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Sample records for resonance imaging applications

  1. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  2. Pharmaceutical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J Craig; Bowtell, Richard W; Mäder, Karsten; Melia, Colin D

    2005-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that provides internal images of materials and living organisms on a microscopic and macroscopic scale. It is non-invasive and non-destructive, and one of very few techniques that can observe internal events inside undisturbed specimens in situ. It is versatile, as a wide range of NMR modalities can be accessed, and 2D and 3D imaging can be undertaken. Despite widespread use and major advances in clinical MRI, it has seen limited application in the pharmaceutical sciences. In vitro studies have focussed on drug release mechanisms in polymeric delivery systems, but isolated studies of bioadhesion, tablet properties, and extrusion and mixing processes illustrate the wider potential. Perhaps the greatest potential however, lies in investigations of pharmaceuticals in vivo, where pilot human and animal studies have demonstrated we can obtain unique insights into the behaviour of gastrointestinal, topical, colloidal, and targeted drug delivery systems.

  3. Resonance Energy Transfer Molecular Imaging Application in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIE Da-hong1,2;TANG Gang-hua1,3

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resonance energy transfer molecular imaging (RETI can markedly improve signal intensity and tissue penetrating capacity of optical imaging, and have huge potential application in the deep-tissue optical imaging in vivo. Resonance energy transfer (RET is an energy transition from the donor to an acceptor that is in close proximity, including non-radiative resonance energy transfer and radiative resonance energy transfer. RETI is an optical imaging technology that is based on RET. RETI mainly contains fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging (FRETI, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (BRETI, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer imaging (CRETI, and radiative resonance energy transfer imaging (RRETI. RETI is the hot field of molecular imaging research and has been widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. This review mainly focuses on RETI principle and application in biomedicine.

  4. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  5. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  6. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  7. Liposomes - experiment of magnetic resonance imaging application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, S.

    1987-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical research effort with liposomes has been involved with the investigation of their use as drug carriers to particular target organs. Recently there has been a growing interest in liposomes not only as carrier of drugs but as a tool for the introduction of various substances into the human body. In this study, liposome delivery of nitroxyl radicals as NMR contrast agent for improved tissue imaging is experimented in rats [fr

  8. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  9. A possible application of magnetic resonance imaging for pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Joanna; Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga

    2011-03-18

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive method, the experiment can be conducted in situ and allows the studying of the sample and the different processes in vitro or in vivo. 1D, 2D or 3D imaging can be undertaken. MRI is nowadays most widely used in medicine as a clinical diagnostic tool, but has still seen limited application in the food and pharmaceutical sciences. The different imaging pulse sequences of MRI allow to image the processes that take place in a wide scale range from ms (dissolution of compact tablets) to hours (hydration of drug delivery systems) for mobile as well as for rigid spins, usually protons. The paper gives examples of MRI application of in vitro imaging of pharmaceutical dosage based on hydroxypropyl methylcellulose which have focused on water-penetration, diffusion, polymer swelling, and drug release, characterized with respect to other physical parameters such as pH and the molecular weight of polymer. Tetracycline hydrochloride was used as a model drug. NMR imaging of density distributions and fast kinetics of the dissolution behavior of compact tablets is presented for paracetamol tablets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging- physical principles and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavri, O.J.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in imaging techniques for better and efficient diagnosis have become possible with the advent of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The modalities of MRI technique for indication and diagnosis are mentioned in with typical examples. (author)

  11. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, F; Crépeault, B; Duchesne, S

    2012-01-01

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging- physical principles and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavri, Omprakash J.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in equipment and knowledge related to radiology are occurring at an astonishingly rapid rate. On November 8, 1895, William Conrad Roentgen discovered x-rays. In 1972, Godfrey Hounsfield and George Ambrose introduced computec tomography at a meeting of the British Institute of Radiology. In the same year, Paul Lauterbur published the idea of spatially resolving nuclear magnetic resonance samples, naming it zeugmatography. In 1977, Waldo Hinshaw and co-workers published a magnetic resonance image of a human hand and wrist, and by 1981 several centres were obtaining clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images. In a very short time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained acceptance as a clinically useful imaging tool. (author)

  13. A compatible electrocutaneous display for functional magnetic resonance imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Cappelli, C; Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Scilingo, E P; Giovannetti, G; Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Pietrini, P; Landini, L; Bicchi, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an MR (magnetic resonance) compatible electrocutaneous stimulator able to inject an electric current, variable in amplitude and frequency, into the fingertips in order to elicit tactile skin receptors (mechanoreceptors). The desired goal is to evoke specific tactile sensations selectively stimulating skin receptors by means of an electric current in place of mechanical stimuli. The field of application ranges from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tactile studies to augmented reality technology. The device here proposed is designed using safety criteria in order to comply with the threshold of voltage and current permitted by regulations. Moreover, MR safety and compatibility criteria were considered in order to perform experiments inside the MR scanner during an fMRI acquisition for functional brain activation analysis. Psychophysical laboratory tests are performed in order to define the different evoked tactile sensation. After verifying the device MR safety and compatibility on a phantom, a test on a human subject during fMRI acquisition is performed to visualize the brain areas activated by the simulated tactile sensation.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Helms, C.A.; Steinbach, L.; Neumann, C.; Munk, P.L.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  15. Application of magnetic resonance techniques for imaging tumour physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have the unique ability to measure in vivo the biochemical content of living tissue in the body in a dynamic, non-invasive and non-destructive manner. MR also permits serial investigations of steady-state tumour physiology and biochemistry, as well as the response of a tumour to treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and a mixture of the two techniques (spectroscopic imaging) allow some physiological parameters, for example pH, to be 'imaged'. Using these methods, information on tissue bioenergetics and phospolipid membrane turnover, pH, hypoxia, oxygenation, and various aspects of vascularity including blood flow, angiogenesis, permeability and vascular volume can be obtained. In addition, MRS methods can be used for monitoring anticancer drugs (e.g. 5FU, ifosfamide) and their metabolites at their sites of action. The role of these state-of-the-art MR methods in imaging tumour physiology and their potential role in the clinic are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Velocity Mapping in Chemical Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Lynn F; Sederman, Andrew J

    2017-06-07

    This review aims to illustrate the diversity of measurements that can be made using magnetic resonance techniques, which have the potential to provide insights into chemical engineering systems that cannot readily be achieved using any other method. Perhaps the most notable advantage in using magnetic resonance methods is that both chemistry and transport can be followed in three dimensions, in optically opaque systems, and without the need for tracers to be introduced into the system. Here we focus on hydrodynamics and, in particular, applications to rheology, pipe flow, and fixed-bed and gas-solid fluidized bed reactors. With increasing development of industrially relevant sample environments and undersampling data acquisition strategies that can reduce acquisition times to chemical engineering research.

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  19. The application of functional magnetic resonance imaging to neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yasmene B; Marsden, Charles A

    2004-10-01

    The technique of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the capacity to acquire data with spatial and temporal resolution that far exceeds other currently available methods of non-invasive investigation of brain function. This coupled with its ability for serial studies makes it an attractive prospect for investigating the effects of pharmacological agents in the brain. Recent advances in fMRI have been made in the areas of reward and dependence, brain trauma and injury, psychotropic drugs and pain using small animals. Although the use of fMRI in pharmacological studies is becoming popular, there are various associated complications, such as the possible interference of drugs with the mechanisms that give rise to the pharmacological fMRI signal, and local or global cardiovascular changes that might produce functional responses unrelated to neural activity. Consideration of these concerns, coupled with careful attention to experimental detail and verification procedures, promises to make pharmacological fMRI use a valuable tool for understanding the actions of drugs in the brain.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Dosimetry application to chemical ferrous gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmet, Ch.

    2000-10-01

    MRI dosimetry is based on the determination of relaxation parameters (T1, T2). Chemical detectors whose NMR properties are sensitive to irradiation are used. Difficulties in absolute relaxation times measure limit the use of this technique. The aim of this work first consists in the development of a quantitative method to determine T, relaxation time on irradiated ferrous gels. So, we can study processes and parameters which affect the technique sensibility. The method sensitivity first depends on imaging instrumentation. Quantitative MRI method used is able to eliminate variable imager factors. The study of instrumental parameters (coil, sequence parameters) permits to define an imaging protocol which is a function of the considered application (volume size, spatial resolution and accuracy). The method sensitivity depends on the detector sensibility too. The best composition of ferrous gel has been determined. Dose distributions are obtained in three minutes. Comparison between MRI results and conventional dosimetry methods (specially ionisation chamber and films) shows a deviation of about 5% for single irradiation with energy fields in the range of 300 keV to 25 MeV. So, the proposed method forms a suitable technique for 3D dosimetry. (author)

  1. Some applications of magnetic resonance imaging in fluid mechanics: Complex flows and complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, Daniel; Rodts, Stephane; Groenink, Maarten; Rafai, Salima; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, Noushine; Coussot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The review deals with applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study flow. We first briefly discuss the principles of flow measurement by MRI and give examples of some applications, such as multiphase flows, the MRI rheology of complex fluid flows, and blood flows in the human

  2. Free elements resonator: design and simulation, application to NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakri-Bouchet, L.; Lapray, Ch.; Briquet, A.

    1999-01-01

    The free elements resonator, has a bird cage structure. It is made with purely inductively coupled circuits which are individually pre-tuned. The resonance frequency is adjusted by a simultaneous rotation of elements that preserves the coil symmetry. The radiofrequency functioning can be analysis by the usual set of coupled differential equations leading to the resonant modes. In the work presented here the formal analysis is completed by a simulation based on software (Pspice). The characteristics of each element (resistance, self-inductance, capacitance) are Firstly measured, as well as the mutual inductance between each couple of elements. Then the resonant modes and the corresponding current and voltage distribution are obtained to evaluate the radiofrequency field. Using this approach, a free elements bird-cage for efficient operation at 2 Tesla is designed. (authors)

  3. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  4. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  5. Assmentment of myocardial perfusion by magnetic resonance imaging: on the way to clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.E.; Lorenz, C.H.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging detects the flow of contrast - enhanced blood and even allows the quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion. The clinical application of this method is being held back by the difficulties in image evaluation and the limitation of standard techniques to the acquisition of a single slice per heart beat cycle. Recent developments in scanner hardware as well as in image acquisition techniques open up the possibility of assessing myocardial perfusion over the entire heart with a spatial resolution in the range of 2 mm. As an example of such a new scanning strategy, a segmented gradient-echo recalled echo planar imaging sequence with preceding saturation is discussed and results in a patient with an infarction are presented. The clinical use of perfusion assessment covering the entire heart for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease is enhanced by the flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of functional cardiac parameters. (orig.) [de

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease

  8. In Vivo Application of Proton-Electron Double-Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Shun; Krishna, Murali C.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Utsumi, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Proton-electron double-resonance imaging (PEDRI) employs electron paramagnetic resonance irradiation with low-field magnetic resonance imaging so that the electron spin polarization is transferred to nearby protons, resulting in higher signals. PEDRI provides information about free radical distribution and, indirectly, about the local microenvironment such as partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), tissue permeability, redox status, and acid-base balance. Recent Advances: Local acid-base balance can be imaged by exploiting the different resonance frequency of radical probes between R and RH+ forms. Redox status can also be imaged by using the loss of radical-related signal after reduction. These methods require optimized radical probes and pulse sequences. Critical Issues: High-power radio frequency irradiation is needed for optimum signal enhancement, which may be harmful to living tissue by unwanted heat deposition. Free radical probes differ depending on the purpose of PEDRI. Some probes are less effective for enhancing signal than others, which can reduce image quality. It is so far not possible to image endogenous radicals by PEDRI because low concentrations and broad line widths of the radicals lead to negligible signal enhancement. Future Directions: PEDRI has similarities with electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) because both techniques observe the EPR signal, directly in the case of EPRI and indirectly with PEDRI. PEDRI provides information that is vital to research on homeostasis, development of diseases, or treatment responses in vivo. It is expected that the development of new EPR techniques will give insights into novel PEDRI applications and vice versa. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1345–1364. PMID:28990406

  9. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solves-Llorens, J. A.; Rupérez, M. J., E-mail: mjruperez@labhuman.i3bh.es; Monserrat, C. [LabHuman, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Feliu, E.; García, M. [Hospital Clínica Benidorm, Avda. Alfonso Puchades, 8, 03501 Benidorm (Alicante) (Spain); Lloret, M. [Hospital Universitari y Politècnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur, 46026 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. Methods: The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. Results: The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. Conclusions: A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the

  10. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solves-Llorens, J. A.; Rupérez, M. J.; Monserrat, C.; Feliu, E.; García, M.; Lloret, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. Methods: The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. Results: The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. Conclusions: A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the

  11. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  12. Edge Sharpness Assessment by Parametric Modeling: Application to Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R; Ding, Y; Simonetti, O P

    2015-05-01

    In biomedical imaging, edge sharpness is an important yet often overlooked image quality metric. In this work, a semi-automatic method to quantify edge sharpness in the presence of significant noise is presented with application to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The method is based on parametric modeling of image edges. First, an edge map is automatically generated and one or more edges-of-interest (EOI) are manually selected using graphical user interface. Multiple exclusion criteria are then enforced to eliminate edge pixels that are potentially not suitable for sharpness assessment. Second, at each pixel of the EOI, an image intensity profile is read along a small line segment that runs locally normal to the EOI. Third, the profiles corresponding to all EOI pixels are individually fitted with a sigmoid function characterized by four parameters, including one that represents edge sharpness. Last, the distribution of the sharpness parameter is used to quantify edge sharpness. For validation, the method is applied to simulated data as well as MRI data from both phantom imaging and cine imaging experiments. This method allows for fast, quantitative evaluation of edge sharpness even in images with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Although the utility of this method is demonstrated for MRI, it can be adapted for other medical imaging applications.

  13. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  15. How to analyze a nuclear magnetic resonance image. Application to the pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parienty, R.; Lavayssiere, R.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is based on the behaviour of some atomic nuclei when they are placed in a magnetic field and subjected to radiofrequency waves of a specific length. The resonance signals they emit under such conditions are collected as localized digital data which are used to construct an image. The signals vary according to multiple tissue characteristics, notably proton density, relaxation times T1 and T2 and, where applicable, blood flow direction and velocity. The relative influences exerted by these tissue factors on resonance signals can be evaluated by altering the technical parameters of the examination, that is practically the radiofrequency wave sequence. Special formulae make it possible to predict signal variations and to increase, decrease or even reverse contrast, thus obtaining as many morphological or functional images of the different media in the body. NMR semiology therefore is copious, complex and variable, but a diagrammatic description of the interplay between parameters provides a key to elementary analysis. Images of pelvic structures taken as examples illustrate the necessity to select the exploratory procedure according to the purpose of the exploration or to manipulate sequences with greater safety [fr

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  17. Preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and systems biology in cancer research: current applications and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Chris; Rodriguez, Olga C; VanMeter, John; Fricke, Stanley T; Rood, Brian R; Lee, YiChien; Wang, Sean S; Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Wang, Yue

    2013-02-01

    Biologically accurate mouse models of human cancer have become important tools for the study of human disease. The anatomical location of various target organs, such as brain, pancreas, and prostate, makes determination of disease status difficult. Imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, can greatly enhance diagnosis, and longitudinal imaging of tumor progression is an important source of experimental data. Even in models where the tumors arise in areas that permit visual determination of tumorigenesis, longitudinal anatomical and functional imaging can enhance the scope of studies by facilitating the assessment of biological alterations, (such as changes in angiogenesis, metabolism, cellular invasion) as well as tissue perfusion and diffusion. One of the challenges in preclinical imaging is the development of infrastructural platforms required for integrating in vivo imaging and therapeutic response data with ex vivo pathological and molecular data using a more systems-based multiscale modeling approach. Further challenges exist in integrating these data for computational modeling to better understand the pathobiology of cancer and to better affect its cure. We review the current applications of preclinical imaging and discuss the implications of applying functional imaging to visualize cancer progression and treatment. Finally, we provide new data from an ongoing preclinical drug study demonstrating how multiscale modeling can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of cancer biology and therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy for magnetic resonance imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Lu; Yu, Yanrong; Li, Xuejian; Liu, Wei; Yang, Hong; Wu, Dongmei; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed serving as a sensitive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was prepared via wet chemical reduction approach. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is superparamagnetic. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy exhibits T 2 -weighted MR enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: For magnetic resonance imaging applications, a facile approach for water-soluble dextran coated amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed. The as-synthesized nanoalloy had a diameter of 9 nm with a narrow size distribution and showed superparamagnetic property with a saturated magnetization (Ms) of 25 emu/g. In vitro cytotoxicity test revealed that it was biocompatible at a concentration below 120 μg/mL. It can be uptaken by HeLa cells effectively and resulted in the obvious T 2 effect after internalization. Biodistribution studies in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) confirmed that Fe–Co nanoalloy was preferentially accumulated in lung and spleen after intravenous injection for 4 h. In vivo MRI, dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy can serve as a sensitive contrast agent for MR imaging, especially in the spleen, so we believe that it maybe hold great promise for diagnosis of splenic disease by appropriately functionalizing their surface

  19. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy for magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Lu; Yu, Yanrong; Li, Xuejian; Liu, Wei [The Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Yang, Hong, E-mail: yanghong@shnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Wu, Dongmei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang, Shiping, E-mail: shipingy@shnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed serving as a sensitive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was prepared via wet chemical reduction approach. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is superparamagnetic. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy exhibits T{sub 2}-weighted MR enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: For magnetic resonance imaging applications, a facile approach for water-soluble dextran coated amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed. The as-synthesized nanoalloy had a diameter of 9 nm with a narrow size distribution and showed superparamagnetic property with a saturated magnetization (Ms) of 25 emu/g. In vitro cytotoxicity test revealed that it was biocompatible at a concentration below 120 μg/mL. It can be uptaken by HeLa cells effectively and resulted in the obvious T{sub 2} effect after internalization. Biodistribution studies in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) confirmed that Fe–Co nanoalloy was preferentially accumulated in lung and spleen after intravenous injection for 4 h. In vivo MRI, dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy can serve as a sensitive contrast agent for MR imaging, especially in the spleen, so we believe that it maybe hold great promise for diagnosis of splenic disease by appropriately functionalizing their surface.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  3. Culture and magnetic resonance image of magnetospirillum magneticum AMB1 for the application as a vector for multimodal image reporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae, Seong Ho; Vu, Nguyen H.; Jung, Young Yeon; Min, Jung Joon

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 synthesize uniform, nano-sized magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which are referred to as bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs). BacMPs have potential for various technological applications and the molecular mechanism of their formation is of particular interest. In this study, we established the culture method for M. magneticum AMB-1 and analysed it's growth property and magnetic resonance image. Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain was obtained from ATCC and inoculated in Magnetospirillum growth medium (MSGM). M. magneticum was cultured at 26? with 60 rpm shaking and check the optical density (OD) in 600 nm every 6 hours. Cultured M. magneticum that reached to stataionary phase was collected by centrifugation and suspend in PBS. MR image was taken by 1.5T MRI machine. The growth of M. magneticum was reached up to 0.2 OD600 at 80 hours after inoculation. The bacterial suspension was made the concentration 2 X 10-11 CFU/ml and successfully taken MR image using by 1.5T MRI machine. M. magneticum AMB strain was successfully cultured in our laboratory condition and was shown intensive MR image. Now we can use this bacteria as a multimodal image vector if the M. magneticum is transformed with an bioluminescent or fluorescent reporter gene. Further study about the development of M. magneticum strain as a multimodal image is needed

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  5. Edge-augmented Fourier partial sums with applications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriva-Latt, Jade; Morrison, Angela; Radgowski, Alison; Tobin, Joseph; Iwen, Mark; Viswanathan, Aditya

    2017-08-01

    Certain applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) require the reconstruction of functions from Fourier spectral data. When the underlying functions are piecewise-smooth, standard Fourier approximation methods suffer from the Gibbs phenomenon - with associated oscillatory artifacts in the vicinity of edges and an overall reduced order of convergence in the approximation. This paper proposes an edge-augmented Fourier reconstruction procedure which uses only the first few Fourier coefficients of an underlying piecewise-smooth function to accurately estimate jump information and then incorporate it into a Fourier partial sum approximation. We provide both theoretical and empirical results showing the improved accuracy of the proposed method, as well as comparisons demonstrating superior performance over existing state-of-the-art sparse optimization-based methods.

  6. Clinical Application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Management of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, also termed primary, induction, or preoperative chemotherapy, is traditionally used to downstage inoperable breast cancer. In recent years it has been increasingly used for patients who have operable cancers in order to facilitate breast-conserving surgery, achieve better cosmetic outcome, and improve prognosis by reaching pathologic complete response (pCR. Many studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can assess residual tumor size after NAC, and that provides critical information for planning of the optimal surgery. NAC also allows for timely adjustment of administered drugs based on response, so ineffective regimens could be terminated early to spare patients from unnecessary toxicity while allowing other effective regimens to work sooner. This review article summarizes the clinical application of MRI during NAC. The use of different MR imaging methods, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, proton MR spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted MRI, to monitor and evaluate the NAC response, as well as how changes of parameters measured at an early time after initiation of a drug regimen can predict final treatment outcome, are reviewed. MRI has been proven a valuable tool and will continue to provide important information facilitating individualized image-guided treatment and personalized management for breast cancer patients undergoing NAC.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest: current and new applications, with an emphasis on pulmonology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Mauad, Fernando Marum, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Secao de Radiologia

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the present review study was to present the principal applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest, including the description of new techniques. Over the past decade, this method has evolved considerably because of the development of new equipment, including the simultaneous interconnection of phased-array multiple radiofrequency receiver coils and remote control of the table movement, in addition to faster techniques of image acquisition, such as parallel imaging and partial Fourier acquisitions, as well as the introduction of new contrast agents. All of these advances have allowed MRI to gain ground in the study of various pathologies of the chest, including lung diseases. Currently, MRI is considered the modality of choice for the evaluation of lesions in the mediastinum and in the chest wall, as well as of superior sulcus tumors. However, it can also facilitate the diagnosis of lung, pleural, and cardiac diseases, as well as of those related to the pulmonary vasculature. Pulmonary MRI angiography can be used in order to evaluate various pulmonary vascular diseases, and it has played an ever greater role in the study of thromboembolism. Because cardiac MRI allows morphological and functional assessment in the same test, it has also become part of the clinical routine in the evaluation of various cardiac diseases. Finally, the role of MRI has been extended to the identification and characterization of pulmonary nodules, the evaluation of airway diseases, and the characterization of pleural effusion. (author)

  8. Application of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hao; Wei Li; Liu Maili

    2006-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years, growing research interest and efforts have been directed to study the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles and substances alike. Despite the fact that significant progress has been made, this is still largely an uncharted field. Any advances in this field would certainly require thorough multi-disciplinary collaboration, in which the expertise and tools in nanoscience/nanotechnoloogy, physics, chemistry and biomedicine have to be combined. Due to their wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biomedicine, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy are among the most important and powerful research tools currently in use, mainly because these techniques can be used in situ and noninvasively to acquire dynamic and real-time information in various samples ranging from protein solution to the human brain. In this paper, the application of MR imaging and spectroscopy in studying the biological effects of manufactured nanoparticles is discussed. It is expected that these techniques will play important roles in 1) detecting the presence of nanoparticles in biological tissues and in vivo, 2) studying the interactions between the nanoparticles and biomolecules and 3) investigating the metabonomic aspect of the biological effects of nanoparticles. (authors)

  9. Lipid-based nanoparticles for magnetic resonance molecular imaging : design, characterization, and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis research is described which was aimed to develop lipidic nanoparticles for the investigation and visualization of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis with both magnetic resonance molecular imaging and optical techniques. The underlying rationale for this is that conventional MR imaging

  10. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Cardiac and pericardial tumors: A potential application of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathala, Ahmed; Abouzied, Mohei; AlSugair, Abdul-Aziz

    2017-07-26

    Cardiac and pericardial masses may be neoplastic, benign and malignant, non-neoplastic such as thrombus or simple pericardial cysts, or normal variants cardiac structure can also be a diagnostic challenge. Currently, there are several imaging modalities for diagnosis of cardiac masses; each technique has its inherent advantages and disadvantages. Echocardiography, is typically the initial test utilizes in such cases, Echocardiography is considered the test of choice for evaluation and detection of cardiac mass, it is widely available, portable, with no ionizing radiation and provides comprehensive evaluation of cardiac function and valves, however, echocardiography is not very helpful in many cases such as evaluation of extracardiac extension of mass, poor tissue characterization, and it is non diagnostic in some cases. Cross sectional imaging with cardiac computed tomography provides a three dimensional data set with excellent spatial resolution but utilizes ionizing radiation, intravenous iodinated contrast and relatively limited functional evaluation of the heart. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has excellent contrast resolution that allows superior soft tissue characterization. CMR offers comprehensive evaluation of morphology, function, tissue characterization. The great benefits of CMR make CMR a highly useful tool in the assessment of cardiac masses. (Fluorine 18) fluorodeoxygluocse (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has become a corner stone in several oncological application such as tumor staging, restaging, treatment efficiency, FDG is a very useful imaging modality in evaluation of cardiac masses. A recent advance in the imaging technology has been the development of integrated PET-MRI system that utilizes the advantages of PET and MRI in a single examination. FDG PET-MRI provides complementary information on evaluation of cardiac masses. The purpose of this review is to provide several clinical scenarios on the incremental value of PET

  13. Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain. Application to assess Wallerian degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Hironaka; Katayama, Yasuo; Tsuganezawa, Toshikazu; Yamamuro, Manabu; Terashi, Akiro; Owan, Chojin [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging is a new algorithm for the treatment of apparent diffusion tensor using the three primary colors. To determine if 3DAC has a clinical application for human brain, six normal volunteers and twenty patients with supratentorial cerebrovascular accidents were examined using clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the changes in the 3DAC images associated with Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract were evaluated. The 3DAC images exhibited impressive anatomical resolution. In all chronic stage patients with hemiparesis, the colors in the pyramidal tract were faded. Patients examined during the acute stage who later recovered from hemiparesis had no visible changes of the 3DAC image, whereas patients who recovered poorly showed distinct color fading in the pyramidal tract within 14 days following stroke. In conclusion, very fine anatomical structures are visible on 3DAC images, and it can be used as a diagnostic tool for the human brain. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain. Application to assess Wallerian degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hironaka; Katayama, Yasuo; Tsuganezawa, Toshikazu; Yamamuro, Manabu; Terashi, Akiro; Owan, Chojin

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) magnetic resonance imaging is a new algorithm for the treatment of apparent diffusion tensor using the three primary colors. To determine if 3DAC has a clinical application for human brain, six normal volunteers and twenty patients with supratentorial cerebrovascular accidents were examined using clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the changes in the 3DAC images associated with Wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract were evaluated. The 3DAC images exhibited impressive anatomical resolution. In all chronic stage patients with hemiparesis, the colors in the pyramidal tract were faded. Patients examined during the acute stage who later recovered from hemiparesis had no visible changes of the 3DAC image, whereas patients who recovered poorly showed distinct color fading in the pyramidal tract within 14 days following stroke. In conclusion, very fine anatomical structures are visible on 3DAC images, and it can be used as a diagnostic tool for the human brain. (author)

  15. Parallel transmission techniques in magnetic resonance imaging: experimental realization, applications and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, P.

    2007-06-01

    The primary objective of this work was the first experimental realization of parallel RF transmission for accelerating spatially selective excitation in magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, basic aspects regarding the performance of this technique were investigated, potential risks regarding the specific absorption rate (SAR) were considered and feasibility studies under application-oriented conditions as first steps towards a practical utilisation of this technique were undertaken. At first, based on the RF electronics platform of the Bruker Avance MRI systems, the technical foundations were laid to perform simultaneous transmission of individual RF waveforms on different RF channels. Another essential requirement for the realization of Parallel Excitation (PEX) was the design and construction of suitable RF transmit arrays with elements driven by separate transmit channels. In order to image the PEX results two imaging methods were implemented based on a spin-echo and a gradient-echo sequence, in which a parallel spatially selective pulse was included as an excitation pulse. In the course of this work PEX experiments were successfully performed on three different MRI systems, a 4.7 T and a 9.4 T animal system and a 3 T human scanner, using 5 different RF coil setups in total. In the last part of this work investigations regarding possible applications of Parallel Excitation were performed. A first study comprised experiments of slice-selective B1 inhomogeneity correction by using 3D-selective Parallel Excitation. The investigations were performed in a phantom as well as in a rat fixed in paraformaldehyde solution. In conjunction with these experiments a novel method of calculating RF pulses for spatially selective excitation based on a so-called Direct Calibration approach was developed, which is particularly suitable for this type of experiments. In the context of these experiments it was demonstrated how to combine the advantages of parallel transmission

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  18. Application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on monitoring flower bud differentiation of tulip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Haojun; Yang Hongguang; Han Hongbin; Sun Xiaomei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for observing morphogenesis process in the living specimen situation of tulip flower buds. Through a comparison of different MRI imaging formation technique (longitudinal relaxation-T1WI, transverse relaxation time weighted imaging-T2WI, proton density weighted imaging-PDWI), seeking for an accurate and practical MRI technique to observe tulip bulb and differentiation period of flower bud. The results showed that in the demonstration of the morphological characters as well as morphogenesis process of flower bud differentiation, the T1WI was completely consistent with the results of rough slice, PDWI and T1WI also had obviously higher map quality than the T2WI (P<0.05). It is indicated that the magnetic resonance imaging technique could monitor the development of flower bud differentiation in vivo. (authors)

  19. Applicability of McDonald 2010 and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis (MAGNIMS) 2016 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria for the Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Sujani Madhurika Kodagoda; Wijeweera, Indunil; Wijesinghe, Priyangi; Adikari, Sanjaya Bandara; Fink, Katharina; Sominanda, Herath Mudiyanselage Ajith

    2018-05-31

    The magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis (MAGNIMS) group recently proposed guidelines to replace the existing dissemination-in-space criteria in McDonald 2010 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for diagnosing multiple sclerosis. There has been insufficient research regarding their applicability in Asians. Objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria with the aim of verifying their applicability in Sri Lankan patients. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome diagnosed by consultant neurologists were recruited from five major neurology centers. Baseline and follow-up MRI scans were performed within 3 months from the initial presentation and at one year after baseline MRI, respectively. McDonald 2010 and MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were applied to all MRI scans. Patients were followed-up for 2 years to assess the conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV for predicting the conversion to CDMS were calculated. Forty-two of 66 patients converted to CDMS. Thirty-seven fulfilled the McDonald 2010 MRI criteria, and 33 converted to CDMS. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were fulfilled by 29, with 28 converting to CDMS. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV were 78%, 83%, 64%, 89%, and 69%, respectively, for the McDonald 2010 criteria, and 67%, 96%, 77%, 96%, and 62% for the MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria. MAGNIMS 2016 MRI criteria were superior to McDonald 2010 MRI criteria in specificity, accuracy, and PPV, but inferior in sensitivity and NPV. Copyright © 2018 Korean Neurological Association.

  20. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Dongsu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  1. Principles of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Tınaz

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a neuroimaging technique that provides brain activation maps with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI method is the most commonly used technique. It measures the hemodynamic response to neural activity. The BOLD fMRI signal is based on the magnetic properties of the oxygenated / deoxygenated hemoglobin which is the oxygen carrier in blood. FMRI is noninvasive, and unlike in positron emission tomography (PET individuals are not exposed to radiation. This allows data collection from the same individual over multiple sessions. The relatively high temporal resolution of fMRI compared to PET provides flexibility in experimental designs of cognitive tasks. In this paper we review the key principles of MRI physics, and the underlying metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrophysiological mechanisms of BOLD signal. We introduce frequently used experimental design paradigms and present examples. Next, we give an overview of theoretical considerations and applications of analysis methods in fMRI time series. Neural network modeling based on fMRI data is also discussed. Finally, we present an ongoing study in our laboratory to demonstrate the application of design types and analysis methods

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  5. Automated Modular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Decision Support System (MIROR): An Application in Pediatric Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Meeus, Emma M; Manias, Karen; Foster, Katharine; Peet, Andrew

    2018-05-02

    Advances in magnetic resonance imaging and the introduction of clinical decision support systems has underlined the need for an analysis tool to extract and analyze relevant information from magnetic resonance imaging data to aid decision making, prevent errors, and enhance health care. The aim of this study was to design and develop a modular medical image region of interest analysis tool and repository (MIROR) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation, and representation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The clinical decision support system was developed and evaluated for diffusion-weighted imaging of body tumors in children (cohort of 48 children, with 37 malignant and 11 benign tumors). Mevislab software and Python have been used for the development of MIROR. Regions of interests were drawn around benign and malignant body tumors on different diffusion parametric maps, and extracted information was used to discriminate the malignant tumors from benign tumors. Using MIROR, the various histogram parameters derived for each tumor case when compared with the information in the repository provided additional information for tumor characterization and facilitated the discrimination between benign and malignant tumors. Clinical decision support system cross-validation showed high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating between these tumor groups using histogram parameters. MIROR, as a diagnostic tool and repository, allowed the interpretation and analysis of magnetic resonance imaging images to be more accessible and comprehensive for clinicians. It aims to increase clinicians' skillset by introducing newer techniques and up-to-date findings to their repertoire and make information from previous cases available to aid decision making. The modular-based format of the tool allows integration of analyses that are not readily available clinically and streamlines the future developments. ©Niloufar Zarinabad, Emma M Meeus, Karen Manias

  6. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  7. Improved application of independent component analysis to functional magnetic resonance imaging study via linear projection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhiying; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Xia; Reiman, Eric; Peng, Danling; Yao, Li

    2009-02-01

    Spatial Independent component analysis (sICA) has been widely used to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The well accepted implicit assumption is the spatially statistical independency of intrinsic sources identified by sICA, making the sICA applications difficult for data in which there exist interdependent sources and confounding factors. This interdependency can arise, for instance, from fMRI studies investigating two tasks in a single session. In this study, we introduced a linear projection approach and considered its utilization as a tool to separate task-related components from two-task fMRI data. The robustness and feasibility of the method are substantiated through simulation on computer data and fMRI real rest data. Both simulated and real two-task fMRI experiments demonstrated that sICA in combination with the projection method succeeded in separating spatially dependent components and had better detection power than pure model-based method when estimating activation induced by each task as well as both tasks.

  8. Application of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging in large invasive pituitary adenoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Cong, Zixiang; Ji, Xueman; Wang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Zhigang; Jia, Yue; Wang, Handong

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the clinical application value of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) in large invasive pituitary adenoma surgery. A total of 30 patients with large pituitary adenoma underwent microscopic tumor resection under the assistance of an iMRI system; 26 cases received surgery through the nasal-transsphenoidal approach, and the remaining four cases received surgery through the pterion approach. iMRI was performed one or two times depending on the need of the surgeon. If a residual tumor was found, further resection was conducted under iMRI guidance. iMRI revealed residual tumors in 12 cases, among which nine cases received further resection. Of these nine cases, iMRI rescanning confirmed complete resection in six cases, and subtotal resection in the remaining three. Overall, 24 cases of tumor were totally resected, and six cases were subtotally resected. The total resection rate of tumors increased from 60% to 80%. iMRI can effectively determine the resection extent of pituitary adenomas. In addition, it provides an objective basis for real-time judgment of surgical outcome, subsequently improving surgical accuracy and safety, and increasing the total tumor resection rate. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  9. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  12. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Qi, E-mail: Qi.Duan@nih.gov; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van [Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan [The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  18. Moment problems in Hilbert space with applications to magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, Marcel.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the mathematical and computational aspects of reconstruction techniques by means of magnetic resonance imaging, in particular for the time-dependent case, referred to as dynamic MRI. The main subjects are: a mathematical framework for dynamic MRI reconstruction; analytic solutions, numerical algorithms and development of reconstruction techniques; stability analysis of the reconstruction algorithms; comparison between these algorithms. (author). 63 refs.; 38 figs.; 5 tabs

  19. Online Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy: First Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Kashani, Rojano; Parikh, Parag; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Wooten, Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Rodriguez, Vivian; Olsen, Lindsey; Robinson, Clifford; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of online adaptive magnetic resonance (MR) image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) through reporting of our initial clinical experience and workflow considerations. Methods and Materials: The first clinically deployed online adaptive MR-IGRT system consisted of a split 0.35T MR scanner straddling a ring gantry with 3 multileaf collimator-equipped "6"0Co heads. The unit is supported by a Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system that allows real-time adaptive planning with the patient on the table. All patients undergo computed tomography and MR imaging (MRI) simulation for initial treatment planning. A volumetric MRI scan is acquired for each patient at the daily treatment setup. Deformable registration is performed using the planning computed tomography data set, which allows for the transfer of the initial contours and the electron density map to the daily MRI scan. The deformed electron density map is then used to recalculate the original plan on the daily MRI scan for physician evaluation. Recontouring and plan reoptimization are performed when required, and patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is performed using an independent in-house software system. Results: The first online adaptive MR-IGRT treatments consisted of 5 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies. The clinical setting included neoadjuvant colorectal (n=3), unresectable gastric (n=1), and unresectable pheochromocytoma (n=1). Recontouring and reoptimization were deemed necessary for 3 of 5 patients, and the initial plan was deemed sufficient for 2 of the 5 patients. The reasons for plan adaptation included tumor progression or regression and a change in small bowel anatomy. In a subsequently expanded cohort of 170 fractions (20 patients), 52 fractions (30.6%) were reoptimized online, and 92 fractions (54.1%) were treated with an online-adapted or previously adapted plan. The median time for recontouring, reoptimization, and QA was 26

  20. Online Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy: First Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Kashani, Rojano; Parikh, Parag; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Wooten, Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Rodriguez, Vivian; Olsen, Lindsey; Robinson, Clifford; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey, E-mail: jolsen@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of online adaptive magnetic resonance (MR) image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) through reporting of our initial clinical experience and workflow considerations. Methods and Materials: The first clinically deployed online adaptive MR-IGRT system consisted of a split 0.35T MR scanner straddling a ring gantry with 3 multileaf collimator-equipped {sup 60}Co heads. The unit is supported by a Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system that allows real-time adaptive planning with the patient on the table. All patients undergo computed tomography and MR imaging (MRI) simulation for initial treatment planning. A volumetric MRI scan is acquired for each patient at the daily treatment setup. Deformable registration is performed using the planning computed tomography data set, which allows for the transfer of the initial contours and the electron density map to the daily MRI scan. The deformed electron density map is then used to recalculate the original plan on the daily MRI scan for physician evaluation. Recontouring and plan reoptimization are performed when required, and patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is performed using an independent in-house software system. Results: The first online adaptive MR-IGRT treatments consisted of 5 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies. The clinical setting included neoadjuvant colorectal (n=3), unresectable gastric (n=1), and unresectable pheochromocytoma (n=1). Recontouring and reoptimization were deemed necessary for 3 of 5 patients, and the initial plan was deemed sufficient for 2 of the 5 patients. The reasons for plan adaptation included tumor progression or regression and a change in small bowel anatomy. In a subsequently expanded cohort of 170 fractions (20 patients), 52 fractions (30.6%) were reoptimized online, and 92 fractions (54.1%) were treated with an online-adapted or previously adapted plan. The median time for recontouring, reoptimization, and QA was 26

  1. Low frequency fluctuations in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Küblböck, M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has emerged as a widely used, highly accepted and very popular method for the assessment of neuronal activity in the human brain. It is a completely non-invasive imaging technique with high temporal resolution, which relies on the measurement of local differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. Therefore, fMRI can be regarded as an indirect measure of neuronal activity via measurement of localised changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen consumption. Maps of neuronal activity are calculated from fMRI data acquired either in the presence of an explicit task (task-based fMRI) or in absence of a task (resting-state fMRI). While in task-based fMRI task-specific patterns of brain activity are subject to research, resting-state fMRI reveals fundamental networks of intrinsic brain activity. These networks are characterized by low-frequency oscillations in the power spectrum of resting-state fMRI data. In the present work, we first introduce the physical principles and the technical background that allow us to measure these changes in blood oxygenation, followed by an introduction to the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect and to analysis methods for both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. We also analyse the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) of a novel 2D-EPI sequence, which allows the experimenter to acquire several slices simultaneously in order to assess the optimal parameter settings for this sequence at 3T. We then proceed to investigate the temporal properties of measures for the amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in resting-state fMRI data, which are regarded as potential biomarkers for a wide range of mental diseases in various clinical studies and show the high stability and robustness of these data, which are important prerequisites for application as a biomarker as well as their dependency on head motion

  2. The application value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in gross tumor volume delineation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Dongliang; Shi Gaofeng; Gao Xianshu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the application value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods: Twenty-nine patients with esophageal SCC treated with radical surgery were analyzed. Routine CT scan, MRI T 2 -weighted and DWMRI were employed before surgery; diffusion-sensitive gradient b-values were taken 400, 600 and 800 s/mm 2 . GTVs were delineated using CT, MRI T 2 -weighted images and DWMRI under different b-value images. The length of GTVs measured under different images was compared with the pathological length and confirm the most accurate imaging condition. Use radiotherapy planning system to fuse DWMRI images and CT images to investigate the possibility of delineate GTVs on fused images. Results: The difference of GTV length value between CT, T 2 WI images and specimen was 3.36 mm and 2.84 mm. When b =400,600 and 800 s/mm 2 , the difference between GTV length value on the DWMRI images and on specimen was 0.47 mm, -0.47 mm and - 1.53 mm; the correlation coefficient of the measuring esophageal lengths on DWMRI images and the pathological lengths was 0.928, 0.927 and 0.938. DWMRI images and CT images could fuse accurately on radiotherapy planning system. GTV margin could.show clearly on fused images. Conclusions: DWMRI images can display the esophageal carcinoma lengths and margin accurately. When DWMRI images fused with CT images, GTV margin could show clearly,it can be used to delineate GTV accurately. (authors)

  3. Multispectral code excited linear prediction coding and its application in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J H; Wang, Y; Cahill, P T

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports a multispectral code excited linear prediction (MCELP) method for the compression of multispectral images. Different linear prediction models and adaptation schemes have been compared. The method that uses a forward adaptive autoregressive (AR) model has been proven to achieve a good compromise between performance, complexity, and robustness. This approach is referred to as the MFCELP method. Given a set of multispectral images, the linear predictive coefficients are updated over nonoverlapping three-dimensional (3-D) macroblocks. Each macroblock is further divided into several 3-D micro-blocks, and the best excitation signal for each microblock is determined through an analysis-by-synthesis procedure. The MFCELP method has been applied to multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. To satisfy the high quality requirement for medical images, the error between the original image set and the synthesized one is further specified using a vector quantizer. This method has been applied to images from 26 clinical MR neuro studies (20 slices/study, three spectral bands/slice, 256x256 pixels/band, 12 b/pixel). The MFCELP method provides a significant visual improvement over the discrete cosine transform (DCT) based Joint Photographers Expert Group (JPEG) method, the wavelet transform based embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) coding method, and the vector tree (VT) coding method, as well as the multispectral segmented autoregressive moving average (MSARMA) method we developed previously.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, A.; Bielke, G.; Bockenheimer, S.; Brenner, G.; Dieringer, H.; Esswein, H.; Hopf, H.; Koch, H.; Meves, M.; Nagel, F.; Oberstein, A.; Ostheimer, E.; Pfaff, M.; Schlaps, D.; Schopka, H.J.; Seiderer, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study investigates three points of main interest: (1) The clinical efficacy of MR imaging as a routine method, if possible to be assessed in comparison to comparable imaging methods, and referring to a broad spectrum of available types of equipment and modes of operation, to be expressed in terms of diagnostic value and indication of therapy. (2) Specific economic aspects, considering different sites of operation and application conditions. (3) Results of clinical application with regard to individual cases (patient careers), in order to establish a nationwide basis for economic cost-benefit assessment of this diagnostic tool. Another aspect taken into account whenever available data allow so, is substitutional or additional application of MR imaging. The survey is performed on the basis of data accumulated by more than 21.000 MR examinations, and of data describing the application environment, furnished by 25 users from university hospitals, general hospitals, or private practice. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  7. Development of the 1.2 T~1.5 T Permanent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Device and Its Application for Mouse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By improving the main magnet, gradient, and RF coils design technology, manufacturing methods, and inventing new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI special alloy, a cost-effective and small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager was developed. The main magnetic field strength of magnetic resonance imager with independent intellectual property rights is 1.2~1.5 T. To demonstrate its effectiveness and validate the mouse imaging experiments in different directions, we compared the images obtained by small animal specific permanent magnet-type three-dimensional magnetic resonance imager with that obtained by using superconductor magnetic resonance imager for clinical diagnosis.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  10. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. Preparation and characterization of alginate based-fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for fluorescence/magnetic resonance multimodal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Su; Choi, Kee-Bong; Lim, Hyungjun; Lee, Sunghwi; Lee, Jae-Jong

    2018-06-01

    Simple and versatile methodologies have been reported that customize the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and impart additional fluorescence capabilities to these contrast agents. Herein, we present the rational design, synthesis, characterization, and biological applications of a new magnetic-based fluorescent probe. The dual modality imaging protocol was developed by labeling fluorophore with alginate natural polymers that have excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, and using gelification method to form nanocomposites containing SPIO. The formation of alginate-based fluorescent magnetic (AFM) nanoparticles was observed in spherical and elliptical forms with a diameter of less than 500 nm by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The fluorescent wavelength band in the range of 560 nm was also confirmed in the UV–visible spectrophotometer. In this study, we demonstrate that the multi-tasking design of AFM nanoparticles provides an ideal platform for building balanced dual-image probes of magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging.

  13. T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Radiotherapy Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua N; Collins, David J; Bainbridge, Hannah; Rank, Christopher M; Nill, Simeon; Kachelrieß, Marc; Oelfke, Uwe; Leach, Martin O; Wetscherek, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and verify a method to obtain good temporal resolution T2-weighted 4-dimensional (4D-T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by using motion information from T1-weighted 4D (4D-T1w) MRI, to support treatment planning in MR-guided radiotherapy. Ten patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer were scanned at 1.5 T axially with a volumetric T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence gated to exhalation and a volumetric T1-weighted stack-of-stars spoiled gradient echo sequence with golden angle spacing acquired in free breathing. From the latter, 20 respiratory phases were reconstructed using the recently developed 4D joint MoCo-HDTV algorithm based on the self-gating signal obtained from the k-space center. Motion vector fields describing the respiratory cycle were obtained by deformable image registration between the respiratory phases and projected onto the T2-weighted image volume. The resulting 4D-T2w volumes were verified against the 4D-T1w volumes: an edge-detection method was used to measure the diaphragm positions; the locations of anatomical landmarks delineated by a radiation oncologist were compared and normalized mutual information was calculated to evaluate volumetric image similarity. High-resolution 4D-T2w MRI was obtained. Respiratory motion was preserved on calculated 4D-T2w MRI, with median diaphragm positions being consistent with less than 6.6 mm (2 voxels) for all patients and less than 3.3 mm (1 voxel) for 9 of 10 patients. Geometrical positions were coherent between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI as Euclidean distances between all corresponding anatomical landmarks agreed to within 7.6 mm (Euclidean distance of 2 voxels) and were below 3.8 mm (Euclidean distance of 1 voxel) for 355 of 470 pairs of anatomical landmarks. Volumetric image similarity was commensurate between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI, as mean percentage differences in normalized mutual information (calculated over all respiratory phases and patients), between

  14. Clinical application of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to intracranial disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanaka, Kiyoyuki; Shirai, Shizuo; Kimura, Hiroshi [Soujinkai Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira; Nose, Tadao

    1995-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed to determine the changes in water diffusion and to investigate the detectability of diffusion anisotropy in patients with intracranial disorders. Diffusion maps of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were created of 19 patients with cerebral infarction, five with intracerebral hematoma, four with glioma, four with meningioma, four with hydrocephalus, and five with subdural hematoma. ADC was increased in chronic cerebral infarction and glioma, and decreased in acute cerebral infarction, meningioma, and the marginal area of glioma compared with the ADC of the normal gray matter. There was a significant difference in ADC between the marginal and internal areas of glioma. Increased ADC may be due to increased vasogenic edema in infarction and a lack of significant restriction of diffusion within glioma. Decreased ADC can be attributed to restricted diffusion caused by cytotoxic edema in infarction and the underlying histological pattern of densely packed tumor cells in glioma. Diffusion anisotropy of the internal capsule was less detectable in pathological than normal hemispheres. Diffusion anisotropy was less detectable in patients with hydrocephalus and subdural hematoma. Intracranial lesions were thought to have influenced the compression of the brain structures and cells, resulting in decreased diffusion. The measurement of ADC by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has the potential for greater understanding of the biophysical changes in various intracranial disorders, including correct diagnosis of cerebral infarction, and histological diagnosis of brain tumor. (author).

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  16. Development and application of efficient strategies for parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, F.

    2006-07-01

    Virtually all existing MRI applications require both a high spatial and high temporal resolution for optimum detection and classification of the state of disease. The main strategy to meet the increasing demands of advanced diagnostic imaging applications has been the steady improvement of gradient systems, which provide increased gradient strengths and faster switching times. Rapid imaging techniques and the advances in gradient performance have significantly reduced acquisition times from about an hour to several minutes or seconds. In order to further increase imaging speed, much higher gradient strengths and much faster switching times are required which are technically challenging to provide. In addition to significant hardware costs, peripheral neuro-stimulations and the surpassing of admissable acoustic noise levels may occur. Today's whole body gradient systems already operate just below the allowed safety levels. For these reasons, alternative strategies are needed to bypass these limitations. The greatest progress in further increasing imaging speed has been the development of multi-coil arrays and the advent of partially parallel acquisition (PPA) techniques in the late 1990's. Within the last years, parallel imaging methods have become commercially available,and are therefore ready for broad clinical use. The basic feature of parallel imaging is a scan time reduction, applicable to nearly any available MRI method, while maintaining the contrast behavior without requiring higher gradient system performance. PPA operates by allowing an array of receiver surface coils, positioned around the object under investigation, to partially replace time-consuming spatial encoding which normally is performed by switching magnetic field gradients. Using this strategy, spatial resolution can be improved given a specific imaging time, or scan times can be reduced at a given spatial resolution. Furthermore, in some cases, PPA can even be used to reduce image

  17. Development and application of efficient strategies for parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Virtually all existing MRI applications require both a high spatial and high temporal resolution for optimum detection and classification of the state of disease. The main strategy to meet the increasing demands of advanced diagnostic imaging applications has been the steady improvement of gradient systems, which provide increased gradient strengths and faster switching times. Rapid imaging techniques and the advances in gradient performance have significantly reduced acquisition times from about an hour to several minutes or seconds. In order to further increase imaging speed, much higher gradient strengths and much faster switching times are required which are technically challenging to provide. In addition to significant hardware costs, peripheral neuro-stimulations and the surpassing of admissable acoustic noise levels may occur. Today's whole body gradient systems already operate just below the allowed safety levels. For these reasons, alternative strategies are needed to bypass these limitations. The greatest progress in further increasing imaging speed has been the development of multi-coil arrays and the advent of partially parallel acquisition (PPA) techniques in the late 1990's. Within the last years, parallel imaging methods have become commercially available,and are therefore ready for broad clinical use. The basic feature of parallel imaging is a scan time reduction, applicable to nearly any available MRI method, while maintaining the contrast behavior without requiring higher gradient system performance. PPA operates by allowing an array of receiver surface coils, positioned around the object under investigation, to partially replace time-consuming spatial encoding which normally is performed by switching magnetic field gradients. Using this strategy, spatial resolution can be improved given a specific imaging time, or scan times can be reduced at a given spatial resolution. Furthermore, in some cases, PPA can even be used to reduce image artifacts

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  19. Possibility of magnetic resonance imaging application in teaching preclinical dentistry - endodontic and prosthetic treatment prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasiewicz, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The necessary condition for successful both endodontic and prosthetic reconstruction treatment is the precise mapping of the shape of dental cavities. The aim of this work is an elaboration and verification of the possibility of using 3D Spin Echo MRI techniques in teaching preclinical dentistry both in endodontic and prosthetics specialty. Objectives. Author' aim was to obtain an elaboration and a verification, whether there exists a possibility to use, at the level of in vitro analysis, techniques of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which are based on the 3D sequence of the Spin Echo that may in the future find employment in the teaching of preclinical dentistry, clinical dental therapy and diagnostics within the scope of: a dimensional imaging of the inner topography of teeth and spatial structure of a chamber and root canals of teeth for the therapeutic and didactic aims; introduction of a nondestructive and a non-impressional method of reconstruction of the topography of the inner spaces of the human teeth for the purposes of the reconstructive dentistry. Material and Methods. 6 extracted molar teeth were used for measurements without additional preparation, after endodontic and prosthetic preparation. MR measurements were carried out on a 4.7 T research MRI system equipped with Maran DRX console. Results. Figures show 3D images of outer surface, inner space of the teeth before and after endodontic preparation and internal tooth fixation constructed using both classical methods (polymer mass impression) and non-impressional methods (MRI representation). The sizes of the presented volumes were calculated. Internal tooth volumes were determined before and after endodontic treatment; total tooth volumes were also measured. Research proceedings made it possible to compare the quality of internal tooth space after preparation for inner root canals fixations constructed using both classical methods and non-impressional MRI method. Conclusions. The results

  20. Clinical application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (resistive type) on cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Katsuya; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging in diagnosing cardiovascular disease, 27 subjects were examined using a 0.1-Tesla resistive type (ASAHI MARK-J). In 10 normal subjects, four cardiac chambers, interventricular septum, aorta, pulmonary vessels and vena cava were clearly identified in NMR imaging. In two patients with old anteroseptal myocardial infarction, anteroseptal wall thinning and left ventricular aneurysm with mural thrombi were demonstrated. In two cases of antrolateral and posterolateral myocardial infarction, however, infarcted areas were not identified in NMR imaging. In one patient with congestive cardiomyopathy, enlarged left ventricle without hypertrophy was recognized. In two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, NMR imaging disclosed thickened left ventricular wall associated with its narrowed cavity. A mural thrombus in the right ventricle was distinctly visualized in one patient with cardio-vascular Behcet's disease. In two patients with mitral valve stenosis, enlarged left atrium with a mural thrombus was clearly demonstrated in both cross and longitudinal sections. In three patients with thoratic aortic aneurysm, local dilatation of aorta and mural thrombi were recognized. In four patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm, double channels with an intimal flap in the aorta were visualized in NMR imaging. Mean T 1 values and standard deviations of left ventricle, left ventricular wall, and thrombi were 593+-89, 341+-20, 316+-84 msec, respectively. Mean T 1 values of thrombi were ordinally shorter than those of left ventricule. But some thrombi which might be expected fresh had longer T 1 values. (J.P.N.)

  1. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  2. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Adam, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of open configuration MR imaging systems, the vision of MRI-based guidance, control, and monitoring of minimally invasive interventions has evolved from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the very exciting emerging field of interventional MRI. The international authorship provides firsthand experience of all relevant topics. This book will familiarize the reader with the basic principles underlying currently available hardware and software configurations. In addition, technical aspects of thermosensitive imaging, techniques for instrument visualization, and safety aspects are covered. Finally, the book emphasizes both existing and future clinical applications. (orig.)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  6. First Application of 7T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2018-01-01

    Background Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of skull base. In this study, we apply a 7T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images to clinical standard of care. Methods Images were acquired at 7T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5T, 3T, and 7T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and ICA branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were utilized for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Results Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7T. 7T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Conclusion Our study represents the first application of 7T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7T MRI compared to 3T and 1.5 T, and found that integration of 7T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7T, 3T, and 1.5 T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. PMID:28359922

  7. First Application of 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-07-01

    Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7-T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of the skull base. In this study, we apply a 7-T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images with clinical standard of care. Images were acquired at 7 T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and internal carotid artery (ICA) branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were used for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7 T. The 7-T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Our study represents the first application of 7-T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7-T MRI compared with 3- and 1.5-T MRI, and found that integration of 7 T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7-T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7-, 3-, and 1.5-T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7-T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  9. Contemporary imaging: Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, H.I.; Higgins, C.; Ring, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to discussing the most recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and the vast array of interventional procedures, this book explores the appropriate clinical applications of each of these important modalities

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: basic principles and application in the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé Atenas, T; Ciampi Díaz, E; Cruz Quiroga, J P; Uribe Arancibia, S; Cárcamo Rodríguez, C

    2018-03-12

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an advanced tool for the study of brain functions in healthy subjects and in neuropsychiatric patients. This tool makes it possible to identify and locate specific phenomena related to neuronal metabolism and activity. Starting with the detection of changes in the blood supply to a region that participates in a function, more complex approaches have been developed to study the dynamics of neuronal networks. Studies examining the brain at rest or involved in different tasks have provided evidence related to the onset, development, and/or response to treatment in various diseases. The diversity of the possible artifacts associated with image registration as well as the complexity of the analytical experimental designs has generated abundant debate about the technique behind fMRI. This article aims to introduce readers to the fundamentals underlying fMRI, to explain how fMRI studies are interpreted, and to discuss fMRI's contributions to the study of the mechanisms underlying diverse diseases of the nervous system. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Contactless respiratory monitoring system for magnetic resonance imaging applications using a laser range sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krug Johannes W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI exam, a respiratory signal can be required for different purposes, e.g. for patient monitoring, motion compensation or for research studies such as in functional MRI. In addition, respiratory information can be used as a biofeedback for the patient in order to control breath holds or shallow breathing. To reduce patient preparation time or distortions of the MR imaging system, we propose the use of a contactless approach for gathering information about the respiratory activity. An experimental setup based on a commercially available laser range sensor was used to detect respiratory induced motion of the chest or abdomen. This setup was tested using a motion phantom and different human subjects in an MRI scanner. A nasal airflow sensor served as a reference. For both, the phantom as well as the different human subjects, the motion frequency was precisely measured. These results show that a low cost, contactless, laser-based approach can be used to obtain information about the respiratory motion during an MRI exam.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  14. Statistical Methods for Magnetic Resonance Image Analysis with Applications to Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomann, Gina-Maria

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated neurological disease that causes disability and morbidity. In patients with MS, the accumulation of lesions in the white matter of the brain is associated with disease progression and worse clinical outcomes. In the first part of the dissertation, we present methodology to study to compare the brain anatomy between patients with MS and controls. A nonparametric testing procedure is proposed for testing the null hypothesis that two samples of curves observed at discrete grids and with noise have the same underlying distribution. We propose to decompose the curves using functional principal component analysis of an appropriate mixture process, which we refer to as marginal functional principal component analysis. This approach reduces the dimension of the testing problem in a way that enables the use of traditional nonparametric univariate testing procedures. The procedure is computationally efficient and accommodates different sampling designs. Numerical studies are presented to validate the size and power properties of the test in many realistic scenarios. In these cases, the proposed test is more powerful than its primary competitor. The proposed methodology is illustrated on a state-of-the art diffusion tensor imaging study, where the objective is to compare white matter tract profiles in healthy individuals and MS patients. In the second part of the thesis, we present methods to study the behavior of MS in the white matter of the brain. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in newer lesions is indicative of more active disease-related processes and is a primary outcome considered in clinical trials of treatments for MS. Such abnormalities in active MS lesions are evaluated in vivo using contrast-enhanced structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), during which patients receive an intravenous infusion of a costly magnetic contrast agent. In some instances, the contrast agents can have toxic effects. Recently, local

  15. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at low temperature and high magnetic eld for biomedical applications in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutailler, Florent

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis work was to design, build and optimize a large volume multi-samples DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) polarizer dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging applications. The experimental system is made up of a high magnetic field magnet (3,35 T) in which takes place a cryogenic system with a pumped bath of liquid helium ("4He) allowing temperatures lower than 1,2 K. A set of inserts is used for the different steps of DNP: irradiation of the sample by a microwave field (f=94 GHz and P=50 mW), polarization measurement by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance... With this system, up to three samples of 1 mL volume can be polarized to a rate of few per-cents. The system has a long autonomy of four hours, so it can be used for polarizing molecules with a long time constant of polarization. Finally, the possibility to get quasi-simultaneously, after dissolution, several samples with a high rate of polarization opens the way of new applications in biomedical imaging. (author) [fr

  16. Applications of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of left ventricular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beacock, David John

    2002-07-01

    This thesis has described the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the investigation of left ventricular dimensions and systolic function. This has been performed in conditions of left ventricular dysfunction, in congestive cardiac failure and following anterior myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of measurements of left ventricular dimensions using MRI has been presented. Such measurements were shown to be reproducible between different MRI studies of normal volunteers and patients with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, measurements from different MRI studies obtained from two commercially different systems were reproducible for the same subject groups. Ventricular dimensions and systolic function was evaluated in adult normal volunteers of different ages. Although left ventricular volumes and mass remained unchanged, detailed studies of the systolic images revealed significant differences between the two age groups. Differences in left ventricular cavity volumes and mass between patients with congestive heart failure and age-matched normal volunteers were also investigated. Left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass were assessed in a group of patients following anterior myocardial infarction. End-systolic volume was significantly increased compared to age-matched volunteers, but no changes in end-diastolic volume or myocardial mass was observed. Serial re-evaluation of these patients revealed no other changes over the subsequent six months. All these patients were treated with optimal medical therapy (thrombolysis, aspirin, beta-blockade and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition). Thus, the use of this therapy may attenuate the process of left ventricular remodelling. Regional wall thickness was measured in the post-infarct patients. Wall thickening was significantly reduced both in the infarcted regions and in myocardium remote to the infarction. In contrast to previous echocardiographic studies, no 'hypercontractility' was

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    nuclei and sulci. FLAIR - sequences with its advantage in suppressing the signal from the cerebrospinal fluid is useful in case of meningeal involvement in hypophysitis. DWI is essential in case of ischemia, apoplexy and associated necrotic changes. Contrast medium application is not compulsory, but it increases the sensitivity of the method, especially in young patients. The contrast used is Gadolinium, applied according to the body weight. After contrast application the gland enhances homogeneously. MR-methods made are responsible for throwing light upon the normal images of the pituitary gland from the neonatal patients to adults, explaining the malformative and rare conditions, leading to disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The most common reason for pathologic conditions in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis remain the adenomas. MR-imaging is the method of choice to rule out a suspected formation in the sellar area. Small adenomas with size around 3mm are now detectable with the use of equipment with high strength of magnetic field. Authors agree on the fact the secreting and nonsecreting adenomas need a thorough MR-follow up in time, especially the nonsecreting ones that are usually detected accidentally. In the era before the multislice diagnostic imaging the pathologies in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis were difficult to assess. The introduction of the new methods of investigation made the diagnosis of such conditions achievable. Magnetic resonance imaging is convenient, informative and clinically applicable for detecting hypothalamic-pituitary axis. However there is no agreement how the MR-protocol should be carried out. MR with high magnetic field is an essential tool in obtaining images with better quality, higher diagnostic value and the opportunity for performing sequences in thin slices and reconstructions in different planes. Key words: Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Hypophysis. 3TESLA

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  6. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  7. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  8. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  9. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-12-22

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  10. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    A resonant multiple is defined as a multiple reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypaths. We show that resonant first-order multiples can be migrated with either Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration methods to give images with approximately twice the spatial resolution compared to post-stack primary-reflection images. A moveout-correction stacking method is proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the resonant multiples before superresolution migration. The effectiveness of this procedure is validated by synthetic and field data tests.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    After only a few years, MR imaging has proved to be an important method for imaging disorders of the musculoskeletal tissues. The images are characterized by great inherent contrast, excellent spatial resolution, and exquisite anatomic display - major reasons why MR imaging compares favorably with other imaging methods, such as radionuclide bone scanning and CT. MR imaging is particularly sensitive to bone marrow alterations and is very effective for detection and characterization of a wide variety of soft tissue conditions. Advances in surface coil technology will increase the usefulness of MR imaging in the evaluation of articular disease. In addition, chemical shift imaging and spectroscopy will add physiologic information to the anatomic features demonstrated by proton imaging

  12. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axel, L

    1989-01-01

    The basis principles of MRI are reviewed in order to understand how blood flow effects arise in conventional imaging. Then some of the ways these effects have ben used in MRI techniques specifically designed for vascular imaging, are considered. (author)

  14. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, M G; Spadavecchia, J; Taurino, A; Rella, R

    2010-01-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV–vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA–Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA–DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T) 15 ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality

  15. Magnetic Gold Nanoparticle-Labeled Heparanase Monoclonal Antibody and its Subsequent Application for Tumor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Jie, Meng-Meng; Yang, Min; Tang, Li; Chen, Si-Yuan; Sun, Xue-Mei; Tang, Bo; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2018-04-01

    Heparanase (HPA) is ubiquitously expressed in various metastatic malignant tumors; previous studies have demonstrated that HPA was a potential tumor-associated antigen (TAA) for tumor immunotherapy. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of HPA as a common TAA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumor metastasis and its potential application in tumor molecular imaging. We prepared a targeted probe based on magnetic gold nanoparticles coupled with an anti-HPA antibody for the specific detection of HPA by MRI. The specificity of the targeted probe was validated in vitro by incubation of the probe with various tumor cells, and the probe was able to selectively detect HPA (+) cells. We found the probes displayed significantly reduced signal intensity in several tumor cells, and the signal intensity decreased significantly after the targeted probe was injected in tumor-bearing nude mice. In the study, we demonstrated that the HPA&GoldMag probe had excellent physical and chemical properties and immune activities and could specifically target many tumor cell tissues both in vitro and in vivo. This may provide an experimental base for molecular imaging of tumor highly expressing heparanase using HPA mAbs.

  16. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  1. T1ρ magnetic resonance: basic physics principles and applications in knee and intervertebral disc imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.; Zhang, Qinwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Chen, Weitian; Ahuja, Anil; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    T1ρ relaxation time provides a new contrast mechanism that differs from T1- and T2-weighted contrast, and is useful to study low-frequency motional processes and chemical exchange in biological tissues. T1ρ imaging can be performed in the forms of T1ρ-weighted image, T1ρ mapping and T1ρ dispersion.

  2. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with continuous arterial spin labeling: methods and clinical applications in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detre, John A. E-mail: detre@mail.med.upenn.edu; Alsop, David C

    1999-05-01

    Several methods are now available for measuring cerebral perfusion and related hemodynamic parameters using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One class of techniques utilizes electromagnetically labeled arterial blood water as a noninvasive diffusible tracer for blood flow measurements. The electromagnetically labeled tracer has a decay rate of T1, which is sufficiently long to allow perfusion of the tissue and microvasculature to be detected. Alternatively, electromagnetic arterial spin labeling (ASL) may be used to obtain qualitative perfusion contrast for detecting changes in blood flow, similar to the use of susceptibility contrast in blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI) to detect functional activation in the brain. The ability to obtain blood flow maps using a non-invasive and widely available modality such as MRI should greatly enhance the utility of blood flow measurement as a means of gaining further insight into the broad range of hemodynamically related physiology and pathophysiology. This article describes the biophysical considerations pertaining to the generation of quantitative blood flow maps using a particular form of ASL in which arterial blood water is continuously labeled, termed continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL). Technical advances permit multislice perfusion imaging using CASL with reduced sensitivity to motion and transit time effects. Interpretable cerebral perfusion images can now be reliably obtained in a variety of clinical settings including acute stroke, chronic cerebrovascular disease, degenerative diseases and epilepsy. Over the past several years, the technical and theoretical foundations of CASL perfusion MRI techniques have evolved from feasibility studies into practical usage. Currently existing methodologies are sufficient to make reliable and clinically relevant observations which complement structural assessment using MRI. Future technical improvements should further reduce the acquisition times

  3. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library and its application in cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Kang, Nam-Young; Yu, Xiaotong; Sahu, Srikanta; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report a new strategy for constructing a dye library with large Stokes shifts. By coupling a dark donor with BODIPY acceptors of tunable high quantum yield, a novel dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library, named BNM, has been synthesized. Upon excitation of the dark donor (BDN) at 490 nm, the absorbed energy is transferred to the acceptor (BDM) with high efficiency, which was tunable in a broad range from 557 nm to 716 nm, with a high quantum yield of up to 0.8. It is noteworthy to mention that the majority of the non-radiative energy loss of the donor was converted into the acceptor's fluorescence output with a minimum leak of donor emission. Fluorescence imaging tested in live cells showed that the BNM compounds are cell-permeable and can also be employed for live-cell imaging. This is a new library which can be excited through a dark donor allowing for strong fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, the BNM library is well suited for high-throughput screening or multiplex experiments in biological applications by using a single laser excitation source. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Water volume quantitation using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: application to cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouffe, P.; Huglo, D.; Dubois, P.; Rousseau, J.; Marchandise, X.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitation in proton NMR imaging is applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Total intracranial CSF volume was measured from Condon's method: CSF signal was compared with distilled water standard signal in a single sagittal thick slice. Brain signal was reduced to minimum using a 5000/360/400 sequence. Software constraints did not permit easy implementing on imager and uniformity correction was performed on a microcomputer. Accuracy was better than 4%. Total intracranial CSF was found between 91 and 164 ml in 5 healthy volunteers. Extraventricular CSF quantitation appears very improved by this method, but planimetric methods seem better in order to quantify ventricular CSF. This technique is compared to total lung water measurement from proton density according to Mac Lennan's method. Water volume quantitation confirms ability of NMR imaging to quantify biologic parameters but image defects have to be known by strict quality control [fr

  5. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    vectorially to the encoding field. This is explicitly corrected for when calculating the encoding matrix. Other external fields and magnet field drift (~-1/ 2G ...simulated reconstruction with the same parameters as Fig. 3c. Fig. 3f and 3g show the experimental and simulated single coil image from the phantom...acquisition times (1), including a mobile MRI system developed for outdoor imaging of small tree branches (2), but these scanners lack a bore size suitable for

  6. Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without or With Applicator in Place for Target Definition in Cervix Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Federico, Mario [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gran Canaria University Hospital, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fotina, Irina [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Physics and Technology, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Oblast (Russian Federation); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Clinical Oncology, Medical University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Schmid, Maximilian; Kirisits, Christian [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nesvacil, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To define, in the setting of cervical cancer, to what extent information from additional pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the brachytherapy applicator improves conformity of CT-based high-risk clinical target volume (CTV{sub HR}) contours, compared with the MRI for various tumor stages (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages I-IVA). Methods and Materials: The CTV{sub HR} was contoured in 39 patients with cervical cancer (FIGO stages I-IVA) (1) on CT images based on clinical information (CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub Clinical}) alone; and (2) using an additional MRI before brachytherapy, without the applicator (CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}). The CT contours were compared with reference contours on MRI with the applicator in place (CTV{sub HR}-MRI{sub ref}). Width, height, thickness, volumes, and topography were analyzed. Results: The CT-MRI{sub ref} differences hardly varied in stage I tumors (n=8). In limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors (n=19), CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}–MRI{sub ref} volume differences (2.6 cm{sup 3} [IIB], 7.3 cm{sup 3} [IIIB]) were superior to CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub Clinical}–MRI{sub ref} (11.8 cm{sup 3} [IIB], 22.9 cm{sup 3} [IIIB]), owing to significant improvement of height and width (P<.05). In advanced disease (n=12), improved agreement with MR volume, width, and height was achieved for CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}. In 5 of 12 cases, MRI{sub ref} contours were partly missed on CT. Conclusions: Pre-BT MRI helps to define CTV{sub HR} before BT implantation appropriately, if only CT images with the applicator in place are available for BT planning. Significant improvement is achievable in limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors. In more advanced disease (extensive IIB to IVA), improvement of conformity is possible but may be associated with geographic misses. Limited impact on precision of CTV{sub HR}-CT is expected in stage IB tumors.

  7. Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without or With Applicator in Place for Target Definition in Cervix Cancer Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pötter, Richard; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Fotina, Irina; Hegazy, Neamat; Schmid, Maximilian; Kirisits, Christian; Nesvacil, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To define, in the setting of cervical cancer, to what extent information from additional pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the brachytherapy applicator improves conformity of CT-based high-risk clinical target volume (CTV_H_R) contours, compared with the MRI for various tumor stages (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages I-IVA). Methods and Materials: The CTV_H_R was contoured in 39 patients with cervical cancer (FIGO stages I-IVA) (1) on CT images based on clinical information (CTV_H_R-CT_C_l_i_n_i_c_a_l) alone; and (2) using an additional MRI before brachytherapy, without the applicator (CTV_H_R-CT_p_r_e_-_B_T _M_R_I). The CT contours were compared with reference contours on MRI with the applicator in place (CTV_H_R-MRI_r_e_f). Width, height, thickness, volumes, and topography were analyzed. Results: The CT-MRI_r_e_f differences hardly varied in stage I tumors (n=8). In limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors (n=19), CTV_H_R-CT_p_r_e_-_B_T _M_R_I–MRI_r_e_f volume differences (2.6 cm"3 [IIB], 7.3 cm"3 [IIIB]) were superior to CTV_H_R-CT_C_l_i_n_i_c_a_l–MRI_r_e_f (11.8 cm"3 [IIB], 22.9 cm"3 [IIIB]), owing to significant improvement of height and width (P<.05). In advanced disease (n=12), improved agreement with MR volume, width, and height was achieved for CTV_H_R-CT_p_r_e_-_B_T _M_R_I. In 5 of 12 cases, MRI_r_e_f contours were partly missed on CT. Conclusions: Pre-BT MRI helps to define CTV_H_R before BT implantation appropriately, if only CT images with the applicator in place are available for BT planning. Significant improvement is achievable in limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors. In more advanced disease (extensive IIB to IVA), improvement of conformity is possible but may be associated with geographic misses. Limited impact on precision of CTV_H_R-CT is expected in stage IB tumors.

  8. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    is Professor of Chemistry at. IIT Madras. ... speeding up the CW imaging by special novel methods. How- ever, the ... presence of gradients which are applied in two or three dimen- sions and ... optics and mechanical engineer- ing stands for ...

  9. Application of run length matrix to magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeriyama, Tomoharu; Kodama, Naoki; Shimada, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    To examine the possibility of diagnosing Alzheimer-type dementia, we studied this condition using the run length matrix, on head MR images of 29 Alzheimer-type dementia patients (8 men, 21 women, 78.7±6.7 years) and healthy elderly controls (10 men, 19 women, 72.3±8.7 years). The results showed that differences in GLN (gray level nonuniformity) and RLN (run length nonuniformity) were statistically significant. Furthermore, discriminant analysis based on GLN and RLN showed a rate of sensitivity of 69.0%, specificity 86.2%, and correct classification 77.6%. Although this rate of correct classification is inferior to the planimetric and volumetric methods, run length matrix is only one method of texture analysis. The results of this study indicate the possibility of MR imaging-based diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia with texture analysis including a run length matrix. (author)

  10. Application of Finite Element Modeling Methods in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Research and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fwu, Peter Tramyeon

    The medical image is very complex by its nature. Modeling built upon the medical image is challenging due to the lack of analytical solution. Finite element method (FEM) is a numerical technique which can be used to solve the partial differential equations. It utilized the transformation from a continuous domain into solvable discrete sub-domains. In three-dimensional space, FEM has the capability dealing with complicated structure and heterogeneous interior. That makes FEM an ideal tool to approach the medical-image based modeling problems. In this study, I will address the three modeling in (1) photon transport inside the human breast by implanting the radiative transfer equation to simulate the diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) in order to measurement the percent density (PD), which has been proven as a cancer risk factor in mammography. Our goal is to use MRI as the ground truth to optimize the DOSI scanning protocol to get a consistent measurement of PD. Our result shows DOSI measurement is position and depth dependent and proper scanning scheme and body configuration are needed; (2) heat flow in the prostate by implementing the Penne's bioheat equation to evaluate the cooling performance of regional hypothermia during the robot assisted radical prostatectomy for the individual patient in order to achieve the optimal cooling setting. Four factors are taken into account during the simulation: blood abundance, artery perfusion, cooling balloon temperature, and the anatomical distance. The result shows that blood abundance, prostate size, and anatomical distance are significant factors to the equilibrium temperature of neurovascular bundle; (3) shape analysis in hippocampus by using the radial distance mapping, and two registration methods to find the correlation between sub-regional change to the age and cognition performance, which might not reveal in the volumetric analysis. The result gives a fundamental knowledge of normal distribution in young

  11. Application of Benchtop-magnetic resonance imaging in a nude mouse tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäder Karsten

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI plays a key role in the preclinical development of new drugs, diagnostics and their delivery systems. However, very high installation and running costs of existing superconducting MRI machines limit the spread of MRI. The new method of Benchtop-MRI (BT-MRI has the potential to overcome this limitation due to much lower installation and almost no running costs. However, due to the low field strength and decreased magnet homogeneity it is questionable, whether BT-MRI can achieve sufficient image quality to provide useful information for preclinical in vivo studies. It was the aim of the current study to explore the potential of BT-MRI on tumor models in mice. Methods We used a prototype of an in vivo BT-MRI apparatus to visualise organs and tumors and to analyse tumor progression in nude mouse xenograft models of human testicular germ cell tumor and colon carcinoma. Results Subcutaneous xenografts were easily identified as relative hypointense areas in transaxial slices of NMR images. Monitoring of tumor progression evaluated by pixel extension analyses based on NMR images correlated with increasing tumor volume calculated by calliper measurement. Gd-BOPTA contrast agent injection resulted in a better differentiation between parts of the urinary tissues and organs due to fast elimination of the agent via kidneys. In addition, interior structuring of tumors could be observed. A strong contrast enhancement within a tumor was associated with a central necrotic/fibrotic area. Conclusions BT-MRI provides satisfactory image quality to visualize organs and tumors and to monitor tumor progression and structure in mouse models.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  13. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging applications in multiple sclerosis patients using 3T magnetic resonance: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testaverde, Lorenzo; Caporali, Laura [University ' ' Sapienza' ' of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Venditti, Eugenio; Grillea, Giovanni [U.O.C. Neuroradiologia, I.R.C.C.S. ' ' Neuromed' ' , Pozzilli (Italy); Colonnese, Claudio [University ' ' Sapienza' ' of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); U.O.C. Neuroradiologia, I.R.C.C.S. ' ' Neuromed' ' , Pozzilli (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    This study evaluated patients with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values. We investigated the possible statistically significant variation of MD and FA in different MS patients, compared simultaneously, putting in comparison their normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and white matter affected by disease (plaques), both during activity and in remission, with normal white matter (NWM) of control subjects. Statistical analysis using Levene's test for comparison of variances revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences between FA values of the NWM of the controls and those of NAWM and active or inactive lesions, of the patients in the study. However, the differences between MD values of the NWM of the controls and those of NAWM and active or inactive lesions of the patients in the study were judged not significant (P > 0.05). Imaging of MS using MRI techniques is constantly searching for reproducible quantitative parameter. This study shows how these parameters can be identified in the MD and FA values, and thus suggests the implementation of MRI routine protocols for diagnosing MS with the DTI analysis, since it can provide valuable information otherwise unobtainable. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of proton spin relaxation in water with dispersed silicon nanoparticles for potential magnetic resonance imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargina, Yu. V.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gippius, A. A.; Minnekhanov, A. A.; Zvereva, E. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Porous and nonporous silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by ball-milling of electrochemically etched porous Si layers and crystalline Si wafers were studied as potential agents for enhancement of the proton spin relaxation in aqueous media. While nonporous Si NPs did not significantly influence the spin relaxation, the porous ones resulted in strong shortening of the transverse relaxation times. In order to investigate an effect of the electron spin density in porous Si NPs on the proton spin relaxation, we use thermal annealing of the NPs in vacuum or in air. The transverse relaxation rate of about 0.5 l/(g s) was achieved for microporous Si NPs, which were thermally annealing in vacuum to obtain the electron spin density of the order of 1017 g-1. The transverse relaxation rate was found to be almost proportional to the concentration of porous Si NPs in the range from 0.1 to 20 g/l. The obtained results are discussed in view of possible biomedical applications of Si NPs as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Simultaneous detection of transgenic DNA by surface plasmon resonance imaging with potential application to gene doping detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Simona; Ermini, Maria Laura; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Mascini, Marco; Bogani, Patrizia; Minunni, Maria

    2011-08-15

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was used as the transduction principle for the development of optical-based sensing for transgenes detection in human cell lines. The objective was to develop a multianalyte, label-free, and real-time approach for DNA sequences that are identified as markers of transgenosis events. The strategy exploits SPRi sensing to detect the transgenic event by targeting selected marker sequences, which are present on shuttle vector backbone used to carry out the transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. Here, we identified DNA sequences belonging to the Cytomegalovirus promoter and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein gene. System development is discussed in terms of probe efficiency and influence of secondary structures on biorecognition reaction on sensor; moreover, optimization of PCR samples pretreatment was carried out to allow hybridization on biosensor, together with an approach to increase SPRi signals by in situ mass enhancement. Real-time PCR was also employed as reference technique for marker sequences detection on human HEK cells. We can foresee that the developed system may have potential applications in the field of antidoping research focused on the so-called gene doping.

  19. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  1. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  4. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  5. Three-dimensional imaging of the optic nerve using magnetic resonance angiography. Application to anterior communicating artery aneurysm and craniopharingioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Fukuyama, Koichi; Ikeno, Kunihiro; Araki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kinya; Sohma, Noriko

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze three-dimensional images of the optic nerve obtained by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in cases of anterior communicating artery aneurysm and craniopharingioma. Four ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms, five non-ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms and two craniopharingiomas were examined. The images were taken using MR/i Hispeed Plus 1.5 T Infinity version, and analyzed by Advantage Work station AW4.1. The routine MR imaging parameters are shown in Table. The imaging time was about 10 minutes. Analysis was made by reformation of images parallel to the optic nerve obtained from the original MRA images. The optic nerve and brain tumor were traced with paintbrush from one sheet to another of the reformed images after subtraction of the blood vessels around the anterior communicating artery in these reformed images, and then three-dimensional images were constructed. Three-dimensional images of the blood vessels were reconstructed from MIP (maximum intensity projection) images using the threshold method. The optic nerve and anterior communicating arterial aneurysm or brain tumor were both observed in the overlapped 3D-SSD (shaded surface display) images. The analysis time was about 15 minutes. Three-dimensional images of the optic nerve and anterior communicating artery aneurysm or brain tumor were able to be made in all cases. As a preoperative investigation for anterior communicating artery aneurysm or suprasellar brain tumor, we considered that three-dimensional imaging of the optic nerve is useful in the operative approach because the optic nerve acts as a merkmal for the anterior communicating aneurysm or brain tumor. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomsdorf, H.; Imme, M.; Jensen, D.; Kunz, D.; Menhardt, W.; Ottenberg, K.; Roeschmann, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Tschendel, O.; Wieland, J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1 H and 13 C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs [de

  7. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  8. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  9. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast...

  11. The application of electron paramagnetic resonance in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Ximei; Wang Liqin; Zhang Wenyi; Liu Zhongchao; Cui Songye; Feng Xin; Jiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance technique has been found more than half a century, for free radicals detection application, it has been applied to various research studies, and promotes the development of the biomedicine. This article summarized the various free radicals measurement by the electron paramagnetic resonance in biology tissue, and the application of the spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technology in biomedicine. (authors)

  12. Role of chelates in magnetic resonance imaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Laxmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging studies are tests performed with a variety of techniques that produce pictures of the inside of a patient′s body. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an imaging technique based on the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone, and virtually all other internal body structures. Chelates have a wide application in such imaging techniques. Chelates in imaging studies are used alone as radioactive agents or conjugated to monoclonal antibodies or to DNA as radioactive agents. Technetium chelates and gadolinium chelates are being widely used as magnetic resonance contrast media.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine. Present applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    At the workshop on nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine held at Saclay, the following topics were presented: physical principles of NMR; NMR spectroscopy signal to noise ratio; principles of NMR imaging; methods of NMR imaging; image options in NMR; biological significance of contrast in proton NMR imaging; measurement and significance of relaxation times in cancers; NMR contrast agents; NMR for in-vivo biochemistry; potential effects and hazards of NMR applications in Medicine; difficulties of NMR implantation in Hospitals; NMR imaging of brain tumors and diseases of the spinal cord; NMR and Nuclear Medicine in brain diseases [fr

  14. Composite Match Index with Application of Interior Deformation Field Measurement from Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Images of Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penglin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a variety of different feature-point matching approaches have been reported in computer vision, few feature-point matching approaches employed in images from nonrigid, nonuniform human tissues have been reported. The present work is concerned with interior deformation field measurement of complex human tissues from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR volumetric images. To improve the reliability of matching results, this paper proposes composite match index (CMI as the foundation of multimethod fusion methods to increase the reliability of these various methods. Thereinto, we discuss the definition, components, and weight determination of CMI. To test the validity of the proposed approach, it is applied to actual MR volumetric images obtained from a volunteer’s calf. The main result is consistent with the actual condition.

  15. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  16. Evaluation of Effective Parameters on Quality of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-computed Tomography Image Fusion in Head and Neck Tumors for Application in Treatment Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Shirvani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In radiation therapy, computed tomography (CT simulation is used for treatment planning to define the location of tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-CT image fusion leads to more efficient tumor contouring. This work tried to identify the practical issues for the combination of CT and MRI images in real clinical cases. The effect of various factors is evaluated on image fusion quality. Materials and Methods: In this study, the data of thirty patients with brain tumors were used for image fusion. The effect of several parameters on possibility and quality of image fusion was evaluated. These parameters include angles of the patient's head on the bed, slices thickness, slice gap, and height of the patient's head. Results: According to the results, the first dominating factor on quality of image fusion was the difference slice gap between CT and MRI images (cor = 0.86, P 4 cm and image fusion quality was <25%. Conclusion: The most important problem in image fusion is that MRI images are taken without regard to their use in treatment planning. In general, parameters related to the patient position during MRI imaging should be chosen to be consistent with CT images of the patient in terms of location and angle.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  19. Prospective observer and software-based assessment of magnetic resonance imaging quality in head and neck cancer: Should standard positioning and immobilization be required for radiation therapy applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Yang, Jinzhong; Colen, Rivka R; Frank, Steven J; Wang, Jihong; Wassal, Eslam Y; Wang, Wenjie; Kantor, Michael E; Balter, Peter A; Rosenthal, David I; Lai, Stephen Y; Hazle, John D; Fuller, Clifton D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a head and neck magnetic resonance simulation and immobilization protocol on reducing motion-induced artifacts and improving positional variance for radiation therapy applications. Two groups (group 1, 17 patients; group 2, 14 patients) of patients with head and neck cancer were included under a prospective, institutional review board-approved protocol and signed informed consent. A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used for anatomic and dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisitions with standard diagnostic MRI setup for group 1 and radiation therapy immobilization devices for group 2 patients. The impact of magnetic resonance simulation/immobilization was evaluated qualitatively by 2 observers in terms of motion artifacts and positional reproducibility and quantitatively using 3-dimensional deformable registration to track intrascan maximum motion displacement of voxels inside 7 manually segmented regions of interest. The image quality of group 2 (29 examinations) was significantly better than that of group 1 (50 examinations) as rated by both observers in terms of motion minimization and imaging reproducibility (P quality of head and neck MRI in terms of motion-related artifacts and positional reproducibility was greatly improved by use of radiation therapy immobilization devices. Consequently, immobilization with external and intraoral fixation in MRI examinations is required for radiation therapy application. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  1. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  2. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  3. Shimadzu magnetic resonance imaging system, SMT-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shiro; Nishida, Takayuki; Fujio, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, as a new modality of medical imaging, has already been put to practical applications on many clinical sites, through which a lot of clinical data has been accumulated. It can offer a powerful new probe of internal anatomy of the human body and its functions. Now that the MRI has established its effectiveness in diagnosis, a really practical MRI system which features high efficiency and economical design with high patient throughput is strongly called for. Introduced in this article is a superconductive magnet MRI system, SMT-50, operating at 5000 Gauss. It has realized an excellent diagnostic capability with such functions as multi-slice multi-echo imaging, high sensitive, surface coil technique and so on. High resolution image display (1024 x 1024 pixcel) unit and separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) will assist high patient throughput. The outline of the SMT-50 and its clinical data are reported here. (author)

  4. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  5. Image quality at synthetic brain magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Won Hwa; Kim, Hye Jung [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun-Kyoung [Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sook-Hyun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Moon Jung [GE Healthcare, MR Applications and Workflow, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    The clinical application of the multi-echo, multi-delay technique of synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates multiple sequences in a single acquisition but has mainly been used in adults. To evaluate the image quality of synthetic brain MR in children compared with that of conventional images. Twenty-nine children (median age: 6 years, range: 0-16 years) underwent synthetic and conventional imaging. Synthetic (T2-weighted, T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) images with settings matching those of the conventional images were generated. The overall image quality, gray/white matter differentiation, lesion conspicuity and image degradations were rated on a 5-point scale. The relative contrasts were assessed quantitatively and acquisition times for the two imaging techniques were compared. Synthetic images were inferior due to more pronounced image degradations; however, there were no significant differences for T1- and T2-weighted images in children <2 years old. The quality of T1- and T2-weighted images were within the diagnostically acceptable range. FLAIR images showed greatly reduced quality. Gray/white matter differentiation was comparable or better in synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images, but poorer in FLAIR images. There was no effect on lesion conspicuity. Synthetic images had equal or greater relative contrast. Acquisition time was approximately two-thirds of that for conventional sequences. Synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images were diagnostically acceptable, but synthetic FLAIR images were not. Lesion conspicuity and gray/white matter differentiation were comparable to conventional MRI. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  8. Carbon Nano-Allotrope/Magnetic Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanomaterials as T2 Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxiang Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most powerful tool for deep penetration and high-quality 3D imaging of tissues with anatomical details. However, the sensitivity of the MRI technique is not as good as that of the radioactive or optical imaging methods. Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention in biomaterial research in recent decades due to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, as well as excellent biological compatibility. Researchers have employed various carbon nano-allotropes to develop hybrid MRI contrast agents for improved sensitivity. This review summarizes the new research progresses in carbon-based hybrid MRI contrast agents, especially those reported in the past five years. The review will only focus on T2-weighted MRI agents and will be categorized by the different carbon allotrope types and magnetic components. Considering the strong trend in recent bio-nanotechnology research towards multifunctional diagnosis and therapy, carbon-based MRI contrast agents integrated with other imaging modalities or therapeutic functions are also covered.

  9. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young [Kyungbook National University Chilgok Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Buk-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); MacFall, James R. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Payne, Martha E. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Jae Hyoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Woong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I{sub O}) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V{sub WMH}), and we establish the I{sub O} -V{sub WMH} relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  10. Multi-Rate Acquisition for Dead Time Reduction in Magnetic Resonance Receivers: Application to Imaging With Zero Echo Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Josip; Weiger, Markus; Reber, Jonas; Brunner, David O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2018-02-01

    For magnetic resonance imaging of tissues with very short transverse relaxation times, radio-frequency excitation must be immediately followed by data acquisition with fast spatial encoding. In zero-echo-time (ZTE) imaging, excitation is performed while the readout gradient is already on, causing data loss due to an initial dead time. One major dead time contribution is the settling time of the filters involved in signal down-conversion. In this paper, a multi-rate acquisition scheme is proposed to minimize dead time due to filtering. Short filters and high output bandwidth are used initially to minimize settling time. With increasing time since the signal onset, longer filters with better frequency selectivity enable stronger signal decimation. In this way, significant dead time reduction is accomplished at only a slight increase in the overall amount of output data. Multi-rate acquisition was implemented with a two-stage filter cascade in a digital receiver based on a field-programmable gate array. In ZTE imaging in a phantom and in vivo, dead time reduction by multi-rate acquisition is shown to improve image quality and expand the feasible bandwidth while increasing the amount of data collected by only a few percent.

  11. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui; Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young; MacFall, James R.; Payne, Martha E.; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Ki Woong

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I O ) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V WMH ), and we establish the I O -V WMH relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  12. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  13. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  14. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  15. Application of Al techniques to a voice actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, P.L.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Meadow, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that to provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures, languages, and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users, research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study, an artificial intelligence (AI) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user, the AI control strategy determines the user's intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid, the control strategy queries the user for additional informaiton. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AI techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure

  16. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging biosensor for cystatin determination based on the application of bromelain, ficin and chymopapain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sankiewicz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI sensor based on bromelain or chymopapain or ficin has been developed for specific cystatin determination. Cystatin was captured from a solution by immobilized bromelain or chymopapain or ficin due to the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex on the biosensor surface. The influence of bromelain, chymopapain or ficin concentration, as well as the pH of the interaction on the SPRI signal, was investigated and optimized. Sensor dynamic response range is between 0–0.6 μg/ml and the detection limit is equal to 0.1 μg/ml. In order to demonstrate the sensor potential, cystatin was determined in blood plasma, urine and saliva, showing good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  18. Olfactometer for functional resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been developing for twenty years. Indeed, the marketing of high-resolution MRI (5 Tesla and 7 Tesla recently) allowed the study of brain mechanisms. The research work of this PHD was to develop instrumentation for objective studies of brain behavior during a sensory stimulation. We are interested in the study of olfaction. We have designed and built a six-channel olfactometer, synchronized with breathing and controlled by computer. The originality of our work lies in the modularity of our device, which makes it adaptable to a wide range of studies. We also propose a new method to change the intensity of stimulation delivered: the Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). This device has been used in several studies in fMRI. The effectiveness of the PWM is highlighted in a psychophysical study described in this manuscript. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.

    1993-01-01

    In the paper authors describe fundamental physical properties of a phenomenon of the radio-frequency excitation and relaxation of nuclei ordered in a strong magnetic field and the usefulness of MRI in medical diagnostic procedures. Basic interpretations principles of MR imaging due to signal intensity differences between organs and tissues in T 1 - and T 2 - weighted sequences and proton density are presented. Both, literature review and experience of authors suggest application of MRI in otolaryngology, it is illustrated by a lot of examples. The MR imaging studies were compared with results obtained from CT in otolaryngology field. (author)

  20. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of glenohumeral joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.; Doornbos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the application of oblique planes and flexible surface coil techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to be of great clinical value in the evaluation of a variety of pathologic conditions affecting the shoulder. In patients with joint effusions, the tendinous portion of the rotator cuff, glenoid labrum, and bicipital tendon can be readily visualized. This capability has particular relevance in patients with inflammatory disease and traumatic conditions. Rotator cuff atrophy and impingement of the coracoacromial arc upon the supraspinatus muscle and tendon can also be demonstrated. MRI is also useful in the evaluation of shoulder instability. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  3. Nanoplatforms for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywinska, M. A.; Grudzinski, I. P.; Cieszanowski, A.; Bystrzejewski, M.; Poplawska, M.

    2011-01-01

    The application of biomedical nanotechnology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is expect to have a major impact leading to the development of new contrast drug candidates on the nanoscale (1 - 100 nm) that are able to react with specific biological targets at a molecular level. One of the major challenges in this regard is the construction of nanomaterials, especially used in molecular MRI diagnostics of cancer in vivo, specialized antitumor drug delivery or real-time evaluation of the efficacy of the implemented cancer treatment. In this paper, we tried to gain further insights into current trends of nanomedicine, with special focus on preclinical MRI studies in translation cancer research. (authors)

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strake, L. te; Persijn van Meerten, E.L. van; Trimbos, J.B.M.Z.; Paul, L.C.; Langeveld, J.W.; Bloem, J.L.; Bluemm, R.G.; Doornbos, J.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of the current applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the genitourinary tract based on the experience with the 0.5-Tesla MR scanner (Gyroscan, Philips) at the Leiden University Hospital and on reports in the literature. MRI appears to share some of the limitations of CT. MRI cannot reliably differentiate between a malignant and a benign tumor. In the staging of ovarian malignancies by means of MRI, bowel preparation would be desirable. On the other hand, the soft-tissue contrast resolution of MRI is superior to that of CT and images can be obtained in any plane. Thus MRI promises to be an accurate method for staging malignancies. The results in the examination of transplant kidneys are encouraging. It is expected that there will be a place for MRI as a complementary technique to ultrasonography in the diagnosis of scrotal disease. (Auth.)

  7. Penetrating power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Guilizzoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of revealing the presence and identifying the nature of conductive targets is of central interest in many fields, including security, medicine, industry, archaeology and geophysics. In many applications, these targets are shielded by external materials and thus cannot be directly accessed. Hence, interrogation techniques are required that allow penetration through the shielding materials, in order for the target to be identified. Electromagnetic interrogation techniques represent a powerful solution to this challenge, as they enable penetration through conductive shields. In this work, we demonstrate the power of resonant electromagnetic induction imaging to penetrate through metallic shields (1.5-mm-thick and image targets (having conductivities σ ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm−1 concealed behind them.

  8. Imaging and assessment of diffusion coefficients by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tintera, J.; Dezortova, M.; Hajek, M.; Fitzek, C.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of assessment of molecular diffusion by magnetic resonance is highlighted and some typical applications of diffusion imaging in the diagnosis, e.g., of cerebral ischemia, changes in patients with phenylketonuria or multiple sclerosis are discussed. The images were obtained by using diffusion weighted spin echo Echo-Planar Imaging sequence with subsequent correction of the geometrical distortion of the images and calculation of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient map

  9. Independent component analysis-based artefact reduction: application to the electrocardiogram for improved magnetic resonance imaging triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, Julien; Pietquin, Olivier; Felblinger, Jacques; Abächerli, Roger; Kraemer, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is required during magnetic resonance (MR) examination for monitoring patients under anaesthesia or with heart diseases and for synchronizing image acquisition with heart activity (triggering). Accurate and fast QRS detection is therefore desirable, but this task is complicated by artefacts related to the complex MR environment (high magnetic field, radio-frequency pulses and fast switching magnetic gradients). Specific signal processing has been proposed, whether using specific MR QRS detectors or ECG denoising methods. Most state-of-the-art techniques use a connection to the MR system for achieving their task, which is a major drawback since access to the MR system is often restricted. This paper introduces a new method for on-line ECG signal enhancement, called ICARE, which takes advantage of using multi-lead ECG and does not require any connection to the MR system. It is based on independent component analysis (ICA) and applied in real time. This algorithm yields accurate QRS detection for efficient triggering

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  13. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...

  14. Task-oriented lossy compression of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark C.; Atkins, M. Stella; Vaisey, Jacques

    1996-04-01

    A new task-oriented image quality metric is used to quantify the effects of distortion introduced into magnetic resonance images by lossy compression. This metric measures the similarity between a radiologist's manual segmentation of pathological features in the original images and the automated segmentations performed on the original and compressed images. The images are compressed using a general wavelet-based lossy image compression technique, embedded zerotree coding, and segmented using a three-dimensional stochastic model-based tissue segmentation algorithm. The performance of the compression system is then enhanced by compressing different regions of the image volume at different bit rates, guided by prior knowledge about the location of important anatomical regions in the image. Application of the new system to magnetic resonance images is shown to produce compression results superior to the conventional methods, both subjectively and with respect to the segmentation similarity metric.

  15. Post-Processing of Dynamic Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Exams of the Liver: Explanation and Potential Clinical Applications for Color-Coded Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Bos, I.C. Van den; Hussain, S.M.; Pattynama, P.M.; Vogel, M.W.; Kr estin, G.P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain and illustrate the current status and potential applications of automated and color-coded post-processing techniques for the analysis of dynamic multiphasic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver. Post-processing of these images on dedicated workstations allows the generation of time-intensity curves (TIC) as well as color-coded images, which provides useful information on (neo)-angiogenesis within a liver lesion, if necessary combined with information on enhancement patterns of the surrounding liver parenchyma. Analysis of TIC and color-coded images, which are based on pharmacokinetic modeling, provides an easy-to-interpret schematic presentation of tumor behavior, providing additional characteristics for adequate differential diagnosis. Inclusion of TIC and color-coded images as part of the routine abdominal MRI workup protocol may help to further improve the specificity of MRI findings, but needs to be validated in clinical decision-making situations. In addition, these tools may facilitate the diagnostic workup of disease for detection, characterization, staging, and monitoring of antitumor therapy, and hold incremental value to the widely used tumor response criteria

  16. Clinical application of bilateral high temporal and spatial resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Baltzer, P.; Bernathova, M.; Weber, M.; Leithner, D.; Helbich, T.H. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W.; Trattnig, S.; Gruber, S.; Zaric, O. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Abeyakoon, O. [King' s College, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Dubsky, P. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Z. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the clinical application of bilateral high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR DCE-MRI) of the breast at 7 T. Following institutional review board approval 23 patients with a breast lesion (BIRADS 0, 4-5) were included in our prospective study. All patients underwent bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T (spatial resolution of 0.7 mm{sup 3} voxel size, temporal resolution of 14 s). Two experienced readers (r1, r2) and one less experienced reader (r3) independently assessed lesions according to BI-RADS registered. Image quality, lesion conspicuity and artefacts were graded from 1 to 5. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were assessed using histopathology as the standard of reference. HR DCE-MRI at 7 T revealed 29 lesions in 23 patients (sensitivity 100 % (19/19); specificity of 90 % (9/10)) resulting in a diagnostic accuracy of 96.6 % (28/29) with an AUC of 0.95. Overall image quality was excellent in the majority of cases (27/29) and examinations were not hampered by artefacts. There was excellent inter-reader agreement for diagnosis and image quality parameters (κ = 0.89-1). Bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T is feasible with excellent image quality in clinical practice and allows accurate breast cancer diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. BOLD magnetic resonance imaging in nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael E; Jordan, Jennifer H; Juncos, Luis A; Hundley, W Gregory; Hall, John E

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a non-invasive modality that provides anatomic and physiologic information, is increasingly used for diagnosis of pathophysiologic conditions and for understanding renal physiology in humans. Although functional MR imaging methods were pioneered to investigate the brain, they also offer powerful techniques for investigation of other organ systems such as the kidneys. However, imaging the kidneys provides unique challenges due to potential complications from contrast agents. Therefore, development of non-contrast techniques to study kidney anatomy and physiology is important. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MR is a non-contrast imaging technique that provides functional information related to renal tissue oxygenation in various pathophysiologic conditions. Here we discuss technical considerations, clinical uses and future directions for use of BOLD MR as well as complementary MR techniques to better understand renal pathophysiology. Our intent is to summarize kidney BOLD MR applications for the clinician rather than focusing on the complex physical challenges that functional MR imaging encompasses; however, we briefly discuss some of those issues. PMID:29559807

  18. BOLD magnetic resonance imaging in nephrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall ME

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Hall,1,2 Jennifer H Jordan,3 Luis A Juncos,1,2 W Gregory Hundley,3 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Cardiovascular Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Magnetic resonance (MR imaging, a non-invasive modality that provides anatomic and physiologic information, is increasingly used for diagnosis of pathophysiologic conditions and for understanding renal physiology in humans. Although functional MR imaging methods were pioneered to investigate the brain, they also offer powerful techniques for investigation of other organ systems such as the kidneys. However, imaging the kidneys provides unique challenges due to potential complications from contrast agents. Therefore, development of non-contrast techniques to study kidney anatomy and physiology is important. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD MR is a non-contrast imaging technique that provides functional information related to renal tissue oxygenation in various pathophysiologic conditions. Here we discuss technical considerations, clinical uses and future directions for use of BOLD MR as well as complementary MR techniques to better understand renal pathophysiology. Our intent is to summarize kidney BOLD MR applications for the clinician rather than focusing on the complex physical challenges that functional MR imaging encompasses; however, we briefly discuss some of those issues. Keywords: functional MRI, kidney, oxygenation, chronic kidney disease 

  19. T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application in Magnetic Resonance–Guided Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua N.; Collins, David J.; Bainbridge, Hannah; Rank, Christopher M.; Nill, Simeon; Kachelrieß, Marc; Oelfke, Uwe; Leach, Martin O.; Wetscherek, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop and verify a method to obtain good temporal resolution T2-weighted 4-dimensional (4D-T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by using motion information from T1-weighted 4D (4D-T1w) MRI, to support treatment planning in MR-guided radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Ten patients with primary non–small cell lung cancer were scanned at 1.5 T axially with a volumetric T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence gated to exhalation and a volumetric T1-weighted stack-of-stars spoiled gradient echo sequence with golden angle spacing acquired in free breathing. From the latter, 20 respiratory phases were reconstructed using the recently developed 4D joint MoCo-HDTV algorithm based on the self-gating signal obtained from the k-space center. Motion vector fields describing the respiratory cycle were obtained by deformable image registration between the respiratory phases and projected onto the T2-weighted image volume. The resulting 4D-T2w volumes were verified against the 4D-T1w volumes: an edge-detection method was used to measure the diaphragm positions; the locations of anatomical landmarks delineated by a radiation oncologist were compared and normalized mutual information was calculated to evaluate volumetric image similarity. Results High-resolution 4D-T2w MRI was obtained. Respiratory motion was preserved on calculated 4D-T2w MRI, with median diaphragm positions being consistent with less than 6.6 mm (2 voxels) for all patients and less than 3.3 mm (1 voxel) for 9 of 10 patients. Geometrical positions were coherent between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI as Euclidean distances between all corresponding anatomical landmarks agreed to within 7.6 mm (Euclidean distance of 2 voxels) and were below 3.8 mm (Euclidean distance of 1 voxel) for 355 of 470 pairs of anatomical landmarks. Volumetric image similarity was commensurate between 4D-T1w and 4D-T2w MRI, as mean percentage differences in normalized mutual information (calculated over all

  20. Artifacts Affecting Musculoskeletal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Their Origins and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eira; Hoff, Michael; Richardson, Michael L; Ha, Alice S; Porrino, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Among articles within the radiology literature, few present the manifestations of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts in a clinically oriented manner. Recognizing such artifacts is imperative given the increasing clinical use of magnetic resonance imaging and the emphasis by the American Board of Radiology on practical physics applications. The purpose of this article is to present magnetic resonance physics principles visually and conceptually in the context of common musculoskeletal radiology artifacts and their solutions, described using nonmathematical explanations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Application of Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis of External Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Murayama, Kazuhiro; Adachi, Kazuhide; Kumai, Tadashi; Abe, Masato; Hirose, Yuichi

    2018-01-01

    Although a subdural fluid collection frequently is observed, diagnostic methods that differentiate between the subdural collection caused by external hydrocephalus and that caused by subdural hygroma have not been established. Here, we report a case of external hydrocephalus caused by Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis that has been previously reported in only 1 case and can be diagnosed by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse magnetic resonance imaging (time-SLIP MRI). A tumor located in the left temporal was detected incidentally in an 81-year-old man by examination of a head injury. The tumor was surgically resected and diagnosed as a high-grade glioma during the surgery; Gliadel wafers subsequently were implanted. Three weeks after the resection, the patient showed disturbed consciousness, and computed tomography revealed a subdural fluid collection. The out-flow of cerebrospinal through the resection cavity was detected by time-SLIP MRI. Cerebrospinal tests indicated high white blood cell counts and high protein levels, with more than 90% of the white blood cell count comprising eosinophils. Therefore, we suspected that the subdural fluid collection was caused by external hydrocephalus because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. We surgically removed the Gliadel wafers and subsequently performed a surgery to insert a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Histologic examination indicated eosinophilic accumulation around the Gliadel wafers. The patient's symptoms improved after the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. In the present case, time-SLIP MRI was a useful and noninvasive method for diagnosing external hydrocephalus which was caused by eosinophilic meningitis because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  3. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  4. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology.

  5. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of ...

  7. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  8. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of which shows a thin ... into the intravenous line (IV) after an initial series of scans. Additional series of images will be ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of ... machine and in some cases, placed around the part of the body being imaged, send and receive ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that time the imaging based on the electrical activity of ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a result, must be kept away from the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray ...

  17. Slotted cage resonator for high-field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrufo, O; Vasquez, F; Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    A variation of the high-frequency cavity resonator coil was experimentally developed according to the theoretical frame proposed by Mansfield in 1990. Circular slots were used instead of cavities to form the coil endplates and it was called the slotted cage resonator coil. The theoretical principles were validated via a coil equivalent circuit and also experimentally with a coil prototype. The radio frequency magnetic field, B1, produced by several coil configurations was numerically simulated using the finite-element approach to investigate their performances. A transceiver coil, 8 cm long and 7.6 cm in diameter, and composed of 4 circular slots with a 15 mm diameter on both endplates, was built to operate at 300 MHz and quadrature driven. Experimental results obtained with the slotted cage resonator coil were presented and showed very good agreement with the theoretical expectations for the resonant frequency as a function of the coil dimensions and slots. A standard birdcage coil was also built for performance comparison purposes. Phantom images were then acquired to compute the signal-to-noise ratio of both coils showing an important improvement of the slotted cage coil over the birdcage coil. The whole-body images of the mouse were also obtained showing high-quality images. Volume resonator coils can be reliably built following the physical principles of the cavity resonator design for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications of rodents.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  19. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T W; Santos-Ramos, R; Cunningham, F G; Parkey, R

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with abnormal pregnancies were examined with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Three had a malformed fetus, 1 had a molar pregnancy, and 1 had an ovarian mass. Both maternal and fetal structures were clearly shown, although fetal motion may have resulted in image degradation in some cases. The authors suggest that MR may be useful in obstetric diagnosis.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging - first human images in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddeley, H.; Doddrell, D.M.; Brooks, W.M.; Field, J.; Irving, M.; Williams, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the demonstration of internal human anatomy and in the diagnosis of disease, has the major advantages that the technique is non-invasive, does not require the use of ionizing radiation and that it can demonstrate neurological and cardiovascular lesions that cannot be diagnosed easily by other imaging methods. The first magnetic resonance images of humans were obtained in Australia in October 1985 on the research instrument of the Queensland Medical Magnetic Resonance Research Centre, which is based at the Mater Hospital in Brisbane

  3. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy Spatially Resolved NMR Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference covers materials science applications as well as microfluidic, biomedical and dental applications and the monitoring of physicochemical processes. It includes the latest in hardware, methodology and applications of spatially resolved magnetic resonance, such as portable imaging and single-sided spectroscopy. For materials scientists, spectroscopists, chemists, physicists, and medicinal chemists.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you, notify the radiologist or technologist. It is important that you remain perfectly still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. You will know when images are being recorded ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist through the two-way intercom. It is important that your child remain perfectly still while the images are being obtained, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. Your child will know when images are being ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... exposure to ionizing radiation. MR imaging of the soft-tissue structures of the body—such as the heart, liver and many other organs—is more likely in some instances to identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  13. Parallel transmission techniques in magnetic resonance imaging: experimental realization, applications and perspectives; Parallele Sendetechniken in der Magnetresonanztomographie: experimentelle Realisierung, Anwendungen und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, P.

    2007-06-15

    The primary objective of this work was the first experimental realization of parallel RF transmission for accelerating spatially selective excitation in magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, basic aspects regarding the performance of this technique were investigated, potential risks regarding the specific absorption rate (SAR) were considered and feasibility studies under application-oriented conditions as first steps towards a practical utilisation of this technique were undertaken. At first, based on the RF electronics platform of the Bruker Avance MRI systems, the technical foundations were laid to perform simultaneous transmission of individual RF waveforms on different RF channels. Another essential requirement for the realization of Parallel Excitation (PEX) was the design and construction of suitable RF transmit arrays with elements driven by separate transmit channels. In order to image the PEX results two imaging methods were implemented based on a spin-echo and a gradient-echo sequence, in which a parallel spatially selective pulse was included as an excitation pulse. In the course of this work PEX experiments were successfully performed on three different MRI systems, a 4.7 T and a 9.4 T animal system and a 3 T human scanner, using 5 different RF coil setups in total. In the last part of this work investigations regarding possible applications of Parallel Excitation were performed. A first study comprised experiments of slice-selective B1 inhomogeneity correction by using 3D-selective Parallel Excitation. The investigations were performed in a phantom as well as in a rat fixed in paraformaldehyde solution. In conjunction with these experiments a novel method of calculating RF pulses for spatially selective excitation based on a so-called Direct Calibration approach was developed, which is particularly suitable for this type of experiments. In the context of these experiments it was demonstrated how to combine the advantages of parallel transmission

  14. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  15. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in acute cerebral infarct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, N; Butcher, K; Davis, SM; Kidwell, CS; Koroshetz, WJ; Rother, J; Schellinger, PD; Warach, S; Ostergaard, L

    Background and Purpose - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) selection of stroke patients eligible for thrombolytic therapy is an emerging application. Although the efficacy of therapy within 3 hours after onset of symptoms with intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been proven for

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaicher, Wibke; Brugger, Peter C.; Mittermayer, Christoph; Schwindt, Jens; Deutinger, Josef; Bernaschek, Gerhard; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowska, J; Zakowiecki, D; Cal, K

    2010-08-01

    A thorough examination of the skin is essential to screen various diseases accurately, evaluate the effectiveness of topically applied drugs and assess the results of dermatological surgeries such as skin grafts. The assessment of skin properties is also crucial in the cosmetics industry, where it is important to evaluate the effects skin care products have on these properties. The simplest and most widely used method of skin evaluation, the 'naked eye' assessment, enables researchers to assess only the skin surface and involves a large amount of inter-observer variability. Thanks to a great progress that has been made in physics, electronics and computer engineering in recent years, sophisticated imaging methods are increasingly available in day-to-day studies. The aim of this review was to present one of these techniques, namely the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to discuss its possible use in skin examination and analysis. We present basic principles of MRI, as well as several interesting applications in the field of dermatology, and discuss the advantages and limitations of this method.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, Wibke [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wibke.blaicher@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Schwindt, Jens [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Deutinger, Josef [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Bernaschek, Gerhard [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... treatment for a variety of conditions within the brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor ... or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal ... to: detect a variety of brain conditions and abnormalities like cysts, tumors, bleeding, swelling, or problems with ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with other ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... than 30 minutes from the onset of symptoms. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than ... cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of ... Patients who might have metal objects in certain parts of their bodies may also require an x- ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... not come in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. For more information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... not come in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series ...

  6. Oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Chen Qun; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) ventilation imaging is a new technique, and the full extent of its physiological significance has not been elucidated. This review article includes background on (1) respiratory physiology; (2) mechanism and optimization of oxygen-enhanced MR imaging technique; (3) recent applications in animal and human models; and (4) merits and demerits of the technique in comparison with hyperpolarized noble gas MR ventilation imaging. Application of oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging to patients with pulmonary diseases has been very limited. However, we believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of this new technique will define the real significance of oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging in the future of pulmonary functional imaging and its usefulness for diagnostic radiology

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  11. Dental magnetic resonance imaging; MRT der Zaehne und des Zahnhalteapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2016-03-15

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  12. The introduction of clinical magnetic resonance imaging in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorby, W.; Baddeley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a new, but expensive, modality that is being introduced into clinical use in Australia. While it promises increased safety and accuracy in many situations, its precise role when compared with computed tomography and other modalities is not fully established. Therefore, a Government financed evaluation of costs and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging units in five teaching hospitals is to be conducted over two years (1986-1988). Experience with the introduction of computed tomography to Australia and other nations has revealed difficulties in the evaluation by conventional methods of a diagnostic technology that is improving rapidly; it is to be hoped that a systematic evaluation of the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging will be more achievable and useful

  13. Quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging methods for pharmaceutical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, M D

    2011-09-30

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool in pharmaceutical research is now well established and the current literature covers a multitude of different pharmaceutically relevant research areas. This review focuses on the use of quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging techniques and how they have been exploited to extract information that is of direct relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. The article is divided into two main areas. The first half outlines the theoretical aspects of magnetic resonance and deals with basic magnetic resonance theory, the effects of nuclear spin-lattice (T(1)), spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and molecular diffusion upon image quantitation, and discusses the applications of rapid magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition to the theory, the review aims to provide some practical guidelines for the pharmaceutical researcher with an interest in MRI as to which MRI pulse sequences/protocols should be used and when. The second half of the article reviews the recent advances and developments that have appeared in the literature concerning the use of quantitative micro-imaging methods to pharmaceutically relevant research. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  15. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is often the best choice for imaging the joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect ... bone cancer inspect the marrow for leukemia and other diseases ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the specific exam and also with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, follow your child’s ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... range of conditions in children due to injury, illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s ... after trauma diagnose and monitor infectious or inflammatory ... (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to talk to your pediatrician ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will ... exam is requested. Sometimes a follow-up exam is done because a potential ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary, and your doctor will ... exam is needed. Sometimes a follow-up exam is done because a suspicious ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... weakness, blurry vision or seizures help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple ... There is also a very small chance of skin irritation at the site of the IV tube ... characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis disorders of the ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some ... Images related to Magnetic ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... illness or congenital abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the bones of the skull and spine without radiation. MRI of the brain and spine ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormalities. When imaging of a child’s brain and spinal cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ... determine the condition of nerve tissue within the spinal cord In the heart, MRI is often used in ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... prior to sedation and the examination. For the safety of your child during the sedation, it is ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bloodstream. The radiologist , technologist or a nurse may ask if your child has allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x- ... facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for a ... imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  6. Physics for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Caner, Alesssandra; Rahal, Ghita

    2007-01-01

    The book introduces the fundamental aspects of digital imaging and covers four main themes: Ultrasound techniques and imaging applications; Magnetic resonance and MPJ in hospital; Digital imaging with X-rays; and Emission tomography (PET and SPECT). Each of these topics is developed by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, quality and safety aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Some issues specific to the individual techniques are also treated, e.g. choice of radioisotopes or contrast agents, optimisation of data acquisition and st

  7. Clinical application of magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Akihiko; Onoe, Teruyuki; Kodera, Akifumi; Ohtsuki, Tetsuya; Shiomi, Akio; Ida, Masaaki; Sawada, Takahisa

    1999-01-01

    We performed the magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) in the cases which underwent coronary angiography (CAG) and obtained images were compared. Lesion with significant constriction more than 75% on CAG were determined as abnormal findings on MRCA, however, lesions with about 50% constriction were as the normal findings. On the assessment of the re-constriction after PTCA, the changes in signal were found in about half of cases. This may come from the contribution of flexion lesions, the difficulty to assess moderate constriction after PTCA, etc. For the anomalous aortic origin of coronary artery, peripheral large vessels could be simultaneously imaged by MRCA and be also assessed among their clear spatial relationship. Although MRCA has some problems on the assessment for flexion or moderate constriction, these results suggested that MRCA is useful to clinical application as the non-invasive examination. (K.H.)

  8. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of xanthomatous meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.; Tsubokawa, T.; Tanaka, A.; Koshinaga, M.; Nemoto, N.

    1993-01-01

    A case of meningioma with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia occurring in the left frontal convexity of a 37-year-old woman is reported. The tumour was demonstrated as a hypodense mass with minimal enhancement on CT. Our findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clue to the diagnosis of meningiomas with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia when CT is less specific. (orig.)

  10. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.R.; Birzgalis, A.R.; Ramsden, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Menieres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. (orig.)

  11. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F.; Cho, Aaron A.; Edward, Neeraj J.; Edward, Deepak P.; Fajardo, Roman G.

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of uveitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Charles Q.; Mafee, Mahmood F. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Cho, Aaron A. [Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Edward, Neeraj J. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Edward, Deepak P. [King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fajardo, Roman G. [University of California, San Diego, Shiley Eye Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Uveitis is a term used to describe inflammation of the choroid, iris, or ciliary body, which make up the uveal tract. It can be idiopathic or associated with a systemic disease which may be infectious or noninfectious. With the exception of B-scan ultrasonography, current imaging methods for diagnosing and monitoring uveitis are predominately non-radiologic. Although MRI has been anecdotally shown to detect various inflammatory conditions of the globe, such as posterior scleritis, endophthalmitis, and posterior uveitis secondary to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, a more comprehensive review of the MRI findings in uveitis of various etiologies is presented here. The MRI and CT studies of seven patients with uveitis and the clinical history of three of them (not available in four patients) were reviewed. Etiologies included ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, sarcoidosis, and tuberculosis. Increased gadolinium enhancement of the uveal tract, which is visualized as the enhancing layer immediately deep to the low-signal sclera, was seen on all six MRI studies. Diffusion-weighted imaging of a case with posterior uveitis and subretinal effusions revealed restriction within the uvea and effusions. Two patients had inflammatory nodules adherent to the uvea, two patients had vitreous humor abnormalities, and one patient exhibited proximal perineural and perimuscular spread of enhancement. Uveoscleral thickening and enhancement with a posterior calcification were observed in the patient with chronic uveitis imaged with CT. Increased uveal tract enhancement is a common finding in patients with uveitis, regardless of anatomic distribution and etiology. MRI can also further evaluate complications of uveitis and help differentiate it from masquerade syndromes. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamsu, G.; Webb, W.R.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.; Crooks, L.E.; Birnberg, F.A.; Goodman, P.; Hinchcliffe, W.A.; Hedgecock, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of the thorax were obtained in ten normal volunteers, nine patients with advanced bronchogenic carcinoma, and three patients with benign thoracic abnormalities. In normal volunteers, mediastinal and hilar structures were seen with equal frequency on NMR images and computed tomographic scans. The hila were especially well displayed on spin-echo images. Spin-echo images showed mediastinal invasion by tumor, vascular and bronchial compression and invasion, and hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Tumor and benign abnormalities could be separated from mediastinal and hilar fat because of their longer T1 times. Lung masses and nodules as small as 1.5 cm could be seen on the spin-echo images. NMR imaging shows promise for assessment of benign and malignant mediastinal, hilar, and lung abnormalities

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao; Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  17. Neural network segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, B.

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks are well adapted to the task of grouping input patterns into subsets which share some similarity. Moreover, once trained, they can generalize their classification rules to classify new data sets. Sets of pixel intensities from magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a natural input to a neural network; by varying imaging parameters, MR images can reflect various independent physical parameters of tissues in their pixel intensities. A neural net can then be trained to classify physically similar tissue types based on sets of pixel intensities resulting from different imaging studies on the same subject. This paper reports that a neural network classifier for image segmentation was implanted on a Sun 4/60, and was tested on the task of classifying tissues of canine head MR images. Four images of a transaxial slice with different imaging sequences were taken as input to the network (three spin-echo images and an inversion recovery image). The training set consisted of 691 representative samples of gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, bone, and muscle preclassified by a neuroscientist. The network was trained using a fast backpropagation algorithm to derive the decision criteria to classify any location in the image by its pixel intensities, and the image was subsequently segmented by the classifier

  18. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  19. History of the development of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been a common tool for physicists and chemists to probe molecular structures since the phenomenon of NMR was discovered in 1946. The development of X-ray CT in 1973 played an important role in stimulating interest in NMR as an imaging tool, resulting in the birth of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since its invention in the early 1970s, the development of MRI has been among the most active and exciting areas in science, technology, and medicine. Over the past twenty years, MRI has become one of the most important imaging modalities available to clinical medicine. In addition to its role as a routine imaging technique with a growing range of clinical applications, the pace of development in MRI methodology remains rapid, and new ideas with significant potential emerge on a regular basis. This article presents a brief history of the development of MRI. (author)

  20. Basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherzinger, A.L.; Hendee, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology has undergone many technologic advances over the past few years. Many of these advances were stimulated by the wealth of information emerging from nuclear magnetic resonance research in the areas of new and optimal scanning methods and radio-frequency coil design. Other changes arose from the desire to improve image quality, ease siting restrictions and generally facilitate the clinical use of MR equipment. Many questions, however, remain unanswered. Perhaps the most controversial technologic question involves the optimal field strength required for imaging or spectroscopic applications or both. Other issues include safety and clinical efficacy. Technologic issues affect all aspects of MR use including the choice of equipment, examination procedure and image interpretation. Thus, an understanding of recent changes and their theoretic basis is necessary. 92 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Moshiri, Mariam; Lee, Jean H; Bhargava, Puneet; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is largely a complex problem of multiparous and postmenopausal women and is associated with pelvic floor or organ descent. Physical examination can underestimate the extent of the dysfunction and misdiagnose the disorders. Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as a promising tool to evaluate the dynamics of the pelvic floor and use for surgical triage and operative planning. This article reviews the anatomy and pathology of pelvic floor dysfunction, typical imaging findings, and the current role of functional MR imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Are Movement Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging a Real Problem?-A Narrative Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Ohlhues, Anders; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2017-01-01

    Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high sensitiv...

  6. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  8. Parasellar meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos; Fontes, Cristina Asvolinsque P.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed 22 cases of patients with parasellar meningiomas evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in private clinics of the cities of Niteroi and Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Our aim was to characterize the imaging findings in this type of tumor. MRI scanners with 0.5 and 1.0 Tesla magnets were used for the acquisition of multiplanar T1-weighted (pre-and post-gadolinium administration) and T2-weighted images. The main symptoms observed were headache and visual disturbances. Hyperprolactinaemia was observed in only one patient. The most frequent imaging finding was a parasellar mass which appeared hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and enhanced intensively after gadolinium administration. MRI is useful to demonstrate the lesion and to asses the damage to adjacent structures, particularly when the patient presents visual disturbances due to involvement of the cavernous sinuses. (author)

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolorz, J.; Linden, A.; Schicha, H.; Sechtem, U.

    1988-01-01

    NMR imaging is a noninvasive technique that has been shown to provide high-quality images of the heart. Due to the signal characteristics of flowing blood, inherent contrast between blood pool and myocardium is achieved without the use of contrast media. This paper briefly describes technical aspects of NMR imaging of the heart, normal cardiovascular anatomy, applications of the technique in patients with ischemic heart disease, and the potential of NMR imaging for functional studies in various forms of heart disease. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lung as an Alternative for a Pregnant Woman with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloß, Manuel; Heckrodt, Jan; Schneider, Christian; Discher, Thomas; Krombach, Gabriele Anja

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of a pregnant 21-year-old woman with pulmonary tuberculosis in which magnetic resonance imaging of the lung was used to assess the extent and characteristics of the pathological changes. Although the lung has been mostly ignored in magnetic resonance imaging for many decades, today technical development enables detailed examinations of the lung. The technique is now entering the clinical arena and its indications are increasing. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung is not only an alternative method without radiation exposure, it can provide additional information in pulmonary imaging compared to other modalities including computed tomography. We describe a successful application of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung and the imaging appearance of post-primary tuberculosis. This case report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging of the lung can potentially be the first choice imaging technique in pregnant women with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis.

  11. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...] Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss factors affecting the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging...

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in sudden deafness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Hugo Valter Lisboa; Barros, Flavia Alencar; Penido, Norma de Oliveira; Souza, Ana Claudia Valerio de; Yamaoka, Wellington Yugo; Yamashita, Helio

    2005-01-01

    The etiology of sudden deafness can remain undetermined despite extensive investigation. This study addresses the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the analysis of sudden deafness patients.Study Design: transversal cohort.Material And Method: In a prospective study, 49 patients attended at otolaryngology emergency room of Federal University of Sao Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina, from April 2001 to May 2003, were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Magnetic Resonance abnormalities were seen in 23 (46.9%) patients and revealed two tumors suggestive of meningioma, three vestibular schwannomas, thirteen microangiopathic changes of the brain and five (21.7%) pathological conditions of the labyrinth.Conclusion: Sudden deafness should be approached as a symptom common to different diseases. The presence of cerebellopontine angle tumors in 10.2% of our cases, among other treatable causes, justifies the recommendation of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance use, not only to study the auditory peripheral pathway, but to study the whole auditory pathway including the brain. (author)

  14. Efficient bias correction for magnetic resonance image denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Qiu, Peihua

    2013-05-30

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular radiology technique that is used for visualizing detailed internal structure of the body. Observed MRI images are generated by the inverse Fourier transformation from received frequency signals of a magnetic resonance scanner system. Previous research has demonstrated that random noise involved in the observed MRI images can be described adequately by the so-called Rician noise model. Under that model, the observed image intensity at a given pixel is a nonlinear function of the true image intensity and of two independent zero-mean random variables with the same normal distribution. Because of such a complicated noise structure in the observed MRI images, denoised images by conventional denoising methods are usually biased, and the bias could reduce image contrast and negatively affect subsequent image analysis. Therefore, it is important to address the bias issue properly. To this end, several bias-correction procedures have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we study the Rician noise model and the corresponding bias-correction problem systematically and propose a new and more effective bias-correction formula based on the regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. Numerical studies show that our proposed method works well in various applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeck, W W; Ha, S-H; Farmaka, S; Nalcioglu, O

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  19. BOLD magnetic resonance imaging in nephrology

    OpenAIRE

    Hall ME; Jordan JH; Juncos LA; Hundley WG; Hall JE

    2018-01-01

    Michael E Hall,1,2 Jennifer H Jordan,3 Luis A Juncos,1,2 W Gregory Hundley,3 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Cardiovascular Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a non-invasive modality that provides ana...

  20. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, G.P.; Martin, B.; Tubiana, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed in 18 patients with proven endometriosis. MRI findings were analyzed and compared with laparoscopic or surgical findings; MRI accurately demonstrated ovarian endometrial cysts as well as ectopic foci of endometriosis. Adhesions may be also suggested. Contrary to laparoscopy, MRI easily depicts both deep lesions and endometrial implants under the peritoneum. Consequently, MRI appears as an useful adjunct to laparoscopy for initial diagnosis before starting a medical treatment and above all as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of the answer to treatment, avoiding iterative and often adhesions limited laparoscopies. (author). 7 refs.; 9 figs

  2. Prostate resonance imaging: morphology and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocantos, Jorge A.; Pietrani, Marcelo A.; Paganini, Lisandro

    2007-01-01

    The cancer of prostate is the most frequent neoplasms and the third cause of death in men, although the average of survival of patients it improved, the cancer of prostate is an important problem in health. The majority of these tumors are of slow growth and the early detection allows high probabilities of definitive treatment. The neoplasms of prostate detected at present are smaller than the detected ones 20 years ago behind, nevertheless exist big differences in the aggressiveness of these tumors. The images are very important in the management of prostate cancer, and the magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate is a new tool in the evaluation of prostate cancer [es

  3. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  5. The origins and future of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrli, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    What began as a curiosity of physics has become the preeminent method of diagnostic medical imaging and may displace x-ray-based techniques in the 21st century. During the past two decades nuclear magnetic resonance has revolutionized chemistry, biochemistry, biology and, more recently, diagnostic medicine. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, (MRI) as it is commonly called, is fundamentally different from x-ray-based techniques in terms of the principles of spatial encoding and mechanisms of signal and contrast generation involved. MRI has a far richer ultimate potential than any other imaging technique known today, and its technology and applications are still far from maturation, which may not occur until early in the 21st century. 23 refs., 6 figs

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Smart Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-01-01

    By visualizing bioactive molecules or biological parameters in vivo, molecular imaging is searching for information at the molecular level in living organisms. In addition to contributing to earlier and more personalized diagnosis in medicine, it also helps understand and rationalize the molecular factors underlying physiological and pathological processes. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complexes of paramagnetic metal ions, mostly lanthanides, are commonly used to enhance the intrinsic image contrast. They rely either on the relaxation effect of these metal chelates (T(1) agents), or on the phenomenon of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST agents). In both cases, responsive molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes can be designed to report on various biomarkers of biological interest. In this context, we review recent work in the literature and from our group on responsive T(1) and PARACEST MRI agents for the detection of biogenic metal ions (such as calcium or zinc), enzymatic activities, or neurotransmitter release. These examples illustrate the general strategies that can be applied to create molecular imaging agents with an MRI detectable response to biologically relevant parameters.

  8. Basic concepts from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Arroyo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has grown exponentially, due in part to excellent anatomic and pathologic detail provided by the modality, as recent technological advances that have led to more rapid acquisition times. Radiology residents in different parts of the world now receive training in MR images from their first year of residence, included the pulse sequences training spin-echo, gradient-echo, inversion-recovery, echo-planar image and MR angiographic sequences, commonly used in medical imaging. However, to optimize the use of this type of study, it has been necessary to understand the basic concepts of physics, included the concepts of recovery T1, degradation T2* and T2, repetition time, echo time, and the effects of chemical shift. Additionally, it has been important to understand the contrast weighting for better representation of specific tissues and thus perform an appropriate differential diagnosis of various pathological processes. (author) [es

  9. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  11. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypothalamic hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, Junichi; Uozumi, Tohru; Sakoda, Katsuaki; Yamanaka, Masami; Kihara, Mikio; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Kagawa, Yoshihiro; Kajima, Toshio.

    1988-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) findings of two patients with a hypothalamic hamartoma are discussed. The two girls showed clinical symptoms and endocrinological signs of precocious puberty. MR imaging was of diagnostic value superior to that of CT in the demonstration of the characteristic location of this tumor and relationships to the neighboring structures because of its multi-dimensional utility. Although it has been reported that CT showed this lesion as isodense to the grey matter with and without injection of contrast medium, MR imaging depicted the lesion as a high signal intensity area on T2-weighted images in both patients. MR imaging is a useful method for the evaluation of the hypothalamic hamartoma.

  13. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichida, Fukiko; Hamamichi, Yuuji; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Okada, Toshio; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Okada, Eikichi

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomical diagnosis and tissue characterization, 8 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied comparing with echocardiography and 201 Tl myocardial imaging. The severity and distribution of hypertrophy were comparable on echocardiography and MRI. MRI was superior to echocardiography to demonstrate the apical hypertrophy. In 4 patients with severe hypertrophy, heterogenous high signal intensity was demonstrated in the site of hypertrophy, which was enhanced by T 2 weighted imaging. In the patient with decreased cardiac performance and progressed cardiac failure, the heterogeneity and high signal intensity progressed in one year interval. Simultaneously performed 201 Tl myocardial imaging showed patchy perfusion defect. Histological findings of the left ventricle demonstrated hypertrophy, degeneration and marked dysarray of the myocytes and fibrosis. MRI has the potential ability for the evaluation and sequential monitoring of myocardial tissue characterization as well as cardiac anatomy in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Fukiko; Hamamichi, Yuuji; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Okada, Toshio; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Okada, Eikichi [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomical diagnosis and tissue characterization, 8 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied comparing with echocardiography and [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging. The severity and distribution of hypertrophy were comparable on echocardiography and MRI. MRI was superior to echocardiography to demonstrate the apical hypertrophy. In 4 patients with severe hypertrophy, heterogenous high signal intensity was demonstrated in the site of hypertrophy, which was enhanced by T[sub 2] weighted imaging. In the patient with decreased cardiac performance and progressed cardiac failure, the heterogeneity and high signal intensity progressed in one year interval. Simultaneously performed [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging showed patchy perfusion defect. Histological findings of the left ventricle demonstrated hypertrophy, degeneration and marked dysarray of the myocytes and fibrosis. MRI has the potential ability for the evaluation and sequential monitoring of myocardial tissue characterization as well as cardiac anatomy in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author).

  16. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, P. O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1998-06-02

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.) With 4 figs., 176 refs.

  17. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  18. The magnetic resonance image findings of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghan, Rami J.

    2004-01-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis is rare disease of breast. Clinically and radiologically it may mimic breast carcinoma. We report a case of a 34-year old female patient with the diagnosis, concentrating on magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and its clinical application. There have been other reports on MRI findings in this entity in the radiological literature, but in our case report clinical, cytological, pathological and radiological correlations are also provided. (author)

  19. New applications of surface plasmon resonance technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tianhao; Yin Meirong; Fang Zheyu; Yang Haidong; Yang Jia; Yang Huizhan; Kang Huizhen; Yang Dapeng; Lu Yanzhen

    2005-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance technology is reviewed and its new applications in various fields are described. These fields include surface plasmon resonance sensors, near-field scanning optical microscopy, thin film optics and thickness measurement, holography, precise measurement of angles, and Q switching. (authors)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo; Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected

  1. Brain Imaging Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Simrun; Prete, Braedan R J; Wade, Alanna; Hane, Francis T; Albert, Mitchell S

    2018-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129 Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a novel iteration of traditional MRI that relies on detecting the spins of 1 H. Since 129 Xe is a gaseous signal source, it can be used for lung imaging. Additionally, 129 Xe dissolves in the blood stream and can therefore be detectable in the brain parenchyma and vasculature. In this work, we provide detailed information on the protocols that we have developed to image 129 Xe within the brains of both rodents and human subjects. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of olfactory neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Mitsuhiro; Homma, Akihiro; Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon intranasal tumor originating from olfactory neuroepithelium. Despite the development of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical testing, the pathological diagnosis of this tumor is still difficult because of the wide range of histological features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of this tumor and the pattern of contrast enhancement have not been well described. The purpose of this report was to analyze the MR characteristics of olfactory neuroblastomas. The MR signal, pattern of contrast enhancement, and correlation with high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging were examined. Seventeen patients with olfactory neuroblastoma were treated at Hokkaido University Hospital and a related hospital during the past 25 years. MR images taken in 12 patients and CT images taken in 9 patients with histologically confirmed olfactory neuroblastoma were retrospectively reviewed. Compared with brain gray matter, 11 tumors were hypointense on T1-weighted images, 9 homogeneously and 2 heterogeneously. Eight tumors were hyperintense on T2-weighted images, 3 homogeneously and 5 heterogeneously, although their appearance was less intense than that of sinusitis. Gadolinium enhancement was moderate in one case and marked in 10 of the 11 cases, 9 homogeneously and 2 heterogeneously. Nine of the 11 tumors showed smooth regular shaped margins; 2 of these tumors exhibited irregular infiltrating margins on gadolinium-enhanced images, compared to the pre-contrast T1-weighted images. Eight of the 11 tumors had clearly demarcated margins, while 3 of the 11 tumors did not exhibit gadolinium enhancement. Six of the 12 cases (50%) exhibited intracranial cysts on the gadolinium-enhanced images. T2-weighted or gadolinium-enhanced images successfully distinguished sinusitis from tumors in 4 cases whereas the CT images failed. Gadolinium enhancement, particularly in the tangential plane, demonstrated intracranial extension not apparent on the CT images

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric neurological disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Aihara, Toshinori; Tanaka, Osamu.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric neurological disease. 17 children between the ages of 2 month and 8.5 year have been examined with MRI. All subjects tolerated the MRI procedure well, although sedation was necessary for young children. Result as follows : (1) MRI does not utilize ionising radiation to produce an image. (2) MRI images more clearly demonstrate cerebral gray and white matter than X-ray CT. (3) Compared with X-ray CT, MRI proved to be advantageous in detection and characterization of the pathology, especially when the abnormality was located along the posterior fossa and spinal canal. It is suggested that these nature of MRI makes it the ideal diagnostic method for children. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J.; King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of parotid tumors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Yamashita, Toshio; Inoue, Toshiya; Kumazawa, Tadami; Kato, Tsutomu; Sawada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1987-01-01

    We compared the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with that of X-ray computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors. We performed in 13 patients with parotid tumors and 10 of them were operated. The MRI equipment had a magnetic fild of 0.15 Tesla. We used the spine echo acquisition technique and a repetition time of 600, 1000 and 2000 milli-seconds, and echo time of 40 and 80 milli-seconds. We found that the T 1 weighted image well visualized the duct of the parotid gland, the T 2 weighted image provided fine pictures of the parotid tumor. The facial nerve of normal parotid glands could not be visualized by MRI. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro

    1991-01-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T 1 -weighted image (T 1 WI) and the T 2 -weighted image (T 2 WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T 1 WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T[sub 1]-weighted image (T[sub 1]WI) and the T[sub 2]-weighted image (T[sub 2]WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T[sub 1]WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T[sub 1]WI and the T[sub 2]WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author).

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, M.E.; Bydder, G.M.; Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of intramuscular metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf-Peter; Behrmann, Curd; Fiedler, Eckhard; Voigt, Wieland; Wienke, Andreas; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse magnetic resonance findings of intramuscular metastases (IM) in a relatively large series. From January 2000 to January 2010, 28 patients (207 metastases) were retrospectively identified in the radiological database of the Martin-Luther-University. Several different scanning protocols were used depending on the localisation of IM. In 12 patients diffusion-weighted (DW) images were obtained with a multi-shot SE-EPI sequence. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were also calculated. Furthermore, fusion images were manually generated between the DW and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images. On T2-weighted images, 97% of the recognised IM were hyperintense in comparison to unaffected musculature, and 3% were mixed iso- to hyperintense. On T1-weighted images most IM (91%) were homogeneously isointense in comparison to muscle tissue, whereas 4% were hypointense, and 5% lightly hyperintense. ADC maps were calculated for 91 metastases ranging from 0.99 to 4.00 mm 2 s -1 (mean value 1.99 ± 0.66). ADC values of low ( 3.0) in 6%. Of the IM that were investigated with contrast medium, 88.5% showed marked enhancement. It was homogeneous in 88% and heterogenous in 6%. Rim enhancement with central low attenuation was seen in 6%. There was no difference in enhancement characteristics with respect to ADC values or fusion patterns. Peritumoral enhancement was identified in 2.4%. Magnetic resonance features of muscle metastases are relatively typical and consist of round or oval intramuscular masses with well-defined margins, marked enhancement, low or moderate ADC values, and moderate to high signal intensity on fusion images. (orig.)

  11. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel at 7 Tesla in comparison to 1.5 Tesla: First steps towards clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnemann, Maria L; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Johst, Soeren; Orzada, Stephan; Umutlu, Lale; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    To perform non-enhanced (NE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the small bowel at 7 Tesla (7T) and to compare it with 1.5 Tesla (1.5T). Twelve healthy subjects were prospectively examined using a 1.5T and 7T MRI system. Coronal and axial true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP) imaging and a coronal T2-weighted (T2w) half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence were acquired. Image analysis was performed by 1) visual evaluation of tissue contrast and detail detectability, 2) measurement and calculation of contrast ratios and 3) assessment of artifacts. NE MRI of the small bowel at 7T was technically feasible. In the vast majority of the cases, tissue contrast and image details were equivalent at both field strengths. At 7T, two cases revealed better detail detectability in the TrueFISP, and better contrast in the HASTE. Susceptibility artifacts and B1 inhomogeneities were significantly increased at 7T. This study provides first insights into NE ultra-high field MRI of the small bowel and may be considered an important step towards high quality T2w abdominal imaging at 7T MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  17. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  18. Far-field superresolution by imaging of resonance scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-10-31

    We show that superresolution imaging in the far-field region of the sources and receivers is theoretically and practically possible if migration of resonant multiples is employed. A resonant multiple is one that bounces back and forth between two scattering points; it can also be the multiple between two smoothly varying interfaces as long as the reflection wave paths partially overlap and reflect from the same Fresnel zone. For a source with frequency f, compared to a one-way trip, N round trips in propagating between two scatterers increase the effective frequency by 2N × f and decrease the effective wavelength by λ/(2N). Thus, multiples can, in principle, be used as high-frequency probes to estimate detailed properties of layers. Tests with both synthetic and field data validate this claim. Improved resolution by multiple imaging is not only feasible for crustal reflections, but might be applicable to mantle and core reverberations recorded by earthquake seismologists.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, C.G.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Wicks, J.D.; Stevens, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    How does magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) currently contribute in the evaluation of patients with suspected heart disease? What role will MRI play in the future in evaluation of cardiovascular disease? To understand better where MRI fits into the diagnostic algorithm of cardiovascular disease the authors first consider the characteristics that they would like to see in the ideal diagnostic test and then survey the available cardiac diagnostic tests to note the characteristics that limit or recommend a test. In the final analysis, the justification for expensive diagnostic tests such as MRI must be an overall improvement in survival or quality of life in those patients treated after diagnosis