have to be complemented by other methods for evaluating disease activity in the joint, such as MRI, particularly in patients with PsA.

  14. Diagnostic value of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: lllb146@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Li, Qiong [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Nie, Wei [Department of Respiratory Disease, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: lsy20112077@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (WB-DWI) technique in detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with that of whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (WB-PET/CT). Materials and methods: Search Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library database from January 1984 to July 2013 for studies comparing WB-DWI with WB-PET/CT for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies. Methodological quality was assessed by the quality assessment of diagnostic studies (QUADAS) instrument. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and areas under the summary receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Potential threshold effect, heterogeneity and publication bias were investigated. Result: Thirteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 1067 patients. There was no significant threshold effect. WB-DWI had a similar AUC (0.966 (95% CI, 0.940–0.992) versus 0.984 (95% CI, 0.965–0.999)) with WB-PET/CT. No significant difference was detected between AUC of WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT. WB-DWI had a pooled sensitivity of 0.897 (95% CI, 0.876–0.916) and a pooled specificity of 0.954 (95% CI, 0.944–0.962). WB-PET/CT had a pooled sensitivity of 0.895 (95% CI, 0.865–0.920) and a pooled specificity of 0.975 (95% CI, 0.966–0.981). Heterogeneity was found to stem primarily from data type (per lesion versus per patient), MR sequence (DWIBS only and DWIBS with other sequence), and primary lesion type (single type and multiple type). The Deeks's funnel plots suggested the absence of publication bias. Conclusion: WB-DWI has similar, good diagnostic performance for the detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with WB-PET/CT. DWIBS with other MR sequences could further improve the diagnostic performance. More high-quality studies regarding comparison of WB-DWI and WB

  15. Understanding Heterogeneity and Permeability of Brain Metastases in Murine Models of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Through Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Implications for Detection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Murrell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain metastases due to breast cancer are increasing, and the prognosis is poor. Lack of effective therapy is attributed to heterogeneity of breast cancers and their resulting metastases, as well as impermeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which hinders delivery of therapeutics to the brain. This work investigates three experimental models of HER2+ breast cancer brain metastasis to better understand the inherent heterogeneity of the disease. We use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to quantify brain metastatic growth and explore its relationship with BBB permeability. DESIGN: Brain metastases due to breast cancer cells (SUM190-BR3, JIMT-1-BR3, or MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 were imaged at 3 T using balanced steady-state free precession and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo sequences. The histology and immunohistochemistry corresponding to MRI were also analyzed. RESULTS: There were differences in metastatic tumor appearance by MRI, histology, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, CD31, CD105 across the three models. The mean volume of an MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 tumor was significantly larger compared to other models (F2,12 = 5.845, P < .05; interestingly, this model also had a significantly higher proportion of Gd-impermeable tumors (F2,12 = 22.18, P < .0001. Ki67 staining indicated that Gd-impermeable tumors had significantly more proliferative nuclei compared to Gd-permeable tumors (t[24] = 2.389, P < .05 in the MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 model. CD31 and CD105 staining suggested no difference in new vasculature patterns between permeable and impermeable tumors in any model. CONCLUSION: Significant heterogeneity is present in these models of brain metastases from HER2+ breast cancer. Understanding this heterogeneity, especially as it relates to BBB permeability, is important for improvement in brain metastasis detection and treatment delivery.

  16. Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging using sliding-window conjugate-gradient highly constrained back-projection reconstruction for detection of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Heng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing; Ge, Lan; An, Jing; Tang, Qing; Li, Han; Zhang, Yu; Chen, David; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jiabin; Liang, Zhigang; Lin, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Bi, Xiaoming; Li, Kuncheng; Li, Debiao

    2012-04-15

    Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with sliding-window conjugate-gradient highly constrained back-projection reconstruction (SW-CG-HYPR) allows whole left ventricular coverage, improved temporal and spatial resolution and signal/noise ratio, and reduced cardiac motion-related image artifacts. The accuracy of this technique for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been determined in a large number of patients. We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of myocardial perfusion MRI with SW-CG-HYPR in patients with suspected CAD. A total of 50 consecutive patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography with suspected CAD underwent myocardial perfusion MRI with SW-CG-HYPR at 3.0 T. The perfusion defects were interpreted qualitatively by 2 blinded observers and were correlated with x-ray angiographic stenoses ≥50%. The prevalence of CAD was 56%. In the per-patient analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of SW-CG-HYPR was 96% (95% confidence interval 82% to 100%), 82% (95% confidence interval 60% to 95%), 87% (95% confidence interval 70% to 96%), 95% (95% confidence interval 74% to100%), and 90% (95% confidence interval 82% to 98%), respectively. In the per-vessel analysis, the corresponding values were 98% (95% confidence interval 91% to 100%), 89% (95% confidence interval 80% to 94%), 86% (95% confidence interval 76% to 93%), 99% (95% confidence interval 93% to 100%), and 93% (95% confidence interval 89% to 97%), respectively. In conclusion, myocardial perfusion MRI using SW-CG-HYPR allows whole left ventricular coverage and high resolution and has high diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspected CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging associated with serum biomarkers and clinical signs of effusion? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveza, L A; Kraus, V B; Collins, J E; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F W; Nevitt, M C; Hunter, D J

    2017-09-20

    To determine the relationship between synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced (non-CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical markers of inflammation, and clinical assessment of effusion in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined data from the OA Biomarkers Consortium within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 600). Non-CE MRIs were semi-quantitatively scored (grades 0-3) for severity of Hoffa synovitis and effusion synovitis. Serum (s) matrix metalloproteinase-3 (sMMP-3), hyaluronic acid (sHA), and nitrated epitope of the α-helical region of type II collagen (sColl2-1NO2) were quantified. The bulge and patellar tap clinical tests were performed at baseline and performance characteristics were assessed for the detection of effusion synovitis on MRI. Multinomial logistic regression adjusted for covariates was used to assess the association between biochemical and imaging markers at baseline and over 12 and 24 months. At baseline, sHA and sMMP-3 were associated with moderate to large (score ≥ 2, n = 117) effusion synovitis, with odds ratio = 1.35 and 1.30 per 1 standard deviation in biochemical markers (95% confidence intervals 1.07, 1.71 and 1.00, 1.69), c-statistics 0.640 and 0.626, respectively. The c-statistics for the presence of Hoffa synovitis (score ≥ 2) were 0.693, 0.694, and 0.694 for sHA, sMMP-3, and sColl2-1NO2, respectively. There was no significant association between biochemical markers (baseline and 12 and 24 month time-integrated concentrations) and changes in MRI markers. The bulge and patellar tap signs were 22.0% and 4.3% sensitive and 88.8% and 94.8% specific, respectively, for detecting effusion synovitis (score ≥ 1) on MRI. sHA and sMMP-3 were modestly associated with effusion synovitis at baseline. Clinical signs of effusion are insensitive but highly specific for the presence of any effusion synovitis on non-CE MRI.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio

    1990-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T 2 weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  2. Retrospective and comparative analysis of 99mTc-Sestamibi breast specific gamma imaging versus mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in Chinese women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Xiuyan; Hu, Guoming; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Fuming; Shao, Xuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhan, Hongwei; Chen, Yiding; Deng, Yongchuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing breast cancer during the early stage may be helpful for decreasing cancer-related mortality. In Western developed countries, mammographies have been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, Chinese women usually have denser and smaller-sized breasts compared to Caucasian women, which decreases the diagnostic accuracy of mammography. However, breast specific gamma imaging, a type of molecular functional breast imaging, has been used for the accurate diagnosis of breast cancer and is not influenced by breast density. Our objective was to analyze the breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) diagnostic value for Chinese women. During a 2-year period, 357 women were diagnosed and treated at our oncology department and received BSGI in addition to mammography (MMG), ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnostic assessment. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of each method of detection and compared the biological profiles of the four imaging methods. A total of 357 women received a final surgical pathology diagnosis, with 168 malignant diseases (58.5 %) and 119 benign diseases (41.5 %). Of these, 166 underwent the four imaging tests preoperatively. The sensitivity of BSGI was 80.35 and 82.14 % by US, 75.6 % by MMG, and 94.06 % by MRI. Furthermore, the breast cancer diagnosis specificity of BSGI was high (83.19 % vs. 77.31 % vs. 66.39 % vs. 67.69 %, respectively). The BSGI diagnostic sensitivity for mammographic breast density in women was superior to mammography and more sensitive for non-luminal A subtypes (luminal A vs. non-luminal A, 68.63 % vs. 88.30 %). BSGI may help improve the ability to diagnose early stage breast cancer for Chinese women, particularly for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), mammographic breast density and non-luminal A breast cancer

  3. Retrospective and comparative analysis of (99m)Tc-Sestamibi breast specific gamma imaging versus mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuyan; Hu, Guoming; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Fuming; Shao, Xuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhan, Hongwei; Chen, Yiding; Deng, Yongchuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-07-11

    Diagnosing breast cancer during the early stage may be helpful for decreasing cancer-related mortality. In Western developed countries, mammographies have been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, Chinese women usually have denser and smaller-sized breasts compared to Caucasian women, which decreases the diagnostic accuracy of mammography. However, breast specific gamma imaging, a type of molecular functional breast imaging, has been used for the accurate diagnosis of breast cancer and is not influenced by breast density. Our objective was to analyze the breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) diagnostic value for Chinese women. During a 2-year period, 357 women were diagnosed and treated at our oncology department and received BSGI in addition to mammography (MMG), ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnostic assessment. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of each method of detection and compared the biological profiles of the four imaging methods. A total of 357 women received a final surgical pathology diagnosis, with 168 malignant diseases (58.5 %) and 119 benign diseases (41.5 %). Of these, 166 underwent the four imaging tests preoperatively. The sensitivity of BSGI was 80.35 and 82.14 % by US, 75.6 % by MMG, and 94.06 % by MRI. Furthermore, the breast cancer diagnosis specificity of BSGI was high (83.19 % vs. 77.31 % vs. 66.39 % vs. 67.69 %, respectively). The BSGI diagnostic sensitivity for mammographic breast density in women was superior to mammography and more sensitive for non-luminal A subtypes (luminal A vs. non-luminal A, 68.63 % vs. 88.30 %). BSGI may help improve the ability to diagnose early stage breast cancer for Chinese women, particularly for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), mammographic breast density and non-luminal A breast cancer.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Bruno Perocco; Costa Junior, Leodante Batista da; Lambertucci, Jose Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  7. Very low field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging at very low field (from 1 mT to 10 mT). A new kind of sensor called 'mixed sensor' has been used to achieve a good detectivity at low frequencies. Combining a superconducting loop and a giant magnetoresistance, those detectors have a competitive equivalent field noise compared to existing devices (Tuned coils, SQUIDs and Atomic Magnetometers). They have been combined with flux transformers to increase the coupling between the sample and the sensor. A complete study has been performed to adapt it to mixed sensors and then maximize the gain. This set has been incorporated in an existing small MRI device to test its robustness in real conditions. In parallel, several MRI sequences (GE, SE, FLASH, EPI,...) have been integrated and adapted to very low field requirements. They have been used to perform in-vivo three dimensional imaging and relaxometry studies on well known products to test their reliability. Finally, a larger setup adapted for full-head imaging has been designed and built to perform images on a larger working volume. (author) [fr

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and brain functional exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for functional analysis of the brain is presented: the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood flowing in the brain do not have the same effect on NMR images; the oxygenated blood, related to brain activity, may be detected and the corresponding activity zone in the brain, identified; functional NMR imaging could be used to gain a better understanding of functional troubles linked to neurological or psychiatric diseases

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F.; Cho, Aaron A.; Edward, Neeraj J.; Edward, Deepak P.; Fajardo, Roman G.

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  11. Detection of compression vessels in trigeminal neuralgia by surface-rendering three-dimensional reconstruction of 1.5- and 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Imai, Hideaki; Kagoshima, Kaiei; Umezawa, Eriko; Shimizu, Tsuneo; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2013-01-01

    Surface-rendered three-dimensional (3D) 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful for presurgical simulation of microvascular decompression. This study compared the sensitivity and specificity of 1.5- and 3.0-T surface-rendered 3D MR imaging for preoperative identification of the compression vessels of trigeminal neuralgia. One hundred consecutive patients underwent microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. Forty and 60 patients were evaluated by 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging, respectively. Three-dimensional MR images were constructed on the basis of MR imaging, angiography, and venography data and evaluated to determine the compression vessel before surgery. MR imaging findings were compared with the microsurgical findings to compare the sensitivity and specificity of 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging. The agreement between MR imaging and surgical findings depended on the compression vessels. For superior cerebellar artery, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 84.4% and 82.7% sensitivity and 100% and 100% specificity, respectively. For anterior inferior cerebellar artery, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 33.3% and 50% sensitivity and 92.9% and 95% specificity, respectively. For the petrosal vein, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 75% and 64.3% sensitivity and 79.2% and 78.1% specificity, respectively. Complete pain relief was obtained in 36 of 40 and 55 of 60 patients undergoing 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging, respectively. The present study showed that both 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging provided high sensitivity and specificity for preoperative assessment of the compression vessels of trigeminal neuralgia. Preoperative 3D imaging provided very high quality presurgical simulation, resulting in excellent clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijen, P.C. van.

    1991-01-01

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio; Itoh, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Hamada, Takeshi.

    1992-01-01

    The width of substantia nigra (SN) in 59 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as 21 normal controls was analyzed by T2 weighted image (T2WI) of 1.5 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance image (MRI). All patients and controls underwent MRI with the spin-echo sequences used TR/TE: 3000/30 (short TE), and TR/TE: 3000/80 (long TE), in 5-mm-thick volumes. The width between the red nucleus and the cerebral peduncle showing low signal intensity areas was measured as that of SN and its ratio to the distance from the aqueduct to the midline of the cerebral peduncle was also measured. The calculated values of the width of SN and its ratio were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. The significant reduction in the width of SN and its ratio in Parkinson's disease were disclosed below: the mean calculated values of the width of SN were 2.95±0.51 mm in controls, 2.68±0.99 mm in Parkinson's disase on long TE images (P<0.01), and the mean ratio of the width of SN were 13.58±4.21% in controls, 10.52±3.07% in Parkinson's disease on long TE images (P=0.0002). The narrowing of SN in Parkinson's disease was more prominent in men, and advanced cases with Yahr stage III and IV. Considering that the pars reticulata, which is normally containing iron, shows low signal intensity on long TE images, the width of pars compacta could be measured more precisely on this sequences. The evaluation of the ratio of SN in midbrain on long TE images seemed to be more sensitive than the calculated values in detecting the narrowing of SN and pars compacta in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  3. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  5. Usefulness of the dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes for detection of pituitary microadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Bee; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik; Choi, Jin Wook

    2012-03-01

    Does dynamic gadolinium-enhanced imaging with simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes improve diagnostic accuracy of pituitary microadenomas compared with coronal images alone? Fifty-six patients underwent 3-T sella MRI including dynamic simultaneous acquisition of coronal and sagittal planes after gadolinium injection. According to conspicuity, lesions were divided into four scores (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite delayed enhancing lesion). Additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones was evaluated with a 4-point score (0, no; 1, possible; 2, probable; 3, definite additional information). Accuracy of tumour detection was calculated. Average scores for lesion detection of a combination of two planes, coronal, and sagittal images were 2.59, 2.32, and 2.18. 6/10 lesions negative on coronal images were detected on sagittal ones. Accuracy of a combination of two planes, of coronal and of sagittal images was 92.86%, 82.14% and 75%. Six patients had probable or definite additional information on supplementary sagittal images compared with coronal ones alone (10.71%). Dynamic MRI with combined coronal and sagittal planes was more accurate for detection of pituitary microadenomas than routinely used coronal images. Simultaneous dynamic enhanced acquisition can make study time fast and costs low. We present a new dynamic MRI technique for evaluating pituitary microadenomas • This technique provides simultaneous acquisition of contrast enhanced coronal and sagittal images. • This technique makes the diagnosis more accurate and reduces the examination time. • Such MR imaging only requires one single bolus of contrast agent.

  6. A preclinical murine model for the early detection of radiation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral tests for learning and memory: with applications for the evaluation of possible stem cell imaging agents and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Gandhi, Nishant; Kato, Yoshinori; Armour, Michael; Zhu, Wenlian; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapies are being developed for radiotherapy-induced brain injuries (RIBI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers advantages for imaging transplanted stem cells. However, most MRI cell-tracking techniques employ superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs), which are difficult to distinguish from hemorrhage. In current preclinical RIBI models, hemorrhage occurs concurrently with other injury markers. This makes the evaluation of the recruitment of transplanted SPIO-labeled stem cells to injury sites difficult. Here, we developed a RIBI model, with early injury markers reflective of hippocampal dysfunction, which can be detected noninvasively with MRI and behavioral tests. Lesions were generated by sub-hemispheric irradiation of mouse hippocampi with single X-ray beams of 80 Gy. Lesion formation was monitored with anatomical and contrast-enhanced MRI and changes in memory and learning were assessed with fear-conditioning tests. Early injury markers were detected 2 weeks after irradiation. These included an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrated by a 92 ± 20 % contrast enhancement of the irradiated versus the non-irradiated brain hemispheres, within 15 min of the administration of an MRI contrast agent. A change in short-term memory was also detected, as demonstrated by a 40.88 ± 5.03 % decrease in the freezing time measured during the short-term memory context test at this time point, compared to that before irradiation. SPIO-labeled stem cells transplanted contralateral to the lesion migrated toward the lesion at this time point. No hemorrhage was detected up to 10 weeks after irradiation. This model can be used to evaluate SPIO-based stem cell-tracking agents, short-term.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  8. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  9. Initial observations using a novel "cine" magnetic resonance imaging technique to detect changes in abdominal motion caused by encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin; Summers, Angela; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Hutchinson, Charles E; Spencer, Paul A; Wilkie, Martin; Hurst, Helen; Herrick, Sarah; Brenchley, Paul; Augustine, Titus; Bardhan, Karna D

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is an uncommon complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), with high mortality and morbidity. The peritoneum thickens, dysfunctions, and forms a cocoon that progressively "strangulates" the small intestine, causing malnutrition, ischemia, and infarction. There is as yet no reliable noninvasive means of diagnosis, but recent developments in image analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging for the recognition of adhesions offers a way forward. We used this protocol before surgery in 3 patients with suspected EPS. Image analysis revealed patterns of abdominal movement that were markedly different from the patterns in healthy volunteers. The volunteers showed marked movement throughout the abdomen; in contrast, movement in EPS patients was restricted to just below the diaphragm. This clear difference provides early "proof of principle" of the approach that we have developed.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of which shows a thin ... into the intravenous line (IV) after an initial series of scans. Additional series of images will be ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of ... machine and in some cases, placed around the part of the body being imaged, send and receive ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a result, must be kept away from the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  9. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio

    1989-10-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author).

  10. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  11. Usefulness of composite methionine-positron emission tomography/3.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging to detect the localization and extent of early-stage Cushing adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Abe, Takehiko; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    Fifty to eighty percent of Cushing disease is diagnosed by typical endocrine responses. Recently, the number of diagnoses of Cushing disease without typical Cushing syndrome has been increasing; therefore, improving ways to determine the localization of the adenoma and making an early diagnosis is important. This study was undertaken to determine the present diagnostic accuracy for Cushing microadenoma and to compare the differences in diagnostic accuracy between MR imaging and PET/MR imaging. During the past 3 years the authors analyzed the diagnostic accuracy in a series of 35 patients with Cushing adenoma that was verified by surgical pituitary exploration. All 35 cases of Cushing disease, including 20 cases of "overt" and 15 cases of "preclinical" Cushing disease, were studied. Superconductive MR images (1.5 or 3.0 T) and composite images from FDG-PET or methionine (MET)-PET and 3.0-T MR imaging were compared with the localization of adenomas verified by surgery. The diagnostic accuracy of superconductive MR imaging for detecting the localization of Cushing microadenoma was only 40%. The causes of unsatisfactory results for superconductive MR imaging were false-negative results (10 cases), false-positive results (6 cases), and instances of double pituitary adenomas (3 cases). In contrast, the accuracy of microadenoma localization using MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 100% and that of FDG-PET/3.0-T MR imaging was 73%. Moreover, the adenoma location was better delineated on MET-PET/MR images than on FDG-PET/MR images. There was no significant difference in maximum standard uptake value of adenomas evaluated by MET-PET between preclinical Cushing disease and overt Cushing disease. Composite MET-PET/3.0-T MR imaging is useful for the improvement of the delineation of Cushing microadenoma and offers high-quality detectability for early-stage Cushing adenoma.

  12. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of varicocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hironobu; Nagai, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Takaharu; Oeda, Tadashi; Nasu, Yasutomo; Ohmori, Hiroyuki; Togami, Izumi; Katoh, Katsuya; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied for diagnosis of varicocele testis. Twelve of fourteen patients with varicocele had positive findings on MRI. In addition, four of seven patients with clinically undetectable varicocele had positive findings on MRI. We think MRI is one of the useful means for detection of varicocele including subclinical form. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  14. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T W; Santos-Ramos, R; Cunningham, F G; Parkey, R

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with abnormal pregnancies were examined with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Three had a malformed fetus, 1 had a molar pregnancy, and 1 had an ovarian mass. Both maternal and fetal structures were clearly shown, although fetal motion may have resulted in image degradation in some cases. The authors suggest that MR may be useful in obstetric diagnosis.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging - first human images in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddeley, H.; Doddrell, D.M.; Brooks, W.M.; Field, J.; Irving, M.; Williams, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the demonstration of internal human anatomy and in the diagnosis of disease, has the major advantages that the technique is non-invasive, does not require the use of ionizing radiation and that it can demonstrate neurological and cardiovascular lesions that cannot be diagnosed easily by other imaging methods. The first magnetic resonance images of humans were obtained in Australia in October 1985 on the research instrument of the Queensland Medical Magnetic Resonance Research Centre, which is based at the Mater Hospital in Brisbane

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in a total of 45 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), comprising 27 with brain symptoms and 18 without it. The results were compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT). Some of the 45 MS patients were also examined by neurophysiological studies for comparison. MRI showed demyelinating plaques of the brain in a total of 31 patients (69%) - 20 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients, MRI was capable of detecting brain lesions in 6 (86%) of 7 acute stage patients and 14 (70%) of 20 non-acute stage patients. It was also capable of detecting brain lesions in 21 (70%) of 30 clinically definite MR patients and 10 (67%) of 15 clinically probable MS patients. Concurrently available X-ray CT revealed brain lesions in 9 symptomatic patients (33%) and one asymptomatic patient (6%). Visual evoked potentials examined in 31 patients showed abnormality in one (11%) of 9 patients without symptoms of optic neuritis and all (100%) of the other 22 patients with symptoms. In 19 evaluable patients, auditory brainstem responses were abnormal in one (11%) of 9 patients without brainstem symptoms and 3 (30%) of 10 patients with symptoms. MRI of the brain was far superior to X-ray CT, visual evoked potentials and auditory brainstem responses in detecting clinically unsuspected lesions. We proposed new diagnostic criteria including MRI findings of the brain in the Japanese MS diagnostic criteria. MRI of the spinal cord was performed in 12 MS patients with spinal cord symptoms by sagittal and coronal images. It demonstrated demyelinating lesions within the cervical and superior thoracic cord in 8 MS acute stage patients. Spinal cord lesions were longitudinally continuous as long as many spinal segments, with swelling in 6 patients and atrophy in 2 patients. MRI of spinal cord was useful in deciding superior and inferior limits of cord lesions and in visualizing cord swelling or atrophy. (Namekawa, K)

  19. The value of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion biopsy platforms in prostate cancer detection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Maudy; van der Aa, Anouk; Beerlage, Harrie P; Schrier, Bart Ph; Mulders, Peter F A; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2016-03-01

    Despite limitations considering the presence, staging and aggressiveness of prostate cancer, ultrasonography (US)-guided systematic biopsies (SBs) are still the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Recently, promising results have been published for targeted prostate biopsies (TBs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion platforms. Different platforms are USA Food and Drug Administration registered and have, mostly subjective, strengths and weaknesses. To our knowledge, no systematic review exists that objectively compares prostate cancer detection rates between the different platforms available. To assess the value of the different MRI/US-fusion platforms in prostate cancer detection, we compared platform-guided TB with SB, and other ways of MRI TB (cognitive fusion or in-bore MR fusion). We performed a systematic review of well-designed prospective randomised and non-randomised trials in the English language published between 1 January 2004 and 17 February 2015, using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included: 'prostate cancer', 'MR/ultrasound(US) fusion' and 'targeted biopsies'. Extraction of articles was performed by two authors (M.G. and A.A.) and were evaluated by the other authors. Randomised and non-randomised prospective clinical trials comparing TB using MRI/US-fusion platforms and SB, or other ways of TB (cognitive fusion or MR in-bore fusion) were included. In all, 11 of 1865 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving seven different fusion platforms and 2626 patients: 1119 biopsy naïve, 1433 with prior negative biopsy, 50 not mentioned (either biopsy naïve or with prior negative biopsy) and 24 on active surveillance (who were disregarded). The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool was used to assess the quality of included articles. No clear advantage of MRI/US fusion-guided TBs was seen for cancer detection rates (CDRs) of all prostate

  20. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in children presenting migraine with aura: Association of hypoperfusion detected by arterial spin labelling and vasospasm on MR angiography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiot, Domitille; Longuet, Romain; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Carsin-Vu, Aline; Corouge, Isabelle; Gomes, Constantin; Proisy, Maïa

    2018-04-01

    Objective A child presenting with a first attack of migraine with aura usually undergoes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to rule out stroke. The purpose of this study was to report vascular and brain perfusion findings in children suffering from migraine with aura on time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and MR perfusion imaging using arterial spin labelling (ASL). Methods We retrospectively included all children who had undergone an emergency MRI examination with ASL and TOF-MRA sequences for acute neurological deficit and were given a final diagnosis of migraine with aura. The ASL perfusion maps and TOF-MRA images were independently assessed by reviewers blinded to clinical data. A mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) value was obtained for each cerebral lobe after automatic data post-processing. Results Seventeen children were finally included. Hypoperfusion was identified in one or more cerebral lobes on ASL perfusion maps by visual assessment in 16/17 (94%) children. Vasospasm was noted within the intracranial vasculature on the TOF-MRA images in 12/17 (71%) children. All (100%) of the abnormal TOF-MRA images were associated with homolateral hypoperfusion. Mean CBF values were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in visually hypoperfused lobes than in normally perfused lobes. Conclusion ASL and TOF-MRA are two totally non-invasive, easy-to-use MRI sequences for children in emergency settings. Hypoperfusion associated with homolateral vasospasm may suggest a diagnosis of migraine with aura.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... you, notify the radiologist or technologist. It is important that you remain perfectly still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. You will know when images are being recorded ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... technologist through the two-way intercom. It is important that your child remain perfectly still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. Your child will know when images are being ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... exposure to ionizing radiation. MR imaging of the soft-tissue structures of the body—such as the heart, liver and many other organs—is more likely in some instances to identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  11. Contemporary imaging: Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, H.I.; Higgins, C.; Ring, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to discussing the most recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and the vast array of interventional procedures, this book explores the appropriate clinical applications of each of these important modalities

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  13. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  14. Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pathological patterns in lupus nephritis patients: a preliminary study using a decision tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huilan; Jia, Junya; Li, Dong; Wei, Li; Shang, Wenya; Zheng, Zhenfeng

    2018-02-09

    Precise renal histopathological diagnosis will guide therapy strategy in patients with lupus nephritis. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applicable noninvasive technique in renal disease. This current study was performed to explore whether BOLD MRI could contribute to diagnose renal pathological pattern. Adult patients with lupus nephritis renal pathological diagnosis were recruited for this study. Renal biopsy tissues were assessed based on the lupus nephritis ISN/RPS 2003 classification. The Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) was used to obtain functional magnetic resonance parameter, R2* values. Several functions of R2* values were calculated and used to construct algorithmic models for renal pathological patterns. In addition, the algorithmic models were compared as to their diagnostic capability. Both Histopathology and BOLD MRI were used to examine a total of twelve patients. Renal pathological patterns included five classes III (including 3 as class III + V) and seven classes IV (including 4 as class IV + V). Three algorithmic models, including decision tree, line discriminant, and logistic regression, were constructed to distinguish the renal pathological pattern of class III and class IV. The sensitivity of the decision tree model was better than that of the line discriminant model (71.87% vs 59.48%, P decision tree model was equivalent to that of the line discriminant model (63.87% vs 63.73%, P = 0.939) and higher than that of the logistic regression model (63.87% vs 38.0%, P decision tree model was greater than that of the line discriminant model (0.765 vs 0.629, P Decision tree models constructed using functions of R2* values may facilitate the prediction of renal pathological patterns.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site ...

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    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... and Radiation Safety Videos related ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue from which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform than other imaging modalities. ...

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will my ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will I ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. Parents ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... wide range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... experience some bruising. There is also a very small chance of skin irritation at the site of ... a result, must be kept away from the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer ...

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  18. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A. de; Doornbos, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Rossum, A.C. van

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate he usefulness of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) in Magnetic Resonance. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction, we studied a total of 45 patients with a first acute myocardial infarction by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging before and after intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA. All patients received thrombolytic treatment by intravenous streptokinase. The magnetic resonance imaging studies were preformed after a meam of 88 h (range 15-241) after the acute onset of acute myocardial infarction. Five patients without evidence of cardiac disease served as controls. Spin-echo measurements (TE 30 ms) were made using a Philips Gyroscan (0.5 Tesla) or a Teslacon II (0.6 Tesla). The 45 patients were divided into four groups of patients. In Group I( patients) Gadolinium-DTPA improved the detection of myocardial infarction by Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group II (20 patients) the magnetic resonance imaging procedure was repeated every 10 min for up to 40 min following administration of Gadolinium-DTPA. Optimal contrast enhancement was obtained 20-25 min after Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group III (27 patients) signal intensities were significantly higher in the patients who underwent the magnetic resonance imaging study more than 72 h (mean 120) after the acute event, suggesting increased acculumation of Gadolinium-DTPA in a more advanced stage of the infarction process. In Group IV (45 patients) Gadolinium-DTPA was administered in an attempt to distinguish between reperfused and nonreperfused myocardial areas after thrombolytic treatment for acute myocardial infarction. The signal intensities did not differ, but reperfused areas showed a more homogeneous aspect whereas nonreperfused areas were visualized as a more heterogeneous contrast enhancement. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging using the contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA significantly improves the detection of infarcted myocardial areas

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  20. PLUTINO DETECTION BIASES, INCLUDING THE KOZAI RESONANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their relative proximity within the trans-Neptunian region, the plutinos (objects in the 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune) are numerous in flux-limited catalogs, and well-studied theoretically. We perform detailed modeling of the on-sky detection biases for plutinos, with special attention to those that are simultaneously in the Kozai resonance. In addition to the normal 3:2 resonant argument libration, Kozai plutinos also show periodic oscillations in eccentricity and inclination, coupled to the argument of perihelion (ω) oscillation. Due to the mean-motion resonance, plutinos avoid coming to pericenter near Neptune's current position in the ecliptic plane. Because Kozai plutinos are restricted to certain values of ω, perihelion always occurs out of the ecliptic plane, biasing ecliptic surveys against finding these objects. The observed Kozai plutino fraction f koz obs has been measured by several surveys, finding values between 8% and 25%, while the true Kozai plutino fraction f koz true has been predicted to be between 10% and 30% by different giant planet migration simulations. We show that f koz obs varies widely depending on the ecliptic latitude and longitude of the survey, so debiasing to find the true ratio is complex. Even a survey that covers most or all of the sky will detect an apparent Kozai fraction that is different from f koz true . We present a map of the on-sky plutino Kozai fraction that would be detected by all-sky flux-limited surveys. This will be especially important for the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope projects, which may detect large numbers of plutinos as they sweep the sky. f koz true and the distribution of the orbital elements of Kozai plutinos may be a diagnostic of giant planet migration; future migration simulations should provide details on their resonant Kozai populations.