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Sample records for resonance delayed enhancement

  1. Delayed enhancement of peripheral zone of neurofibromas at magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Kuramoto, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan); Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    It is well known that bizonal histologic appearance characteristic of neurofibromas are reflected on magnetic resonance (MR) images. We report a case in which a delayed enhanced MR image showed that the entire mass enhanced homogeneously resulting in loss of zonal distinction on early enhanced MR image. (orig.)

  2. Delay-enhanced stability and stochastic resonance in perception bistability under non-Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tao; Zeng, Chunhua; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua; Mei, Dongcheng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of time delay in an attractor network model of perception bistability driven by non-Gaussian noise. Using delay Langevin and Fokker–Planck approaches, the theoretical analysis of the model is presented. It is found that the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the time delay exhibits a maximum, which is identified as the characteristic of the delay-enhanced stability of the system. This is different to the case of noise-enhanced stability. The non-Gaussian noise-enhanced stability of the system is also analyzed. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of the noise intensity exhibits a maximum. This maximum implies the identifying characteristic of stochastic resonance (SR), and the time delay and non-Gaussian noise can enhance the SR phenomenon. (paper)

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m 2 , and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m 2 , there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension

  4. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro, E-mail: lgpignataro@ig.com.br; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel [Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Ilha do Fundão, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m{sup 2}, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m{sup 2}, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging in patients with clinically suspected stress cardiomyopathy (Tako-Tsubo)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerleile, K.; Sultan, A.; Willems, S.; Lund, G.; Groth, M.; Adam, G.; Barmeyer, A.; Meinertz, T.; Koester, R.; Heitzer, T.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the ability of delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) and other MRI and clinical parameters to identify diseases mimicking stress cardiomyopathy (SCM). The study included 14 consecutive patients fulfilling the American Heart Association (AHA) criteria for SCM with acute left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of coronary artery disease, triggered by psychological stress. The MRI protocol consisted of cine, T 2-weighted, first-pass-perfusion (FPP) and DE-MRI. Six patients with DE were classified as mimicking SCM (non-SCM) and 8 patients without DE as SCM. FPP defects were found in 4 patients with non-SCM and in none with SCM (p < 0.05). Myocardial edema was found in 5 patients with non-SCM and in 2 patients with SCM (p = ns). No significant differences in clinical findings such as ECG, cardiac markers and echocardiographic recovery of left ventricular function were found between patients with non-SCM and SCM. Non-SCM defined by DE-MRI is a frequent finding in patients fulfilling the AHA criteria for SCM. Clinical findings seem to be of limited value to differentiate between non-SCM and SCM. (orig.)

  6. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  7. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  8. Comparison of infarct size changes with delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and electrocardiogram QRS scoring during the 6 months after acutely reperfused myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, L.E.; Ripa, R.S.; Grande, P.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Magnetic resonance imaging using the delayed contrast-enhanced (DE-MRI) method can be used for characterizing and quantifying myocardial infarction (MI). Electrocardiogram (ECG) score after the acute phase of MI can be used to estimate the portion of left ventricular myocardium...

  9. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol......PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58......) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images (P I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA (P

  10. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC), after slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Zilkens@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd; Jaeger, Marcus; Schultz, Johannes [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Holstein, Arne [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Kim, Young-jo; Millis, Michael B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Childrens Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical, School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inselspital Bern, University Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Krauspe, Ruediger [Department of Orthopaedics, Heinrich-Heine University Medical School, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in hip joint cartilage in mature hips with a history of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) using delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Methods: 28 young-adult subjects (32 hips) with a mean age of 23.8 {+-} 4.0 years (range: 18.1-30.5 years) who were treated for mild or moderate SCFE in adolescence were included into the study. Hip function and clinical symptoms were evaluated with the Harris hip score (HHS) system at the time of MRI. Plain radiographic evaluation included Tonnis grading, measurement of the minimal joint space width (JSW) and alpha-angle measurement. The alpha-angle values were used to classify three sub-groups: group 1 = subjects with normal femoral head-neck offset (alpha-angle <50{sup o}), group 2 = subjects with mild offset decrease (alpha-angle 50{sup o}-60{sup o}), and group 3 = subjects with severe offset decrease (alpha-angle >60{sup o}). Results: There was statistically significant difference noted for the T1{sub Gd} values, lateral and central, between group 1 and group 3 (p-values = 0.038 and 0.041). The T1{sub Gd} values measured within the lateral portion were slightly lower compared with the T1{sub Gd} values measured within the central portion that was at a statistically significance level (p-value <0.001). HHS, Tonnis grades and JSW revealed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: By using dGEMRIC in the mid-term follow-up of SCFE we were able to reveal degenerative changes even in the absence of joint space narrowing that seem to be related to the degree of offset pathology. The dGEMRIC technique may be a potential diagnostic modality in the follow-up evaluation of SCFE.

  11. Study of optimal flip angle for inversion-recovery gradient echo method in delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masashi; Matsumura, Yoshio; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable tool for detecting myocardial infarction and assessing myocardial viability. The standard viability MRI technique is the inversion-recovery gradient echo (IR-GRE) method. Several previous studies have demonstrated that this imaging technique provides superior image quality at high magnetic field strengths, e.g., 3.0 T. However, there are numerous possible flip angles. We investigated the optimal flip angle of IR-GRE in delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI. Phantoms were made that modeled infarcted myocardium and normal myocardium after administration of contrast agent. To determine optimal flip angle, we compared the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) among these phantoms and evaluated the degree of artifacts induced by increased flip angle. The flip angle that showed the highest CNR for 2D IR-GRE and 3D IR-GRE was 30deg/15deg at 1.5 T and 25deg/15deg at 3.0 T. The flip angle that showed the highest CNR was independent of R-R interval. Streak artifacts induced by increased flip angle tended to occur more readily at 3.0 T than 1.5 T. The optimal flip angle for 2D IR-GRE and 3D IR-GRE at 1.5 T was 30deg and 15deg, respectively. At 3.0 T, taking into account the results for both CNR and streak artifacts, we concluded the optimal flip angle of 2D IR-GRE to be 15-20deg. (author)

  12. Effects of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in financial system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiang-Cheng; Li, Chun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The effect of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in finance system was investigated. The time delay is introduced into the Heston model driven by the extrinsic and intrinsic periodic information for stock price. The signal power amplification (SPA) was calculated by numerical simulation. The results indicate that an optimal critical value of delay time maximally enhances the reverse-resonance in the behaviors of SPA as a function of long-run variance of volatility or cross correlation coefficient between noises for both cases of intrinsic and extrinsic periodic information. Moreover, in both cases, being a critical value in the delay time, when the delay time takes value below the critical value, reverse-resonance increases with the delay time increasing, however, when the delay time takes value above the critical value, the reverse-resonance decrease with the delay time increasing. - Highlights: • The effects of delay time on stochastic resonance of the stock prices was investigated. • There is an optimal critical value of delay time maximally enhances the reverse-resonance • The reverse-resonance increases with the delay time increasing as the delay time takes value below the critical value • The reverse-resonance decrease with the delay time increasing as the delay time takes value above the critical value

  13. Effects of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in financial system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiang-Cheng [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, 650091 (China); Li, Chun [Department of Computer Science, Puer Teachers' College, Puer 665000 (China); Mei, Dong-Cheng, E-mail: meidch@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, 650091 (China)

    2014-06-13

    The effect of time delay on stochastic resonance of the stock prices in finance system was investigated. The time delay is introduced into the Heston model driven by the extrinsic and intrinsic periodic information for stock price. The signal power amplification (SPA) was calculated by numerical simulation. The results indicate that an optimal critical value of delay time maximally enhances the reverse-resonance in the behaviors of SPA as a function of long-run variance of volatility or cross correlation coefficient between noises for both cases of intrinsic and extrinsic periodic information. Moreover, in both cases, being a critical value in the delay time, when the delay time takes value below the critical value, reverse-resonance increases with the delay time increasing, however, when the delay time takes value above the critical value, the reverse-resonance decrease with the delay time increasing. - Highlights: • The effects of delay time on stochastic resonance of the stock prices was investigated. • There is an optimal critical value of delay time maximally enhances the reverse-resonance • The reverse-resonance increases with the delay time increasing as the delay time takes value below the critical value • The reverse-resonance decrease with the delay time increasing as the delay time takes value above the critical value.

  14. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K. E.; Qvistgaard, E.; Danneskiold-Samsoe, B.; Thomsen, C.; Oestergaard, M.; Bliddal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. Material and Methods: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58 years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol/l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. Results: Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) in the joint cartilage compared to the non-enhanced images ( P <0.002). I.a. Gd-DTPA provided significantly higher SNR and CNR compared to i.v. Gd-DTPA ( P <0.01). Furthermore, a better delineation of the cartilage in the synovial/cartilage zone and of the chondral/subchondral border was observed. Conclusion: The dGEMRIC MRI method markedly improved delineation of hip joint cartilage compared to non-enhanced MRI. The i.a. Gd-DTPA provided the best cartilage delineation. dGEMRIC is a clinically applicable MRI method that may improve identification of early subtle cartilage damage and the accuracy of volume measurements of hip joint cartilage

  15. Resonant enhancement in leptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, P. S. B.; Garny, M.; Klaric, J.; Millington, P.; Teresi, D.

    2018-02-01

    Vanilla leptogenesis within the type I seesaw framework requires the mass scale of the right-handed neutrinos to be above 109 GeV. This lower bound can be avoided if at least two of the sterile states are almost mass degenerate, which leads to an enhancement of the decay asymmetry. Leptogenesis models that can be tested in current and upcoming experiments often rely on this resonant enhancement, and a systematic and consistent description is therefore necessary for phenomenological applications. In this paper, we give an overview of different methods that have been used to study the saturation of the resonant enhancement when the mass difference becomes comparable to the characteristic width of the Majorana neutrinos. In this limit, coherent flavor transitions start to play a decisive role, and off-diagonal correlations in flavor space have to be taken into account. We compare various formalisms that have been used to describe the resonant regime and discuss under which circumstances the resonant enhancement can be captured by simplified expressions for the CP asymmetry. Finally, we briefly review some of the phenomenological aspects of resonant leptogenesis.

  16. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dGEMRIC) of Hip Joint Cartilage: Better Cartilage Delineation after Intra-Articular than Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Jensen, K.E.; Quistgaard, E.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate and compare delayed gadolinium (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the hip joint using intravenous (i.v.) or ultrasound-guided intra-articular (i.a.) Gd-DTPA injection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 10 patients (50% males, mean age 58...... years) with clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA; Kellgren score II-III), MRI of the hip was performed twice on a clinical 1.5T MR scanner: On day 1, before and 90-180 min after 0.3 mmol/kg body weight i.v. Gd-DTPA and, on day 8, 90-180 min after ultrasound-guided i.a. injection of a 4 mmol....../l Gd-DTPA solution. Coronal STIR, coronal T1 fat-saturated spin-echo, and a cartilage-sensitive gradient-echo sequence (3D T1 SPGR) in the sagittal plane were applied. RESULTS Both the post-i.v. and post-i.a. Gd-DTPA images showed significantly higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR...

  17. Investigation of a delayed feedback controller of MEMS resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Karim M.

    2013-08-04

    Controlling mechanical systems is an important branch of mechanical engineering. Several techniques have been used to control Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. In this paper, we study the effect of a delayed feedback controller on stabilizing MEMS resonators. A delayed feedback velocity controller is implemented through modifying the parallel plate electrostatic force used to excite the resonator into motion. A nonlinear single degree of freedom model is used to simulate the resonator response. Long time integration is used first. Then, a finite deference technique to capture periodic motion combined with the Floquet theory is used to capture the stable and unstable periodic responses. We show that applying a suitable positive gain can stabilize the MEMS resonator near or inside the instability dynamic pull in band. We also study the stability of the resonator by tracking its basins of attraction while sweeping the controller gain and the frequency of excitations. For positive delayed gains, we notice significant enhancement in the safe area of the basins of attraction. Copyright © 2013 by ASME.

  18. Three-dimensional delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage at 3 T: A prospective controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.zilkens@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ. Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstrasse 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ. Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstrasse 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Kim, Young-Jo, E-mail: young-jo.kim@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Hosalkar, Harish, E-mail: hhosalkar@rchsd.org [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rady Children' s Hospital San Diego, 3030 Childrens Way Ste 410, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ. Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstrasse 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Krauspe, Ruediger, E-mail: krauspe@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ. Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstrasse 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd, E-mail: bbittersohl@partners.org [Univ. Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstrasse 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess acetabular and femoral hip joint cartilage with three-dimensional (3D) delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) in patients with degeneration of hip joint cartilage and asymptomatic controls with morphologically normal appearing cartilage. Methods and materials: A total of 40 symptomatic patients (18 males, 22 females; mean age: 32.8 {+-} 10.2 years, range: 18-57 years) with different hip joint deformities including femoroacetabular impingement (n = 35), residual hip dysplasia (n = 3) and coxa magna due to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease in childhood (n = 2) underwent high-resolution 3D dGEMRIC for the evaluation of acetabular and femoral hip joint cartilage. Thirty-one asymptomatic healthy volunteers (12 males, 19 females; mean age: 24.5 {+-} 1.8 years, range: 21-29 years) without underlying hip deformities were included as control. MRI was performed at 3 T using a body matrix phased array coil. Region of interest (ROI) analyses for T1{sub Gd} assessment was performed in seven regions in the hip joint, including anterior to superior and posterior regions. Results: T1{sub Gd} mapping demonstrated the typical pattern of acetabular cartilage consistent with a higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in the main weight-bearing area. T1{sub Gd} values were significantly higher in the control group than in the patient group whereas significant differences in T1{sub Gd} values corresponding to the amount of cartilage damage were noted both in the patient group and in the control group. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the potential of high-resolution 3D dGEMRIC at 3 T for separate acetabular and femoral hip joint cartilage assessment in various forms of hip joint deformities.

  19. Validity of gradient-echo three-dimensional delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: A histologically controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.zilkens@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Herten, Monika, E-mail: Moherten@web.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Kurzidem, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.kurzidem@uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Jäger, Marcus [Univ Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, D-45147 Essen (Germany); König, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmarpierre.koenig@lvr.de [LVR Clinic for Orthopedic Surgery, D-41749 Viersen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Krauspe, Rüdiger, E-mail: krauspe@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.bittersohl@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To validate gradient-echo three-dimensional (3D) delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) by means of histological analyses in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. Materials and methods: Twenty-one femoral head specimens collected from 21 patients (7 males, 14 females, mean age: 60.9 ± 9.6 years; range: 37.6–77.3 years), who underwent total hip replacement for symptomatic hip joint osteoarthritis, underwent MRI and histological assessment. A region of 2 cm{sup 2} at the weight-bearing area was marked with four pins to enable multi-planar MRI reformatting to be matched with histological sections. MRI was performed at 3 T with a 3D double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence for morphological cartilage assessment and 3D Volumetric Interpolated Breathhold Examination (VIBE) for T1{sub Gd} mapping. Histological sections were evaluated according to the Mankin score system. Total Mankin score, grade of toluidine staining (sensitive for glycosaminoglycan content) and a modified Mankin score classification system with four sub-groups of cartilage damage were correlated with MRI data. Results: Spearman's rho correlation analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between T1{sub Gd} mapping and histological analyses in all categories including total Mankin score (r = −0.658, p-value ≤ 0.001), toluidine staining (r = −0.802, p-value < 0.001) and modified Mankin score (r = −0.716, p-value < 0.001). The correlation between morphological MRI and histological cartilage assessment was statistically significant but inferior to the biochemical cartilage MRI (r-values ranging from −0.411 to 0.525, p-values < 0.001). Conclusions: Gradient-echo dGEMRIC is reliable while offering the unique features of high image resolution and 3D biochemically sensitive MRI for the assessment of early cartilage degeneration.

  20. Symptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmia is associated with delayed gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and with elevated plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Katsumi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakao, Shinji; Lee-Kawabata, Masaaki; Ezumi, Akira; Masai, Miho; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Masuyama, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    Delayed gadolinium enhancement (DGE) in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging indicates the areas with myocardial fibrosis, which are suggested to be arrhythmogenic substrate in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is associated with cardiovascular events in HCM. We investigated the grade of DGE in CMR and plasma BNP levels in HCM patients with or without symptomatic ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). We recruited 26 consecutive untreated HCM patients without any symptoms of heart failure. They were divided into 2 groups: patients with symptomatic VT/VF [VT/VF (+) group, n=6]; patients without symptomatic VT/VF [VT/VF (-) group, n=20]. CMR was performed to evaluate left ventricular geometry and the grade of DGE. Plasma BNP levels, left ventricular mass index, and the number of segments with positive DGE were greater in the VT/VF (+) group than in the VT/VF (-) group (698.1±387.6 vs. 226.9±256.8 pg/ml, p=0.006; 152.3±49.5 vs. 89.5±24.1 g/m 2 , p=0.003; 9.7±5.7 vs. 3.5±3.3, p=0.013). On logistic regression, adjusted odds ratio for symptomatic VT/VF was 214 for log BNP (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-37,043, p=0.04) and 1.54 for DGE score (95% CI 1.01-2.34, p=0.04). High plasma BNP levels and the enlarged area of DGE in CMR were associated with symptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmia. These factors may be useful markers for detecting high-risk patients of sudden cardiac death in HCM. (author)

  1. Characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on delayed contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chaowu; Zhao Shihua; Li Hua; Jiang Shiliang; Lu Minjie; Zhang Yan; Wei Yunqing; Ling Jian; Fang Wei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) on delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Methods: All patients underwent delayed contrast-enhanced CMRI. The left ventricle was divided into 9 segments to assess the location, extent and function of the hypertrophic segments. The t test was applied for the statistics. Results: Of 154 patients, delayed enhancement of' hypertrophic segment was found in 95 cases and non-delayed enhancement in 59 cases. The thickness and number of hypertrophic segment in patients with delayed enhancement were larger than those with non-delayed enhancement [(24.8±5.5) mm vs (20.4± 3.8) mm, t=3.82, P<0.05; (3.3±1.9) vs (2.4±1.7), t=2.26, P<0.05], and the age was younger [(46.0±15.2) years vs (55.0±11.9) years, t=-3.67, P<0.05]. The diffuse enhancement was found in 62 patients, and confluent enhancement in 33 patients. Confluent enhancement was found in all 14 patients after the alcohol ablation procedure. Conclusion: The age, thickness and number of hypertrophic segments in patients with delayed enhancement are different from those with non-delayed enhancement. (authors)

  2. Radiofrequency spark chambers and delay line resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayag, Jacques

    1971-01-01

    According to a suggestion of A. Kastler, a spark chamber was excited by an undamped radiofrequency pulse and tracks about 1 mm wide obtained; the result was interpreted by computation of the coefficients of electronic amplification and partial ambipolar diffusion. This work led us to the construction of a new fast triggering undamped wave-train generator of very high tension (patent taken out by the C.E.A. under the no.: EN 7 134 650 the 27.9.1971). Since this apparatus uses a resonant storage line, its design implied a precise knowledge of high impedance delay lines. The experimental radiofrequency spectra of the input impedance of opened or short-circuited lines were plotted completely and analysed by the circuits theory, new measuring methods were established, dispersion relations accurately checked and the equivalence of the formulas, within the third order, with theses of Debye's Dipolar Absorption demonstrated. General properties of Hilbert's transform were also investigated. From the experimental point of view, the electromagnetic energy storage process was extended to the case of a liquid nitrogen-immersed resonant delay line. The good behavior of the cryogenic experiment, where the main difficulty of icing was overcame by the construction of special electrodes, offers great promise for extrapolation to superconductivity. (author) [fr

  3. Delayed enhanced MRI in intraparenchymal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Delayed enhanced MRI was performed on 20 intraparenchymal tumors, and these findings were compared with those of early enhanced MRI. Using the spin-echo technique (SE: 400-500/20 msec), early scans were obtained 5 minutes, and delayed scans were obtained 60 minutes, after the intravenous injection of 0.1 nmol of gadolinium-DTPA/Kg. We discussed the changes in the delayed scan with regard to the change in the pattern of enhancement and the boundary of enhancement. In these twenty intraparenchymal tumors, there were three low-grade astrocytomas, two anaplastic astrocytomas, seven glioblastomas, and eight metastatic tumors. The changes in the enhanced pattern showed three types as follows: Type I: heterogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans; Type II: heterogeneous enhancement in early scan and homogeneous enhancement in delayed scan; Type III: homogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans. Most malignant tumors, such as glioblastomas (6/8), anaplastic astrocytomas (2/2), and metastatic tumors (7/8), revealed Type I, although low-grade astrocytomas showed Type II (3/2) and Type III (1/3). The heterogeneous enhancement in delayed scan was found in malignant tumors and in low-grade astrocytoma; even if the early scan revealed heterogeneous enhancement, the delayed scan showed homogeneous enhancement. In the delayed scan, most enhanced boundaries spread out of the boundaries in the early scan. Glioblastomas spread markedly in the delayed scan, although none of the low-grade astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, or metastases revealed marked spreading. We called these marked increases in the delayed scan a 'spreading sign' and thought that this sign was specific to glioblastomas. Recently some authors have emphasized the usefulness of serial scans. Delayed enhanced MRI 60 minutes after the administration of a contrast medium was here found also to be useful for the accurate diagnosis for brain tumors. (author)

  4. Low dose prospective ECG-gated delayed enhanced dual-source computed tomography in reperfused acute myocardial infarction comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rui; Zhang Zhaoqi; Xu Lei; Ma Qin; He Yi; Lu Dongxu; Yu Wei; Fan Zhanming

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated delayed contrast-enhanced dual-source computed tomography (DCE-DSCT) can accurately delineate the extension of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with delayed enhanced cardiac MR (DE-MR). Material and methods: Eleven patients were examined using dual-source CT and cardiac MR in 2 weeks after a first reperfused MI. DCE-DSCT scan protocol was performed with prospective ECG-gating sequential scan model 7 min after contrast administration. In a 17-model, infarcted myocardium detected by DE-MR was categorized as transmural and subendocardial extension. Segment of infarcted location and graded transmurality were compared between DCE-MDCT and DE-MR. Results: In all eleven patients, diagnostic quality was obtained for depicting delayed enhanced myocardium. Agreement between DCE-DSCT and MR was good on myocardial segment based comparison (kappa = 0.85, p < 0.001), and on transmural and subendocardial infarction type comparison (kappa = 0.82, p < 0.001, kappa = 0.52, p < 0.001, respectively). CT value was higher on infarcted region than that of normal region (100.02 ± 9.57 HU vs. 72.63 ± 7.32 HU, p < 0.001). Radiation dose of prospectively ECG-gating protocol were 0.99 ± 0.08 mSv (0.82-1.19 mSv). Conclusions: Prospective ECG-gated DCE-DSCT can accurately assess the extension and the patterns of myocardial infarction with low radiation dose.

  5. Low dose prospective ECG-gated delayed enhanced dual-source computed tomography in reperfused acute myocardial infarction comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Rui, E-mail: rui_wang1979@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Zhang Zhaoqi, E-mail: zhaoqi5000@vip.sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Xu Lei, E-mail: leixu2001@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Ma Qin, E-mail: tel1367@gmail.com [Department of Emergency, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); He Yi, E-mail: heyi139@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Lu Dongxu, E-mail: larry.hi@163.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Yu Wei, E-mail: yuwei02@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China); Fan Zhanming, E-mail: fanzm120@tom.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100029 Beijing (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated delayed contrast-enhanced dual-source computed tomography (DCE-DSCT) can accurately delineate the extension of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with delayed enhanced cardiac MR (DE-MR). Material and methods: Eleven patients were examined using dual-source CT and cardiac MR in 2 weeks after a first reperfused MI. DCE-DSCT scan protocol was performed with prospective ECG-gating sequential scan model 7 min after contrast administration. In a 17-model, infarcted myocardium detected by DE-MR was categorized as transmural and subendocardial extension. Segment of infarcted location and graded transmurality were compared between DCE-MDCT and DE-MR. Results: In all eleven patients, diagnostic quality was obtained for depicting delayed enhanced myocardium. Agreement between DCE-DSCT and MR was good on myocardial segment based comparison (kappa = 0.85, p < 0.001), and on transmural and subendocardial infarction type comparison (kappa = 0.82, p < 0.001, kappa = 0.52, p < 0.001, respectively). CT value was higher on infarcted region than that of normal region (100.02 {+-} 9.57 HU vs. 72.63 {+-} 7.32 HU, p < 0.001). Radiation dose of prospectively ECG-gating protocol were 0.99 {+-} 0.08 mSv (0.82-1.19 mSv). Conclusions: Prospective ECG-gated DCE-DSCT can accurately assess the extension and the patterns of myocardial infarction with low radiation dose.

  6. Stochastic resonance in a time-delayed asymmetric bistable system with mixed periodic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Feng, Guo; Wei, Xu; Liang, Wang

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in an asymmetric bistable system with time-delayed feedback and mixed periodic signal by using the theory of signal-to-noise ratio in the adiabatic limit. A general approximate Fokker–Planck equation and the expression of the signal-to-noise ratio are derived through the small time delay approximation at both fundamental harmonics and mixed harmonics. The effects of the additive noise intensity Q, multiplicative noise intensity D, static asymmetry r and delay time τ on the signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. It is found that the higher mixed harmonics and the static asymmetry r can restrain stochastic resonance, and the delay time τ can enhance stochastic resonance. Moreover, the longer the delay time τ is, the larger the additive noise intensity Q and the multiplicative noise intensity D are, when the stochastic resonance appears. (general)

  7. Investigation of a delayed feedback controller of MEMS resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Karim M.; Younis, Mohammad I.; Shao, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Controlling mechanical systems is an important branch of mechanical engineering. Several techniques have been used to control Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. In this paper, we study the effect of a delayed feedback controller

  8. Use of a 3-Telsa magnet to perform delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the distal interphalangeal joint of horses with and without naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, Andrea S; Fürst, Anton E; Torgerson, Paul R; Carstens, Ann; Hilbe, Monika; Kircher, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) features of healthy hyaline cartilage of the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) of horses, to determine whether dGEMRIC can be used to differentiate various stages of naturally occurring osteoarthritis of the DIPJ, and to correlate relaxation times determined by dGEMRIC with the glycosaminoglycan concentration, water content, and macroscopic and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage of DIPJs with and without osteoarthritis. SAMPLE 1 cadaveric forelimb DIPJ from each of 12 adult warmblood horses. PROCEDURES T1-weighted cartilage relaxation times were obtained for predetermined sites of the DIPJ before (T1 preGd ) and after (T1 postGd ) intra-articular gadolinium administration. Corresponding cartilage sites underwent macroscopic, histologic, and immunohistochemical evaluation, and cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration and water content were determined. Median T1 preGd and T1 postGd were correlated with macroscopic, histologic, and biochemical data. Mixed generalized linear models were created to evaluate the effects of cartilage site, articular surface, and macroscopic and histologic scores on relaxation times. RESULTS 122 cartilage specimens were analyzed. Median T1 postGd was lower than the median T1 preGd for normal and diseased cartilage. Both T1 preGd and T1 postGd were correlated with macroscopic and histologic scores, whereby T1 preGd increased and T1 postGd decreased as osteoarthritis progressed. There was topographic variation of T1 preGd and T1 postGd within the DIPJ. Cartilage glycosaminoglycan concentration and water content were significantly correlated with T1 preGd and macroscopic and histologic scores but were not correlated with T1 postGd . CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that dGEMRIC relaxation times varied for DIPJs with various degrees of osteoarthritis. These findings may help facilitate early detection of osteoarthritis.

  9. Microvascular obstruction on delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, compared with myocardial {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-BMIPP dual SPECT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hiroaki [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Isobe, Satoshi, E-mail: sisobe@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Sakai, Shinichi [Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Yamada, Takashi [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki; Miura, Manabu [Department of Cardiology, Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Uchida, Yasuhiro; Kanashiro, Masaaki; Ichimiya, Satoshi [Department of Cardiology, Yokkaichi Municipal Hospital, Yokkaichi (Japan); Okumura, Takahiro; Murohara, Toyoaki [Department of Cardiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The percentage infarct size (%IS) was significantly greater in the microvascular obstruction (MO) group than in the non-MO group. • The percentage mismatch score (%MMS) on dual scintigraphy significantly correlated with the %IS and the percentage MO. • The %MMS was significantly greater in the non-MO group than in the MO group, and was an independent predictor for MO. - Abstract: Background: The hypo-enhanced regions within the hyper-enhanced infarct areas detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging reflect microvascular obstruction (MO) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The combined myocardial thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl)/iodine-123-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid ({sup 123}I-BMIPP) dual single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a useful tool for detecting myocardial reversibility after AMI. We evaluated whether MO could be an early predictor of irreversible myocardial damage in comparison with {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-BMIPP dual SPECT findings in AMI patients. Methods: Sixty-two patients with initial AMI who successfully underwent coronary revascularization were enrolled. MO was defined by CMR imaging. Patients were divided into 2 groups as follows: MO group (n = 32) and non-MO group (n = 30). Scintigraphic defect scores were calculated using a 17-segment model with a 5-point scoring system. The mismatch score (MMS) was calculated as follows: the total sum of (Σ) {sup 123}I-BMIPP defect score minus Σ{sup 201}Tl defect score. The percentage mismatch score (%MMS) was calculated as follows: MMS/(Σ{sup 123}I-BMIPP score) × 100 (%). Results: The percentage infarct size (%IS) was significantly greater in the MO group than in the non-MO group (32.2 ± 13.8% vs. 18.3 ± 12.1%, p < 0.001). The %MMS significantly correlated with the %IS and the percentage MO (r = −0.26, p = 0.03; r = −0.45, p < 0.001, respectively). The %MMS was significantly greater in the non-MO group than in the MO group (45.4

  10. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance chimeras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Anna; Semenova, Nadezhda; Anishchenko, Vadim; Schöll, Eckehard

    2017-11-01

    Using the model of a FitzHugh-Nagumo system in the excitable regime, we investigate the influence of time-delayed feedback on noise-induced chimera states in a network with nonlocal coupling, i.e., coherence resonance chimeras. It is shown that time-delayed feedback allows for the control of the range of parameter values where these chimera states occur. Moreover, for the feedback delay close to the intrinsic period of the system, we find a novel regime which we call period-two coherence resonance chimera.

  11. Stochastic resonance in a delayed triple-well potential driven by correlated noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Jin, Yanfei; Xiao, Shaomin

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate stochastic resonance (SR) in a delayed triple-well potential subject to correlated noises and a harmonic signal. The stationary probability density, together with the response amplitude of the system, is obtained by using the small time delay approximation. It is found that the time delay, noise intensities, and the cross-correlation between noises can induce the occurrence of the transition. Moreover, the appropriate choice of noise intensities and time delay can improve the output of the system, enhance the SR effect, and lead to the phenomenon of noise enhanced stability. Especially, the stochastic multi-resonance phenomenon is observed when the multiplicative and additive noises are correlated. Finally, the theoretical results are well verified through numerical simulations.

  12. Optical resonators for true-time-delay beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Leslie H.; Evanko, Stephen M.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional true time delay beamforming and steering devices rely on switching between various lengths of delay line. Therefore only discrete delays are possible. Proposed is a new photonics concept for true time delay beamforming which provides a finely controlled continuum of delays with switching speeds on the order of 10's of nanoseconds or faster. The architecture uses an array of waveguide cavities with different resonate frequencies to channelize the signal. Each spectral component of the signal is phase shifted by an amount proportional to the frequency of that component and the desired time delay. These phase shifted spectral components are then summed to obtain the delayed signal. This paper provides an overview of the results of a Phase I SBIR contract where this concept has been refined and analyzed. The parameters for an operational system are determined and indication of the feasibility of this approach is given. Among the issues addressed are the requirements of the resonators and the methods necessary to implement fiber optic Bragg gratings as these resonators.

  13. Delayed shear enhancement in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M.D. [Atmospheric Environment Service, Ontario (Canada); Pielke, R.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a much more important role on the mesoscale: horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and often dominated by vertical wind shear on these scales through the interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing. Just over 30 years ago, Pasquill suggested that this interaction need not be simultaneous and that the combination of differential horizontal advection with delayed or subsequent vertical mixing could maintain effective horizontal diffusion in spite of temporal or spatial reductions in boundary-layer turbulence intensity. This two-step mechanism has not received much attention since then, but a recent analysis of observations from and numerical simulations of two mesoscale tracer experiments suggests that delayed shear enhancement can play an important role in MAD. This paper presents an overview of this analysis, with particular emphasis on the influence of resolvable vertical shear on MAD in these two case studies and the contributions made by delayed shear enhancement.

  14. A scheme to expand the delay-bandwidth product in the resonator-based delay lines by optical OFDM technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangbo; Tao, Li; Zhang, Ziran

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme to expand the inherent limit in the product of the optical delay and the transmission bandwidth in resonator-based delay lines, with the optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) technique. The optical group delay properties of a single ring resonator we...

  15. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  16. Time delayed K sup + N reactions and exotic baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P

    2003-01-01

    Evidence and hints, from both the theoretical and experimental sides, of exotic baryon resonances with B = S, have been with us for the last 30 years. The poor status of the general acceptance of these Z* resonances is partly due to the prejudice against penta-quark baryons and partly due to the opinion that a proof of the existence of exotic states must be rigorous. This can refer to the quality and amount of data gathered, and also to the analytical methods applied in the study of these resonances. It then seems mandatory that all possibilities and aspects be exploited. We do that by analysing the time delay in K sup + N scattering, encountering clear signals of the exotic Z* resonances close to the pole values found in partial wave analyses.

  17. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, B.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, José M. L.; Barland, S.; Javaloyes, J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a photonic regenerative memory based upon a neuromorphic oscillator with a delayed self-feedback (autaptic) connection. We disclose the existence of a unique temporal response characteristic of localized structures enabling an ideal support for bits in an optical buffer memory for storage and reshaping of data information. We link our experimental implementation, based upon a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode driving a laser, to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback. This proof-of-concept photonic regenerative memory might constitute a building block for a new class of neuron-inspired photonic memories that can handle high bit-rate optical signals.

  18. Delay-controlled primary and stochastic resonances of the SD oscillator with stiffness nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Cao, Qingjie

    2018-03-01

    This work presents analytical studies of the stiffness nonlinearities SD (smooth and discontinuous) oscillator under displacement and velocity feedback control with a time delay. The SD oscillator can capture the qualitative characteristics of quasi-zero-stiffness and negative-stiffness. We focus mainly on the primary resonance of the quasi-zero-stiffness SD oscillator and the stochastic resonance (SR) of the negative-stiffness SD oscillator. Using the averaging method, we have been analyzed the amplitude response of the quasi-zero-stiffness SD oscillator. In this regard, the optimum time delay for changing the control intensity according to the optimization standard proposed can be obtained. For the optimum time delay, increasing the displacement feedback intensity is advantageous to suppress the vibrations in resonant regime where vibration isolation is needed, however, increasing the velocity feedback intensity is advantageous to strengthen the vibrations. Moreover, the effects of time-delayed feedback on the SR of the negative-stiffness SD oscillator are investigated under harmonic forcing and Gaussian white noise, based on the Langevin and Fokker-Planck approaches. The time-delayed feedback can enhance the SR phenomenon where vibrational energy harvesting is needed. This paper established the relationship between the parameters and vibration properties of a stiffness nonlinearities SD which provides the guidance for optimizing time-delayed control for vibration isolation and vibrational energy harvesting of the nonlinear systems.

  19. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bharucha, Aoife; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-10

    The data collected by the LHC collaborations at an energy of 13 TeV indicates the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum that would correspond to a resonance of a 750 GeV mass. The apparently large production cross section is nevertheless very difficult to explain in minimal models. We consider the possibility that the resonance is a pseudoscalar boson $A$ with a two--photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the $\\frac12 M_A$ threshold and a very small decay width, $\\ll 1$ MeV; one can then generate a large enhancement of the $A\\gamma\\gamma$ amplitude which explains the excess without invoking a large multiplicity of particles propagating in the loop, large electric charges and/or very strong Yukawa couplings. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the $A$ state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through...

  20. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Romeira, B.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, José M. L.; Barland, S.; Javaloyes, J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a photonic regenerative memory based upon a neuromorphic oscillator with a delayed self-feedback (autaptic) connection. We disclose the existence of a unique temporal response characteristic of localized structures enabling an ideal support for bits in an optical buffer memory for storage and reshaping of data information. We link our experimental implementation, based upon a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode driving a laser, to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the...

  1. Delay-enhanced coherence of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan Zhisheng; Chen Guanrong

    2008-01-01

    We study the spatial dynamics of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal ensembles evoked by different information transmission delays and network topologies. In classical settings of coherence resonance the intensity of noise is fine-tuned so as to optimize the system's response. Here, we keep the noise intensity constant, and instead, vary the length of information transmission delay amongst coupled neurons. We show that there exists an intermediate transmission delay by which the spiral waves are optimally ordered, hence indicating the existence of delay-enhanced coherence of spatial dynamics in the examined system. Additionally, we examine the robustness of this phenomenon as the diffusive interaction topology changes towards the small-world type, and discover that shortcut links amongst distant neurons hinder the emergence of coherent spiral waves irrespective of transmission delay length. Presented results thus provide insights that could facilitate the understanding of information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks

  2. Resonant metallic nanostructures for enhanced terahertz spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-11-12

    We present our recent studies on terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas. Exploiting the localization and enhancement capabilities of these devices, we introduce an effective method to perform terahertz spectroscopy on an extremely small number of nano-objects.

  3. Resonant metallic nanostructures for enhanced terahertz spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.; Tuccio, S.; Prato, M.; De Donato, F.; Perucchi, A.; Di Pietro, P.; Marras, S.; Liberale, Carlo; Zaccaria, R. Proietti; De Angelis, F.; Manna, L.; Lupi, S.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Razzari, L.

    2015-01-01

    We present our recent studies on terahertz resonant dipole nanoantennas. Exploiting the localization and enhancement capabilities of these devices, we introduce an effective method to perform terahertz spectroscopy on an extremely small number

  4. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Developmentally Delayed Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Momen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Developmental disorders are failure or inability to acquire various age-specific skills at expected maturational age, which affects about 5–10% of preschool children. One of the most important methods for evaluation of developmentally delayed children is neuroimaging, especially, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that provides useful information regarding brain tissue structures and anomalies. Method and Material. In this study, hospital records of 580 developmentally delayed children (aged 2 months to 15 years who admitted in pediatric ward of Golestan Hospital from 1997 to 2009 were selected. Information such as age, MRI findings were collected in the questionnaire and statistically analyzed. Results. Total, 580 children including 333 males (57.4% and 247 females (42.6% were studied. Abnormal brain MRI was observed in 340 (58.6% cases (204 Males, 136 females. The finding includes nonspecific in 38 (6.6%, congenital and developmental anomalies of brain in 39 (6.7%, recognizable syndromes in 3 (0.5%, neurovascular diseases or trauma in 218 (37.6%, and metabolic or neurodegenerative diseases in 42 (7.2% cases. Conclusion. Because 60% of all study groups showed abnormal brain MRI, using this method could be effective in diagnosis, management, and almost prognosis determination processes.

  5. Delay dynamics of neuromorphic optoelectronic nanoscale resonators: Perspectives and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José M. L.; Javaloyes, Julien

    2017-11-01

    With the recent exponential growth of applications using artificial intelligence (AI), the development of efficient and ultrafast brain-like (neuromorphic) systems is crucial for future information and communication technologies. While the implementation of AI systems using computer algorithms of neural networks is emerging rapidly, scientists are just taking the very first steps in the development of the hardware elements of an artificial brain, specifically neuromorphic microchips. In this review article, we present the current state of the art of neuromorphic photonic circuits based on solid-state optoelectronic oscillators formed by nanoscale double barrier quantum well resonant tunneling diodes. We address, both experimentally and theoretically, the key dynamic properties of recently developed artificial solid-state neuron microchips with delayed perturbations and describe their role in the study of neural activity and regenerative memory. This review covers our recent research work on excitable and delay dynamic characteristics of both single and autaptic (delayed) artificial neurons including all-or-none response, spike-based data encoding, storage, signal regeneration and signal healing. Furthermore, the neural responses of these neuromorphic microchips display all the signatures of extended spatio-temporal localized structures (LSs) of light, which are reviewed here in detail. By taking advantage of the dissipative nature of LSs, we demonstrate potential applications in optical data reconfiguration and clock and timing at high-speeds and with short transients. The results reviewed in this article are a key enabler for the development of high-performance optoelectronic devices in future high-speed brain-inspired optical memories and neuromorphic computing.

  6. Fundamental and Subharmonic Resonances of Harmonically Oscillation with Time Delay State Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. EL-Bassiouny

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Time delays occur in many physical systems. In particular, when automatic control is used with structural or mechanical systems, there exists a delay between measurement of the system state and corrective action. The concept of an equivalent damping related to the delay feedback is proposed and the appropriate choice of the feedback gains and the time delay is discussed from the viewpoint of vibration control. We investigate the fundamental resonance and subharmonic resonance of order one-half of a harmonically oscillation under state feedback control with a time delay. By using the multiple scale perturbation technique, the first order approximation of the resonances are derived and the effect of time delay on the resonances is investigated. The fixed points correspond to a periodic motion for the starting system and we show the external excitation-response and frequency-response curves. We analyze the effect of time delay and the other different parameters on these oscillations.

  7. Heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a small-world neuronal network system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Xianqing

    2016-06-01

    A neuronal network often involves time delay caused by the finite signal propagation time in a given biological network. This time delay is not a homogenous fluctuation in a biological system. The heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a noisy small-world neuronal network system are numerically studied in this work by calculating synchronization measure and spike interval distribution. We focus on three different delay conditions: double-values delay, triple-values delay, and Gaussian-distributed delay. Our results show the following: 1) the heterogeneity in delay results in asynchronous firing in the neuronal network, and 2) maximum synchronization could be achieved through resonance given that the delay values are integer or half-integer times of each other.

  8. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu; Di Falco, Andrea; Molinari, Diego P.; Khan, Yasser; Ooi, Boon S.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2013-05-05

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced Performance & Functionality of Tunable Delay Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Based Tunable Optical Delays”, Optics Letters, Vol. 33, Issue 13, pp. 1518-1520 (2008). 2. Louis Christen, Irfan Fazal , Omer F. Yilmaz, Xiaoxia Wu...2008. 3. Omer F. Yilmaz, Louis Christen, Xiaoxia Wu, Scott R. Nuccio, Irfan Fazal , and Alan E. Willner, “Time-Slot-Interchange of 40 Gb/s Variable...F. Yilmaz, S. Khaleghi, L. Christen, I. Fazal , and A. E. Willner, “503 ns, Tunable Optical Delay of 40 Gb/s RZ-OOK using Additional λ-Conversion

  11. Trampoline metamaterial: Local resonance enhancement by springboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Osama R.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the dispersion characteristics of locally resonant elastic metamaterials formed by the erection of pillars on the solid regions in a plate patterned by a periodic array of holes. We show that these solid regions effectively act as springboards leading to an enhanced resonance behavior by the pillars when compared to the nominal case of pillars with no holes. This local resonance amplification phenomenon, which we define as the trampoline effect, is shown to cause subwavelength bandgaps to increase in size by up to a factor of 4. This outcome facilitates the utilization of subwavelength metamaterial properties over exceedingly broad frequency ranges.

  12. Amplification of weak signals via the non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance in a bistable dynamical system with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Luchun; Mei Dongcheng

    2011-01-01

    The non-adiabatic regime of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with time delay, an additive white noise and a periodic signal was investigated. The signal power amplification η was employed to characterize the SR of the system. The simulation results indicate that (i) in the case of intermediate frequency Ω of the periodic signal, the typical behavior of SR is lowered monotonically by increasing the delay time τ; in the case of large Ω, τ weakens the SR behavior and then enhances it, with a non-monotonic behavior as a function of time delay; (ii) time delay induces SR when A is above the threshold, whereas no such resonance exists in the absence of time delay; (iii) time delay induces a transition from bimodal to unimodal configuration of η; (iv) varying the particular form of time delay results in different phenomena.

  13. Wigner-Eisenbud-Smith photoionization time delay due to autoioinization resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, P. C.; Kumar, A.; Varma, H. R.; Banerjee, S.; Manson, Steven T.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    An empirical ansatz for the complex photoionization amplitude and Wigner-Eisenbud-Smith time delay in the vicinity of a Fano autoionization resonance are proposed to evaluate and interpret the time delay in the resonant region. The utility of this expression is evaluated in comparison with accurate numerical calculations employing the ab initio relativistic random phase approximation and relativistic multichannel quantum defect theory. The indisputably good qualitative agreement (and semiquantitative agreement) between corresponding results of the proposed model and results produced by the ab initio theories proves the usability of the model. In addition, the phenomenology of the time delay in the vicinity of multichannel autoionizing resonances is detailed.

  14. Delayed contrast-enhanced MRI: use in myocardial viability assessment and other cardiac pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, J.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2005-01-01

    As in other organs, tissue characterization is important for many cardiac diseases. For example, in ischemic heart disease, differentiation between reversibly and irreversibly damaged myocardium in patients with a prior myocardial infarction is crucial in determining disease severity, functional recovery and patient outcome. With the recent advent of the single inversion-recovery contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence (delayed contrast-enhanced MRI), contrast between normal and abnormal tissues could be significantly enhanced compared with the conventional cardiac MRI sequences, enabling even subtle abnormalities to be visualized. Together with other advances in cardiac MRI (e.g. functional imaging, coronary artery imaging), MRI has become one of the preferred non-invasive modalities to study cardiac diseases. In this paper an overview of the versatility of delayed contrast-enhanced MRI for investigating cardiac diseases is given. (orig.)

  15. Active high-power RF pulse compression using optically switched resonant delay lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1996-11-01

    The authors present the design and a proof of principle experimental results of an optically controlled high power rf pulse compression system. The design should, in principle, handle few hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band. The system is based on the switched resonant delay line theory. It employs resonant delay lines as a means of storing rf energy. The coupling to the lines is optimized for maximum energy storage during the charging phase. To discharge the lines, a high power microwave switch increases the coupling to the lines just before the start of the output pulse. The high power microwave switch, required for this system, is realized using optical excitation of an electron-hole plasma layer on the surface of a pure silicon wafer. The switch is designed to operate in the TE 01 mode in a circular waveguide to avoid the edge effects present at the interface between the silicon wafer and the supporting waveguide; thus, enhancing its power handling capability

  16. Heat dissipation and information flow for delayed bistable Langevin systems near coherence resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiejun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, stochastic thermodynamics of delayed bistable Langevin systems near coherence resonance is discussed. We calculate the heat dissipation rate and the information flow of a delayed bistable Langevin system under various noise intensities. Both the heat dissipation rate and the information flow are found to be bell-shaped functions of the noise intensity, which implies that coherence resonance manifests itself in the thermodynamic properties.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Shen-yun [Research Center of Applied Electromagnetics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China)

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  18. Resonantly enhanced collisional ionization measurements of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Bushaw, B.A.; Gerke, G.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors developed a new laser technique to analyze for radionuclides at extremely low levels. The technique, called resonantly enhanced collisional ionization (RECI), uses two nitrogen-laser pumped dye lasers to excite the target isotope to a high-energy Rydberg state. Atoms in these Rydberg states (within a few hundred wavenumbers in energy from the ionization threshold) efficiently ionize upon colliding with an inert gas and the ions can be detected by conventional means. The principal advantage of resonantly-enhanced collisional ionization is the extreme sensitivity coupled with its relative simplicity and low cost. Actinides typically have an ionization potential of about 6eV (uranium I.P. = 6.2 eV, plutonium I.P. = 5.7 eV). Two-step laser excitation to a state just below threshold requires wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. They showed that when both steps in the excitation process are resonant steps, relatively low-power lasers can populate the Rydberg state with almost unit efficiency. This is because the resonant excitations have much larger cross-sections than do photoionization processes. They also demonstrated that a few torr of a buffer gas will cause most of the excited-state atoms to be ionized

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Althaf S.; Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the de...

  20. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  1. Detection of active bile leak with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR cholangiography: Comparison of 20–25 min delayed and 60–180 min delayed images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Stadnik, Anna; Lezak, Aleksandra; Maj, Edyta; Zieniewicz, Krzysztof; Rowinska-Berman, Katarzyna; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.; Krawczyk, Marek; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) performed in different time delays after injection of gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) for the diagnosis of active bile leak. Methods: This retrospective analysis included Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR images of 34 patients suspected of bile leak. Images were acquired 20–25 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. If there was inadequate contrast in the bile ducts then delayed images after 60–90 min and 150–180 min were obtained. Results were correlated with intraoperative findings, ERCP results, clinical data, laboratory tests, and follow-up examinations. Results: Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRC yielded an overall sensitivity of 96.4%, specificity of 100% and accuracy of 97.1% for the diagnosis of an active bile leak. The sensitivity of 20–25 min delayed MR images was 42.9%, of combined 20–25 min and 60–90 min delayed images was 92.9% and of combined 20–25 min, 60–90 min and 150–180 min delayed images was 96.4%. Conclusions: Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRC utilizing delayed phase images was effective for detecting the presence and location of active bile leaks. The images acquired 60–180 min post-injection enabled identification of bile leaks even in patients with a dilated biliary system or moderate liver dysfunction

  2. Stochastic Resonance-Like and Resonance Suppression-Like Phenomena in a Bistable System with Time Delay and Additive Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Chang-Zheng; Nie Lin-Ru; Zhou Zhong-Rao

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR)-like and resonance suppression (RS)-like phenomena in a time-delayed bistable system driven by additive white noise are investigated by means of stochastic simulations of the power spectrum, the quality factor of the power spectrum, and the mean first-passage time (MFPT) of the system. The calculative results indicate that: (i) as the system is driven by a small periodic signal, the quality factor as a function delay time exhibits a maximal value at smaller noise intensities, i.e., an SR-like phenomenon. With the increment in additive noise intensity, the extremum gradually disappears and the quality factor decreases monotonously with delay time. (ii) As the additive noise intensity is smaller, the curve of the MFPT with respect to delay time displays a peak, i.e., an RS-like phenomenon. At higher levels of noise, however, the non-monotonic behavior is lost. (general)

  3. Coherence resonance in an excitable system with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethia, Gautam C.; Kurths, Juergen; Sen, Abhijit

    2007-01-01

    We study the noise activated dynamics of a model excitable system that consists of a subcritical Hopf oscillator with a time delayed nonlinear feedback. The coherence of the noise driven pulses of the system exhibits a novel double peaked structure as a function of the noise amplitude. The two peaks correspond to separate optimal noise levels for excitation of single spikes and multiple spikes (bursts) respectively. The relative magnitudes of these peaks are found to be a sensitive function of time delay. The physical significance of our results and its practical implications in various real life systems are discussed

  4. Endogenous fields enhanced stochastic resonance in a randomly coupled neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Bin; Wang, Lin; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xi-le; Yu, Hai-tao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study effects of endogenous fields on stochastic resonance in a neural network. • Stochastic resonance can be notably enhanced by endogenous field feedback. • Endogenous field feedback delay plays a vital role in stochastic resonance. • The parameters of low-passed filter play a subtle role in SR. - Abstract: Endogenous field, evoked by structured neuronal network activity in vivo, is correlated with many vital neuronal processes. In this paper, the effects of endogenous fields on stochastic resonance (SR) in a randomly connected neuronal network are investigated. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons and the axonal conduction delays between neurons are also considered. Numerical results elucidate that endogenous field feedback results in more rhythmic macroscope activation of the network for proper time delay and feedback coefficient. The response of the network to the weak periodic stimulation can be notably enhanced by endogenous field feedback. Moreover, the endogenous field feedback delay plays a vital role in SR. We reveal that appropriately tuned delays of the feedback can either induce the enhancement of SR, appearing at every integer multiple of the weak input signal’s oscillation period, or the depression of SR, appearing at every integer multiple of half the weak input signal’s oscillation period for the same feedback coefficient. Interestingly, the parameters of low-passed filter which is used in obtaining the endogenous field feedback signal play a subtle role in SR

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petryka, Joanna; Miśko, Jolanta; Przybylski, Andrzej; Śpiewak, Mateusz; Małek, Łukasz A.; Werys, Konrad; Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz; Gepner, Katarzyna; Croisille, Pierre; Demkow, Marcin; Rużyłło, Witold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of dyssynchrony and myocardial viability assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) of both ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled for CRT in NYHA class II–IV, left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, QRS ≥ 120 ms were included. Tagged cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were performed. Dyssynchrony was assessed with inTag toolbox and LGE was quantified using cutoff value at half of maximal signal in the scar. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, echocardiography and blood testing for NT-proBNP levels were done at baseline and 6 months after CRT. Results: 52 patients (age 60.3 ± 13 years) were included. 26 patients (50%) met response criteria. The ischaemic etiology of HF was more frequent (69% vs. 31%, p = 0.002), the percent of LGE was higher (7.7% [0–13.5%] vs. 19.0% (0–31.9%], p = 0.013), regional vector of circumferential strain variance (RVV) was lower (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.009) and uniformity of radial strain was higher (0.72 ± 0.25 vs. 0.56 ± 0.29, p = 0.046) in non-responders vs. responders. Multivariate logistic regression showed that RVV predicted response to CRT (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.02–5.02, p = 0.0430) independently of LGE and the etiology of heart failure. In the subgroup of patients with ischaemic HF the extend of transmural scar within myocardium was higher in non-responders vs. responders (26.3% vs. 15.0% respectively, p = 0.01) and was a predictor of response to CRT in univariable analysis (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77–0.98, p = 0.025) providing the sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 75% at the cutoff point of 18% in the prediction of poor response to CRT. In patients with non-ischaemic HF QRS was wider (162 ms vs. 140 ms, p = 0.04), regional vector of strain variance (RVV) was higher (0.39 vs. 0.25, p = 0.002) and uniformity of radial

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petryka, Joanna, E-mail: joannapetryka@hotmail.com [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miśko, Jolanta [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Przybylski, Andrzej [Department of Arrhythmia, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Śpiewak, Mateusz [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Małek, Łukasz A. [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiology and Interventional Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Werys, Konrad [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiomyopathy, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Gepner, Katarzyna [Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Croisille, Pierre [Creatis Laboratory, UMR CNRS 5515, INSERM, U1044, CHU Saint-Etienne, Universite de Lyon (France); Demkow, Marcin [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Rużyłło, Witold [Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of dyssynchrony and myocardial viability assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) of both ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled for CRT in NYHA class II–IV, left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, QRS ≥ 120 ms were included. Tagged cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were performed. Dyssynchrony was assessed with inTag toolbox and LGE was quantified using cutoff value at half of maximal signal in the scar. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, echocardiography and blood testing for NT-proBNP levels were done at baseline and 6 months after CRT. Results: 52 patients (age 60.3 ± 13 years) were included. 26 patients (50%) met response criteria. The ischaemic etiology of HF was more frequent (69% vs. 31%, p = 0.002), the percent of LGE was higher (7.7% [0–13.5%] vs. 19.0% (0–31.9%], p = 0.013), regional vector of circumferential strain variance (RVV) was lower (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.009) and uniformity of radial strain was higher (0.72 ± 0.25 vs. 0.56 ± 0.29, p = 0.046) in non-responders vs. responders. Multivariate logistic regression showed that RVV predicted response to CRT (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.02–5.02, p = 0.0430) independently of LGE and the etiology of heart failure. In the subgroup of patients with ischaemic HF the extend of transmural scar within myocardium was higher in non-responders vs. responders (26.3% vs. 15.0% respectively, p = 0.01) and was a predictor of response to CRT in univariable analysis (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77–0.98, p = 0.025) providing the sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 75% at the cutoff point of 18% in the prediction of poor response to CRT. In patients with non-ischaemic HF QRS was wider (162 ms vs. 140 ms, p = 0.04), regional vector of strain variance (RVV) was higher (0.39 vs. 0.25, p = 0.002) and uniformity of radial

  7. Adaptive logical stochastic resonance in time-delayed synthetic genetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Wenbin; Song, Aiguo

    2018-04-01

    In the paper, the concept of logical stochastic resonance is applied to implement logic operation and latch operation in time-delayed synthetic genetic networks derived from a bacteriophage λ. Clear logic operation and latch operation can be obtained when the network is tuned by modulated periodic force and time-delay. In contrast with the previous synthetic genetic networks based on logical stochastic resonance, the proposed system has two advantages. On one hand, adding modulated periodic force to the background noise can increase the length of the optimal noise plateau of obtaining desired logic response and make the system adapt to varying noise intensity. On the other hand, tuning time-delay can extend the optimal noise plateau to larger range. The result provides possible help for designing new genetic regulatory networks paradigm based on logical stochastic resonance.

  8. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  9. Probability distribution of wave packet delay time for strong overlapping of resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshits, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Time behaviour of nuclear reactions in the case of high level densities is investigated basing on the theory of overlapping resonances. In the framework of a model of n equivalent channels an analytical expression is obtained for the probability distribution function for wave packet delay time at the compound nucleus production. It is shown that at strong overlapping of the resonance levels the relative fluctuation of the delay time is small at the stage of compound nucleus production. A possible increase in the duration of nuclear reactions with the excitation energy rise is discussed

  10. Resonant cavity enhanced multi-analyte sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstein, David Alan

    Biological research and medicine increasingly depend on interrogating binding interactions among small segments of DNA, RNA, protein, and bio-specific small molecules. Microarray technology, which senses the affinity for target molecules in solution for a multiplicity of capturing agents fixed to a surface, has been used in biological research for gene expression profiling and in medicine for molecular biomarker detection. Label-free affinity sensing is preferable as it avoids fluorescent labeling of the target molecules, reducing test cost and variability. The Resonant Cavity Imaging Biosensor (RCIB) is a label-free optical inference based technique introduced that scales readily to high throughput and employs an optical resonant cavity to enhance sensitivity by a factor of 100 or more. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a cavity constructed from Si/SiO2 Bragg reflectors, one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept 5 nm, an Indium-Gallium-Arsenide digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel with resolution 128 x 128. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity, one can control the sensitivity of the measurement to the presence of bound molecules thereby enhancing or suppressing sensitivity where appropriate. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations are recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup was constructed. A sample was fabricated with 25, 100 mum wide square regions, each with a different density of 1 mum square depressions etched 12 nm into the S1O 2 surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm RMS precision when the sample remains loaded in the setup and 0.3 nm RMS precision when the sample is removed and replaced. Selective binding of the protein

  11. Resonance enhancement of neutrinoless double electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.; Simkovic, Fedor; Frekers, Dieter; Faessler, Amand

    2011-01-01

    The process of neutrinoless double electron (0νECEC) capture is revisited for those cases where the two participating atoms are nearly degenerate in mass. The theoretical framework is the formalism of an oscillation of two atoms with different total lepton number (and parity), one of which can be in an excited state so that mass degeneracy is realized. In such a case and assuming light Majorana neutrinos, the two atoms will be in a mixed configuration with respect to the weak interaction. A resonant enhancement of transitions between such pairs of atoms will occur, which could be detected by the subsequent electromagnetic de-excitation of the excited state of the daughter atom and nucleus. Available data of atomic masses, as well as nuclear and atomic excitations are used to select the most likely candidates for the resonant transitions. Assuming an effective mass for the Majorana neutrino of 1 eV, some half-lives are predicted to be as low as 10 22 years in the unitary limit. It is argued that, in order to obtain more accurate predictions for the 0νECEC half-lives, precision mass measurements of the atoms involved are necessary, which can readily be accomplished by today's high precision Penning traps. Further advancements also require a better understanding of high-lying excited states of the final nuclei (i.e. excitation energy, angular momentum and parity) and the calculation of the nuclear matrix elements.

  12. Resonantly Enhanced Axion-Photon Regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Sikivie, P; Van Bibber, K; Bibber, Karl van

    2007-01-01

    We point out that photon regeneration-experiments that search for the axion, or axion-like particles, may be resonantly enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities encompassing both the axion production and conversion magnetic field regions. Compared to a simple photon regeneration experiment, which uses the laser in a single-pass geometry, this technique can result in a gain in rate of order ${\\cal F}^2$, where ${\\cal F}$ is the finesse of the cavities. This gain could feasibly be $10^{(10-12)}$, corresponding to an improvement in sensitivity in the axion-photon coupling, $g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}$ , of order ${\\cal F}^{1/2} \\sim 10^{(2.5-3)}$, permitting a practical purely laboratory search to probe axion-photon couplings not previously excluded by stellar evolution limits, or solar axion searches.

  13. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  14. Stochastic resonance in a bistable system subject to multi-time-delayed feedback and aperiodic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianlong; Zeng Lingzao

    2010-01-01

    We discuss in detail the effects of the multi-time-delayed feedback driven by an aperiodic signal on the output of a stochastic resonance (SR) system. The effective potential function and dynamical probability density function (PDF) are derived. To measure the performance of the SR system in the presence of a binary random signal, the bit error rate (BER) defined by the dynamical PDF is employed, as is commonly used in digital communications. We find that the delay time, strength of the feedback, and number of time-delayed terms can change the effective potential function and the effective amplitude of the signal, and then affect the BER of the SR system. The numerical simulations strongly support the theoretical results. The goal of this investigation is to explore the effects of the multi-time-delayed feedback on SR and give a guidance to nonlinear systems in the application of information processing.

  15. Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT: initial experience in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed enhancement CT has not been reported in children and young adults. To describe initial experience of myocardial delayed enhancement CT regarding image quality, radiation dose and identification of myocardial lesions in children and young adults. Between August 2013 and November 2016, 29 consecutive children and young adults (median age 16 months) with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality underwent arterial- and delayed-phase cardiac CT at our institution. We measured CT densities in normal myocardium, left ventricular cavity, and arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing myocardial lesions. We then compared the extent of delayed hyperenhancing lesions with delayed-enhancement MRI or thallium single-photon emission CT. Normal myocardium and left ventricular cavity showed significantly higher CT numbers on arterial-phase CT than on delayed-phase CT (t-test, P<0.0001). Contrast-to-noise ratios of the arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing lesions on CT were 26.7, 17.6 and 18.7, respectively. Delayed-phase CT findings were equivalent to those of delayed-enhancement MRI in all cases (7/7) and to those of thallium single-photon emission CT in 70% (7/10). Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT can be added to evaluate myocardial lesions in select children and young adults with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality. (orig.)

  16. Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT: initial experience in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2017-01-01

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed enhancement CT has not been reported in children and young adults. To describe initial experience of myocardial delayed enhancement CT regarding image quality, radiation dose and identification of myocardial lesions in children and young adults. Between August 2013 and November 2016, 29 consecutive children and young adults (median age 16 months) with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality underwent arterial- and delayed-phase cardiac CT at our institution. We measured CT densities in normal myocardium, left ventricular cavity, and arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing myocardial lesions. We then compared the extent of delayed hyperenhancing lesions with delayed-enhancement MRI or thallium single-photon emission CT. Normal myocardium and left ventricular cavity showed significantly higher CT numbers on arterial-phase CT than on delayed-phase CT (t-test, P<0.0001). Contrast-to-noise ratios of the arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing lesions on CT were 26.7, 17.6 and 18.7, respectively. Delayed-phase CT findings were equivalent to those of delayed-enhancement MRI in all cases (7/7) and to those of thallium single-photon emission CT in 70% (7/10). Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT can be added to evaluate myocardial lesions in select children and young adults with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality. (orig.)

  17. Topical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance dacryocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hirota, Shozo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance dacryocystography (MRD) with topical administration of normal saline solution and diluted Gd-DTPA solution for the assessment of lacrimal outflow disorders. Two T2-weighted sequences and two T1-weighted sequences were evaluated in this study. The 1:100 diluted Gd solution was prepared by diluting Gd-DTPA (Magnevist) with normal saline solution. A phantom study using tube phantoms of various diameters filled with normal saline solution and 1:100 diluted Gd solution was performed. A preliminary study was performed in ten normal volunteers Eighteen patients with lacrimal outflow disorders underwent clinical MRD, and 14 also underwent conventional dacryocystography (CDG). MRD images were evaluated and compared with clinical symptoms and CDG images. In all sequences, MRD could visualize the full length of 0.7 to 1.7 mm diameter tube phantoms and could show all of the normal lacrimal sacs and nasolacrimal ducts. In the clinical study, MRD findings were compatible with the symptoms in 14 patients but were not compatible with CDG findings in half of the cases. Topical contrast-enhanced MRD provided a simple, non-invasive means of obtaining detailed morphological and functional information on the lacrimal drainage apparatus. (author)

  18. The effects of resonances on time delay estimation for water leak detection in plastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabrício C. L.; Brennan, Michael J.; Joseph, Phillip F.; Gao, Yan; Paschoalini, Amarildo T.

    2018-04-01

    In the use of acoustic correlation methods for water leak detection, sensors are placed at pipe access points either side of a suspected leak, and the peak in the cross-correlation function of the measured signals gives the time difference (delay) between the arrival times of the leak noise at the sensors. Combining this information with the speed at which the leak noise propagates along the pipe, gives an estimate for the location of the leak with respect to one of the measurement positions. It is possible for the structural dynamics of the pipe system to corrupt the time delay estimate, which results in the leak being incorrectly located. In this paper, data from test-rigs in the United Kingdom and Canada are used to demonstrate this phenomenon, and analytical models of resonators are coupled with a pipe model to replicate the experimental results. The model is then used to investigate which of the two commonly used correlation algorithms, the Basic Cross-Correlation (BCC) function or the Phase Transform (PHAT), is more robust to the undesirable structural dynamics of the pipe system. It is found that time delay estimation is highly sensitive to the frequency bandwidth over which the analysis is conducted. Moreover, it is found that the PHAT is particularly sensitive to the presence of resonances and can give an incorrect time delay estimate, whereas the BCC function is found to be much more robust, giving a consistently accurate time delay estimate for a range of dynamic conditions.

  19. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. (fast track communication)

  20. Coherent enhancement of resonance-mediated multiphoton absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hui; Jia, Tianqing; Wang, Zugeng; Sun, Zhenrong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the coherent enhancement of resonance-mediated (2+2) four-photon absorption. It is found that by shaping the spectral phase with a π phase step, the resonance-mediated (2+2) four-photon transition probability can be enhanced. Furthermore, the coherent enhancement dependences on the detuning between the two two-photon absorptions, laser spectral bandwidth and laser centre frequency are explicitly discussed and analysed. We believe these theoretical results may play an important role in enhancing more complex resonance-mediated multiphoton absorption processes.

  1. Comparison between immediate and delayed imaging after gadolinium chelate injection for detecting enhanced lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.; Roudbari, A.; Heidarzadeh, A.; Kouhsari, M.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and valuable method in the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Compared with other modalities, the sensitivity of Magnetic resonance imaging for detection of the lesion increases using magnetization transfer and delayed imaging. Our aim was to compare the two methods in detecting Multiple Sclerosis lesions. Patients and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, twenty-one patients with the definite diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis referred to Poursina Hospital, Rasht were included. Two radiologists evaluated all the images. First, images without contrast were conducted, then 0.1 mmol/kg contrast material (Dotarem, single dose) was injected and after 30 minutes, T1W and magnetization transfer images were obtained. Seventy-two hours later, T1W images were obtained immediately after injection of 0.2 mmol/kg contrast material (double dose). The data were analyzed using Fisher's and McNemar tests by SPSS for Windows. Results: Delayed magnetization transfer showed 44 enhanced lesions using magnetization transfer (69.84%) and 29 lesions using T1 (46.03%). In addition, the number of enhanced lesions in the delayed method were significantly more than those in the immediate method (p value=0.003). Conclusion: The use of single dose in combination with magnetization transfer and delayed images after 20-30 minutes enables us to detect more enhanced lesions.

  2. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  3. Bifurcation analysis of delay-induced resonances of the El-Niño Southern Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauskopf, Bernd; Sieber, Jan

    2014-09-08

    Models of global climate phenomena of low to intermediate complexity are very useful for providing an understanding at a conceptual level. An important aspect of such models is the presence of a number of feedback loops that feature considerable delay times, usually due to the time it takes to transport energy (for example, in the form of hot/cold air or water) around the globe. In this paper, we demonstrate how one can perform a bifurcation analysis of the behaviour of a periodically forced system with delay in dependence on key parameters. As an example, we consider the El-Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which is a sea-surface temperature (SST) oscillation on a multi-year scale in the basin of the Pacific Ocean. One can think of ENSO as being generated by an interplay between two feedback effects, one positive and one negative, which act only after some delay that is determined by the speed of transport of SST anomalies across the Pacific. We perform here a case study of a simple delayed-feedback oscillator model for ENSO, which is parametrically forced by annual variation. More specifically, we use numerical bifurcation analysis tools to explore directly regions of delay-induced resonances and other stability boundaries in this delay-differential equation model for ENSO.

  4. Rolling bearing fault diagnosis based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jimeng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2017-08-01

    Rolling bearings are the key components in the modern machinery, and tough operation environments often make them prone to failure. However, due to the influence of the transmission path and background noise, the useful feature information relevant to the bearing fault contained in the vibration signals is weak, which makes it difficult to identify the fault symptom of rolling bearings in time. Therefore, the paper proposes a novel weak signal detection method based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance (TFMSR) system and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution (MED) to realize the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. The MED method is employed to preprocess the vibration signals, which can deconvolve the effect of transmission path and clarify the defect-induced impulses. And a modified power spectrum kurtosis (MPSK) index is constructed to realize the adaptive selection of filter length in the MED algorithm. By introducing the time-delayed feedback item in to an over-damped monostable system, the TFMSR method can effectively utilize the historical information of input signal to enhance the periodicity of SR output, which is beneficial to the detection of periodic signal. Furthermore, the influence of time delay and feedback intensity on the SR phenomenon is analyzed, and by selecting appropriate time delay, feedback intensity and re-scaling ratio with genetic algorithm, the SR can be produced to realize the resonance detection of weak signal. The combination of the adaptive MED (AMED) method and TFMSR method is conducive to extracting the feature information from strong background noise and realizing the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. Finally, some experiments and engineering application are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed AMED-TFMSR method in comparison with a traditional bistable SR method.

  5. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  6. Frequency adaptation in controlled stochastic resonance utilizing delayed feedback method: two-pole approximation for response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Hiroki

    2011-06-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) enhanced by time-delayed feedback control is studied. The system in the absence of control is described by a Langevin equation for a bistable system, and possesses a usual SR response. The control with the feedback loop, the delay time of which equals to one-half of the period (2π/Ω) of the input signal, gives rise to a noise-induced oscillatory switching cycle between two states in the output time series, while its average frequency is just smaller than Ω in a small noise regime. As the noise intensity D approaches an appropriate level, the noise constructively works to adapt the frequency of the switching cycle to Ω, and this changes the dynamics into a state wherein the phase of the output signal is entrained to that of the input signal from its phase slipped state. The behavior is characterized by power loss of the external signal or response function. This paper deals with the response function based on a dichotomic model. A method of delay-coordinate series expansion, which reduces a non-Markovian transition probability flux to a series of memory fluxes on a discrete delay-coordinate system, is proposed. Its primitive implementation suggests that the method can be a potential tool for a systematic analysis of SR phenomenon with delayed feedback loop. We show that a D-dependent behavior of poles of a finite Laplace transform of the response function qualitatively characterizes the structure of the power loss, and we also show analytical results for the correlation function and the power spectral density.

  7. Enhanced THz extinction in arrays of resonant semiconductor particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, M. C.; Georgiou, G.; J. Gomez Rivas,

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of resonant semiconductor particles. This phenomenon is explained in terms of the radiative coupling of localized resonances with diffractive orders in the plane of the array (Rayleigh anomalies). The experimental results

  8. Magnetic resonance image enhancement using V-filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Sugita, K.; Kanzaki, N.; Johja, I.; Hiraki, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a method of boundary enhancement algorithms for magnetic resonance images using a V-filter. The boundary of the brain tumor was precisely extracted by the region segmentation techniques

  9. Bounds and enhancements for negative scattering time delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muga, J.G.; Egusquiza, I.L.; Damborenea, J.A.; Delgado, F.

    2002-01-01

    The time of passage of the transmitted wave packet in a tunneling collision of a quantum particle with a square potential barrier becomes independent of the barrier width in a range of barrier thickness. This is the Hartman effect, which has been frequently associated with 'superluminality'. A fundamental limitation on the effect is set by nonrelativistic 'causality conditions'. We demonstrate first that the causality conditions impose more restrictive bounds on the negative time delays (time advancements) when no bound states are present. These restrictive bounds are in agreement with a naive, and generally false, causality argument based on the positivity of the 'extrapolated phase time', one of the quantities proposed to characterize the duration of the barrier's traversal. Nevertheless, square wells may in fact lead to much larger advancements than square barriers. We point out that close to the thresholds of new bound states, the time advancement increases considerably, while, at the same time, the transmission probability is large, which facilitates the possible observation of the enhanced time advancement

  10. Subwavelength resonant antennas enhancing electromagnetic energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumbe Tekam, Gabin; Ginis, Vincent; Seetharamdoo, Divitha; Danckaert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an electromagnetic energy harvester operating at microwave frequencies is designed based on a cut- wire metasurface. This metamaterial is known to contain a quasistatic electric dipole resonator leading to a strong resonant electric response when illuminated by electromagnetic fields.1 Starting from an equivalent electrical circuit, we analytically design the parameters of the system to tune the resonance frequency of the harvester at the desired frequency band. Subsequently, we compare these results with numerical simulations, which have been obtained using finite elements numerical simulations. Finally, we optimize the design by investigating the best arrangement for energy harvesting by coupling in parallel and in series many single layers of cut-wire metasurfaces. We also discuss the implementation of different geometries and sizes of the cut-wire metasurface for achieving different center frequencies and bandwidths.

  11. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  12. Transmission and group-delay characterization of coupled resonator optical waveguides apodized through the longitudinal offset technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech, J D; Muñoz, P; Capmany, J

    2011-01-15

    In this Letter, the amplitude and group delay characteristics of coupled resonator optical waveguides apodized through the longitudinal offset technique are presented. The devices have been fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology employing deep ultraviolet lithography. The structures analyzed consisted of three racetracks resonators uniform (nonapodized) and apodized with the aforementioned technique, showing a delay of 5 ± 3 ps and 4 ± 0.5 ps over 1.6 and 1.4 nm bandwidths, respectively.

  13. Scan cell design for enhanced delay fault testability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brakel, Gerrit; van Brakel, G.; Xing, Yizi; Xing, Y.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    1992-01-01

    Problems in testing scannable sequential circuits for delay faults are addressed. Modifications to improve circuit controllability and observability for the testing of delay faults are implemented efficiently in a scan cell design. A layout on a gate array is designed and evaluated for this scan

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of endometrial cancer. Optimizing the imaging delay for tumour-myometrium contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the optimal imaging delay time of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women with endometrial cancer. This prospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the participants. Thirty-five women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 29-66 years) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with a temporal resolution of 25-40 seconds. The signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were analyzed to investigate the optimal imaging delay time using single change-point analysis. The optimal imaging delay time for appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast ranged from 31.7 to 268.1 seconds. The median optimal imaging delay time was 91.3 seconds, with an interquartile range of 46.2 to 119.5 seconds. The median signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were 0.03, with an interquartile range of -0.01 to 0.06, on the pre-contrast MR imaging and 0.20, with an interquartile range of 0.15 to 0.25, on the post-contrast MR imaging. An imaging delay of approximately 90 seconds after initiating contrast material injection may be optimal for obtaining appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast in women with endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  15. Infinite dwell time and group delay in resonant electron tunneling through double complex potential barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacak, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2017-12-01

    Tunneling times in complex potentials are investigated. Analytical expressions for dwell time, self-interference time and group delay are obtained for the case of complex double delta potentials. It is shown that we can always find a set of parameters of the potential so that the tunneling times achieve very large values and even approach infinity for the case of resonance. The phenomenon of infinite tunneling times occurs for only one particular positive value of the imaginary part of the potential, if all other parameters are given.

  16. Primed infusion with delayed equilibrium of Gd.DTPA for enhanced imaging of small pulmonary metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalber, Tammy L; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Siow, Bernard M; Sage, Elizabeth; Price, Anthony N; Ordidge, Katherine L; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Janes, Sam M; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    To use primed infusions of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent Gd.DTPA (Magnevist), to achieve an equilibrium between blood and tissue (eqMRI). This may increase tumor Gd concentrations as a novel cancer imaging methodology for the enhancement of small tumor nodules within the low signal-to-noise background of the lung. A primed infusion with a delay before equilibrium (eqMRI) of the Gd(III) chelator Gd.DTPA, via the intraperitoneal route, was used to evaluate gadolinium tumor enhancement as a function of a bolus injection, which is applied routinely in the clinic, compared to gadolinium maintained at equilibrium. A double gated (respiration and cardiac) spin-echo sequence at 9.4T was used to evaluate whole lungs pre contrast and then at 15 (representative of bolus enhancement), 25 and 35 minutes (representative of eqMRI). This was carried out in two lung metastasis models representative of high and low tumor cell seeding. Lungs containing discrete tumor nodes where inflation fixed and taken for haematoxylin and eosin staining as well as CD34 staining for correlation to MRI. We demonstrate that sustained Gd enhancement, afforded by Gd equilibrium, increases the detection of pulmonary metastases compared to bolus enhancement and those tumors which enhance at equilibrium are sub-millimetre in size (<0.7 mm(2)) with a similar morphology to early bronchoalveolar cell carcinomas. As Gd-chelates are routinely used in the clinic for detecting tumors by MRI, this methodology is readily transferable to the clinic and advances MRI as a methodology for the detection of small pulmonary tumors.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of developmental delay in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Althaf S; Syed, Naziya P; Murthy, G S N; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B K; Venkateswarlu, J

    2015-01-01

    Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child's ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was found to be 68% and higher yield was seen in patients presenting with

  18. Evaluation of delayed contrast-enhanced CT scan in diagnosing hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianding; Liang Chenyang; Zhang Hua; Zhang Yuezhen; Li Rui

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of delayed CT contrast enhancement patterns in hilar cholangiocarcinoma based on two-phased dynamic incremental CT scanning. Methods: Fifty-two patients with suspected hilar tumor and bile duct obstruction underwent spiral CT scan. The scan time for one revolution of the X-ray tube was 1 second. To elucidate the delay time for optimal imaging, all proved cholangiocarcinoma with delayed (6, 8, 10, 15, 20, 30 minutes) post-equilibrium-phase contrast-enhanced CT scans were acquired with unenhanced, dynamic contrast-enhanced, and delayed images. Degree of delayed enhancement was compared with that of surrounding liver parenchyma. Results: (1) 8-15 minutes after IV injection of contrast material was the delay time for optimal imaging. (2) Of 29 cholangiocarcinomas, the early CT showed hypo-attenuating (lower than that of liver parenchyma) in 23 tumors, iso-attenuating (equal to that of the liver) in 4 tumors, and hyper-attenuating (higher than that of liver) in 2 tumors. The delayed CT scan showed iso-attenuating in 8 tumors, hyper-attenuating in 21 tumors, and no hypo-attenuating. Most of delay imaging of hilar cholangiocarcinoma may appear hyper-attenuating (U = -4.3073, P 2 = 9.09, P < 0.01). Conclusion: When assessing hilar tumor, delayed CT contrast enhancement patterns based on two-phase dynamic incremental CT scans is useful in the detection and characterization of hilar cholangiocarcinoma

  19. Stochastic resonance: noise-enhanced order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishchenko, Vadim S; Neiman, Arkady B; Moss, F; Shimansky-Geier, L

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) provides a glaring example of a noise-induced transition in a nonlinear system driven by an information signal and noise simultaneously. In the regime of SR some characteristics of the information signal (amplification factor, signal-to-noise ratio, the degrees of coherence and of order, etc.) at the output of the system are significantly improved at a certain optimal noise level. SR is realized only in nonlinear systems for which a noise-intensity-controlled characteristic time becomes available. In the present review the physical mechanism and methods of theoretical description of SR are briefly discussed. SR features determined by the structure of the information signal, noise statistics and properties of particular systems with SR are studied. A nontrivial phenomenon of stochastic synchronization defined as locking of the instantaneous phase and switching frequency of a bistable system by external periodic force is analyzed in detail. Stochastic synchronization is explored in single and coupled bistable oscillators, including ensembles. The effects of SR and stochastic synchronization of ensembles of stochastic resonators are studied both with and without coupling between the elements. SR is considered in dynamical and nondynamical (threshold) systems. The SR effect is analyzed from the viewpoint of information and entropy characteristics of the signal, which determine the degree of order or self-organization in the system. Applications of the SR concept to explaining the results of a series of biological experiments are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Stochastic resonance: noise-enhanced order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anishchenko, Vadim S; Neiman, Arkady B [N.G. Chernyshevskii Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation); Moss, F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri at St. Louis (United States); Shimansky-Geier, L [Humboldt University at Berlin (Germany)

    1999-01-31

    Stochastic resonance (SR) provides a glaring example of a noise-induced transition in a nonlinear system driven by an information signal and noise simultaneously. In the regime of SR some characteristics of the information signal (amplification factor, signal-to-noise ratio, the degrees of coherence and of order, etc.) at the output of the system are significantly improved at a certain optimal noise level. SR is realized only in nonlinear systems for which a noise-intensity-controlled characteristic time becomes available. In the present review the physical mechanism and methods of theoretical description of SR are briefly discussed. SR features determined by the structure of the information signal, noise statistics and properties of particular systems with SR are studied. A nontrivial phenomenon of stochastic synchronization defined as locking of the instantaneous phase and switching frequency of a bistable system by external periodic force is analyzed in detail. Stochastic synchronization is explored in single and coupled bistable oscillators, including ensembles. The effects of SR and stochastic synchronization of ensembles of stochastic resonators are studied both with and without coupling between the elements. SR is considered in dynamical and nondynamical (threshold) systems. The SR effect is analyzed from the viewpoint of information and entropy characteristics of the signal, which determine the degree of order or self-organization in the system. Applications of the SR concept to explaining the results of a series of biological experiments are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Enhanced THz extinction in arrays of resonant semiconductor particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Martijn C; Georgiou, Giorgos; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate experimentally the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of resonant semiconductor particles. This phenomenon is explained in terms of the radiative coupling of localized resonances with diffractive orders in the plane of the array (Rayleigh anomalies). The experimental results are described by numerical calculations using a coupled dipole model and by Finite-Difference in Time-Domain simulations. An optimum particle size for enhancing the extinction efficiency of the array is found. This optimum is determined by the frequency detuning between the localized resonances in the individual particles and the Rayleigh anomaly. The extinction calculations and measurements are also compared to near-field simulations illustrating the optimum particle size for the enhancement of the near-field.

  2. Characterization of liver metastases: the efficacy of biphasic magnetic resonance imaging with ferucarbotran-enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, H.S.; Byun, J.H.; Won, H.J.; Kim, K.W.; Lee, S.S.; Lee, M.G.; Yun, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of biphasic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver with ferucarbotran-enhancement for the characterization of hepatic metastases. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients underwent MRI of the liver with separate acquisition of double-contrast enhancement consisting of gadolinium and ferucarbotran. A total of 106 focal hepatic lesions (51 metastases, 31 cysts, 23 haemangiomas, and one eosinophilic abscess) were included. Two sets of MRI were analysed: (1) ferucarbotran set: ferucarbotran-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) dynamic imaging combined with ferucarbotran-enhanced T2*-weighted (T2*W) delayed imaging and (2) double set: gadolinium-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging combined with ferucarbotran-enhanced T2*W delayed imaging. The diagnostic accuracy of the two sets was evaluated using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Sensitivity and specificity were compared using the McNemar test. The enhancement pattern of focal hepatic lesions was analysed on gadolinium and ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging. Results: There was no significant difference in the accuracy of characterizing hepatic metastases between the two sets. Sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between the sets (p > 0.05). Peripheral rim enhancement was exhibited in 57% of metastatic lesions on ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging. The majority (96%) of hepatic haemangiomas demonstrated typical peripheral nodular enhancement with progression on ferucarbotran-enhanced T1W dynamic imaging and were easily differentiated from metastases. Conclusion: Biphasic MRI of the liver with ferucarbotran-enhancement alone provided comparable diagnostic efficacy to double-contrast MRI for the characterization of hepatic metastases.

  3. Radionuclide measurements using resonantly enhanced collisional ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Bushaw, B.A.; Gerke, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes development of a laser-enhanced collisional ionization method for direct radionuclide measurements that are independent of radioactive decay. The technique uses two nitrogen-laser-pumped dye lasers to selectively excite the target isotope to an electronic state near the ionization threshold. The excited actinide atoms then undergo collisions with a buffer gas and are efficiently ionized. The resulting ions can be detected by conventional methods. The attributes of this approach include highly sensitive isotope analysis with relatively inexpensive lasers and a simple vacuum system. 9 refs., 3 figs

  4. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in delayed encephalopathy of acute carbon monoxide poisoning - comparison with CT -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Choo, In Wook

    1986-01-01

    Eleven magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) imaging were performed in nine patients with mild to moderate degree of delayed neuropsychiatric symptoms following acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, to evaluate the capability of MR in demonstrating any additional finding to CT. The MR images were obtained using 0.15 Tesla resistive system with various combination of three pulse sequences, including partial saturation recovery, T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery. Bilateral white matter abnormalities suggesting demyelination were demonstrated in 4 patients with MR and in only 2 patients with CT. The contrast discrimination between normal and abnormal white matter proved to be better with T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery than with partial saturation recovery and CT. But necrosis of the globus pallidus (1 patient) and diffuse atrophy (3 patients) were equally demonstrated on both MR and CT. It is suggested that MR be used as a initial imaging method in the evaluation of the delayed encephalopathy following acute CO poisoning, especially for the detection of the possible white matter lesions. Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning produces hypoxia by displacing oxygen from hemoglobin and preventing its release from hemoglobin in tissues, often resulting in fetal event. Victims who survive acute CO poisoning may have various delayed symptoms and signs. Occasionally, an apparent recovery is followed within two days to three weeks by a sudden neurological deterioration. The degree of neuropsychiatric symptoms depends upon the extent and severity of the pathologic changes in the brain. The pathologic effects of CO poisoning are present in almost all organs of patients. However, the most important changes occur in the brain, which consist of necrosis of the globus pallidus and reticular zone of the substantia nigra, and the degeneration of the cerebral white matter. The diagnostic superiority of magnetic resonance (MR) over CT has already

  5. Unexpected enhancements and reductions of rf spin resonance strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Leonova

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We recently analyzed all available data on spin-flipping stored beams of polarized protons, electrons, and deuterons. Fitting the modified Froissart-Stora equation to the measured polarization data after crossing an rf-induced spin resonance, we found 10–20-fold deviations from the depolarizing resonance strength equations used for many years. The polarization was typically manipulated by linearly sweeping the frequency of an rf dipole or rf solenoid through an rf-induced spin resonance; spin-flip efficiencies of up to 99.9% were obtained. The Lorentz invariance of an rf dipole’s transverse ∫Bdl and the weak energy dependence of its spin resonance strength E together imply that even a small rf dipole should allow efficient spin flipping in 100 GeV or even TeV storage rings; thus, it is important to understand these large deviations. Therefore, we recently studied the resonance strength deviations experimentally by varying the size and vertical betatron tune of a 2.1  GeV/c polarized proton beam stored in COSY. We found no dependence of E on beam size, but we did find almost 100-fold enhancements when the rf spin resonance was near an intrinsic spin resonance.

  6. Multiple coherence resonances and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive scale-free neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on multiple coherence resonances (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) induced by time delay in adaptive scale-free Hodgkin–Huxley neuronal networks. It is found that STDP has a big influence on MCR and ST induced by time delay and on the effect of network average degree on the MCR and ST. MCR is enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate A p of STDP decreases or increases, and there is optimal A p by which ST becomes strongest. As network average degree 〈k〉 increases, ST is enhanced and there is optimal 〈k〉 at which MCR becomes strongest. Moreover, for a larger A p value, ST is enhanced more rapidly with increasing 〈k〉 and the optimal 〈k〉 for MCR increases. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR, and there is optimal STDP that can most strongly enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings could find potential implication for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  7. Absorption enhancement in graphene with an efficient resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Binggang; Gu, Mingyue; Qin, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene can be utilized in designing tunable terahertz (THz) devices due to its tunability of sheet conductivity, suffering however with weak light-graphene interactions. In this paper, an absorption enhancement in graphene using a Fabry–Perot resonator is presented, and its performance has been...

  8. Resonant Dipole Nanoantenna Arrays for Enhanced Terahertz Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-08-04

    Our recent studies on dipole nanoantenna arrays resonating in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 – 10 THz) will be presented. The main near- and far-field properties of these nanostructures will be shown and their application in enhanced terahertz spectroscopy of tiny quantities of nanomaterials will be discussed.

  9. Stochastic resonance in a time-delayed mono-stable system with correlated multiplicative and additive white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu-Rong

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the stochastic resonance for a time-delayed mono-stable system, driven by correlated multiplicative and additive white noise. It finds that the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) varies non-monotonically with the delayed times. The SNR varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensities of the multiplicative and additive noise, with the increase of the correlation strength between the two noises, as well as with the system parameter. (general)

  10. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Alan P; Silva, Afonso C

    2004-12-01

    Manganese ion (Mn2+) is an essential metal that participates as a cofactor in a number of critical biological functions, such as electron transport, detoxification of free radicals and synthesis of neurotransmitters. Mn2+ can enter excitable cells using some of the same transport systems as Ca2+ and it can bind to a number of intracellular sites because it has high affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding sites on proteins and nucleic acids. Paramagnetic forms of manganese ions are potent MRI relaxation agents. Indeed, Mn2+ was the first contrast agent proposed for use in MRI. Recently, there has been renewed interest in combining the strong MRI relaxation effects of Mn2+ with its unique biology, in order to further expand the already broad assortment of useful information that can be measured by MRI. Such an approach has been continuously developed in the past several years to provide unique tissue contrast, to assess tissue viability, to act as a surrogate marker of calcium influx into cells and to trace neuronal connections. This special issue of NMR in Biomedicine on manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is aimed at providing the readers of this journal with an extensive review of some of the most prominent applications of MEMRI in biological systems. Written by several of the leaders in the field, the reviews and original research articles featured in this special issue are likely to offer an exciting and inspiring view of the broad range of applications of MEMRI. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma occurring in liver transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mimi; Kang, Tae Wook; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Jong Man; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Kim, Min-Ji; Jung, Sin-ho

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on magnetic resonance (MR) images were compared in patients who did or did not undergo liver transplantation (LT), and we evaluated the relationship of these findings with overall survival (OS) and time-to-tumour recurrence (TTR) after transplantation. The enhancement pattern of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR images of 25 patients with recurrent HCCs (LT group) and 25 surgically confirmed HCC patients in the non-transplanted (control) group were compared. Typical enhancement was defined as 1) arterial enhancement and delayed wash-out and 2) absence of typical features of cholangiocarcinoma consisting of arterial rim enhancement and target appearance on hepatobiliary phase images. OS and TTR were analyzed in the LT group according to these patterns using the log-rank test. HCCs in the LT group significantly more often had an atypical enhancement pattern (16/25, 64.0%) than those in the control group (5/25, 20.0%; p = 0.004). However, OS and TTR did not differ significantly according to these enhancement patterns of recurrent HCC (p > 0.05). Although enhancement patterns of recurrent HCC in transplanted liver did not affect OS and TTR, these HCCs that arise after LT frequently revealed atypical enhancement on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging. (orig.)

  12. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma occurring in liver transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mimi [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University of Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae Wook; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Man [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sinn, Dong Hyun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of hepatology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Ji; Jung, Sin-ho [Samsung Medical Center, Biostatics and Clinical Epidemiology Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on magnetic resonance (MR) images were compared in patients who did or did not undergo liver transplantation (LT), and we evaluated the relationship of these findings with overall survival (OS) and time-to-tumour recurrence (TTR) after transplantation. The enhancement pattern of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR images of 25 patients with recurrent HCCs (LT group) and 25 surgically confirmed HCC patients in the non-transplanted (control) group were compared. Typical enhancement was defined as 1) arterial enhancement and delayed wash-out and 2) absence of typical features of cholangiocarcinoma consisting of arterial rim enhancement and target appearance on hepatobiliary phase images. OS and TTR were analyzed in the LT group according to these patterns using the log-rank test. HCCs in the LT group significantly more often had an atypical enhancement pattern (16/25, 64.0%) than those in the control group (5/25, 20.0%; p = 0.004). However, OS and TTR did not differ significantly according to these enhancement patterns of recurrent HCC (p > 0.05). Although enhancement patterns of recurrent HCC in transplanted liver did not affect OS and TTR, these HCCs that arise after LT frequently revealed atypical enhancement on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging. (orig.)

  13. Realce Tardio miocárdico por Ressonância Magnética Cardíaca pode identificar risco para Taquicardia Ventricular na Cardiopatia Chagásica Crônica Delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance Imaging can identify the risk for ventricular tachycardia in chronic Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Peixoto de Mello

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Testes invasivos e não invasivos têm sido usados para identificar risco para Taquicardia Ventricular (TV em pacientes com Cardiopatia Chagásica Crônica (CCC. Ressonância Magnética Cardíaca (RMC pela técnica do Realce Tardio (RT pode ser útil para selecionar pacientes com disfunção ventricular global ou segmentar, com alto grau de fibrose e maior risco para TV clínica. OBJETIVO: Melhorar a identificação de elementos preditivos de TV em pacientes com CCC. MÉTODO: Quarenta e um pacientes com CCC foram pesquisados, sendo 30 (72% do sexo masculino, com média de idade de 55,1 ± 11,9 anos. Vinte e seis pacientes apresentavam histórico de TV (grupo TV, e 15 não apresentavam TV (grupo NTV. Todos os pacientes incluídos tinham RT e disfunção segmentar ventricular. Volume, porcentagem de comprometimento da espessura da parede ventricular em cada segmento, e distribuição de RT foi determinado em cada caso. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatística em termos de volume de RT entre os dois grupos: grupo TV = 30,0 ± 16,2%; grupo NTV = 21,7 ± 15,7%; p = 0,118. A probabilidade de TV foi maior se duas ou mais áreas contíguas de fibrose transmural estivessem presentes, sendo um fator preditor de TV clínica (RR 4,1; p = 0,04. A concordância entre os observadores foi de 100% nesse critério (p BACKGROUND: Invasive and non-invasive tests have been used to identify the risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT in patients with chronic Chagas' heart disease (CCHD. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI using the delayed enhancement (DE technique can be useful to select patients with global or segmentary ventricular dysfunction, with high degree of fibrosis and at higher risk for clinical VT. OBJECTIVE: To improve the identification of predictors of VT in patients with CCHD. METHOD: This study assessed 41 patients with CCHD [30 (72% males; mean age, 55.1 ± 11.9 years]. Twenty-six patients had history of VT (VT group, and 15 had

  14. Nanoscale imaging of photocurrent enhancement by resonator array photovoltaic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Dongheon; Yoon, Yohan; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2018-04-01

    Nanoscale surface patterning commonly used to increase absorption of solar cells can adversely impact the open-circuit voltage due to increased surface area and recombination. Here, we demonstrate absorptivity and photocurrent enhancement using silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanosphere arrays on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell that do not require direct surface patterning. Due to the combined effects of thin-film interference and whispering gallery-like resonances within nanosphere arrays, there is more than 20% enhancement in both absorptivity and photocurrent. To determine the effect of the resonance coupling between nanospheres, we perform a scanning photocurrent microscopy based on a near-field scanning optical microscopy measurement and find a substantial local photocurrent enhancement. The nanosphere-based antireflection coating (ARC), made by the Meyer rod rolling technique, is a scalable and a room-temperature process; and, can replace the conventional thin-film-based ARCs requiring expensive high-temperature vacuum deposition.

  15. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  16. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of hepatic hemangioma compared with enhanced computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Tateyama, Akihiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Takumi, Koji; Shindo, Toshikazu; Kumagae, Yuichi; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To clarify features of hepatic hemangiomas on gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with enhanced computed tomography (CT).

  17. Non-resonant terahertz field enhancement in periodically arranged nanoslits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    We analyze ultra strong non-resonant field enhancement of THz field in periodic arrays of nanoslits cut in ultrathin metal films. The main feature of our approach is that the slit size and metal film thickness are several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength λ of the impinging radiatio...... by the microscopic Drude-Lorentz model taking into account retardation processes in the metal film and validated by the finite difference frequency domain method. We expect sensor and modulation applications of the predicted giant broadband field enhancement.......We analyze ultra strong non-resonant field enhancement of THz field in periodic arrays of nanoslits cut in ultrathin metal films. The main feature of our approach is that the slit size and metal film thickness are several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength λ of the impinging radiation...... approaches the THz wavelength but before entering the Raleigh-Wood anomaly, the field enhancement in nanoslit stays close to that in a single isolated slit, i.e., the well-known inversefrequency dependence. Both regimes are non-resonant and thus extremely broadband for P

  18. Improved parenchymal liver enhancement with extended delay on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in patients with parenchymal liver disease: associated clinical and imaging factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esterson, Y.B.; Flusberg, M.; Oh, S.; Mazzariol, F.; Rozenblit, A.M.; Chernyak, V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To establish the effect of prolonged hepatobiliary phase (HBP) delay time on hepatic enhancement in patients with parenchymal liver disease (PLD). Materials and methods: Gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations with HBP were obtained after 20- (HBP-20) and 30-minute (HBP-30) delays in patients with PLD. For each patient, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, total and direct bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were recorded. Signal intensities of the liver, main portal vein, and spleen on pre-contrast, HBP-20, and HBP-30 were documented. Signal intensities were used to calculate liver relative enhancement (LRE), liver–spleen index (LSI), and liver–portal vein index (LPI) for HBP-20 and HBP-30. Improved hepatic enhancement was considered if two or more indices were higher on HBP-30 than HBP-20. A logistic regression model was constructed with improved hepatic enhancement as the outcome. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine patients underwent 142 MRIs. Mean LRE, LSI, and LPI each increased from HBP-20 to HBP-30 (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Seventy-two point five percent of cases demonstrated improved hepatic enhancement. The odds ratios for improved hepatic enhancement were 0.85 for MELD score (p = 0.02) and 3.2 for the 3 T scanner (p = 0.02), adjusted for age and sex. Conclusion: Increasing HBP delay to 30 minutes improves hepatic enhancement in patients with PLD, particularly if using a 3 T scanner. This effect is attenuated with higher MELD scores. -- Highlights: •Increasing hepatobiliary phase delay improves hepatic enhancement in liver disease. •This effect is enhanced if using a 3T scanner. •This effect is attenuated with higher MELD scores

  19. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10 4 A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found

  20. The structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance and consequences for beta-delayed neutron spectra and element synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in β-delayed neutron emission are interpreted by structure of the Gamow-Teller giant resonance not included in the 'gross-theory' of β-decay. Inclusion of this structure of the β-decay function is important for calculations of β-decay production rates for heavy nuclides by astrophysical processes and thermonuclear explosions. (Auth.)

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A. de; Doornbos, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Rossum, A.C. van

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate he usefulness of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) in Magnetic Resonance. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction, we studied a total of 45 patients with a first acute myocardial infarction by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging before and after intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA. All patients received thrombolytic treatment by intravenous streptokinase. The magnetic resonance imaging studies were preformed after a meam of 88 h (range 15-241) after the acute onset of acute myocardial infarction. Five patients without evidence of cardiac disease served as controls. Spin-echo measurements (TE 30 ms) were made using a Philips Gyroscan (0.5 Tesla) or a Teslacon II (0.6 Tesla). The 45 patients were divided into four groups of patients. In Group I( patients) Gadolinium-DTPA improved the detection of myocardial infarction by Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group II (20 patients) the magnetic resonance imaging procedure was repeated every 10 min for up to 40 min following administration of Gadolinium-DTPA. Optimal contrast enhancement was obtained 20-25 min after Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group III (27 patients) signal intensities were significantly higher in the patients who underwent the magnetic resonance imaging study more than 72 h (mean 120) after the acute event, suggesting increased acculumation of Gadolinium-DTPA in a more advanced stage of the infarction process. In Group IV (45 patients) Gadolinium-DTPA was administered in an attempt to distinguish between reperfused and nonreperfused myocardial areas after thrombolytic treatment for acute myocardial infarction. The signal intensities did not differ, but reperfused areas showed a more homogeneous aspect whereas nonreperfused areas were visualized as a more heterogeneous contrast enhancement. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging using the contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA significantly improves the detection of infarcted myocardial areas

  2. Dynamic optical bistability in resonantly enhanced Raman generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, I.; Phillips, D.F.; Zibrov, A.S.; Andre, A.; Walsworth, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report observations of novel dynamic behavior in resonantly enhanced stimulated Raman scattering in Rb vapor. In particular, we demonstrate a dynamic hysteresis of the Raman scattered optical field in response to changes of the drive laser field intensity and/or frequency. This effect may be described as a dynamic form of optical bistability resulting from the formation and decay of atomic coherence. We have applied this phenomenon to the realization of an all-optical switch

  3. Enhancement of particle-wave energy exchange by resonance sweeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-10-01

    It is shown that as the resonance condition of the particle-wave interaction is varied adiabatically, that the particles trapped in the wave will form phase space holes or clumps that can enhance the particle-wave energy exchange. This mechanism can cause much larger saturation levels of instabilities, and even allow the free energy associated with instability, to be tapped in a system that is linearly stable due to background dissipation

  4. Experimental demonstration of two methods for controlling the group delay in a system with photonic-crystal resonators coupled to a waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yijie; Sandhu, Sunil; Pan, Jun; Stuhrmann, Norbert; Povinelli, Michelle L; Kahn, Joseph M; Harris, James S; Fejer, Martin M; Fan, Shanhui

    2011-04-15

    We measure the group delay in an on-chip photonic-crystal device with two resonators side coupled to a waveguide. We demonstrate that such a group delay can be controlled by tuning either the propagation phase of the waveguide or the frequency of the resonators.

  5. Optimal autaptic and synaptic delays enhanced synchronization transitions induced by each other in Newman–Watts neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Baoying; Gong, Yubing; Xie, Huijuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimal autaptic delay enhanced synchronization transitions induced by synaptic delay in neuronal networks. • Optimal synaptic delay enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay. • Optimal coupling strength enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autaptic or synaptic delay. - Abstract: In this paper, we numerically study the effect of electrical autaptic and synaptic delays on synchronization transitions induced by each other in Newman–Watts Hodgkin–Huxley neuronal networks. It is found that the synchronization transitions induced by synaptic delay vary with varying autaptic delay and become strongest when autaptic delay is optimal. Similarly, the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay vary with varying synaptic delay and become strongest at optimal synaptic delay. Also, there is optimal coupling strength by which the synchronization transitions induced by either synaptic or autaptic delay become strongest. These results show that electrical autaptic and synaptic delays can enhance synchronization transitions induced by each other in the neuronal networks. This implies that electrical autaptic and synaptic delays can cooperate with each other and more efficiently regulate the synchrony state of the neuronal networks. These findings could find potential implications for the information transmission in neural systems.

  6. Enhancement of the Accelerating Gradient in Superconducting Microwave Resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [IIT, Chicago; Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Zasadzinski, John [IIT, Chicago (main)

    2017-05-01

    The accelerating gradient of superconducting resonators can be enhanced by engineering the thickness of a dirty layer grown at the cavity's rf surface. In this paper the description of the physics behind the accelerating gradient enhancement by meaning of the dirty layer is carried out by solving numerically the the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for the layered system. The calculation shows that the presence of the dirty layer stabilizes the Meissner state up to the lower critical field of the bulk, increasing the maximum accelerating gradient.

  7. Oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance ventilation imaging of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Chen Qun; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) ventilation imaging is a new technique, and the full extent of its physiological significance has not been elucidated. This review article includes background on (1) respiratory physiology; (2) mechanism and optimization of oxygen-enhanced MR imaging technique; (3) recent applications in animal and human models; and (4) merits and demerits of the technique in comparison with hyperpolarized noble gas MR ventilation imaging. Application of oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging to patients with pulmonary diseases has been very limited. However, we believe that further basic studies, as well as clinical applications of this new technique will define the real significance of oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation imaging in the future of pulmonary functional imaging and its usefulness for diagnostic radiology

  8. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  9. Brain metastasis of small cell lung carcinoma. Comparison of Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and enhanced computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Miyamoto, Tadaaki.

    1994-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) frequently metastasizes into the brain, resulting in serious influences upon prognosis. Delayed brain damage caused by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is also problematic. Gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to detect early brain metastasis from SCLC, and its usefulness was compared with contrast computerized tomography (CT). Among 25 SCLC patients, brain metastasis was detected in 11 by MRI and in 10 by CT, although six of them were completely asymptomatic. In the 11 patients, 6.3 and 2.4 lesions were respectively detected on average by MRI and CT. The ability of MRI to detect metastatic lesions of ≥15 mm diameter did not differ from that of CT, but became different as lesions became smaller (P<0.002), and MRI had a decided advantage over CT because as many as 30 lesions of ≤5 mm diameter were detected by MRI, whereas such lesions visualized on CT numbered only one (P<0.0001). MRI was incomparably superior to CT (P<0.0004) for subtentorial lesions since 18 lesions were detected on MRI, but only three, measuring ≥25 mm in diameter, were demonstrated on CT. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI was determined to be extremely useful in the early diagnosis of SCLC brain metastasis. MRI was thought to reduce delayed brain damage caused by PCI if performed according to an adequate schedule. (author)

  10. Enhancing optical response of graphene through stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Enhancing the optical response of graphene is a topic of interest with applications in optoelectronics. Subject to light irradiation, graphene can exhibit nontrivial topologically insulating states, effectively turning itself into a Floquet topological insulator due to the time periodicity of the external driving. We find that, when random disorder is present, its interplay with the topologically insulating states can have a dramatic effect on electronic transport through graphene. In particular, we consider the prototypical setting where a graphene nanoribbon is irradiated by circularly polarized light, where the length of the nanoribbon is sufficiently long so that evanescent states have little effect on transport. We uncover a resonance phenomenon in which the conductance is enhanced as the disorder strength is increased from zero, reaches a maximum value for an optimal level of disorder, and decreases as the disorder is strengthened further. With respect to its value at the zero-disorder strength, the maximum conductance value can be as much as 50 % higher. Qualitatively, this can be understood as a result of the dynamical interplay between disorder and Floquet states (channels) generated by light irradiation. Quantitatively, the resonance phenomenon can be explained in the framework of Born theory, where the disorder reorganizes the Floquet Hamiltonian and enhances the effective coupling between the adjacent Floquet conducting channels. That is, disorder is capable of promoting both photon absorption and emission, leading to significant enhancement of nonequilibrium electronic transport. We demonstrate the robustness of the resonance phenomenon by investigating the effects of spatial symmetry breaking on transport and provide an understanding based on analyzing the behavior of the density of states of the Floquet channels.

  11. The probability distribution of the delay time of a wave packet in strong overlap of resonance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    The time development of nuclear reactions at a large density of levels is investigated using the theory of overlapping resonances. The analytical expression for the function describing the time delay probability distribution of a wave packet is obtained in the framework of the model of n equi - valent channels. It is shown that a relative fluctuation of the time delay at the stage of the compound nucleus is snall. The possibility is discussed of increasing the duration of nuclear raactions with rising excitation energy

  12. Terahertz Magnetoelectric Resonance Enhanced by Mutual Coupling of Electromagnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yamasaki, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Both electric- and magnetic-dipole active spin excitations, i.e., electromagnons, which mediate the dynamical magnetoelectric effect, have been investigated for a multiferroic perovskite of manganite by optical spectroscopy at terahertz frequencies. Upon the magnetoelectric resonance at 1 meV in the multiferroic phase with the bc-plane spin cycloidal order, a gigantic dynamical magnetoelectric effect has been observed as a nonreciprocal directional dichroism or birefringence. The light k-vector-dependent difference (Δκ=κ+-κ-) of the extinction coefficient (κ±) is as large as Δκ˜1 or 2Δκ/(κ++κ-)˜0.7 at the lowest-lying electromagnon energy. We clarified the mutual coupling of the Eω∥a-polarized electromagnons of the different origins, leading to the enhancement of the magnetoelectric resonance.

  13. Delayed enhancement imaging in a contemporary patient cohort following correction of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preim, Uta; Sommer, Philipp; Hoffmann, Janine; Kehrmann, Jana; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Daehnert, Ingo; Gutberlet, Matthias; Grothoff, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that myocardial scars after repair of tetralogy of Fallot are related to impaired cardiac function and adverse clinical outcome. A total of 53 patients were retrospectively analysed after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. The median patient age was 20 years (range 2-48). Cardiac MRI with a 1.5 T magnet included cine sequences to obtain volumes and function, phase-sensitive inversion recovery delayed enhancement imaging to detect myocardial scars, and flow measurements to determine pulmonary regurgitation fraction. In addition, clinical parameters were obtained. An overall 83% of patients were in NYHA class I. All patients with the exception of 2 (96%) had pulmonary insufficiency. Mean ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume index were 46% and 128 ml/m2 for the right ventricle and 54% and 82 ml/m² for the left ventricle, respectively. Excluding enhancement of the septal insertion and prosthetic patches, delayed enhancement was seen in 11/53 cases (21%). Delayed enhancement of the right ventricle was detected in 6/53 patients (11%) and of the left ventricle in 5/53 patients (9%). The patient group with delayed enhancement was significantly older (p=0.003), had later repair (p=0.007), and higher left ventricular myocardial mass index (p=0.009) compared with the group without delayed enhancement. This study reveals that scarring is common in patients after surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot and is associated with older age and late repair. However, there was no difference in right ventricular function, NYHA class, or occurrence of clinically relevant arrhythmias between patients with and those without myocardial scars.

  14. Hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity enhanced photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid III–V/SOI resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure comprising a high-contrast grating (HCG) reflector, a hybrid grating (HG) reflector, and an air cavity between them, has been proposed and investigated. In the proposed structure, a light absorbing material is integrated...... as part of the HG reflector, enabling a very compact vertical cavity. Numerical investigations show that a quantum efficiency close to 100 % and a detection linewidth of about 1 nm can be achieved, which are desirable for wavelength division multiplexing applications. Based on these results, a hybrid RCE...

  15. Lead salt resonant cavity enhanced detector with MEMS mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, F.; Fill, M.; Rahim, M.; Zogg, H.; Quack, N.; Blunier, S.; Dual, J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a tunable resonant cavity enhanced detector (RCED) for the mid-infrared employing narrow gap lead-chalcogenide (IV-VI) layers on a Si substrate. The device consists of an epitaxial Bragg reflector layer, a thin p-n+ heterojunction with PbSrTe as detecting layer and a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) micromirror as second mirror. Despite the thin absorber layer the sensitivity is even higher than for a conventional detector. Tunability is achieved by changing the cavity length with a vertically movable MEMS mirror. The device may be used as miniature infrared spectrometer to cover the spectral range from 30 μm.

  16. An enhanced DWBA algorithm in hybrid WDM/TDM EPON networks with heterogeneous propagation delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjun; Guo, Wei; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Weiqiang; Hu, Weisheng

    2011-12-01

    An enhanced dynamic wavelength and bandwidth allocation (DWBA) algorithm in hybrid WDM/TDM PON is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In addition to the fairness of bandwidth allocation, this algorithm also considers the varying propagation delays between ONUs and OLT. The simulation based on MATLAB indicates that the improved algorithm has a better performance compared with some other algorithms.

  17. Defect enhanced diffusion process and hydrogen delayed fracture in high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.; Mu Zaiqin.

    1985-10-01

    A defect enhanced diffusion model for hydrogen delayed fracture in high strength steels is suggested. It is shown that the rate of crack growth is dependent on the square or higher power of the stress intensity factor which is consistent with recent experiments. (author)

  18. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  19. Is dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI useful for assessing proximal fragment vascularity in scaphoid fracture delayed and non-union?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Alex W.H.; Griffith, James F.; Li, Alvin [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Taljanovic, Mihra S. [The University of Arizona Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., P.O. Box 245067, Tucson, AZ (United States); Tse, W.L.; Ho, P.C. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-07-15

    To assess dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) as a measure of vascularity in scaphoid delayed-union or non-union. Thirty-five patients (34 male, one female; mean age, 27.4 {+-} 9.4 years; range, 16-51 years) with scaphoid delayed-union and non-union who underwent DCE MRI of the scaphoid between September 2002 and October 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Proximal fragment vascularity was classified as good, fair, or poor on unenhanced MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and DCE MRI. For DCE MRI, enhancement slope, E{sub slope} comparison of proximal and distal fragments was used to classify the proximal fragment as good, fair, or poor vascularity. Proximal fragment vascularity was similarly graded at surgery in all patients. Paired t test and McNemar test were used for data comparison. Kappa value was used to assess level of agreement between MRI findings and surgical findings. Twenty-five (71 %) of 35 patients had good vascularity, four (11 %) had fair vascularity, and six (17 %) had poor vascularity of the proximal scaphoid fragment at surgery. DCE MRI parameters had the highest correlation with surgical findings (kappa = 0.57). Proximal scaphoid fragments with surgical poor vascularity had a significantly lower E{sub max} and E{sub slope} than those with good vascularity (p = 0.0043 and 0.027). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and accuracy of DCE MRI in predicting impaired vascularity was 67, 86, 67, 86, and 80 %, respectively, which was better than that seen with unenhanced and post-contrast MRI. Flattened time intensity curves in both proximal and distal fragments were a feature of protracted non-union with a mean time interval of 101.6 {+-} 95.5 months between injury and MRI. DCE MRI has a higher diagnostic accuracy than either non-enhanced MRI or contrast enhanced MRI for assessing proximal fragment vascularity in scaphoid delayed-union and non-union. For proper interpretation of contrast-enhanced

  20. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Resonance-Enhanced CARS of Gaseous Iodine at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ping; Fan Rong-Wei; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying; Yao Yong

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is applied to investigate molecular dynamics in gaseous iodine. 40 fs laser pulses are applied to create and monitor the high vibrational states of iodine at room temperature (corresponding to a vapor pressure as low as about 35 Pa) by femtosecond time-resolved CARS. Depending on the time delay between the probe pulse and the pump/Stokes pulse pairs, the high vibrational states both on the electronically ground states and the excited states can be detected as oscillations in the CARS transient signal. It is proved that the femtosecond time-resolved CARS technique is a promising candidate for investigating the molecular dynamics of a low concentration system and can be applied to environmental and atmospheric monitoring measurements. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Resonance-enhanced laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for sensitive elemental analysis: Elucidation of enhancement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, S.L.; Cheung, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    When performing laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for elemental analysis, the analyte signal-to-noise ratio increased from four to over fifty if the plume was reheated by a dye laser pulse tuned to resonant absorption. Time-resolved studies showed that the enhancement was not due to resonance photoionization. Rather, efficient and controlled rekindling of a larger plume volume was the key mechanism. The signal-to-noise ratio further increased to over a hundred if the atmosphere was replaced by a low-pressure heavy inert gas. The ambient gas helped confine and thermally insulate the expanding vapor

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in the diagnostic evaluation of developmental delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, Krijn T.; Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.

    Aim: To assess the contribution of MRI and proton spectroscopy (1HMRS) in establishing an etiological diagnosis in children with developmental delay (DD) and to assess whether the chance of finding specific abnormalities correlates with the presence of neurological signs and/or abnormal head

  3. Performance investigation of stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time-delayed feedback and three types of asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Youguo

    2018-03-01

    The simultaneous influence of potential asymmetries and time-delayed feedback on stochastic resonance (SR) subject to both periodic force and additive Gaussian white noise is investigated by using two-state theory and small-delay approximation, where three types of asymmetries include well-depth, well-width, and both well-depth and well-width asymmetries, respectively. The asymmetric types and time-delayed feedback determine the behaviors of SR, especially output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) peaks, optimal additive noise intensity and feedback intensity. Moreover, the largest SNR in asymmetric SR is found to be relatively larger than symmetric one in some cases, whereas in other cases the symmetric SR is superior to asymmetric one, which is of dependence on time delay and feedback intensity. In addition, the SR with well-width asymmetry can suppress stronger noise than that with well-depth asymmetry under the action of same time delay, which is beneficial to weak signal detection.

  4. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  5. Delayed Occurrence of Diabetes Insipidus After Transsphenoidal Surgery with Radiologic Evaluation of the Pituitary Stalk on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Aida, Yasuhiro; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Kita, Daisuke; Tachibana, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a major complication of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). DI usually occurs within a couple of days after TSS. Delayed occurrence of postoperative DI is rarely observed and its developing mechanisms remain unknown. Six patients were identified as having postoperative delayed DI, which was defined as DI that first occurred 2 or more weeks after TSS. They consisted of 1 male and 5 females, and their mean age was 38.3 years (range, 10-76 years). Five patients were histologically diagnosed with Rathke cleft cyst (RCC), and one had RCC coexisting with prolactin-secreting adenoma. Sequential T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated for hyperintensity (HI) in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe, indicating the location of antidiuretic hormone. No patients had any DI before TSS. Delayed DI occurred 2 weeks to 3 months after TSS and persisted for 2 weeks to 5 months. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that the HI in the posterior lobe became faint but did not disappear after DI occurrence, and their intensities increased with recovery from DI. In contrast, the HI in the pituitary stalk was found faintly preoperatively and turned clear postoperatively and decreased with recovery from DI. The morphologic patterns were dependent on DI duration. In the delayed occurrence of DI, it was suggested that preoperative antidiuretic hormone transport was mildly congested yet not completely blocked when DI manifested postoperatively. Gradual spreading of inflammation to the infundibulum after RCC removal was considered as 1 possible mechanism of this delayed DI development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Security-enhanced chaos communication with time-delay signature suppression and phase encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chenpeng; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Yunxin; Wang, Chao; Li, Guilan; Lin, Shuqing; Qiu, Kun

    2016-08-15

    A security-enhanced chaos communication scheme with time delay signature (TDS) suppression and phase-encrypted feedback light is proposed, in virtue of dual-loop feedback with independent high-speed phase modulation. We numerically investigate the property of TDS suppression in the intensity and phase space and quantitatively discuss security of the proposed system by calculating the bit error rate of eavesdroppers who try to crack the system by directly filtering the detected signal or by using a similar semiconductor laser to synchronize the link signal and extract the data. The results show that TDS embedded in the chaotic carrier can be well suppressed by properly setting the modulation frequency, which can keep the time delay a secret from the eavesdropper. Moreover, because the feedback light is encrypted, without the accurate time delay and key, the eavesdropper cannot reconstruct the symmetric operation conditions and decode the correct data.

  7. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-12-01

    To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)(2-), i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (pfibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  9. Mid-Infrared Tunable Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Zogg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-infrared detectors that are sensitive only in a tunable narrow spectral band are presented. They are based on the Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detector (RCED principle and employing a thin active region using IV-VI narrow gap semiconductor layers. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by two mirrors. The active layer is grown onto one mirror, while the second mirror can be displaced. This changes the cavity length thus shifting the resonances where the detector is sensitive. Using electrostatically actuated MEMS micromirrors, a very compact tunable detector system has been fabricated. Mirror movements of more than 3 μm at 30V are obtained. With these mirrors, detectors with a wavelength tuning range of about 0.7 μm have been realized. Single detectors can be used in mid-infrared micro spectrometers, while a detector arrangement in an array makes it possible to realize Adaptive Focal Plane Arrays (AFPA.

  10. Experimental REMPI [Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization] studies of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. We shall give an overview together with examples of current studies of excited molecular states to illustrate the principles of and prospects for REMPI. 27 refs., 3 figs

  11. Correlative Study of Angiogenesis and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Gao, Z.Q.; Yan, X.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the correlation between contrast-enhancement patterns on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and angiogenesis by analyzing microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and P53 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: MRI was performed with a GE Signa 5T MR scanner using SE and FMPSPGR sequences in 30 patients (38 lesions) during the period October 1998 to March 2000. All had histopathologically proven HCC. MR images were reviewed/analyzed retrospectively. The 30 patients were between 35 and 65 years of age. SE T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI were acquired initially. The FMPSPGR sequence was acquired in the same position. The DCE-MRI was performed in the arterial, portal vein, and delay phase after a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The specimens were stained immunohistochemically for CD34, VEGF, and P53. MVD was highlighted by anti-CD34 antibody staining. The enhancement features of HCC lesions were studied correlatively with the tumor MVD, VEGF, and P53 expression at protein level. Results: In the arterial phase, the results showed that MVD of HCC in the high-enhancement group (229.76±80.96) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (173.09±61.38) and low-enhancement groups (153.00±108.58) (P <0.01, respectively). VEGF expression of HCC in the high-enhancement group (68.42%) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (36.36%) and low-enhancement groups (38.89%) (P <0.05, respectively). In the portal vein phase, MVD of HCC in the enhancement group (259.80±93.30) was higher than that in the non-enhancement group (178.64±92.65) (P <0.05). No significant correlation was found between VEGF expression and the enhancement feature in the portal vein phase. In the delay phase, MVD of HCC in the ring-enhancement group (269.06±57.89) was significantly higher than that in the non-ring-enhancement group (144.10±88.90) (P <0.01). There was a significant difference in VEGF

  12. Enhancement of cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reactions by a single exposure to UV-A or PUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, S.; Mobacken, H.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of irradiation with UV-A and PUVA (8-methoxy-psoralen and UV-A) on delayed hypersensitivity reactions to microbial antigens was studied in healthy human individuals. Skin reactions to Candida albicans antigen and PPD were enhanced by UV-A als well as by PUVA compared with nonirradiated tests. A statistically significant difference was reached with UV-A for both antigens. For PUVA, erythemogenic doses to Candida tests produced a significant increase of response. (orig.)

  13. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, A.; Tripathi, R.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the utility of perfusion MRI in cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional MRI, and to evaluate the relationships of perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic results in these tumours. Twenty-two patients with histopathologically proven cerebral gliomas and showing insignificant contrast enhancement on conventional MR were included in the present study. All patients underwent perfusion MRI and MR spectroscopy on a 1.5-T MR system. Significant differences of the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values and the choline : creatine ratios were noted between low-grade and anaplastic gliomas (P < 0.01). Good correlation was found between the rCBV values and the choline : creatine values (y = 0. 532x + 1.5643; r = 0.67). Perfusion MRI can be a useful tool in assessing the histopathological grade of non-contrast-enhancing cerebral gliomas. Along with MR spectroscopic imaging it can serve as an important technique for preoperative characterization of such gliomas, so that accurate targeting by stereotactic biopsies is possible. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. The significance of delayed contrast-enhanced CT in chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Hideharu; Ohya, Shigeru; Ueno, Junji; Watanabe, Saburo; Mikabe, Toshio

    1983-01-01

    We have previously, reported our delayed contrast-enhanced CT (DCECT) findings in traumatic subdural hygromas and chronic subdural hematomas. The purpose of this report is to clarify the relationship between the contrast media within subdural hematomas and the delayed enhancement. The clinical subjects were 35 cases of traumatic subdural hematomas. DCECT examinations were performed in all cases. The concentrations of the contrast media within the hematoma were measured during the operations. DCECT showed that the density of the hematomas increased 3 to 6 hours after the injection of the contrast media. The contrast media were detected within the hematomas a few hours after the injection. The contrast media were still present 24 hours after the injection, but disappeared in 48 hours. These findings suggest that contrast media go in and then come out of the subdural hematomas and that the main factor related to delayed enhancement is the concentration of the contrast media within the hematomas. DCECT examination may be most helpful in evaluating the dynamic changes in subdural collections. (author)

  15. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  16. Recent advances in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, J.F.M.; Goyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides a means of visualizing vascular structures noninvasively and is increasingly replacing conventional X-ray angiography in routine use. Contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), in which gadolinium contrast agents are used to shorten the T1 relaxation, offers increased resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with earlier flow-dependent [time-of-flight (TOF) or phase-contrast (PC)] techniques. Currently available contrast agents differ in their ability to lower T1 values, and hence the choice of contrast agent is an important consideration in the successful use of CE-MRA. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first of a new class of intravascular contrast agents. This agent is extensively (approximately 85%) and reversibly bound to human serum albumin and is retained within the vasculature thus allowing steady-state imaging to be perform-ed. An additional benefit is that gado0fosveset offers higher relaxivity compared with other contrast agents, thus giving a lower blood T1 values which also makes it ideal for first-pass imaging. Clinical trials have consistently shown that gadofosveset enhanced MRA is more sensitive, specific and accurate than time-of-flight MRA, gives fewer uninterpretable scans and affords greater diagnostic confidence. Intravascular contrast agents such as gadofosveset, therefore, offer the potential for improved vascular imaging. (orig.)

  17. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  18. Extracorporeal shockwave enhanced regeneration of fibrocartilage in a delayed tendon-bone insertion repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Suen, Pui Kit; Huang, Le; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Ng, Chun; Shi, San Qiang; Wong, Margaret Wan Nar; Qin, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Fibrous tissue is often formed in delayed healing of tendon bone insertion (TBI) instead of fibrocartilage. Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) provides mechanical cues and upregulates expression of fibrocartilage-related makers and cytokines. We hypothesized that ESW would accelerate fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. Partial patellectomy with shielding at the TBI interface was performed on 32 female New Zealand White Rabbits for establishing this delayed TBI healing model. The rabbits were separated into the control and ESW group for evaluations at postoperative week 8 and 12. Shielding was removed at week 4 and a single ESW treatment was applied at week 6. Fibrocartilage regeneration was evaluated histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. Vickers hardness of the TBI matrix was measured by micro-indentation. ESW group showed higher fibrocartilage area, thickness, and proteoglycan deposition than the control in week 8 and 12. ESW increased expression of SOX9 and collagen II significantly in week 8 and 12, respectively. ESW group showed a gradual transition of hardness from bone to fibrocartilage to tendon, and had a higher Vickers hardness than the control group at week 12. In conclusion, ESW enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Usefulness of percentage enhancement washout value calculated on unenhanced, contrast-enhanced, and delayed enhanced CT in adrenal masses: adenoma versus metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Kyung Myung; Lee, Sung Yong; Lee, Keun Ho

    2003-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of percentage enhancement washout value calculated on unenhanced, enhanced and delayed enhanced CT scans for the characterization of adrenal masses. Forty adrenal masses less than 5 cm in size were assessed using a protocol consisting of unenhanced CT, enhanced CT 60 seconds after intravenous administration of contrast material, and delayed enhanced CT at 10 minutes. The CT attenuation value of adrenal tumors was estimated on each scan, and percentage enhancement washout value was calculated as follows:[(attenuation value at enhanced CT-attenuation value at delayed CT)/ (attenuation value at enhanced CT-attenuation value at unenhanced CT)x100]. An adrenal mass was considered benign if its percentage enhancement washout value was at the threshold value, set to 60% and 50%, or higher. The accuracy of the procedure was determined by comparing its findings with the final clinical diagnosis. Twenty-nine massess were benign and 11 were malignant. The mean percentage enhancement washout value of the former was significantly higher than that of the latter (66.7% vs. 21.8%; p<0.01). All adenomas except one had a washout value of more than 50%. With a percentage washout threshold of 60%, 35 of 40 lesions were correctly characterized as benign or malignant [sensitivity 82.7% (24/29), specificity 100% (11/11), accuracy 87.5% (35/40)]; with a threshold of 50%, 39 of 40 lesions were correctly characterized [(sensitivity 96.5% (28/29), specificity 100% (11/11), accuracy 97.5% (39/40)]. Percentage enhancement washout values are useful for characterizing an adrenal mass as benign or malignant. For characterization, a threshold value of 50% was more accurate than one of 60%

  20. Time delay for resonant vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the time delay associated with vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collision is presented. It consists of a direct study of the time dependence of the process for three model systems. An electron wave packet, that is narrow in time, is sent on the target and the amplitudes in the different inelastic channels are studied as functions of time. The time delay is found to correspond to very different time effects: broadenings, shifts in time of the wave packet, but also complex distortions that cannot be represented by a time delay. The direct analysis of the scattered wave also provides new insights into the vibrational excitation process. It should be a useful tool to analyze complex collision processes

  1. Delayed contrast-enhanced computed tomography in patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, Tadao; Naya, Masanao; Obara, Masahiko [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Kudo, Kohsuke [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Sapporo (Japan); Ohira, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Ayako; Tsujino, Ichizo [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, First Department of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Tsutsui, Hiroyuki [Kyushu University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of delayed contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DE-CT) for cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) in patients with or without implantable devices, including a quantitative comparison with late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR). Twenty-four patients (mean age, 64 ± 9 years; 17 women) with known or suspected CS underwent retrospective electrocardiogram-gated DE-CT at 80 kV with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction. Fourteen patients without implantable devices also underwent LGE-CMR, while ten with pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators did not. The presence of hyperenhanced myocardium was assessed visually and quantitatively using a 5-standard deviation threshold above the mean of remote myocardium. Inter-observer agreement for visual detection of hyperenhanced segments on DE-CT was excellent in patients with implantable devices and in those without (κ = 0.91 and κ = 0.94, respectively). Comparisons of the percent area of hyperenhanced myocardium between DE-CT and LGE-CMR on both per-patient and per-segment analyses showed good correlations (r = 0.96 and r = 0.83, respectively; p < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of DE-CT for the diagnosis of CS were 94% and 33%. The extent of hyperenhanced lesion with DE-CT showed good agreement with LGE-CMR results. DE-CT showed high sensitivity for detecting CS and may be useful particularly in patients with contraindications to CMR. (orig.)

  2. Enhancing endogenous stem cells in the newbornvia delayed umbilical cord clamping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher Lawton; Sandra Acosta; Nate Watson; Chiara Gonzales-Portillo; hTeo Diamandis; Naoki Tajiri; Yuji Kaneko; Paul R. Sanberg; Cesar V. Borlongan

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no consensus among clinicians and scientists over the appropriate or optimal timing for umbilical cord clamping. However, many clinical studies have suggested that delayed cord clamping is associated with various neonatal beneifts including increased blood volume, reduced need for blood transfusion, increased cerebral oxygenation in pre-term infants, and decreased frequency of iron deifciency anemia in term infants. Human umbilical cord blood con-tains signiifcant amounts of stem and progenitor cells and is currently used in the treatment of several life-threatening diseases. We propose that delayed cord clamping be encouraged as it en-hances blood lfow from the placenta to the neonate, which is accompanied by an increase supply of valuable stem and progenitor cells, as well as may improve blood oxygenation and increase blood volume, altogether reducing the infant’s susceptibility to both neonatal and age-related diseases.

  3. Extinction ratio enhancement of SOA-based delayed-interference signal converter using detuned filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Kumar, S.; Yan, L.-S.; Willner, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally >3 dB extinction ratio improvement at the output of SOA-based delayed-interference signal converter (DISC) using optical off-centered filtering. Through careful modeling of the carrier and the phase dynamics, we explain in detail the origin of sub-pulses in the wavelength converted output, with an emphasis on the time-resolved frequency chirping of the output signal. Through our simulations we conclude that the sub-pulses and the main-pulses are oppositely chirped, which is also verified experimentally by analyzing the output with a chirp form analyzer. We propose and demonstrate an optical off-center filtering technique which effectively suppresses these sub-pulses. The effects of filter detuning and phase bias adjustment in the delayed-interferometer are experimentally characterized and optimized, leading to a >3 dB extinction ratio enhancement of the output signal.

  4. Enhancing endogenous stem cells in the newborn via delayed umbilical cord clamping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lawton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no consensus among clinicians and scientists over the appropriate or optimal timing for umbilical cord clamping. However, many clinical studies have suggested that delayed cord clamping is associated with various neonatal benefits including increased blood volume, reduced need for blood transfusion, increased cerebral oxygenation in pre-term infants, and decreased frequency of iron deficiency anemia in term infants. Human umbilical cord blood contains significant amounts of stem and progenitor cells and is currently used in the treatment of several life-threatening diseases. We propose that delayed cord clamping be encouraged as it enhances blood flow from the placenta to the neonate, which is accompanied by an increase supply of valuable stem and progenitor cells, as well as may improve blood oxygenation and increase blood volume, altogether reducing the infant′s susceptibility to both neonatal and age-related diseases.

  5. Delayed-enhancement MRI of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment of the intramural distribution and comparison with clinical symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, and cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kumita, Shinichiro; Takayama, Morimasa; Kitamura, Mitsunobu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is reported to show patchy midwall myocardial hyper enhancement on delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). The intramural distribution of myocardial hyper enhancement and its correlation with clinical symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, and cardiac function have not been described for symptomatic apical HCM. Purpose: To evaluate the features and significance of myocardial hyper enhancement on DE-MRI in symptomatic apical HCM. Material and Methods: Thirteen patients with symptomatic apical HCM and their 65 apical segments were investigated. Myocardial hyper enhancement and regional and global functional parameters were determined with MRI. We investigated the intramural distribution and frequencies of this myocardial hyper enhancement and compared them with the patients' clinical symptoms, the presence of ventricular arrhythmias, and cine MRI. Results: Eight (61.5%) patients with symptomatic apical HCM displayed apical myocardial hyper enhancement, and 22 (33.8%) of the 65 apical segments examined showed myocardial hyper enhancement. Of the myocardial hyper enhancement observed, 81.8% showed a subendocardial pattern.The Hyperenhanced apical myocardium had a lower percentage of systolic myocardial thickening, and was associated with serious symptoms (e.g. syncope) and ventricular arrhythmias. Conclusion: Patients with symptomatic apical HCM showed myocardial hyper enhancement involving the subendocardial layer, which might be related to regional systolic dysfunction, serious clinical symptoms, and ventricular arrhythmias

  6. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  7. Development of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.D.; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Bajaj, P.N.; Sinha, A.K.; Bhatt, S.; Gupta, M.D.P.

    2009-05-01

    Radiation and Photochemistry Division has developed a Molecular Beam-Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization-Time-of-Flight spectrometer, a highly sensitive and selective analytical detection system, for investigation of photodissociation dynamics of isolated molecules. In this system, the molecular beam is intersected in the extraction region of a Wiley-McLaren type Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer by the photolysis laser beam, propagating perpendicular to both the molecular beams and the Time-of-Flight tube. The probe (ionization) laser beam counter propagating to the photolysis beam, ionizes the stable products and the radicals produced on photodissociation. The important features of the system, namely, the resolution and the detection limit, have been determined from the studies of aniline molecular beam, generated by seeding 1% aniline in helium. For the present configuration, using one metre long flight tube, the resolution has been found to be about 400, and detection limit is better than 106 species per cm 3 . The integrity of the set-up is obtained from the photodissociation dynamics studies of bromoform. (author)

  8. Stochastic Resonance algorithms to enhance damage detection in bearing faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castiglione Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic Resonance is a phenomenon, studied and mainly exploited in telecommunication, which permits the amplification and detection of weak signals by the assistance of noise. The first papers on this technique are dated early 80 s and were developed to explain the periodically recurrent ice ages. Other applications mainly concern neuroscience, biology, medicine and obviously signal analysis and processing. Recently, some researchers have applied the technique for detecting faults in mechanical systems and bearings. In this paper, we try to better understand the conditions of applicability and which is the best algorithm to be adopted for these purposes. In fact, to get the methodology profitable and efficient to enhance the signal spikes due to fault in rings and balls/rollers of bearings, some parameters have to be properly selected. This is a problem since in system identification this procedure should be as blind as possible. Two algorithms are analysed: the first exploits classical SR with three parameters mutually dependent, while the other uses Woods-Saxon potential, with three parameters yet but holding a different meaning. The comparison of the performances of the two algorithms and the optimal choice of their parameters are the scopes of this paper. Algorithms are tested on simulated and experimental data showing an evident capacity of increasing the signal to noise ratio.

  9. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  10. Dynamic and delayed contrast enhancement in upper abdominal MRI studies: Comparison of gadoxetic acid and gadobutrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Sokolska 581, CZ-500 05 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zizka@fnhk.cz; Klzo, Ludovit [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Sokolska 581, CZ-500 05 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ferda, Jiri [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Alej Svobody 80, CZ-306 40 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mrklovsky, Milan [Department of Radiology and Imaging Centre Pardubice, Regional Hospital, Kyjevska 44, CZ-530 01 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Bukac, Josef [Department of Biophysics, Medical Faculty, Charles University, Simkova 870, CZ-500 38 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Objective: To prospectively compare contrast properties of extracelullar (gadobutrol) and hepatospecific (gadoxetic acid) contrast agents in upper abdominal MRI studies. Materials and methods: Standardized (0.1 ml/kg) dose of gadobutrol (56 subjects) and gadoxetic acid (51 subjects) was administered intravenously by MRI-compatible injector at 2 ml/s, followed by 20 ml saline flush. MR signal intensity changes (SIC) between precontrast scans and arterial phase, portal venous phase, equilibrium, and delayed scans at 10 and 20 min were measured in abdominal aorta, portal vein, common bile duct, liver, and spleen. Mean SIC values for gadobutrol and gadoxetic acid were compared by a two-sample t-test with p-value <0.05 considered significant. Results: In abdominal aorta, the mean SIC in the arterial phase did not significantly differ between gadobutrol (330%) and gadoxetic acid (295%). In portal vein, the mean SIC in the portal venous phase significantly differed between gadobutrol (267%) and gadoxetic acid (176%). Liver parenchyma enhancement was significantly higher for gadobutrol than for gadoxetic acid in both arterial phase (28 versus 13%) and portal venous phase (81 versus 46%). On the contrary, gadobutrol reached significantly lower mean SIC in the liver on delayed scans at 10 min (47 versus 59%) and 20 min (40 versus 67%), as well as in common bile duct at 10 min (54 versus 133%) and 20 min (57 versus 457%), respectively. In the spleen, mean SIC for gadobutrol was significantly higher at all phases. Conclusion: Gadobutrol showed superior enhancement of upper abdominal structures in the dynamic phases whereas gadoxetic acid showed better enhancement of the hepatobiliary structures on delayed scans.

  11. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  12. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  13. Experience with contrast-enhanced CT in delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Otsuka, Toshibumi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1984-02-01

    During the four-and-a-half-year period from April, 1976, to September, 1980, out of 257 patients with severe head injuries graded 8 or less by the Glasgow Coma Scale in the Department of Neurosurgery and Critical Care Medicine of the Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan, 33 cases showed the development of delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma (DTICH) upon the serial computerized tomography (CT). Contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 20 cases of the 33 patients demonstrating DTICH. Among these, 8 cases (40%) indicated the development of DTICH in the lesions of cerebral contusion (a salt-and-pepper appearance in the initial plain CT) which showed a remarkable enhancement, sustaining the extravasation of the contrast medium into the contused brain tissue. The authors discuss the pathogenesis of DTICH and suggest that vasoparalysis in the cerebral contusion might be a factor in the development of DTICH in patients with servere head injuries.

  14. Experience with contrast-enhanced CT in delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1984-01-01

    During the four-and-a-half-year period from April, 1976, to September, 1980, out of 257 patients with severe head injuries graded 8 or less by the Glasgow Coma Scale in the Department of Neurosurgery and Critical Care Medicine of the Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan, 33 cases showed the development of delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma (DTICH) upon the serial computerized tomography (CT). Contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 20 cases of the 33 patients demonstrating DTICH. Among these, 8 cases (40%) indicated the development of DTICH in the lesions of cerebral contusion (a salt-and-pepper appearance in the initial plain CT) which showed a remarkable enhancement, sustaining the extravasation of the contrast medium into the contused brain tissue. The authors discuss the pathogenesis of DTICH and suggest that vasoparalysis in the cerebral contusion might be a factor in the development of DTICH in patients with servere head injuries. (author)

  15. Gas detection by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nooke, Alida

    2012-11-01

    This thesis investigated gas sensing by means of surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry. Surface plasmons were excited in a 40 - 50 nm gold layer by a He-Ne-laser using the Kretschmann configuration, which was arranged on a self-made copper measuring cell. A fixed angle of incidence and the ellipsometric parameter {Delta} as the measured value were used to monitor changes in the gas phase. Different types of gases were investigated: flammable (hydrocarbons and hydrogen), oxidising (oxygen and ozone), toxic (carbon monoxide) and inert (helium and nitrogen). The gas types can be distinguished by their refractive indices, whereas the sensor responds instantly relative to the reference gas with an increase or a decrease in {Delta}. Diluting the analyte gas with a reference gas (nitrogen or air) allowed the detection limits to be determined, these lay in the low % range. The sensor stability was also enhanced as well as the sensitivity by modifying the gold layers with a 3-10 nm additional layer. These additional layers consisted of the inorganic materials TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2} and Fe: SnO{sub 2} which were deposited by different coating processes. Surface investigations were made of every utilised layer: scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope measurements for surface topology and spectroscopic ellipsometry mapping to determine the optical constants and the layer thicknesses. All applied materials protected the gold layer from contaminations and thus prolonged the life span of the sensor. Furthermore, the detection limits were reduced significantly, to the low ppm range. The material Fe: SnO{sub 2} demonstrates a special behaviour in reaction with the toxic gas carbon monoxide: Due to the iron doping, the response to carbon monoxide is extraordinary and concentrations below 1 ppm were detected. In order to approach a future application in industry, the sensor system was adapted to a stainless steel tube. With this measuring

  16. Ultraviolet enhanced reactivation of a human virus: effect of delayed infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockstahler, L.E.; Lytle, C.D.; Stafford, J.E.; Haynes, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    The ability of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus to form plaques was examined in monolayers of CV-1 monkey kidney cells preexposed to UV radiation at different intervals before virus assay. From analysis of UV reactivation (Weigle reactivation) curves it was found that as the interval between cell UV irradiation (0-20 J/m 2 ) and initiation of the virus assay was increased over a period of five days, (1) the capacity of the cells to support unirradiated virus plaque formation, which was decreased immediately following UV exposure of the monolayers, increased and returned to approximately normal levels within five days, and (2) at five days an exponential increase was observed in the relative plaque formation of irradiated virus as a function of UV dose to the monolayers. For high UV fluence (20 J/m 2 ) to the cells, the relative plaque formation by the UV-irradiated virus at five days was about 10-fold higher than that obtained from assay on unirradiated cells. This enhancement in plaque formation is interpreted as a delayed expression of Weigle reactivation. The amount of enhancement resulting from this delayed reactivation was several fold greater than that produced by the Weigle reactivation which occurred when irradiated herpes virus was assayed immediately following cell irradiation

  17. Resonant-cantilever bio/chemical sensors with an integrated heater for both resonance exciting optimization and sensing repeatability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haitao; Li Xinxin; Gan Xiaohua; Liu Yongjing; Liu Xiang; Xu Pengcheng; Li Jungang; Liu Min

    2009-01-01

    With an integrated resonance exciting heater and a self-sensing piezoresistor, resonant micro-cantilever bio/chemical sensors are optimally designed and fabricated by micromachining techniques. This study is emphasized on the optimization of the integrated heating resistor. Previous research has put the heater at either the cantilever clamp end, the midpoint or the free end. Aiming at sufficiently high and stable resonant amplitude, our research indicates that the optimized location of the thermal-electric exciting resistor is the clamp end instead of other positions. By both theoretical analysis and resonance experiments where three heating resistors are placed at the three locations of the fabricated cantilever, it is clarified that the clamp end heating provides the most efficient resonance excitation in terms of resonant amplitude, Q-factor and resonance stability. Besides, the optimized combination of dc bias and ac voltage is determined by both analysis and experimental verification. With the optimized heating excitation, the resonant cantilever is used for biotin–avidin-specific detection, resulting in a ±0.1 Hz ultra-low noise floor of the frequency signal and a 130 fg mass resolution. In addition to resonance excitation, the heater is used to heat up the cantilever for speed-up desorption after detection that helps rapid and repeated sensing to chemical vapor. The clamp end is determined (by simulation) as the optimal heating location for uniform temperature distribution on the cantilever. Using the resonant cantilever, a rapid and repeated sensing experiment on dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor shows that a short-period heating at the detection interval significantly quickens the signal recovery and enhances the sensing repeatability

  18. Emergence of resonant mode-locking via delayed feedback in quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykalewicz, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Erneux, T; Kelleher, B; Viktorov, E A

    2016-02-22

    With conventional semiconductor lasers undergoing external optical feedback, a chaotic output is typically observed even for moderate levels of the feedback strength. In this paper we examine single mode quantum dot lasers under strong optical feedback conditions and show that an entirely new dynamical regime is found consisting of spontaneous mode-locking via a resonance between the relaxation oscillation frequency and the external cavity repetition rate. Experimental observations are supported by detailed numerical simulations of rate equations appropriate for this laser type. The phenomenon constitutes an entirely new mode-locking mechanism in semiconductor lasers.

  19. Enhanced photoluminescence from ring resonators in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan J; Wood, Michael G; Reano, Ronald M

    2017-11-01

    We report enhanced photoluminescence in the telecommunications wavelength range in ring resonators patterned in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films deposited via low-temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The thin films exhibit broadband photoluminescence that is enhanced by up to 5 dB by the resonant modes of the ring resonators due to the Purcell effect. Ellipsometry measurements of the thin films show a refractive index comparable to crystalline silicon and an extinction coefficient on the order of 0.001 from 1300 nm to 1600 nm wavelengths. The results are promising for chip-scale integrated optical light sources.

  20. Enhanced Faraday rotation in one dimensional magneto-plasmonic structure due to Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, S.; Hamidi, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    Enhanced Faraday rotation in a new type of magneto-plasmonic structure with the capability of Fano resonance, has been reported theoretically. A magneto-plasmonic structure composed of a gold corrugated layer deposited on a magneto-optically active layer was studied by means of Lumerical software based on finite-difference time-domain. In our proposed structure, plasmonic Fano resonance and localized surface plasmon have induced enhancement in magneto-optical Faraday rotation. It is shown that the influence of geometrical parameters in gold layer offers a desirable platform for engineering spectral position of Fano resonance and enhancement of Faraday rotation.

  1. Ring resonator systems to perform optical communication enhancement using soliton

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Iraj Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The title explain new technique of secured and high capacity optical communication signals generation by using the micro and nano ring resonators. The pulses are known as soliton pulses which are more secured due to having the properties of chaotic and dark soliton signals with ultra short bandwidth. They have high capacity due to the fact that ring resonators are able to generate pulses in the form of solitons in multiples and train form. These pulses generated by ring resonators are suitable in optical communication due to use the compact and integrated rings system, easy to control, flexibi

  2. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  3. Blunt splenic trauma: Can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre, E-mail: Pierre-Alexandre.Poletti@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D.; Arditi, Daniel; Terraz, Sylvain [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Buchs, Nicolas [Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, 22 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Platon, Alexandra [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Methods: Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48–72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6 h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. Results: CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT.

  4. Blunt splenic trauma: Can contrast enhanced sonography be used for the screening of delayed pseudoaneurysms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Christoph D.; Arditi, Daniel; Terraz, Sylvain; Buchs, Nicolas; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Platon, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced sonography (CES) for the detection of delayed post-traumatic splenic pseudo-aneurysms, usually considered an indication for angiographic embolization. Methods: Sixty-three consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients in whom admission CT displayed a splenic injury of grade II or higher (AAST classification), without evidence of vascular involvement, were included in the study. CES of the spleen using a second generation contrast agent was systematically performed within 48–72 h after admission, for the detection of a pooling of contrast media suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Within 6 h after contrast-enhanced sonography, all patients underwent an abdominal CT for control purposes. CES results were compared to CT findings, which were considered the reference standard. This study received approval from the institutional ethical board. Results: CES showed a blush of contrast consistent with a pseudoaneurysm in 6 of the 63 patients. All were confirmed at subsequent control CT. Pooling of contrast was found at CT in 2 patients in whom contrast-enhanced sonography was negative. There was no false positive CES examination for the suspicion of pseudoaneurysms. When compared to CT, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CES to suggest a pseudoaneurysms, were 75% (6/8), 100% (55/55), 100% (6/6), and 96% (55/57), respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that CES may be useful for the screening of delayed traumatic splenic pseudoaneurysms: if a negative CES does not absolutely rule out a pseudoaneurysm, a positive CES warrants an angiography, without need of control CT

  5. Enhancement of four-wave mixing induced by interacting dark resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Weifeng; Gong Shangqing; Niu Yueping; Jin Shiqi; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    We analyse a four-wave mixing (FWM) scheme in a five-level atomic system in which double-dark resonances are present. It is found that the enhancement of FWM in both electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) windows can be obtained even without the condition of multiphoton resonance. Moreover, the conversion efficiency of FWM in one EIT window can be much larger than that in the other due to the presence of interacting dark resonances

  6. Stochastic resonance and noise delayed extinction in a model of two competing species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study the role of the noise in the dynamics of two competing species. We consider generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of a multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. The interaction parameter between the species is a random process which obeys a stochastic differential equation with a generalized bistable potential in the presence of a periodic driving term, which accounts for the environment temperature variation. We find noise-induced periodic oscillations of the species concentrations and stochastic resonance phenomenon. We find also a nonmonotonic behavior of the mean extinction time of one of the two competing species as a function of the additive noise intensity.

  7. A Resonant Scanning Dipole-Antenna Probe for Enhanced Nanoscale Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, L.; van 't Oever, Jan Joannes Frederik; van Hulst, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization

  8. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for bile duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Shi-Hong; Teng, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Qi-Dong; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Chen, Feng; Xiao, Wen-Bo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct (IPMN-B).

  9. Adaptive Transmitter Optimization in Multiuser Multiantenna Systems: Theoretical Limits, Effect of Delays, and Performance Enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardzija Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in programmable and reconfigurable radios have rendered feasible transmitter optimization schemes that can greatly improve the performance of multiple-antenna multiuser systems. Reconfigurable radio platforms are particularly suitable for implementation of transmitter optimization at the base station. We consider the downlink of a wireless system with multiple transmit antennas at the base station and a number of mobile terminals (i.e., users each with a single receive antenna. Under an average transmit power constraint, we consider the maximum achievable sum data rates in the case of (1 zero-forcing (ZF spatial prefilter, (2 modified zero-forcing (MZF spatial prefilter, and (3 triangularization spatial prefilter coupled with dirty-paper coding (DPC transmission scheme. We show that the triangularization with DPC approaches the closed-loop MIMO rates (upper bound for higher SNRs. Further, the MZF solution performs very well for lower SNRs, while for higher SNRs, the rates for the ZF solution converge to the MZF rates. An important impediment that degrades the performance of such transmitter optimization schemes is the delay in channel state information (CSI. We characterize the fundamental limits of performance in the presence of delayed CSI and then propose performance enhancements using a linear MMSE predictor of the CSI that can be used in conjunction with transmitter optimization in multiple-antenna multiuser systems.

  10. Noise-enhanced Parametric Resonance in Perturbed Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Ioannis V.; Kandrup, Henry E.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes how parametric resonances associated with a galactic potential subjected to relatively low-amplitude, strictly periodic time-dependent perturbations can be impacted by pseudo-random variations in the pulsation frequency, modeled as colored noise. One aim thereby is to allow for the effects of a changing oscillation frequency as the density distribution associated with a galaxy evolves during violent relaxation. Another is to mimic the possible effects of internal substructures, satellite galaxies, and/or a high-density environment. The principal conclusions are that allowing for a variable frequency does not vitiate the effects of parametric resonance, and that, in at least some cases, such variations can increase the overall importance of parametric resonance associated with systematic pulsations. In memory of Professor H. E. Kandrup, a brilliant scientist, excellent teacher, and good friend. His genius and sense of humor will be greatly missed.

  11. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Kjel [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: kjel_andersen@web.de; Hennersdorf, Marcus [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: hennersdorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, Mathias [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, Dirk [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, Ulrich [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@uni-duesseldorf.de; Poll, Ludger W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: poll@gmx.de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  12. Delayed enhancement of multitasking performance: Effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation on the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Yu; Zanto, Theodore P; Anguera, Joaquin A; Lin, Yung-Yang; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-08-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been proposed to play an important role in neural processes that underlie multitasking performance. However, this claim is underexplored in terms of direct causal evidence. The current study aimed to delineate the causal involvement of the DLPFC during multitasking by modulating neural activity with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) prior to engagement in a demanding multitasking paradigm. The study is a single-blind, crossover, sham-controlled experiment. Anodal tDCS or sham tDCS was applied over left DLPFC in forty-one healthy young adults (aged 18-35 years) immediately before they engaged in a 3-D video game designed to assess multitasking performance. Participants were separated into three subgroups: real-sham (i.e., real tDCS in the first session, followed by sham tDCS in the second session 1 h later), sham-real (sham tDCS first session, real tDCS second session), and sham-sham (sham tDCS in both sessions). The real-sham group showed enhanced multitasking performance and decreased multitasking cost during the second session, compared to first session, suggesting delayed cognitive benefits of tDCS. Interestingly, performance benefits were observed only for multitasking and not on a single-task version of the game. No significant changes were found between the first and second sessions for either the sham-real or the sham-sham groups. These results suggest a causal role of left prefrontal cortex in facilitating the simultaneous performance of more than one task, or multitasking. Moreover, these findings reveal that anodal tDCS may have delayed benefits that reflect an enhanced rate of learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Kjel; Hennersdorf, Marcus; Cohnen, Mathias; Blondin, Dirk; Moedder, Ulrich; Poll, Ludger W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  14. Transition of EMRIs through resonance: higher order corrections in resonant flux enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Deyan; Gair, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) are candidate events for gravitational wave detection in the millihertz range (by detectors like LISA and eLISA). These events involve a stellar-mass black hole, or a similar compact object, descending into the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole, eventually merging with it. Properties of the inspiraling trajectory away from resonance are well known and have been studied extensively, however little is known about the behaviour of these binary systems at resonance, when the radial and lateral frequencies of the orbit become commensurate. There are two resonance models in the literature, the instantaneous frequency function by Gair, Bender, and Yunes, and the standard two timescales approach devised by Flanagan and Hinderer. We argue that the Gair, Bender and Yunes model provides a valid treatment of the resonance problem and extend this solution to higher order in the size of the on-resonance perturbation. The non-linear differential equations which arise in treating resonances are interesting from a mathematical view point. We present our algorithm for perturbative solutions and the results to third order in the infinitesimal parameter, and discuss the scope of this approach. Deyan Mihaylov is funded by the STFC.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance optical cavity enhanced refractive index sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Gagliardi, G.; Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; Iodice, M.; Adam, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 11 (2013), s. 1951-1953 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Resonators * Surface plasmons * Optical sensing and sensors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  16. Enhancing a slow and weak optomechanical nonlinearity with delayed quantum feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyou; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2017-07-01

    A central goal of quantum optics is to generate large interactions between single photons so that one photon can strongly modify the state of another one. In cavity optomechanics, photons interact with the motional degrees of freedom of an optical resonator, for example, by imparting radiation pressure forces on a movable mirror or sensing minute fluctuations in the position of the mirror. Here, we show that the optical nonlinearity arising from these effects, typically too small to operate on single photons, can be sufficiently enhanced with feedback to generate large interactions between single photons. We propose a protocol that allows photons propagating in a waveguide to interact with each other through multiple bounces off an optomechanical system. The protocol is analysed by evolving the full many-body quantum state of the waveguide-coupled system, illustrating that large photon-photon interactions mediated by mechanical motion may be within experimental reach.

  17. Enhanced insulin sensitivity in prepubertal children with constitutional delay of growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dyanne A; Hofman, Paul L; Miles, Harriet L; Sato, Tim A; Billett, Nathalie E; Robinson, Elizabeth M; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that prepubertal children with presumed constitutional delay of growth and development (CDGD) have enhanced insulin sensitivity and, therefore, insulin sensitivity is associated with later onset of puberty. Twenty-one prepubertal children with presumed CDGD and 23 prepubertal control children, underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test to evaluate insulin sensitivity and other markers of insulin, glucose, and growth regulation. Children in the CDGD group were shorter and leaner than control subjects. Children with presumed CDGD were 40% more insulin sensitive (17.0 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L] versus 12.1 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L]; P = .0006) and had reduced acute insulin response, thus maintaining euglycemia (216 mU/L versus 330 mU/L; P = .02) compared with control subjects. In addition, the CDGD group had lower serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels (3333 ng/mL versus 3775 ng/mL; P = .0004) and a trend toward lower serum insulin-like growth factor-II levels (794 ng/mL versus 911 ng/mL; P = .06). Prepubertal children with presumed CDGD have enhanced insulin sensitivity, supporting the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity is associated with timing of puberty. It may signify long-term biological advantages with lower risk of metabolic syndrome and malignancy. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical value of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for differentiating recurrent or residual brain tumor from delayed cerebral necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, June S.; Langston, James W.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Kingsley, Peter B.; Ogg, Robert J.; Pui, Margaret H.; Kun, Larry E.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Gang, Chen; Ochs, Judith J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Heideman, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed cerebral necrosis (DN) is a significant risk for brain tumor patients treated with high-dose irradiation. Although differentiating DN from tumor progression is an important clinical question, the distinction cannot be made reliably by conventional imaging techniques. We undertook a pilot study to assess the ability of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) to differentiate prospectively between DN or recurrent/residual tumor in a series of children treated for primary brain tumors with high-dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twelve children (ages 3-16 years), who had clinical and MR imaging (MRI) changes that suggested a diagnosis of either DN or progressive/recurrent brain tumor, underwent localized 1 H MRS prior to planned biopsy, resection, or other confirmatory histological procedure. Prospective 1 H MRS interpretations were based on comparison of spectral peak patterns and quantitative peak area values from normalized spectra: a marked depression of the intracellular metabolite peaks from choline, creatine, and N-acetyl compounds was hypothesized to indicate DN, and median-to-high choline with easily visible creatine metabolite peaks was labeled progressive/recurrent tumor. Subsequent histological studies identified the brain lesion as DN or recurrent/residual tumor. Results: The patient series included five cases of DN and seven recurrent/residual tumor cases, based on histology. The MRS criteria prospectively identified five out of seven patients with active tumor, and four out of five patients with histologically proven DN correctly. Discriminant analysis suggested that the primary diagnostic information for differentiating DN from tumor lay in the normalized MRS peak areas for choline and creatine compounds. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows promising sensitivity and selectivity for differentiating DN from recurrent/progressive brain tumor. A novel diagnostic index based on peak areas for choline and

  19. Outer hair cell piezoelectricity: frequency response enhancement and resonance behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Erik K; Tasker, Ron; Brownell, William E

    2003-09-01

    Stretching or compressing an outer hair cell alters its membrane potential and, conversely, changing the electrical potential alters its length. This bi-directional energy conversion takes place in the cell's lateral wall and resembles the direct and converse piezoelectric effects both qualitatively and quantitatively. A piezoelectric model of the lateral wall has been developed that is based on the electrical and material parameters of the lateral wall. An equivalent circuit for the outer hair cell that includes piezoelectricity shows a greater admittance at high frequencies than one containing only membrane resistance and capacitance. The model also predicts resonance at ultrasonic frequencies that is inversely proportional to cell length. These features suggest all mammals use outer hair cell piezoelectricity to support the high-frequency receptor potentials that drive electromotility. It is also possible that members of some mammalian orders use outer hair cell piezoelectric resonance in detecting species-specific vocalizations.

  20. Resonance-induced sensitivity enhancement method for conductivity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Shih, Chi-yuan (Inventor); Li, Wei (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for improving the sensitivity of a variety of conductivity sensing devices, in particular capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detectors. A parallel inductor is added to the conductivity sensor. The sensor with the parallel inductor is operated at a resonant frequency of the equivalent circuit model. At the resonant frequency, parasitic capacitances that are either in series or in parallel with the conductance (and possibly a series resistance) is substantially removed from the equivalent circuit, leaving a purely resistive impedance. An appreciably higher sensor sensitivity results. Experimental verification shows that sensitivity improvements of the order of 10,000-fold are possible. Examples of detecting particulates with high precision by application of the apparatus and methods of operation are described.

  1. Stochastic Resonance algorithms to enhance damage detection in bearing faults

    OpenAIRE

    Castiglione Roberto; Garibaldi Luigi; Marchesiello Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic Resonance is a phenomenon, studied and mainly exploited in telecommunication, which permits the amplification and detection of weak signals by the assistance of noise. The first papers on this technique are dated early 80 s and were developed to explain the periodically recurrent ice ages. Other applications mainly concern neuroscience, biology, medicine and obviously signal analysis and processing. Recently, some researchers have applied the technique for detecting faults in mecha...

  2. Delay and Standard Deviation Beamforming to Enhance Specular Reflections in Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaru, Raja Sekhar; Sornes, Anders Rasmus; Hermans, Jeroen; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Although interventional devices, such as needles, guide wires, and catheters, are best visualized by X-ray, real-time volumetric echography could offer an attractive alternative as it avoids ionizing radiation; it provides good soft tissue contrast, and it is mobile and relatively cheap. Unfortunately, as echography is traditionally used to image soft tissue and blood flow, the appearance of interventional devices in conventional ultrasound images remains relatively poor, which is a major obstacle toward ultrasound-guided interventions. The objective of this paper was therefore to enhance the appearance of interventional devices in ultrasound images. Thereto, a modified ultrasound beamforming process using conventional-focused transmit beams is proposed that exploits the properties of received signals containing specular reflections (as arising from these devices). This new beamforming approach referred to as delay and standard deviation beamforming (DASD) was quantitatively tested using simulated as well as experimental data using a linear array transducer. Furthermore, the influence of different imaging settings (i.e., transmit focus, imaging depth, and scan angle) on the obtained image contrast was evaluated. The study showed that the image contrast of specular regions improved by 5-30 dB using DASD beamforming compared with traditional delay and sum (DAS) beamforming. The highest gain in contrast was observed when the interventional device was tilted away from being orthogonal to the transmit beam, which is a major limitation in standard DAS imaging. As such, the proposed beamforming methodology can offer an improved visualization of interventional devices in the ultrasound image with potential implications for ultrasound-guided interventions.

  3. Array-Enhanced Coherence Resonance: Nontrivial Effects of Heterogeneity and Spatial Independence of Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Juergen; Hu, Bambi

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the effect of coherence resonance in a heterogeneous array of coupled Fitz Hugh--Nagumo neurons. It is shown that coupling of such elements leads to a significantly stronger coherence compared to that of a single element. We report nontrivial effects of parameter heterogeneity and spatial independence of noise on array-enhanced coherence resonance; especially, we find that (i) the coherence increases as spatial correlation of the noise decreases, and (ii) inhomogeneity in the parameters of the array enhances the coherence. Our results have the implication that generic heterogeneity and background noise can play a constructive role to enhance the time precision of firing in neural systems

  4. Wavelength modulated surface enhanced (resonance) Raman scattering for background-free detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Bavishna B; Steuwe, Christian; Mazilu, Michael; Dholakia, Kishan; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2013-05-21

    Spectra in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are always accompanied by a continuum emission called the 'background' which complicates analysis and is especially problematic for quantification and automation. Here, we implement a wavelength modulation technique to eliminate the background in SERS and its resonant version, surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS). This is demonstrated on various nanostructured substrates used for SER(R)S. An enhancement in the signal to noise ratio for the Raman bands of the probe molecules is also observed. This technique helps to improve the analytical ability of SERS by alleviating the problem due to the accompanying background and thus making observations substrate independent.

  5. Delayed clearance of cerebrospinal fluid tracer from entorhinal cortex in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: A glymphatic magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per K; Ringstad, Geir

    2018-01-01

    The glymphatic system plays a key role for clearance of waste solutes from the rodent brain. We recently found evidence of glymphatic circulation in the human brain when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tracer in conjunction with multiple MRI acquisitions (gMRI). The present study explored the hypothesis that reduced glymphatic clearance in entorhinal cortex (ERC) may be instrumental in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) dementia. gMRI acquisitions were obtained over a 24-48 h time span in cognitively affected iNPH patients and non-cognitively affected patients with suspected CSF leaks. The CSF tracer enrichment was determined as changes in normalized MRI T1 signal units. The study included 30 patients with iNPH and 8 individuals with suspected CSF leaks (i.e. reference individuals). Compared to reference individuals, iNPH patients presented with higher medial temporal lobe atrophy score and Evan's index and inferior ERC thickness. We found delayed clearance of the intrathecal CSF tracer gadobutrol from CSF, the ERC and adjacent white matter, suggesting impaired glymphatic circulation. Reduced clearance and accumulation of toxic waste product such as amyloid-β may be a mechanism behind dementia in iNPH. Glymphatic MRI (gMRI) may become a tool for assessment of early dementia.

  6. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping at 3T MRI of the wrist: Feasibility and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Klaan, Bastian; Burkholder, Iris; von Stillfried, Falko; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T 2 mapping for biochemical imaging of the wrist at 3T. Seventeen patients with wrist pain (mean age, 41.4 ± 13.1 years) including a subgroup with chondromalacia (n = 11) and 15 healthy volunteers (26.0 ± 2.2 years) underwent dGEMRIC and T 2 mapping at 3T. For dGEMRIC, the optimum time window after contrast-injection (gadopentetate dimeglumine) was defined as the plateau of the T 1 curve of repeated measurements 15-90 minutes postinjection and assessed in all volunteers. Reference values of healthy-appearing cartilage from all individuals and values in areas of chondromalacia were assessed using region-of-interest analyses. Receiver-operating-characteristic analyses were applied to assess discriminatory ability between damaged and normal cartilage. The optimum time window was 45-90 minutes, and the 60-minute timepoint was subsequently used. In chondromalacia, dGEMRIC values were lower (551 ± 84 msec, P imaging of the wrist. Both techniques allow separation and biochemical assessment of thin opposing cartilage surfaces and can distinguish between healthy and damaged cartilage. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:381-389. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Production of narrowband tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation by noncollinear resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Hollenstein, U.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation (bandwidth ≲300 MHz) tunable around 91 nm is produced by use of two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing on the Kr resonance at 94 093 cm

  8. Enhancement and tunability of Fano resonance in symmetric multilayer metamaterials at optical regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Tun; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Zai-peng; Huang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Fano resonance (FR) is routinely observed in three-dimensional symmetric metamaterials (MMs) consisting of elliptical nanoholes array (ENA) embedding through metal–dielectric–metal (MDM) multilayers. It is shown theoretically that a square periodic ENA perforating through MDM layers produces an FR response in the near infrared regime. This FR response is attributed to the interplay between the bright modes and dark modes, where the bright modes originate from the electric resonance (localized surface plasmon resonance) caused by the ENA and the dark modes are due to the magnetic resonance (inductive–capacitive resonance) induced by the MDM multilayers. Notably, one can achieve a narrower FR when the elliptical nanoholes occupy the sites of a rectangular lattice, owing to the interaction of the magnetic resonances with the enhanced electric resonances. Moreover, a higher varying degree of the lattice constant along the horizontal direction allows for an FR with a higher value of the quality factor and the tuning of the amplitude and the resonant frequency of the transparency window. Such an FR created by the interference among the magnetic and electric dipolar resonances opens up an alternative way of forming a sharp FR in the symmetric multilayer MMs, and could be exploited for sensing. (paper)

  9. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases and apparent treatment volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnirsky, Marina; Nguyen, Vinh; Katz, Joel S; Steinklein, Jared; Rosen, Lisa; Warshall, Craig; Schulder, Michael; Knisely, Jonathan P S

    2016-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is the preeminent diagnostic test for brain metastasis (BM). Detection of BMs for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning may improve with a time delay following administration of a high-relaxivity agent for 1.5-T and 3-T imaging systems. Metastasis detection with time-delayed MRI was evaluated in this study. Fifty-three volumetric MRI studies from 38 patients undergoing SRS for BMs were evaluated. All studies used 0.1-mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco Diagnostics) immediately after injection, followed by 2 more axial T1-weighted sequences after 5-minute intervals (final image acquisition commenced 15 minutes after contrast injection). Two studies were motion limited and excluded. Two hundred eighty-seven BMs were identified. The studies were randomized and examined separately by 3 radiologists, who were blinded to the temporal sequence. Each radiologist recorded the number of BMs detected per scan. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test compared BM numbers between scans. One radiologist determined the scan on which BMs were best defined. All confirmed, visible tumors were contoured using iPlan RT treatment planning software on each of the 3 MRI data sets. A linear mixed model was used to analyze volume changes. The interclass correlations for Scans 1, 2, and 3 were 0.7392, 0.7951, and 0.7290, respectively, demonstrating excellent interrater reliability. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the second scan as compared with the first in 35.3% of subjects (95% CI 22.4%-49.9%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 1 and 2 ranged from 1 to 10. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the third scan as compared with the second in 21.6% of subjects (95% CI 11.3%-35.3%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 2 and 3 ranged from 1 to 9. Between Scans 1 and 3, additional tumors were seen on 43.1% of scans (increase ranged from 1 to 14). The median increase in tumor number for all comparisons was 1. There was a significant increase in number

  10. Suppression of two-photon resonantly enhanced nonlinear processes in extended media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.; Moore, M.A.; Payne, M.G.; Wunderlich, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    On the basis of combined experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear processes associated with two-photon excitations near 3d and 4d states in Na, we show how resonantly enhanced stimulated hyper-Raman emission, parametric four-wave mixing processes and total resonant two-photon absorption can become severely suppressed through the actions of internally generated fields on the total atomic response in extended media. 7 refs., 3 figs

  11. Slow light enhanced optical nonlinearity in a silicon photonic crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Takumi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Takesue, Hiroki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate highly enhanced optical nonlinearity in a coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) in a four-wave mixing experiment. Using a CROW consisting of 200 coupled resonators based on width-modulated photonic crystal nanocavities in a line defect, we obtained an effective nonlinear constant exceeding 10,000 /W/m, thanks to slow light propagation combined with a strong spatial confinement of light achieved by the wavelength-sized cavities.

  12. Vehicle Position Estimation Based on Magnetic Markers: Enhanced Accuracy by Compensation of Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeun-Sub Byun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The real-time recognition of absolute (or relative position and orientation on a network of roads is a core technology for fully automated or driving-assisted vehicles. This paper presents an empirical investigation of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a self-positioning system based on a magnetic marker reference sensing method for an autonomous vehicle. Specifically, the estimation accuracy of the magnetic sensing ruler (MSR in the up-to-date estimation of the actual position was successfully enhanced by compensating for time delays in signal processing when detecting the vertical magnetic field (VMF in an array of signals. In this study, the signal processing scheme was developed to minimize the effects of the distortion of measured signals when estimating the relative positional information based on magnetic signals obtained using the MSR. In other words, the center point in a 2D magnetic field contour plot corresponding to the actual position of magnetic markers was estimated by tracking the errors between pre-defined reference models and measured magnetic signals. The algorithm proposed in this study was validated by experimental measurements using a test vehicle on a pilot network of roads. From the results, the positioning error was found to be less than 0.04 m on average in an operational test.

  13. Strong guided mode resonant local field enhanced visible harmonic generation in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian Hung; Tseng, Chun-Yen; Lee, Ching-Ting; Young, Jeff F; Kan, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2014-02-10

    Guided mode resonance (GMR) enhanced second- and third-harmonic generation (SHG and THG) is demonstrated in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating (RWG), comprised of a poled azo-polymer layer on top of a textured SU8 substrate with a thin intervening layer of TiO2. Strong SHG and THG outputs are observed by matching either in-coming fundamental- or out-going harmonic-wavelength to the GMR wavelengths of the azo-polymer RWG. Without the azo-polymer coating, pure TiO2 RWGs, do not generate any detectable SHG using a fundamental beam peak intensity of 2 MW/cm(2). Without the textured TiO2 layer, a planar poled azo-polymer layer results in 3650 times less SHG than the full nonlinear RWG structure under identical excitation conditions. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis calculations confirm that this enhancement of the nonlinear conversion is due to strong local electric fields that are generated at the interfaces of the TiO2 and azo-polymer layers when the RWG is excited at resonant wavelengths associated with both SHG and THG conversion processes.

  14. Search for a resonant enhancement of the 7Be + d reaction and primordial 7Li abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Malley, Patrick; Adekola, A.S.; Cizewski, J.A.; Howard, M.E.; Strauss, S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Smith, Michael Scott; Ahn, S.H.; Jones, K.L.; Pittman, S.T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Graves, S.; Kozub, R.L.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.; Wheeler, J.L.; Linhardt, Laura; Matos, M.; Moazen, B.M.; Peters, W.A.; Spassova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results, produce 7 Li abundances almost a factor of four larger than those extrapolated from observations. Since primordial 7 Li is believed to be mostly produced by the beta decay of 7 Be, one proposed solution to this discrepancy is a resonant enhancement of the 7 Be(d,p)2α reaction rate through the 5/2 + 16.7-MeV state in 9 B. The 2 H( 7 Be,d) 7 Be reaction was used to search for such a resonance; none was observed. An upper limit on the width of the proposed resonance was deduced.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Enhancement Patterns at the Different Ages of Symptomatic Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Ja Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To investigate the magnetic resonance (MR) enhancement patterns of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) according to the fracture age, based on the successful single-level percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) cases. The study included 135 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MR imaging and successful PVP from 2005 to 2010 due to a single- level osteoporotic VCF. Two radiologists blinded to the fracture age evaluated the MR enhancement patterns in consensus. The MR enhancement patterns were classified according to the enhancing proportion to the vertebral height and the presence or extent of a non-enhancing cleft within the enhancing area on sagittal plane. The Fisher' exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess the differences in the MR enhancement patterns according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. A diffuse enhancing area can be seen in not only the hyperacute and acute VCFs but also the chronic symptomatic VCFs. Symptomatic VCFs having a segmental enhancing area were all included in the hyperacute or acute stage. Most symptomatic osteoporotic VCFs had a non-enhancing cleft in the enhanced vertebral body (128/135, 94.8%). There was no statistical difference of the enhancement pattern according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. The most common pattern is a non-enhancing cleft within a diffuse enhanced vertebra.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Enhancement Patterns at the Different Ages of Symptomatic Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Ja Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Kang, Heung Sik

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic resonance (MR) enhancement patterns of symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) according to the fracture age, based on the successful single-level percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) cases. The study included 135 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MR imaging and successful PVP from 2005 to 2010 due to a single- level osteoporotic VCF. Two radiologists blinded to the fracture age evaluated the MR enhancement patterns in consensus. The MR enhancement patterns were classified according to the enhancing proportion to the vertebral height and the presence or extent of a non-enhancing cleft within the enhancing area on sagittal plane. The Fisher' exact test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess the differences in the MR enhancement patterns according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. A diffuse enhancing area can be seen in not only the hyperacute and acute VCFs but also the chronic symptomatic VCFs. Symptomatic VCFs having a segmental enhancing area were all included in the hyperacute or acute stage. Most symptomatic osteoporotic VCFs had a non-enhancing cleft in the enhanced vertebral body (128/135, 94.8%). There was no statistical difference of the enhancement pattern according to the fracture age. Symptomatic VCFs show variable MR enhancement patterns in all fracture ages. The most common pattern is a non-enhancing cleft within a diffuse enhanced vertebra.

  17. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  18. Enhanced confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, L; Stiebing, K E; Dobrescu, S

    2010-02-01

    Power loss by plasma-wall interactions may become a limitation for the performance of ECR and fusion plasma devices. Based on our research to optimize the performance of electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) devices by the use of metal-dielectric (MD) structures, the development of the method presented here, allows to significantly improve the confinement of plasma electrons and hence to reduce losses. Dedicated measurements were performed at the Frankfurt 14 GHz ECRIS using argon and helium as working gas and high temperature resistive material for the MD structures. The analyzed charge state distributions and bremsstrahlung radiation spectra (corrected for background) also clearly verify the anticipated increase in the plasma-electron density and hence demonstrate the advantage by the MD-method.

  19. Enhancement of delayed-rectifier potassium conductance by low concentrations of local anaesthetics in spinal sensory neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschewski, Andrea; Wolff, Matthias; Bräu, Michael E; Hempelmann, Gunter; Vogel, Werner; Safronov, Boris V

    2002-01-01

    Combining the patch-clamp recordings in slice preparation with the ‘entire soma isolation' method we studied action of several local anaesthetics on delayed-rectifier K+ currents in spinal dorsal horn neurones.Bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine at low concentrations (1–100 μM) enhanced delayed-rectifier K+ current in intact neurones within the spinal cord slice, while exhibiting a partial blocking effect at higher concentrations (>100 μM). In isolated somata 0.1–10 μM bupivacaine enhanced delayed-rectifier K+ current by shifting its steady-state activation characteristic and the voltage-dependence of the activation time constant to more negative potentials by 10–20 mV.Detailed analysis has revealed that bupivacaine also increased the maximum delayed-rectifier K+ conductance by changing the open probability, rather than the unitary conductance, of the channel.It is concluded that local anaesthetics show a dual effect on delayed-rectifier K+ currents by potentiating them at low concentrations and partially suppressing at high concentrations. The phenomenon observed demonstrated the complex action of local anaesthetics during spinal and epidural anaesthesia, which is not restricted to a suppression of Na+ conductance only. PMID:12055132

  20. Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI of the Coronary Artery Wall in Takayasu Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Stuber, Matthias; Berger, Alexander; Schneider, Udo; Yu, Jing; Gebker, Rolf; Weiss, Robert G.; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Background Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare form of chronic inflammatory granulomatous arteritis of the aorta and its major branches. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated its value for the detection of vessel wall alterations in TA. The aim of this study was to assess LGE of the coronary artery wall in patients with TA compared to patients with stable CAD. Methods We enrolled 9 patients (8 female, average age 46±13 years) with proven TA. In the CAD group 9 patients participated (8 male, average age 65±10 years). Studies were performed on a commercial 3T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva; Philips, Best, The Netherlands) using a 3D inversion prepared navigator gated spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which was repeated 34–45 minutes after low-dose gadolinium administration. Results No coronary vessel wall enhancement was observed prior to contrast in either group. Post contrast, coronary LGE on IR scans was detected in 28 of 50 segments (56%) seen on T2-Prep scans in TA and in 25 of 57 segments (44%) in CAD patients. LGE quantitative assessment of coronary artery vessel wall CNR post contrast revealed no significant differences between the two groups (CNR in TA: 6.0±2.4 and 7.3±2.5 in CAD; p = 0.474). Conclusion Our findings suggest that LGE of the coronary artery wall seems to be common in patients with TA and similarly pronounced as in CAD patients. The observed coronary LGE seems to be rather unspecific, and differentiation between coronary vessel wall fibrosis and inflammation still remains unclear. PMID:23236382

  1. Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations with alternated loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmorat, R.; Chambart, M.; Gatuingt, F.; Guilbaud, D.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic damage thermodynamics framework allows to model the concrete-like materials behavior and in particular their dissymmetric tension/compression response. To deal with dynamics applications such as impact, it is furthermore necessary to take into account the strain rate effect observed experimentally. This is done in the present work by means of anisotropic visco-damage, by introducing a material strain rate effect in the cases of positive hydrostatic stresses only. The proposed delay-damage law assumes no viscous effect in compression as the consideration of inertia effects proves sufficient to model the apparent material strength increase. High-rate dynamics applications imply to deal with wave propagation and reflection which can generate alternated loading in the impacted structure. In order to do so, the key concept of active damage is defined and introduced within both the damage criterion and the delay-damage evolution law. At the structural level, strain localization often leads to spurious mesh dependency. Three-dimensional Finite Element computations of dynamic tensile tests by spalling are presented, with visco-damage and either without or with non-local enhancement. Delay-damage, as introduced, regularizes the solution in fast dynamics. The location of the macro-crack initiated is found influenced by non-local regularization. The strain rate range in which each enhancement, delay-damage or non-local enhancement, has a regularizing effect is studied. (authors)

  2. Nanoantennas for surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy: Effects of interaction and higher order resonant excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aizpurua

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity in surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy (SEIRS strongly depends on where the resonant excitation is spectrally located compared to the molecular vibration that is to be enhanced. In this contribution, we study the effect of coupling in the electromagnetic properties of 2D gold nanorod arrays in the IR. We also study the SEIRS activity of higher order resonant excitations in long nanoantennas to identify polaritonic signals of a supporting SiO2 layer with nanometer thickness (3 nm on a silicon substrate.

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A hipertensão arterial pulmonar é uma doença grave e progressiva. O maior desafio clínico é seu diagnóstico precoce. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença e a extensão do realce tardio miocárdico pela ressonância magnética cardíaca bem como verificar se o percentual da massa de fibrose miocárdica é indicador de gravidade. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 30 pacientes com hipertensão arterial pulmonar dos grupos I e IV, submetidos às avaliações clínica, funcional e hemodinâmica, e à ressonân...

  4. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bong Joo [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Sook [Department of Radiology, St. Paul Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Mokdong Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Youn [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  5. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Ji Youn; Song, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  6. Social interaction enhances motor resonance for observed human actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, Jeremy; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2012-04-25

    Understanding the neural basis of social behavior has become an important goal for cognitive neuroscience and a key aim is to link neural processes observed in the laboratory to more naturalistic social behaviors in real-world contexts. Although it is accepted that mirror mechanisms contribute to the occurrence of motor resonance (MR) and are common to action execution, observation, and imitation, questions remain about mirror (and MR) involvement in real social behavior and in processing nonhuman actions. To determine whether social interaction primes the MR system, groups of participants engaged or did not engage in a social interaction before observing human or robotic actions. During observation, MR was assessed via motor-evoked potentials elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Compared with participants who did not engage in a prior social interaction, participants who engaged in the social interaction showed a significant increase in MR for human actions. In contrast, social interaction did not increase MR for robot actions. Thus, naturalistic social interaction and laboratory action observation tasks appear to involve common MR mechanisms, and recent experience tunes the system to particular agent types.

  7. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and functional outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Jun; Shimada, Toshio; Murakami, Yo; Ochiai, Koichi; Inoue, Shin-ichi; Ishibashi, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Sano, Kazuya; Murakami, Rinji

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) reflect the severity of ischemic injury during the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction (MI). Twenty-nine patients with their first acute MI underwent Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI in the first week (4.2±0.3 days) and at 1 month after onset. Pairs of left ventriculograms were compared with Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images, classified into 3 pattern groups: hyper-enhancement, with and without a central hypo-enhanced region (P1 and P2, respectively), and non-enhancement (P3). In the acute phase of MI, P1 was found in 10, P2 in 11, and P3 in 8 patients. One month later, the image pattern had changed from P1 to P2 in a single patient, from P2 to P3 in 4 patients, and had remained identical in the others. Patients with P3 showed improvement of anterior wall motion in the 1-month follow-up study, and had higher TIMI flow grades and lower peak creatine kinase values than those without recovery. Thus, Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images, closely reflecting the severity of myocardial injury, are useful in predicting myocardial functional recovery after MI. (author)

  8. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  9. Envelope enhancement increases cortical sensitivity to interaural envelope delays with acoustic and electric hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E H Hartley

    Full Text Available Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs. In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM and ii half-wave rectified (HWR tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli

  10. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal infectious processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, K.L.; Li, K.C.P.; Bergman, G.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides diagnostic information beyond that given by nonenhanced imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infectious processes and whether it can be used for differentiating infectious from noninfectious inflammatory lesions. Magnetic resonance images performed with and without intravenous gadolinium-DTPA in 34 cases in which musculoskeletal infection had been clinically suspected were reviewed. Infectious lesions-including osteomyelitis, pyarthrosis, abscess, and cellulitis-were confirmed in a total of 22 cases: in 15 by biopsy or drainage and in 7 by clinical course. Our results show that gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a highly sensitive technique in diagnosing musculoskeletal infectious lesions. It is especially useful in distinguishing abscesses from surrounding cellulitis/myositis. Lack of contrast enhancement rules out infection with a high degree of certainty. However, contrast enhancement cannot be used to reliably distinguish infectious from noninfectious inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Using Silica Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation of this work was to have robust spectroscopic sensors for sensitive detection and chemical analysis of organic and molecular compounds. The solution is to use silica sphere optical resonators to provide surface-enhanced spectroscopic signal. Whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators made from silica microspheres were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) without coupling to a plasmonic mechanism. Large Raman signal enhancement is observed by exclusively using 5.08-micron silica spheres with 785-nm laser excitation. The advantage of this non-plasmonic approach is that the active substrate is chemically inert silica, thermally stable, and relatively simple to fabricate. The Raman signal enhancement is broadly applicable to a wide range of molecular functional groups including aliphatic hydrocarbons, siloxanes, and esters. Applications include trace organic analysis, particularly for in situ planetary instruments that require robust sensors with consistent response.

  12. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal infectious processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, K.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Li, K.C.P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Bergman, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides diagnostic information beyond that given by nonenhanced imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infectious processes and whether it can be used for differentiating infectious from noninfectious inflammatory lesions. Magnetic resonance images performed with and without intravenous gadolinium-DTPA in 34 cases in which musculoskeletal infection had been clinically suspected were reviewed. Infectious lesions-including osteomyelitis, pyarthrosis, abscess, and cellulitis-were confirmed in a total of 22 cases: in 15 by biopsy or drainage and in 7 by clinical course. Our results show that gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a highly sensitive technique in diagnosing musculoskeletal infectious lesions. It is especially useful in distinguishing abscesses from surrounding cellulitis/myositis. Lack of contrast enhancement rules out infection with a high degree of certainty. However, contrast enhancement cannot be used to reliably distinguish infectious from noninfectious inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  13. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA. Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  14. Metal Nanoparticles/Porous Silicon Microcavity Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Fluorescence for the Detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong

    2018-02-23

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSiMC) with resonant peak wavelength of 635 nm was fabricated by electrochemical etching. Metal nanoparticles (NPs)/PSiMC enhanced fluorescence substrates were prepared by the electrostatic adherence of Au NPs that were distributed in PSiMC. The Au NPs/PSiMC device was used to characterize the target DNA immobilization and hybridization with its complementary DNA sequences marked with Rhodamine red (RRA). Fluorescence enhancement was observed on the Au NPs/PSiMC device substrate; and the minimum detection concentration of DNA ran up to 10 pM. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the MC substrate; which is so well-positioned to improve fluorescence enhancement rather the fluorescence enhancement of the high reflection band of the Bragg reflector; would welcome such a highly sensitive in biosensor.

  15. Visualization of isolated trigeminal nerve invasion by lymphoma using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manon-Espaillat, R.; Lanska, D.J.; Ruff, R.L.; Cleveland Veteran's Administration Medical Center, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH; Masaryk, T.; University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with active histiocytic lymphoma for 12 years developed an isolated right trigeminal neuropathy. Initial evaluation with head computed tomography, X-rays of the skull base, bone scan, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis including cytology were normal. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the proximal third of the right trigeminal nerve. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI can be useful for the early demonstration of cranial nerve invasion by lymphoma. (orig.)

  16. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D.; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm −1 ) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies

  17. Enhanced Electron Photoemission by Collective Lattice Resonances in Plasmonic Nanoparticle-Array Photodetectors and Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Uskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays to enhance and tailor photoelectron emission in Schottky barrier photodetectors and solar cells. We show that the interaction between narrow-band lattice resonances (the Rayleigh anomaly) and broader-band individual-particle...... excitations (localized surface plasmon resonances) leads to stronger local field enhancement. In turn, this causes a significant increase of the photocurrent compared to the case when only individual-particle excitations are present. The results can be used to design new photodetectors with highly selective......, tunable spectral response, which are able to detect photons with the energy below the semiconductor bandgap. The findings can also be used to develop solar cells with increased efficiency....

  18. Gadolinium enhancement of spinal subdural collection on magnetic resonance imaging after lumbar puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean O.; McKinney, Alexander; Michel, Eduard; Truwit, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old male with an unusual contrast-enhancing sterile spinal subdural collection on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), apparently occurring as a complication of lumbar puncture. Follow-up MRI after 4 weeks demonstrated spontaneous resolution of the collection without intervening treatment. (orig.)

  19. Applicability of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for the direct discrimination of ballpoint pen inks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifar, R.M.; Verheul, J.M.; Ariese, F.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Gooijer, C.

    2001-01-01

    In situ surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) with excitation at 685 nm is suitable for the direct discrimination of blue and black ballpoint pen inks on paper. For black inks, shorter excitation wavelengths can also be used. For blue inks, SERRS at 514.5 and 457.9 nm does not

  20. Transmission Property of Directly Modulated Signals Enhanced by a Micro-ring Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Yi; Lorences Riesgo, Abel; Seoane, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    A silicon micro-ring resonator is used to enhance the modulation speed of a 10-Gbit/s directly modulated laser to 40 Gbit/s. The generated signal is transmitted error free over 4.5 km SSMF. Dispersion tolerance is also studied....

  1. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of bone cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubler, F. M.; Algra, P. R.; Maas, M.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Falke, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    To examine the contents of intraosseous cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the signal intensity characteristics on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The hand or foot joints of nine patients with the cystic form of RA (where the initial radiological

  2. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  3. Enhanced sensitivity of a mountain bog to climate change as a delayed effect of road construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. von Sengbusch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trees of Pinus rotundata (bog pine characterise many bogs in the mid-altitude mountains of central Europe (Switzerland, East and South Germany, Czech Republic. The research described here focuses on recent changes in the growth of bog pine on the Ennersbacher Moor, a mountain mire in the Black Forest (south-west Germany. An increase in the cover of bog pine is usually caused by drainage and subsequent drawdown of the water table. However, this bog has not been drained or directly disturbed in any other way. One possible explanation is that a road constructed in 1983 along one margin of the bog has diverted part of its water supply. Even though the road was designed to conduct potentially salt-contaminated drainage water away from the bog, its construction did not cause an immediate vegetation response in the 1980s and 1990s. Therefore, I hypothesise that it enhanced the sensitivity of the bog to climatic stress, predisposing it to a succession that was eventually triggered by a series of drought years in 2009–2011. Data collected near the centre of the bog over the period 1998–2014 indicate not only a distinct change in the relationship between height and trunk circumference of the trees, but also an increase of dwarf shrub cover and changes in the composition of Sphagnum communities. Although the pH of near-surface water may have increased slightly over this period, pH and EC values remain within typical ranges for raised bogs in the Black Forest. Examination of peat profiles reveals that the peat is more highly humified now than it was in 2002, and water table records from 2012–2014 show a greater amplitude of fluctuation than water table data collected in 1998–2001. Even though its mean level is only 105 mm below the ground surface, the water table is now observed to fall rapidly to depths of at least 350 mm during both wet and dry summers. Mapping surface (mesotopography and flow lines from the adjacent slope shows that the

  4. Systematic investigation of resonance-induced single-harmonic enhancement in the extreme-ultraviolet range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Bom, L. B. Elouga; Kieffer, J.-C.; Ozaki, T.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the intensity enhancement of single harmonics in high-order harmonic generation from laser plasma. We identified several targets (In, Sn, Sb, Cr, and Mn) that demonstrate resonance-induced enhancement of single harmonic, that are spectrally close to ionic transitions with strong oscillator strengths. We optimized and obtained enhancements of the 13th, 17th, 21st, 29th, and 33rd harmonics from the above targets, by varying the chirp of the 800 nm wavelength femtosecond laser. We also observe harmonic enhancement by using frequency-doubled pump laser (400 nm wavelength). For Mn plasma pumped by the 400 nm wavelength laser, the maximum order of the enhanced harmonic observed was the 17th order (λ=23.5 nm), which corresponds to the highest photon energy (52.9 eV) reported for an enhanced single harmonic

  5. Noise enhanced stability effect in a metastable system with two different kinds of time delays and cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2011-01-01

    We numerically investigate the influences of the time delay τ simultaneously existing in both the deterministic and fluctuating forces, the time delay τ r existing only in the fluctuating force and the cross-correlation strength λ on the enhancement of the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the additive D and the multiplicative α noise intensities in a metastable system. The results indicate that both the multiplicative and additive noises can induce the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect. An increase of λ can enhance or weaken the NES effect induced by the additive noise, depending on the value of τ. However, it weakens the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise with a suppression of the effect of λ caused by increasing τ. The τ-induced critical behavior on both NES effects can be observed, i.e. an increase of τ can enhance or restrain the NES effects induced by the two kinds of noises. With an increase of λ and τ, MFPT versus D shows a transition from one peak to two peaks and finally one peak, implying the multiple NES effect caused by λ and τ. An increase of τ r can enhance the NES effect induced by the additive noise and weaken the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise.

  6. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances delayed BMC delivery and attenuates post-infarction cardiac remodelling by inducing engraftment signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanmei; Zhang, Chuanxi; Shen, Shuxin; Guo, Shengcun; Zhong, Lintao; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Chen, Gangbin; He, Xiang; Huang, Chixiong; He, Nvqin; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Bin, Jianping

    2016-12-01

    Delayed administration of bone marrow cells (BMCs) at 2-4 weeks after successful reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) does not improve cardiac function. The reduction in engraftment signals observed following this time interval might impair the effects of delayed BMC treatment. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) treatment could increase engraftment signals, enhance the delivery of delayed BMCs and subsequently attenuate post-infarction cardiac remodelling. A myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) model was induced in Wistar rats via left coronary ligation for 45 min followed by reperfusion. Western blotting revealed that engraftment signals peaked at 7 days post-I/R and were dramatically lower at 14 days post-I/R. The lower engraftment signals at 14 days post-I/R could be triggered by UTMD treatment at a mechanical index of 1.0-1.9. The troponin I levels in the 1.9 mechanical index group were higher than in the other groups. Simultaneous haematoxylin and eosin staining and fluorescence revealed that the number of engrafted BMCs in the ischaemic zone was greater in the group treated with both UTMD and delayed BMC transplantation than in the control groups (PBMC transplantation improved cardiac function and decreased cardiac fibrosis at 4 weeks after treatment, as compared with control groups (both PBMC transplantation increased capillary density, myocardial cell proliferation and c-kit + cell proliferation. These findings indicated that UTMD treatment could induce engraftment signals and enhance homing of delayed BMCs to ischaemic myocardium, attenuating post-infarction cardiac remodelling by promoting neovascularization, cardiomyogenesis and expansion of cardiac c-kit + cells. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Confident Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula Using Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabulut, Nevzat; Cakmak, Vefa; Kiter, Go ksel [Pamukkale University Medical Center, Denizli (Turkmenistan)

    2010-08-15

    We report the utility of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) using gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in the diagnosis of bronchobiliary fistula associated with liver hydatid cyst. Contrast-enhanced MRC clearly delineated the leakage of contrast agent from the biliary duct and its communication with the bronchial tree. Providing functional information about physiologic or pathologic biliary flow in addition to the display of biliary anatomy, contrast enhanced MRC stands as a robust technique in confidently detecting bronchobiliary fistula and bile leaks

  8. Resonance reactions and enhancement of weak interactions in collisions of cold molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    With the creation of ultracold atoms and molecules, a new type of chemistry - 'resonance' chemistry - emerges: chemical reactions can occur when the energy of colliding atoms and molecules matches a bound state of the combined molecule (Feshbach resonance). This chemistry is rather similar to reactions that take place in nuclei at low energies. In this paper we suggest some problems for future experimental and theoretical work related to the resonance chemistry of ultracold molecules. Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates are particularly interesting because in this system collisions and chemical reactions are extremely sensitive to weak fields; also, a preferred reaction channel may be enhanced due to a finite number of final states. The sensitivity to weak fields arises due to the high density of narrow compound resonances and the macroscopic number of molecules with kinetic energy E=0 (in the ground state of a mean-field potential). The high sensitivity to the magnetic field may be used to measure the distribution of energy intervals, widths, and magnetic moments of compound resonances and study the onset of quantum chaos. A difference in the production rate of right-handed and left-handed chiral molecules may be produced by external electric E and magnetic B fields and the finite width Γ of the resonance (correlation ΓE·B). The same effect may be produced by the parity-violating energy difference in chiral molecules

  9. Spatial mapping of mineralization with manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnick, I.E.; Centeno, J.A.; Todorov, T.I.; Koenig, A.E.; Potter, K.

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to the processing of calcium during the bone formation process. At low doses, after just 48h of exposure, osteoblasts take up sufficient quantities of manganese to cause marked reductions in the water proton T1 values compared with untreated cells. After just 24h of exposure, 25??M MnCl2 had no significant effect on cell viability. However, for mineralization studies 100??M MnCl2 was used to avoid issues of manganese depletion in calvarial organ cultures and a post-treatment delay of 48h was implemented to ensure that manganese ions taken up by osteoblasts is deposited as mineral. All specimens were identified by their days in vitro (DIV). Using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we confirmed that Mn-treated calvariae continued to deposit mineral in culture and that the mineral composition was similar to that of age-matched controls. Notably there was a significant decrease in the manganese content of DIV18 compared with DIV11 specimens, possibly relating to less manganese sequestration as a result of mineral maturation. More importantly, quantitative T1 maps of Mn-treated calvariae showed localized reductions in T1 values over the calvarial surface, indicative of local variations in the surface manganese content. This result was verified with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We also found that ??R1 values, calculated by subtracting the relaxation rate of Mn-treated specimens from the relaxation rate of age-matched controls, were proportional to the surface manganese content and thus mineralizing activity. From this analysis, we established that mineralization of DIV4 and DIV11 specimens occurred in all tissue zones, but was reduced for DIV18 specimens because of mineral maturation with less manganese sequestration. In DIV25 specimens, active mineralization was observed for

  10. Effects of linear and nonlinear time-delayed feedback on the noise-enhanced stability phenomenon in a periodically driven bistable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Zheng-Lin; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    We investigate numerically the effects of time delay on the phenomenon of noise-enhanced stability (NES) in a periodically modulated bistable system. Three types of time-delayed feedback, including linear delayed feedback, nonlinear delayed feedback and global delayed feedback, are considered. We find a non-monotonic behaviour of the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the delay time τ, with a maximum in the case of linear delayed feedback and with a minimum in the case of nonlinear delayed feedback. There are two peculiar values of τ around which the NES phenomenon is enhanced or weakened. For the case of global delayed feedback, the increase of τ always weakens the NES phenomenon. Moreover, we also show that the amplitude A and the frequency Ω of the periodic forcing play an opposite role in the NES phenomenon, i.e. the increase of A weakens the NES effect while the increase of Ω enhances it. These observations demonstrate that the time-delayed feedback can be used as a feasible control scheme for the NES phenomenon

  11. Enhanced sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor by using oblique deposited silver nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Chia; Wu, Pin Chieh; Tseng, Ming Lun; Lin, Wen-Chi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor is demonstrated to be enhanced by oblique deposited silver nanorods. Silver nanorods are thermally deposited on silver nanothin film by oblique angle deposition (OAD). The length of the nanorods can be tuned by controlling the deposition parameters of thermal deposition. By measuring the phase difference between the p and s waves of surface plasmon resonance heterodyne interferometer with different wavelength of incident light, we have demonstrated that maximum sensitivity of glucose detection down to 7.1 × 10(-8) refractive index units could be achieved with optimal deposition parameters of silver nanorods.

  12. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  13. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping of talar osteochondral lesions: Indicators of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Kuni, Benita; Wuennemann, Felix; Chloridis, Dimitrios; Kirwadi, Anand; Burkholder, Iris; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the utility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T 2 mapping in evaluation of type II osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the talus and define cutoff values for identifying patients with good/poor clinical outcomes. 28 patients (mean age, 42.3 years) underwent T 2 mapping and dGEMRIC at least 1.5 years (mean duration, 3.5 years) after microfracture (n = 12) or conservative (n = 16) treatment for type II OCL. Clinical outcomes were considered good with an American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score ≥80. The T 1 /T 2 -values and indices of repair tissue (RT; cartilage above the OCL) were compared to those of the adjacent normal cartilage (NC) by region-of-interest analysis. The ability of the two methods to discriminate RT from NC was determined by area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis. The Youden index was maximized for T 1 /T 2 measures for identifying cutoff values indicative of good/poor clinical outcomes. Repair tissue exhibited lower dGEMRIC values (629.83 vs. 738.51 msec) and higher T 2 values (62.07 vs. 40.69 msec) than NC (P < 0.001). T 2 mapping exhibited greater AUC than dGEMRIC (0.88 vs. 0.69; P = 0.0398). All T 1 measures exhibited higher maximized Youden indices than the corresponding T 2 measures. The highest maximized Youden index for T 1difference was observed at a cutoff value of 84 msec (sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 83%). While T 2 mapping is superior to dGEMRIC in discriminating RT, the latter better identifies good/poor clinical outcomes in patients with type II talar OCL. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1601-1610. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Self-regulation strategies may enhance the acute effect of exercise on smoking delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis; Pappa, Vassiliki; Tsiami, Anastasia; Tzatzaki, Theodora; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zourbanos, Nikos; Goudas, Marios; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined the acute effect of a moderate intensity aerobic exercise session combined with self-regulation on smoking delay in physically inactive smokers. Participants were 11 adults (5 males and 6 females) that completed three experimental conditions: control, exercise, and exercise using self-regulation strategies (SR). Following the experimental treatment smoking for the two exercise conditions delayed significantly more than for the control condition; in addition exercise SR delayed smoking marginally more that the plain exercise condition. Findings supported previous research that acute exercise reduces cravings to smoke, and suggests that the use of self-regulation strategies may strengthen exercise for smoking cessation interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitation of Cu-like gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, C. Y.; Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, J.; Li, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Wang, K.

    2017-09-01

    Employing the independent-process and isolated-resonance approximations using distorted-waves (IPIRDW), we have performed a series of calculations of the resonance-enhanced electron-impact excitations (EIE) among 27 singly excited levels from the n ≤ 6 configurations of Cu-like gold (Au, Z = 79). Resonance excitation (RE) contributions from both the n = 4 → 4 - 7 and n = 3 → 4 core excitations have been considered. Our results demonstrate that RE contributions are significant and enhance the effective collision strengths (ϒ) of certain excitations by up to an order of magnitude at low temperature (106.1 K), and are still important at relatively high temperature (107.5 K). Results from test calculations of the resonance-enhanced EIE processes among 16 levels from the n ≤ 5 configurations using both the Dirac R-matrix (DRM) and IPIRDW approaches agree very well with each other. This means that the close-coupling effects are not important for this ion, and thus warrants the reliability of present resonance-enhanced EIE data among the 27 levels. The results from the collisional-radiative model (CRM) show that, at 3000 eV, near where Cu-like Au is most abundant, RE contributions have important effects (up to 25%) on the density diagnostic line intensity ratios, which are sensitive near 1020 cm-3. The present work is the first EIE research including RE contributions for Cu-like Au. Our EIE data are more accurate than previous results due to our consideration of RE contributions, and the data should be helpful for modeling and diagnosing a variety of plasmas.

  16. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  17. A TOTP-Based Enhanced Route Optimization Procedure for Mobile IPv6 to Reduce Handover Delay and Signalling Overhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Peer Azmat; Hasbullah, Halabi B.; Lawal, Ibrahim A.; Aminu Mu'azu, Abubakar; Tang Jung, Low

    2014-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of handheld mobile devices, multimedia applications like Voice over IP (VoIP), video conferencing, network music, and online gaming are gaining popularity in recent years. These applications are well known to be delay sensitive and resource demanding. The mobility of mobile devices, running these applications, across different networks causes delay and service disruption. Mobile IPv6 was proposed to provide mobility support to IPv6-based mobile nodes for continuous communication when they roam across different networks. However, the Route Optimization procedure in Mobile IPv6 involves the verification of mobile node's reachability at the home address and at the care-of address (home test and care-of test) that results in higher handover delays and signalling overhead. This paper presents an enhanced procedure, time-based one-time password Route Optimization (TOTP-RO), for Mobile IPv6 Route Optimization that uses the concepts of shared secret Token, time based one-time password (TOTP) along with verification of the mobile node via direct communication and maintaining the status of correspondent node's compatibility. The TOTP-RO was implemented in network simulator (NS-2) and an analytical analysis was also made. Analysis showed that TOTP-RO has lower handover delays, packet loss, and signalling overhead with an increased level of security as compared to the standard Mobile IPv6's Return-Routability-based Route Optimization (RR-RO). PMID:24688398

  18. A TOTP-Based Enhanced Route Optimization Procedure for Mobile IPv6 to Reduce Handover Delay and Signalling Overhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer Azmat Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the proliferation of handheld mobile devices, multimedia applications like Voice over IP (VoIP, video conferencing, network music, and online gaming are gaining popularity in recent years. These applications are well known to be delay sensitive and resource demanding. The mobility of mobile devices, running these applications, across different networks causes delay and service disruption. Mobile IPv6 was proposed to provide mobility support to IPv6-based mobile nodes for continuous communication when they roam across different networks. However, the Route Optimization procedure in Mobile IPv6 involves the verification of mobile node’s reachability at the home address and at the care-of address (home test and care-of test that results in higher handover delays and signalling overhead. This paper presents an enhanced procedure, time-based one-time password Route Optimization (TOTP-RO, for Mobile IPv6 Route Optimization that uses the concepts of shared secret Token, time based one-time password (TOTP along with verification of the mobile node via direct communication and maintaining the status of correspondent node’s compatibility. The TOTP-RO was implemented in network simulator (NS-2 and an analytical analysis was also made. Analysis showed that TOTP-RO has lower handover delays, packet loss, and signalling overhead with an increased level of security as compared to the standard Mobile IPv6’s Return-Routability-based Route Optimization (RR-RO.

  19. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsoo; Lim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Jaeseok; Kang, Won-Seok; Moon, Cheil; Choi, Ji-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalograms (EEGs) measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI) studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR) is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP) signal that represents a brain’s response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE) schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML) criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°. PMID:27322267

  20. Joint Maximum Likelihood Time Delay Estimation of Unknown Event-Related Potential Signals for EEG Sensor Signal Quality Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungsoo Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalograms (EEGs measure a brain signal that contains abundant information about the human brain function and health. For this reason, recent clinical brain research and brain computer interface (BCI studies use EEG signals in many applications. Due to the significant noise in EEG traces, signal processing to enhance the signal to noise power ratio (SNR is necessary for EEG analysis, especially for non-invasive EEG. A typical method to improve the SNR is averaging many trials of event related potential (ERP signal that represents a brain’s response to a particular stimulus or a task. The averaging, however, is very sensitive to variable delays. In this study, we propose two time delay estimation (TDE schemes based on a joint maximum likelihood (ML criterion to compensate the uncertain delays which may be different in each trial. We evaluate the performance for different types of signals such as random, deterministic, and real EEG signals. The results show that the proposed schemes provide better performance than other conventional schemes employing averaged signal as a reference, e.g., up to 4 dB gain at the expected delay error of 10°.

  1. A TOTP-based enhanced route optimization procedure for mobile IPv6 to reduce handover delay and signalling overhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Peer Azmat; Hasbullah, Halabi B; Lawal, Ibrahim A; Aminu Mu'azu, Abubakar; Tang Jung, Low

    2014-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of handheld mobile devices, multimedia applications like Voice over IP (VoIP), video conferencing, network music, and online gaming are gaining popularity in recent years. These applications are well known to be delay sensitive and resource demanding. The mobility of mobile devices, running these applications, across different networks causes delay and service disruption. Mobile IPv6 was proposed to provide mobility support to IPv6-based mobile nodes for continuous communication when they roam across different networks. However, the Route Optimization procedure in Mobile IPv6 involves the verification of mobile node's reachability at the home address and at the care-of address (home test and care-of test) that results in higher handover delays and signalling overhead. This paper presents an enhanced procedure, time-based one-time password Route Optimization (TOTP-RO), for Mobile IPv6 Route Optimization that uses the concepts of shared secret Token, time based one-time password (TOTP) along with verification of the mobile node via direct communication and maintaining the status of correspondent node's compatibility. The TOTP-RO was implemented in network simulator (NS-2) and an analytical analysis was also made. Analysis showed that TOTP-RO has lower handover delays, packet loss, and signalling overhead with an increased level of security as compared to the standard Mobile IPv6's Return-Routability-based Route Optimization (RR-RO).

  2. Gold split-ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2013-10-24

    We used gold split ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The arrays of SRRs were fabricated by electron-beam lithography in combination with plasma etching. In the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, SERS enhancement factors of the order of 105 was achieved. This SERS enhancement increased as the size of the split gap decrease as a consequence of the matching between the resonance wavelength of the SRRs and the excitation wavelength of SERS. As the size of the split gap decreased, the localized surface plasmon resonance shifted to near the excitation wavelength and, thus, resulted in the increase in the electric field on the nanostructures. We used finite integration method (FIT) to simulate numerically the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs. The results of the simulation agreed well with our experimental observations. We anticipate this work will provide an approach to manipulate the SERS enhancement by modulating the size of split gap with SRRs without affecting the area and structural arrangement. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Gold split-ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Zhihong; Chen, Longqing; Wang, Xianbin

    2013-01-01

    We used gold split ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The arrays of SRRs were fabricated by electron-beam lithography in combination with plasma etching. In the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, SERS enhancement factors of the order of 105 was achieved. This SERS enhancement increased as the size of the split gap decrease as a consequence of the matching between the resonance wavelength of the SRRs and the excitation wavelength of SERS. As the size of the split gap decreased, the localized surface plasmon resonance shifted to near the excitation wavelength and, thus, resulted in the increase in the electric field on the nanostructures. We used finite integration method (FIT) to simulate numerically the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs. The results of the simulation agreed well with our experimental observations. We anticipate this work will provide an approach to manipulate the SERS enhancement by modulating the size of split gap with SRRs without affecting the area and structural arrangement. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary adenoma: Analysis of the enhancement patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Choi, Woo Suk; Shin, In Soo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 30 patients with surgically or biochemically confirmed pituitary adenomas (20 macroadenomas, 10 microadenomas) were retrospectively evaluated. Ten patients had hyperprolactinaemia, another eight had acromegaly, another eight had nonfunctioning adenoma and four had cushing disease. The examinations were performed at a1.5 T superconducting MR system using a multisection spin-echo technique with 3 mm thick sections and a 256 X 224 matrix. TI weighted sagittal and coronal images were obtained before and within 30 minutes after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Analysis of the MRI was focused on the signal intensity and enhancement patterns of the pituitary adenoma before and after Gd-DTPA administration. Compared with endocrinological diagnosis, macroadenoma showed heterogeneous enhancement in 55%, rim enhancement in 35% and homogeneous enhancement in 10%. Conclusively, the enhancement patterns of the pituitary adenoma did not correlate with the subtypes made according to hormone production.

  5. Resonant enhanced parallel-T topology for weak coupling wireless power transfer pickup applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Guo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For the wireless power transfer (WPT system, the transfer performance and the coupling coefficient are contradictory. In this paper, a novel parallel-T resonant topology consists of a traditional parallel circuit and a T-matching network for secondary side is proposed. With this method, a boosted voltage can be output to the load, since this topology has a resonant enhancement effect, and high Q value can be obtained at a low resonant frequency and low coil inductance. This feature makes it more suitable for weak coupling WPT applications. Besides, the proposed topology shows good frequency stability and adaptability to variations of load. Experimental results show that the output voltage gain improves by 757% compared with traditional series circuit, and reaches 85% total efficiency when the coupling coefficient is 0.046.

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn'sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic...

  7. Enhanced IMC based PID controller design for non-minimum phase (NMP) integrating processes with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghousiya Begum, K; Seshagiri Rao, A; Radhakrishnan, T K

    2017-05-01

    Internal model control (IMC) with optimal H 2 minimization framework is proposed in this paper for design of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers. The controller design is addressed for integrating and double integrating time delay processes with right half plane (RHP) zeros. Blaschke product is used to derive the optimal controller. There is a single adjustable closed loop tuning parameter for controller design. Systematic guidelines are provided for selection of this tuning parameter based on maximum sensitivity. Simulation studies have been carried out on various integrating time delay processes to show the advantages of the proposed method. The proposed controller provides enhanced closed loop performances when compared to recently reported methods in the literature. Quantitative comparative analysis has been carried out using the performance indices, Integral Absolute Error (IAE) and Total Variation (TV). Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of micro-resonator based on enhanced metal insulator semiconductor capacitor for glucose recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Rajendra; Kim, E S; Jo, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Young

    2017-03-01

    We present a concept for the characterization of micro-fabricated based resonator incorporating air-bridge metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor to continuously monitor an individual's state of glucose levels based on frequency variation. The investigation revealed that, the micro-resonator based on MIS capacitor holds considerable promise for implementation and recognition as a glucose sensor for human serum. The discrepancy in complex permittivity as a result of enhanced capacitor was achieved for the detection and determination of random glucose concentration levels using a unique variation of capacitor that indeed results in an adequate variation of the resonance frequency. Moreover, the design and development of micro-resonator with enhanced MIS capacitor generate a resolution of 112.38 × 10 -3 pF/mg/dl, minimum detectable glucose level of 7.45mg/dl, and a limit of quantification of 22.58mg/dl. Additionally, this unique approach offers long-term reliability for mediator-free glucose sensing with a relative standard deviation of less than 0.5%. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resonant cavity enhanced light harvesting in flexible thin-film organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2013-04-24

    Dielectric/metal/dielectric (DMD) electrodes have the potential to significantly increase the absorption efficiency and photocurrent in flexible organic solar cells. We demonstrate that this enhancement is attributed to a broadband cavity resonance. Silver-based semitransparent DMD electrodes with sheet resistances below 10 ohm/sq. are fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates in a high-throughput roll-to-roll sputtering tool. We carefully study the effect of the semitransparent DMD electrode (here composed of ZnxSnyOz/Ag/InxSn yOz) on the optical device performance of a copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) bilayer cell and illustrate that a resonant cavity enhanced light trapping effect dominates the optical behavior of the device. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  10. Enhanced resonant second harmonic generation in plasma based on density transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kant Niti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resonant second harmonic generation of a relativistic self-focusing laser in plasma with density ramp profile has been investigated. A high intense Gaussian laser beam generates resonant second harmonic beam in plasma with density ramp profile. The second harmonic undergoes periodic focusing in the plasma channel created by the fundamental wave. The normalized second harmonic amplitude varies periodically with distance and attains maximum value in the focal region. Enhancement in the second harmonic amplitude on account of relativistic self-focusing of laser based on plasma density transition is seen. Plasma density ramp plays an important role to make self-focusing stronger which leads to enhance the second harmonic generation in plasma.

  11. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of optically levitated nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potential applications of NV centers in gas sensing.

  12. Resonance-enhanced laser-induced plasma spectroscopy: ambient gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, S.L.; Cheung, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    When performing laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for elemental analysis, the sensitivity could be significantly enhanced if the plume was resonantly rekindled by a dye laser pulse. The extent of the enhancement was found to depend on the ambient gas. Air, nitrogen, helium, argon and xenon at pressures ranging from vacuum to 1 bar were investigated. In vacuum, the analyte signal was boosted because of reduced cooling, but it soon decayed as the plume freely expanded. By choosing the right ambient gas at the right pressure, the expanding plume could be confined as well as thermally insulated to maximize the analyte signal. For instance, an ambient of 13 mbar xenon yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 110. That ratio was 53 when the pellet was ablated in air, and decreased further to 5 if the dye laser was tuned off resonance

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  14. Correlation between late gadolinium enhancement and diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy assessed by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyasu, Munenobu; Kurita, Tairo; Onishi, Katsuya

    2008-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is common in patients with overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Steady-state cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables measurement of the diastolic function of the left ventricle (LV), and late gadolinium enhanced MRI can delineate the presence and extent of fibrosis in HCM. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the extent of myocardial fibrosis demonstrated by late gadolinium-enhanced MRI and diastolic dysfunction. Seventeen patients (13 men, mean age 57.7±9.8 years) with HCM were studied. The severity index of late gadolinium enhancement was determined by scoring the extent of enhanced tissue in 30 myocardial segments. The peak filling rate (PFR), LV ejection fraction and LV mass were determined by cine MRI. Contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated late gadolinium enhancement in 97 of 510 segments (19%) and 13 of the 17 patients (77%). The severity index of late gadolinium enhancement demonstrated a significant negative correlation with PFR (r=-0.86, p<0.01) and with the LV ejection fraction (r=-0.59, p<0.05). No significant correlation was observed between the severity index of late gadolinium enhancement and LV mass (r=0.23, p=0.30). The extent of myocardial fibrosis revealed by late gadolinium-enhanced MRI has a strong relationship to diastolic dysfunction in patients with HCM. (author)

  15. Detection of pericardial inflammation with late-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan; Verbeken, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    To examine the value of late-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of pericardial inflammation. Late-enhancement cardiac MRI was performed in 16 patients with clinical suspicion of pericardial disease. Pericardial effusion, pericardial thickening and pericardial enhancement were assessed. MRI findings were compared with those of definitive pericardial histology (n=14) or microbiology (n=2). A control group of 12 patients with no clinical evidence of pericardial disease were also imaged with the same MRI protocol. Sensitivity and specificity for late-enhancement MRI detection of pericardial inflammation was of 100%. There was MRI late enhancement of the pericardial layers in all five patients with histological/microbiological evidence of inflammatory pericarditis. MRI demonstrated no pericardial thickening and no MRI late enhancement with or without a pericardial effusion in any of the five patients with histological evidence of a normal pericardium. MRI detected pericardial thickening in the absence of both pericardial effusion and late enhancement in all six patients with histological evidence of chronic fibrosing pericarditis. The 12 control subjects showed no evidence of pericardial MRI late enhancement. These findings demonstrate that MRI late enhancement can be used to visualize pericardial inflammation in patients with clinical suspicion of pericardial disease. (orig.)

  16. Resonant-enhanced above-threshold ionization of atoms by XUV short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, V.D. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: vladimir@df.uba.ar; Macri, P.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, CONICET, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Arbo, D.G. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, UBA-CONICET, CC 67 Suc 28 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-01-15

    Above-threshold ionization of atoms by XUV short laser pulses is investigated close to the resonant 1s-2p transitions. Both ab initio TDSE and a theoretical Coulomb-Volkov like theory are used to study the enhancement in the ionization probabilities. Our modified Coulomb-Volkov theory, fully accounting for the important 1s-2p transition is able to explain the spectrum as well as the total ionization cross sections.

  17. Application of acoustic micro-resonators in quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huadan; Dong, Lei; Wu, Hongpeng; Yin, Xukun; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2018-01-01

    During the past 15 years since the first report of quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), QEPAS has become one of the leading optical techniques for trace chemical gas sensing. This paper is a review of the current state-of-the art of QEPAS. QEPAS based spectrophones with different acoustic micro-resonators (AmR) configurations employing both standard quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and custom-made QTFs are summarized and discussed in detail.

  18. Dichroic mirror embedded in a submicrometer waveguide for enhanced resonant nonlinear optical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaccabarozzi, Luigi; Fejer, M M; Huo, Yijie; Fan, Shanhui; Yu, Xiaojun; Harris, James S

    2006-11-15

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of novel dichroic mirrors embedded in a tightly confining AlGaAs/Al(x)O(y) waveguide. Reflection at the first-harmonic wavelength as high as 93% is achieved, while high transmission is maintained at the second-harmonic wavelength. The measured cavity spectrum is in excellent agreement with finite-difference time-domain simulations. Such a mirror is essential for achieving resonant enhancement of second-harmonic generation.

  19. Overexpression of persimmon DkXTH1 enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress and delayed fruit softening in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Han, Shoukun; Ban, Qiuyan; He, Yiheng; Jin, Mijing; Rao, Jingping

    2017-04-01

    DkXTH1 promoted cell elongation and more strength to maintain structural integrity by involving in cell wall assembly, thus enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress with broader phenotype in transgenic plants. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) is thought to play a key role in cell wall modifications by cleaving and re-joining xyloglucan, and participates in the diverse physiological processes. DkXTH1 was found to peak in immature expanding persimmon fruit, and its higher expression level exhibited along with firmer fruit during storage. In the present study, transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato plants were generated with DkXTH1 constitutively expressed. Overexpression of DkXTH1 enhanced tolerance to salt, ABA and drought stresses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. Transgenic tomatoes collected at the mature green stage, presented delayed fruit softening coupled with postponed color change, a later and lower ethylene peak, and higher firmness in comparison with the wild-type tomatoes during storage. Furthermore, broader leaves and tomato fruit with larger diameter were gained in transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato, respectively. Most importantly, transgenic plants exhibited more large and irregular cells with higher density of cell wall and intercellular spaces, resulting from the overactivity of XET enzymes involving in cell wall assembly. We suggest that DkXTH1 expression resulted in cells with more strength and thickness to maintain structural integrity, and thus enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress and delayed fruit softening in transgenic plants.

  20. Histological examination of the gadolinium-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Tada, Tsuyoshi; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Kyoshima, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging often demonstrates gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the dura mater around meningiomas. The Gd-enhanced dura mater was histologically investigated to detect meningioma cells. Gd enhancement of the dura mater occurred in 11 (79%) of the 14 meningiomas studied, and extended as far as 35 mm from the tumor. Histological examination revealed generation of vascular-rich loose connective tissue at the surface of the dura in all five tumors examined. Some clusters of meningothelial cells were distributed in the loose connective tissue in three of the five specimens, and one cluster was obviously neoplastic. These observations suggest that clusters of meningioma cells occur in the Gd-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas. (author)

  1. Histological examination of the gadolinium-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Tada, Tsuyoshi; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Kyoshima, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeaki [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1993-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging often demonstrates gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the dura mater around meningiomas. The Gd-enhanced dura mater was histologically investigated to detect meningioma cells. Gd enhancement of the dura mater occurred in 11 (79%) of the 14 meningiomas studied, and extended as far as 35 mm from the tumor. Histological examination revealed generation of vascular-rich loose connective tissue at the surface of the dura in all five tumors examined. Some clusters of meningothelial cells were distributed in the loose connective tissue in three of the five specimens, and one cluster was obviously neoplastic. These observations suggest that clusters of meningioma cells occur in the Gd-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas. (author).

  2. Approximate Solutions of Delay Differential Equations with Constant and Variable Coefficients by the Enhanced Multistage Homotopy Perturbation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Olvera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We expand the application of the enhanced multistage homotopy perturbation method (EMHPM to solve delay differential equations (DDEs with constant and variable coefficients. This EMHPM is based on a sequence of subintervals that provide approximate solutions that require less CPU time than those computed from the dde23 MATLAB numerical integration algorithm solutions. To address the accuracy of our proposed approach, we examine the solutions of several DDEs having constant and variable coefficients, finding predictions with a good match relative to the corresponding numerical integration solutions.

  3. Delayed contrast enhancement imaging of a murine model for ischemia reperfusion with carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel M Burk

    Full Text Available We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8-12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300 mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of human cerebral infarction: Enhancement with Gd-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imakita, S.; Nishimura, T.; Naito, H.; Yamada, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Takamiya, M.; Yamada, Y.; Sakashita, Y.; Minamikawa, J.; Kikuchi, H.

    1987-09-01

    Five patients (1 female and 4 males) with cerebral infarction of 4 h to 27 months duration were studied 9 times with magnetic resonance (MR) using Gd-DTPA. Spinecho (SE) MR images (MRI) were obtained before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA, and correlative CT scans were performed on the same day. In 2 cases, 4 h and 27 months after the ictus, there was no enhancement with Gd-DTPA. There was faint enhancement in 2 cases with cerebral infarction of about 24 h duration and obvious enhancement in all cases in the subacute stage. Compared with enhanced CT, MR using Gd-DTPA demonstrated more obvious enhancement of infarcted areas. MR enhancement using Gd-DTPA showed a gradual increase and the accumulated Gd-DTPA in infarcted areas slowly diffused to the periphery. MR enhancement with Gd-DTPA is similar to that of enhanced CT, but may be more sensitive in the detection of blood brain barrier breakdown.

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  6. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  7. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  8. Mental simulation of drawing actions enhances delayed recall of a complex figure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Natascia; Trojano, Luigi; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo; Conson, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    Motor simulation implies that the same motor representations involved in action execution are re-enacted during observation or imagery of actions. Neurofunctional data suggested that observation of letters or abstract paintings can elicit simulation of writing or drawing gestures. We performed four behavioural experiments on right-handed healthy participants to test whether observation of a static and complex geometrical figure implies re-enactment of drawing actions. In Experiment 1, participants had to observe the stimulus without explicit instruction (observation-only condition), while performing irrelevant finger tapping (motor dual task), or while articulating irrelevant verbal material (verbal dual task). Delayed drawing of the stimulus was less accurate in the motor dual-task (interfering with simulation of hand actions) than in verbal dual-task and observation-only conditions. In Experiment 2, delayed drawing in the observation only was as accurate as when participants encoded the stimulus by copying it; in both conditions, accuracy was higher than when participants were instructed to observe the stimulus to recall it later verbally (observe to recall), thus being discouraged from engaging motor simulation. In Experiment 3, delayed drawing was as accurate in the observation-only condition as when participants imagined copying the stimulus; accuracy in both conditions was higher than in the observe-to-recall condition. In Experiment 4, in the observe-only condition participants who observed the stimulus with their right arm hidden behind their back were significantly less accurate than participants who had their left arm hidden. These findings converge in suggesting that mere observation of a geometrical stimulus can activate motor simulation and re-enactment of drawing actions.

  9. Ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the assessment of potential kidney transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoumpos, Sokratis; Mark, Patrick B. [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Renal and Transplant Unit, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hennessy, Martin; Kasthuri, Ram; Roditi, Giles [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vesey, Alex T.; Kingsmore, David B. [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Renal and Transplant Unit, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Radjenovic, Aleksandra [University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    Traditional contrast-enhanced methods for scanning blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT carry potential risks for patients with advanced kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle preparation that has potential as an MRI contrast agent in assessing the vasculature. Twenty patients with advanced kidney disease requiring aorto-iliac vascular imaging as part of pre-operative kidney transplant candidacy assessment underwent ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (FeMRA) between December 2015 and August 2016. All scans were performed for clinical indications where standard imaging techniques were deemed potentially harmful or inconclusive. Image quality was evaluated for both arterial and venous compartments. First-pass and steady-state FeMRA using incremental doses of up to 4 mg/kg body weight of ferumoxytol as intravenous contrast agent for vascular enhancement was performed. Good arterial and venous enhancements were achieved, and FeMRA was not limited by calcification in assessing the arterial lumen. The scans were diagnostic and all patients completed their studies without adverse events. Our preliminary experience supports the feasibility and utility of FeMRA for vascular imaging in patients with advanced kidney disease due for transplant listing, which has the advantages of obtaining both arteriography and venography using a single test without nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  10. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  11. An Enhanced Plane Wave Expansion Method to Solve Piezoelectric Phononic Crystal with Resonant Shunting Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Lian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced plane wave expansion (PWE method is proposed to solve piezoelectric phononic crystal (PPC connected with resonant shunting circuits (PPC-C, which is named as PWE-PPC-C. The resonant shunting circuits can not only bring about the locally resonant (LR band gap for the PPC-C but also conveniently tune frequency and bandwidth of band gaps through adjusting circuit parameters. However, thus far, more than one-dimensional PPC-C has been studied just by Finite Element method. Compared with other methods, the PWE has great advantages in solving more than one-dimensional PC as well as various lattice types. Nevertheless, the conventional PWE cannot accurately solve coupling between the structure and resonant shunting circuits of the PPC-C since only taking one-way coupling from displacements to electrical parameters into consideration. A two-dimensional PPC-C model of orthorhombic lattice is established to demonstrate the whole solving process of PWE-PPC-C. The PWE-PPC-C method is validated by Transfer Matrix method as well as Finite Element method. The dependence of band gaps on circuit parameters has been investigated in detail by PWE-PPC-C. Its advantage in solving various lattice types is further illustrated by calculating the PPC-C of triangular and hexagonal lattices, respectively.

  12. Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement in specific cardiomyopathies by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Caterina; Moon, James C; Elkington, Andrew G; John, Anna S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Pennell, Dudley J

    2007-12-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can visualize myocardial interstitial abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess whether regions of abnormal myocardium can also be visualized by late enhancement gadolinium CMR in the specific cardiomyopathies. A retrospective review of all referrals for gadolinium CMR with specific cardiomyopathy over 20 months. Nine patients with different specific cardiomyopathies were identified. Late enhancement was demonstrated in all patients, with a mean signal intensity of 390 +/- 220% compared with normal regions. The distribution pattern of late enhancement was unlike the subendocardial late enhancement related to coronary territories found in myocardial infarction. The affected areas included papillary muscles (sarcoid), the mid-myocardium (Anderson-Fabry disease, glycogen storage disease, myocarditis, Becker muscular dystrophy) and the global sub-endocardium (systemic sclerosis, Loeffler's endocarditis, amyloid, Churg-Strauss). Focal myocardial late gadolinium enhancement is found in the specific cardiomyopathies, and the pattern is distinct from that seen in infarction. Further systematic studies are warranted to assess whether the pattern and extent of late enhancement may aid diagnosis and prognostic assessment.

  13. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents.

  14. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE...

  15. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of bone cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, F M; Algra, P R; Maas, M; Dijkstra, P F; Falke, T H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the contents of intraosseous cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the signal intensity characteristics on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS--The hand or foot joints of nine patients with the cystic form of RA (where the initial radiological abnormality consisted of intraosseous cysts without erosions) were imaged before and after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. A 0.6 unit, T1 weighted spin echo and T2* weighted gradient echo were used to obtain images in at least two perpendicular planes. RESULTS--Most cysts showed a low signal intensity on the non-enhanced T1 weighted (spin echo) images and a high signal intensity on the T2* weighted (gradient echo) images, consistent with a fluid content. No cyst showed an enhancement of signal intensity on the T1 weighted images after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA, whereas synovium hyperplasia at the site of bony erosions did show an increased signal intensity after Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging detected more cysts (as small as 2 mm) than plain films, and the cysts were located truly intraosseously. In six patients no other joint abnormalities were identified by magnetic resonance imaging; the three other patients also showed, after Gd-DTPA administration, an enhanced synovium at the site of bony erosions. CONCLUSIONS--It is suggested that intraosseous bone cysts in patients with RA do not contain hyperaemic synovial proliferation. The bone cysts in patients with the cystic form of RA may be the only joint abnormality. Images PMID:8257207

  16. Pulse advancement and delay in an integrated optical two-port ring-resonator circuit: direct experimental observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Zhuang, L.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    We report experimental observations of the negative-group-velocity (v_g) phenomenon in an integrated-optical two-port ring-resonator circuit. We demonstrate that when the v_g is negative, the (main) peak of output pulse appears earlier than the peak of a reference pulse, while for a positive v_g,

  17. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC): Intra- and Interobserver Variability in Standardized Drawing of Regions of Interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiderius, C.J.; Tjoernstrand, J.; Aakeson, P.; Soedersten, K.; Dahlberg, L.; Leander, P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the reproducibility of a standardized region of interest (ROI) drawing procedure in delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC). Material and Methods: A large ROI in lateral and medial femoral weight-bearing cartilage was drawn in images of 12 healthy male volunteers by 6 investigators with different skills in MRI. The procedure was done twice, with a 1-week interval. Calculated T1-values were evaluated for intra- and interobserver variability. Results: The mean interobserver variability for both compartments ranged between 1.3% and 2.3% for the 6 different investigators without correlation to their experience in MRI. Post-contrast intra-observer variability was low in both the lateral and the medial femoral cartilage, 2.6% and 1.5%, respectively. The larger variability in lateral than in medial cartilage was related to slightly longer and thinner ROIs. Conclusion: Intra-observer variability and interobserver variability are both low when a large standardized ROI is used in dGEMRIC. The experience of the investigator does not affect the variability, which further supports a clinical applicability of the method

  18. Serial gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis treated with mitoxantrone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapf, H.; Mauch, E.; Fetzer, U.; Laufen, H.; Kornhuber, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    Serial gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to monitor the effect of mitoxantrone in ten patients with rapidly deteriorating multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI was performed as a baseline and thereafter at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months. The total number of Gd-enhancing lesions diminished from 169 at baseline to 10 after 1 year and to 5 after 2 years. This reduction and the percentage of follow-up MRI studies showing no Gd enhancement were more pronounced than in other MRI studies of the natural course of MS. Measured with quantitative neurological scales, only one patient showed deterioration after 2 years; nevertheless, the changes in MRI were much more marked than those observed clinically. Serial Gd-MRI therefore, seems necessary for documenting efficacy in future therapeutic trails. (orig.)

  19. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tran, Hong Nhung; Fort, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  20. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  1. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller

    2005-01-01

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  2. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid enhanced magnetic resonance imagings in cardiomyopathic hamsters. Histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Hiroko

    1995-01-01

    To assess the significance of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the findings were correlated with histopathological findings in cardiomyopathic hamsters (Bio 14.6). In hamsters given 1 mBq of Gd-DTPA, autoradiography revealed uptake of Gd-DTPA corresponding to the fibrotic tissue. According to the degree of fibrosis and inflammation, the tissue was graded into three. The ratio of contrast enhancement in the fibrotic area to that in the normal area was significantly higher in grade 1 than grades 2 and 3, and in grade 2 than grade 3. Next, hamsters in various age groups were given 0.2 mmol/kg intravenously. In the age group of 2-5 month, contrast enhancement was homogeneously observed in the entire myocardium. In the age group of 8-10 years, it was entirely observed, partly with heterogeneous enhancement. In the age group of 11-12 years, contrast enhancement was not different from that in the normal hamsters. Histological examination revealed that fibrosis changed from grade 1 through grade 3 with advancing age. In conclusion, MR imaging for myocardiopathy showed signal intensity reflecting the fibrotic tissue. Contrast enhancement of MR imaging was stronger when much more inflammatory cells were involved and fibrotic tissues were filled with much more blood vessels. Thus MR imaging may be a promising tool for evaluating the severity of myocardiopathy. (N.K.)

  3. Micro-MRI at 11.7 T of a Murine Brain Tumor Model Using Delayed Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex A. Moats

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging methodologies allow for serial measurement of tumor size, circumventing the need for sacrificing mice at given time points. In orthotopically transplanted murine models of brain tumors, cross-section micro-MRI allows for visualization and measurement of the physically inaccessible tumors. To allow for long resident times of a contrast agent in the tumor, intraperitoneal administration was used as a route of injection for contrast-enhanced micro-MRI, and a simple method for relative tumor volume measurements was examined. A strategy for visualizing the variability of the delayed tumor enhancement was developed. These strategies were applied to monitor the growth of brain tumors xenotransplanted into nude mice and either treated with the antiangiogenic peptide EMD 121974 or an inactive control peptide. Each mouse was used as its own control. Serial imaging was done weekly, beginning at Day 7 after tumor cell implantation and continued for 7 weeks. Images obtained were reconstructed on the MRI instrument. The image files were transferred off line to be postprocessed to assess tumor growth (volume and variability in enhancement (three-dimensional [3-D] intensity models. In a small study, tumor growth and response to treatment were followed using this methodology and the high-resolution images displayed in 3-D allowed for straightforward qualitative assessment of variable enhancement related to vascular factors and tumor age.

  4. Enhancement of optical Kerr effect in quantum-cascade lasers with multiple resonance levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jing; Citrin, D S

    2008-08-18

    In this paper, we investigated the optical Kerr lensing effect in quantum-cascade lasers with multiple resonance levels. The Kerr refractive index n2 is obtained through the third-order susceptibility at the fundamental frequency chi(3)( omega; omega, omega,-omega). Resonant two-photon processes are found to have almost equal contributions to chi(3)( omega; omega, omega,-omega) as the single-photon processes, which result in the predicted enhancement of the positive nonlinear (Kerr) refractive index, and thus may enhance mode-locking of quantum-cascade lasers. Moreover, we also demonstrate an isospectral optimization strategy for further improving n2 through the band-structure design, in order to boost the multimode performance of quantum-cascade lasers. Simulation results show that the optimized stepwise multiple-quantum-well structure has n2 approximately 10-8 cm2/W, a twofold enhancement over the original flat quantum-well structure. This leads to a refractive-index change (delta)n of about 0.01, which is at the upper bound of those reported for typical Kerr medium. This stronger Kerr refractive index may be important for quantum-cascade lasers ultimately to demonstrate self-mode-locking.

  5. Plasmon resonance-induced photoluminescence enhancement of CdTe/Cds quantum dots thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210003 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructure and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructure and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Yangqing; Xu, Jun; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructure and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • CdTe/CdS quantum dots/Au nano-rods nano-composite films were fabricated. • PL intensity of the quantum dots films was enhanced due to Au nanorods. • Internal quantum efficiency increased due to localized surface plasmon resonance. • The lifetimes of quantum dots films decreased after interaction with Au nano-rods. - Abstract: CdTe/CdS quantum dots/Au nano-rods nano-composite films were fabricated on planar Si substrates. The optical properties of all samples were investigated and the corresponding simulations were studied. It was found that the photoluminescence intensity of the CdTe/CdS quantum dots films was enhanced about 9-fold after the incorporation of Au nano-rods, the internal quantum efficiency increased from 24.3% to 35.2% due to the localized surface plasmon resonance. The time-resolved luminescence decay curves showed that the lifetimes of CdTe/CdS quantum dots films decreased to 2.8 ns after interaction with Au nano-rods. The results of finite-difference time-domain simulation indicated that Au nano-rods induced the localization of electric field, which enhanced the PL intensity of quantum dots films in the vicinity of Au nano-rods.

  6. Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography: value for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Burbelko, M.; Schenck zu Schweinsberg, T.; Funke, C.; Wecker, C.; Walthers, E.M.; Rominger, M.

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) is the morphologic gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables the visualization of not only the pancreatic duct but also the surrounding parenchyma using T2- and T1-weighted sequences before and after the application of a contrast agent. Moreover, it allows the depiction of ductal segments distal to a stenosis or occlusion. However, conventional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) was not able to achieve accuracy similar to that of ERCP. Despite many technological innovations, such as fast breath-hold acquisitions or respiratory-gated 3D sequences, this drawback could not be overcome. In recent years, secretin-enhanced MRCP has been used for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. A recent study showed that secretin not only improves the visibility of the pancreatic duct and its side branches but it also enhances the diagnostic accuracy of MRCP. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were improved by the application of secretin. Moreover, the agreement between independent observers increased after the use of secretin. In addition, quantitative post-processing tools have been developed that enable the measurement of the exocrine pancreatic output non-invasively using secretin-enhanced MRCP. These tools facilitate applications, such as functional follow-up after pancreaticogastrostomy and pancreaticogastric anastomoses, evaluation of the functional status of the graft after pancreas transplantation and follow-up of pancreatic drainage procedures and duct disruption. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin on nanostructured Ag surfaces: The role of excitation wavelength, plasmon resonance and molecular resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šubr, Martin; Kuzminova, Anna; Kylián, Ondřej; Procházka, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Optimization of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensors for (bio)analytical applications has received much attention in recent years. For optimum sensitivity, both the nanostructure fabrication process and the choice of the excitation wavelength used with respect to the specific analyte studied are of crucial importance. In this contribution, detailed SERS intensity profiles were measured using gradient nanostructures with the localized surface-plasmon resonance (LSPR) condition varying across the sample length and using riboflavin as the model biomolecule. Three different excitation wavelengths (633 nm, 515 nm and 488 nm) corresponding to non-resonance, pre-resonance and resonance excitation with respect to the studied molecule, respectively, were tested. Results were interpreted in terms of a superposition of the enhancement provided by the electromagnetic mechanism and intrinsic properties of the SERS probe molecule. The first effect was dictated mainly by the degree of spectral overlap between the LSPR band, the excitation wavelength along with the scattering cross-section of the nanostructures, while the latter was influenced by the position of the molecular resonance with respect to the excitation wavelength. Our experimental findings contribute to a better understanding of the SERS enhancement mechanism.

  9. Intraindividual comparison of myocardial delayed enhancement MR imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine at 1.5 T and 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Bernhard D.; Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael; Kramer, Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sandstede, Joern [Roentgenzentrum, Hamburg (Germany); Lodemann, Klaus P. [Bracco Altana Pharma, Konstanz (Germany); Hoevelborn, Tobias [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department for Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    For contrast-enhanced imaging techniques relying on strong T1 weighting, 3 T provides increased contrast compared with 1.5 T. The aim of our study was the intraindividual comparison of delayed enhancement MR imaging at 1.5 T and at 3 T. Twenty patients with myocardial infarction were examined at 1.5 T and 3 T. Fifteen minutes after injection of contrast agent (0.1 mmol gadobenate dimeglumine per kg body weight), inversion recovery gradient recalled echo (IR-GRE) sequences were acquired (1.5 T/3 T: TR 11.0/9.9 ms, TE 4.4/4.9 ms, flip 30 /30 , slice thickness 6/6 mm) to assess myocardial viability. Two observers rated image quality (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Quantification of hyperenhanced myocardium and standardized SNR/CNR measurements were performed (Student's t test). There was no significant difference with respect to image quality (1.5 T/3 T: 3.5/3.3, p = 0.34, reader 1; 2.4/2.7, p = 0.12, reader 2) and infarction size (760 {+-} 566/828 {+-} 677 mm{sup 2} at 1.5 T, 808 {+-} 639/826 {+-} 726 mm{sup 2} at 3 T, reader 1/reader 2, p > 0.05). Mean SNR in hyperenhanced/normal myocardium was 19.2/6.2 at 1.5 T and 29.5/8.8 at 3 T (p < 0.05). Mean CNR was 14.3 at 1.5 T and 26.0 at 3 T (p < 0.05). Delayed enhancement MR imaging at 3 T is a robust procedure yielding superior tissue contrast at 3 T compared with 1.5 T which is, however, not reflected by increased image quality. (orig.)

  10. Attempting to Answer a Meaningful Question Enhances Subsequent Learning Even When Feedback Is Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornell, Nate

    2014-01-01

    Attempting to retrieve information from memory enhances subsequent learning even if the retrieval attempt is unsuccessful. Recent evidence suggests that this benefit materializes only if subsequent study occurs immediately after the retrieval attempt. Previous studies have prompted retrieval using a cue (e.g., "whale-???") that has no…

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors

  12. Resonance enhanced laser mass spectrometry for process- and environmental-analysis: Applications and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Dorfner, Ralph; Kettrup, Antonius; Heger, Hans Joerg; Boesl, Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    Laser induced Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (REMPI TOFMS) is a highly selective as well as sensitive analytical technique, well suited for species selective, on-line monitoring of trace-substances. In this contribution some analytical applications of a mobile REMPI-TOFMS are presented. This includes REMPI-TOMS on-line analysis of coffee roasting gas and waste incineration flue gas as well as headspace measurements of pulp processing lye or rapid analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil samples via thermal desorption

  13. Design of Transparent Anodes for Resonant Cavity Enhanced Light Harvesting in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-03

    The use of an ITO-free MoO 3/Ag/MoO 3 anode to control the photon harvesting in PCDTBT:PC 70BM solar cells is proposed. At first sight, the fact that these anodes possess reduced far-field transmission compared to ITO may seem to be a disadvantage. But, despite this, we show that by carefully tuning the resonant optical cavity we can enhance the external quantum efficiency close to the band edge of PCDTBT, resulting in high photocurrent and power conversion efficiency on par with ITO. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Enhancing monochromatic multipole emission by a subwavelength enclosure of degenerate Mie resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2017-07-06

    Sound emission is inefficient at low frequencies as limited by source size. This letter presents enhancing emission of monochromatic monopole and multipole sources by enclosing the source with a subwavelength circular enclosure filled of an anisotropic material of a low radial sound speed. The anisotropy is associated with an infinite tangential density along the azimuth. Numerical simulations show that emission gain is produced at frequencies surrounding degenerate Mie resonant frequencies of the enclosure, and meanwhile the radiation directivity pattern is well preserved. The degeneracy is theoretically analyzed. A realization of the material is suggested by using a space-coiling structure.

  15. Broadband Acoustic Transmission Enhancement through a Structured Stiff Plate with Locally Resonant Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Liang Bin; Zou Xin-Ye; Cheng Jian-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Broadband acoustic transmission enhancement (ATE) is realized for a periodically structured stiff plate without any opening that is conventionally thought to be only capable of supporting narrowband ATE, by introducing locally resonant (LR) elements. This exotic phenomenon is interpreted by analyzing the vibration pattern of the structure-induced LR modes, and is well modeled by a simple 'spring-mass' system which reveals the contribution of the LR effect to the important broadband performance. Our findings should help to better understand the physical mechanism of ATE and may have potential impact on ultrasonic applications such as broadband acoustic filters or compact acoustic devices in subwavelength scale

  16. In situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P C; Munro, C H; Smith, W E

    1996-06-01

    An in situ surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) procedure is described for the analysis of a reactive dye covalently bound to a single strand of a cotton fibre. This procedure can be completed in 5 h, whereas an alternative enzyme digestion method takes approximately 21 h. These two fibre preparation methods give similar spectra from picogram quantities of dye present on a 2-5 mm length of fibre. The in situ nature of the analysis and the small sample size make this method particularly suitable for forensic applications.

  17. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors.

  18. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy of p-chlorofluorobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, William D.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2017-09-01

    The S1 ← S0 (A˜1 B2 ← X˜1 A1) electronic transition of para-chlorofluorobenzene has been investigated using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy. Assignment of the vibrational structure has been achieved by comparison with corresponding spectra of related molecules, via quantum chemical calculations, and via shifts in bands between the spectra of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues. In addition, we have also partially reassigned a previously-published spectrum of para-dichlorobenzene.

  19. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y.; Maruyama, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  20. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y. [Shimane Medical Univ., The Fourth Dept. of Internal Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan); Maruyama, R. [Shimane Medical Univ., Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  1. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  2. Feasibility of gadoteric acid for delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) at the wrist and knee and comparison with Gd-DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Klaan, Bastian; Do, Thuy; Barié, Alexander; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of gadoteric acid for delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and to compare the dGEMRIC values obtained using gadoteric acid with those obtained by an equimolar dose of Gd-DTPA. At 3T, dGEMRIC of the wrist was performed twice using a T 1 -weighted 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence in 16 healthy volunteers (10 women; mean age 26.0 years) using gadoteric acid first and Gd-DTPA 3 weeks later. In addition, 24 patients with knee pain were examined using gadoteric acid (n = 12; seven women; mean age 45.8 years) or Gd-DTPA (n = 12; four women; mean age 47.1 years). T 1 values, the relative decrease in T 1 , and the delta R1 were compared using t-tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed using the intraclass correlation (ICC) between two independent readers. At the wrist, there was no significant difference in delta R1 values (0.34 ± 0.10/s, 95% confidence interval [0.30;0.38]/s for gadoteric acid and 0.32 ± 0.09 [0.29;0.35]/s for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.24) or the relative decrease in T 1 (0.25 ± 0.06 [0.29;0.35] msec for gadoteric acid and 0.24 ± 0.05 [0.22;0.27] msec for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.35). High observer agreement was found at precontrast (ICC = 0.87, P DTPA, P = 0.59) or the relative decrease in T 1 (0.30 ± 0.10 [0.26;0.34] msec for gadoteric acid and 0.33 ± 0.05 [0.30;0.35] msec for Gd-DTPA, P = 0.28). High ICCs of 0.96 (P DTPA. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1433-1440. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. LEFT ATRIAL FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION ACCORDING TO MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING WITH LATE GADOLINIUM ENHANCEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Stukalova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common type of arrhythmia. Left atrial abnormalities in AF require further investigation.Aim: To evaluate characteristics of myocardial structure of the left atrium by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with delayed contrast enhancement in patients with AF associated with essential hypertension (EH, in those without any cardiovascular disorders, and in patients with AF after cryoablation of the pulmonary artery orifice.Materials and methods: The study enrolled 53 patients with AF (mean age 56 years. Twenty eight of them had AF without any associated cardiovascular disorders (lone AF, or LAF group, 25 patients had AF related to EH (AF + EH group. Three patients had undergone anti-arrhythmic intervention. Cardiac MRI was performed in all patients with high resolution late gadolinium enhancement (LGE at 15–20 min after i.v. gadoversetamide (0.15 mmol/kg. For LGE MRI, we used a novel high resolution inversion recovery (inversion times 290–340 ms magnetic resonance pulse sequence with isotropic voxel (size 1.25 . 1.25 .2.5 mm and fat saturation. Left atrium walls were segmented semi-automatically on the LGE images. Left atrium fibrosis quantification was performed with the original software LGE Heart Analyzer, developed in Russian Cardiology Research and Production Complex (Moscow.Results: Left atrium fibrosis (mean, 9 [1.7; 18] % was found both in patients with AF + EH and with lone AF. There was a trend towards more significant left atrial fibrosis in the group of AF + EH, compared to that in the lone AF group (10.972 [6.98; 19.366] % vs 4.37 [0.893; 18.575] %, respectively, p = 0.1. The extent of left atrium fibrosis correlated with left atrium dilatation (r = 0.37, p < 0.001 and with the decreased ejection fraction (r = -0.4, р < 0.001. The patients who had undergone an antiarrhythmic intervention, demonstrated formation of intensive LGE zones in the ablation areas.Conclusion: Quantification of

  4. AN ENHANCED METHOD FOREXTENDING COMPUTATION AND RESOURCES BY MINIMIZING SERVICE DELAY IN EDGE CLOUD COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    B.Bavishna*1, Mrs.M.Agalya2 & Dr.G.Kavitha3

    2018-01-01

    A lot of research has been done in the field of cloud computing in computing domain. For its effective performance, variety of algorithms has been proposed. The role of virtualization is significant and its performance is dependent on VM Migration and allocation. More of the energy is absorbed in cloud; therefore, the utilization of numerous algorithms is required for saving energy and efficiency enhancement in the proposed work. In the proposed work, green algorithm has been considered with ...

  5. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  6. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, S. Bruce; Bhutta, Sadaf T.; Buchmann, Robert F. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)is a well-established technique in older children and adults. No studies have focused on its use in neonates and small infants. Our objective was to study the use of gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis. Materials and Methods:Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography was performed on seven neonates and small infants for the evaluation of caval or aortic thrombosis. Gadolinium-DTPA at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (minimum dose 1 ml) was injected using a power injector (0.2 ml/s). Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed using a 3-D, fast, radiofrequency spoiled gradient-echo sequence (TR/TE: 4.8/1.1, flip angle 45 , matrix 256 x 128, slice thickness 2.6 mm interpolated to 1.3 mm, FOV variable, NEX=1.0). Diagnostic-quality angiograms were obtained in all seven neonates. Superior vena cava thrombosis was identified in two neonates, and abdominal aortic thrombosis was present in one neonate. It is practical to perform gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates weighing as little as 600 g for the detection of caval or aortic thrombosis. (orig.)

  7. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  8. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, S. Bruce; Bhutta, Sadaf T.; Buchmann, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)is a well-established technique in older children and adults. No studies have focused on its use in neonates and small infants. Our objective was to study the use of gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis. Materials and Methods:Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography was performed on seven neonates and small infants for the evaluation of caval or aortic thrombosis. Gadolinium-DTPA at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (minimum dose 1 ml) was injected using a power injector (0.2 ml/s). Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed using a 3-D, fast, radiofrequency spoiled gradient-echo sequence (TR/TE: 4.8/1.1, flip angle 45 , matrix 256 x 128, slice thickness 2.6 mm interpolated to 1.3 mm, FOV variable, NEX=1.0). Diagnostic-quality angiograms were obtained in all seven neonates. Superior vena cava thrombosis was identified in two neonates, and abdominal aortic thrombosis was present in one neonate. It is practical to perform gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates weighing as little as 600 g for the detection of caval or aortic thrombosis. (orig.)

  9. Gadobenate-dimeglumine-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for hepatic lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Mann, Erika [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Kamath, Binita M. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Toronto (Canada); Babyn, Paul S. [Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by hepatocyte-specific contrast media has been found useful to characterize liver lesions in adults and children. To present our experience with gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA)-enhanced MRI for evaluation of focal liver lesions in children. We retrospectively reviewed gadobenate-dimeglumine-enhanced MR images obtained for evaluation of suspected hepatic lesions in 30 children. Signal characteristics on various sequences including 45- to 60-min hepatobiliary phase images were noted by two radiologists. Chart review identified relevant clinical details including history of cancer treatment, available pathology and stability of lesion size on follow-up imaging. Of the 30 children who had gadobenate-enhanced MRI, 26 showed focal lesions. Diagnoses in 26 children were focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) in 15, hemangiomas in 3, regenerating nodules in 3, focal fatty infiltration in 2, indeterminate lesions in 3, and one patient each with adenomas, hepatoblastoma and metastasis. Two patients had multiple diagnoses. All FNH lesions (39), all regenerative nodules (19) and an indeterminate lesion were iso- or hyperintense on hepatobiliary-phase images while all other lesions (28) were hypointense to hepatic parenchyma. The average follow-up period was 21.7 months. Our experience with gadobenate-enhanced MRI indicates potential utility of gadobenate in the evaluation of pediatric hepatic lesions in differentiating FNH and regenerating nodules from other lesions. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of therapeutically induced hypertension in patients with delayed cerebral vasospasm by xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan)

    1992-08-01

    Serial cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement were made with stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography in 20 patients with angiographically confirmed reputerd intracranial aneurysms, before and during induced hypertension with continuous infusion of dopamine. All patients showed angiogaphic vasospasm during their course. Twelve patients without symptomatic vasospasm (Group 1) had the lowest hemispheric CBF on the craniotomy side of 31.6[+-]6.8 ml/100 gm/min on days 4-9 (control value, 40.1[+-]2.0 ml/100 gm/min), while the other eight patients with symptomatic vasopsasm (Group 2) had the lowest hemispheric CBF on the craniotomy side of 25.0[+-]7.6 ml/100 gm/min on days 10-14. The critical hemispheric CBF inducing neurological deficits was about 20 ml/ 100 gm/min in Group 2. Dysautoregulation was usually present in Groups 1 and 2, but therapeutically induced hypertension could reverse the delayed neurological deficits, it begun early at the stage of delayed vasospasm. (author).

  11. Plasmonic resonance-enhanced local photothermal energy deposition by aluminum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Xinyuan; Jiang Naibo; Zhang Zhili; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Local energy deposition of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) by localized surface plasmon resonance-enhanced photothermal effects is demonstrated. Low-power light stimuli are efficiently and locally concentrated to trigger the oxidation reactions of Al NPs because of the large ohmic absorption and high reactivity of the Al. Numerical simulations show that both ultraviolet and visible light are more efficient than infrared light for photothermal energy coupling. The natural oxidation layer of alumina is found to have minimum impact on the energy deposition because of its negligible dielectric losses. The near-field distributions of the electric field indicate that slight aggregation induces much higher local enhancement, especially at the interface region of multiple contacting nanoparticles.

  12. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium.

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  14. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy of single R6G molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Zeng-Hui; Liu Li; Wang Gui-Ying; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on colloidal silver clusters has been studied. Based on the great enhancement of the Raman signal and the quench of the fluorescence, the SERRS spectra of R6G were recorded for the samples of dye colloidal solution with different concentrations. Spectral inhomogeneity behaviours from single molecules in the dried sample films were observed with complementary evidences, such as spectral polarization, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuation of vibrational lines and even "breathing" of the molecules. Sequential spectra observed from a liquid sample with an average of 0.3 dye molecules in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1 or 2 molecules. Difference between the SERRS spectra of R6G excited by linearly and circularly polarized light were experimentally measured.

  15. Investigation on Mechanisms of Polymer Enhanced Oil Recovery by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Microscopic Theoretical Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Kao-Ping, Song; Er-Long, Yang; Li, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Polymer flooding is an efficient technique to enhance oil recovery over water flooding. There are lots of discussions regarding the mechanisms for polymer flooding enhancing oil recovery. The main focus is whether polymer flooding can increase sweep efficiency alone, or can increase both of sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. We present a study on this problem. Oil displacement experiments on 4 natural cores show that polymer flooding can increase oil recovery efficiency by more than 12% over water. Moreover, photos are taken by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method both after water flooding and after polymer flooding, which show remaining oil saturation distribution at the middle cross section and the central longitudinal section. Analyses of these photos demonstrate that polymer flooding can increase both sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  16. Comparison of neuroendocrine tumor detection and characterization using DOTATOC-PET in correlation with contrast enhanced CT and delayed contrast enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesel, F.L.; Kratochwil, C.; Mehndiratta, A.; Wulfert, S.; Moltz, J.H.; Zechmann, C.M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Haberkorn, U.; Ley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the rate of successful characterization of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) present with an increased somatostatin receptor, comparing CE-CT with CE-MRI, each in correlation with DOTATOC-PET. Methods and materials: 8 patients with GEP-NET were imaged using CE-MRI (Gd-EOB-DTPA), CE-CT (Imeron 400) and DOTATOC-PET. Contrast-enhancement of normal liver-tissue and metastasis was quantified with ROI-technique. Tumor delineation was assessed with visual-score in blind-read-analysis by two experienced radiologists. Results: Out of 40 liver metastases in patients with NETs, all were detected by CE-MRI and the lesion extent could be adequately assessed, whereas CT failed to detect 20% of all metastases. The blind-read-score of CT in arterial and portal phase was median −0.65 and −1.4, respectively, and 2.7 for delayed-MRI. The quantitative ROI-analysis presented an improved contrast-enhancement-ratio with a median of 1.2, 1.6 and 3.3 for CE-CT arterial, portal-phase and delayed-MRI respectively. Conclusion: Late CE-MRI was superior to CE-CT in providing additionally morphologic characterization and exact lesion extension of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumor detected with DOTATOC-PET. Therefore, late enhanced Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI seems to be the adequate imaging modality for combination with DOTATOC-PET to provide complementary (macroscopic and molecular) tumor characterization in hepatic metastasized NETs

  17. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage of the ankle joint: Results after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC)-aided reconstruction of osteochondral lesions of the talus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiewiorski, M.; Miska, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Studler, U.; Bieri, O.; Valderrabano, V.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess cartilage quality using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus using autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC). Materials and methods: A three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo (SGE) sequence at 3 T was used to obtain quantitative T1 relaxation times before and after Gd-DTPA2 (Magnevist, 0.2 mM/kg bod weight) administration to assess 23 cases of AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Delta relaxation rates (ΔR1) for reference cartilage (RC) and repair tissue (RT), and the relative delta relaxation rate (rΔR1) were calculated. The morphological appearance of the cartilage RT was graded on sagittal dual-echo steady-state (DESS) views according to the “magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue” (MOCART) protocol. The study was approved by the institutional review board and written consent from each patient was obtained. Results: The AMIC cases had a mean T1 relaxation time of 1.194 s (SD 0.207 s) in RC and 1.470 s (SD 0.384 s) in RT before contrast medium administration. The contrast-enhanced T1 relaxation time decreased to 0.480 s (SD 0.114 s) in RC and 0.411 s (SD 0.096 s) in RT. There was a significant difference (p > 0.05) between the ΔR1 in RC (1.372 × 10 −3 /s, range 0.526–3.201 × 10 −3 /s, SD 0.666 × 10 −3 /s) and RT (1.856 × 10 −3 /s, range 0.93–3.336 × 10 −3 /s, SD 0.609 × 10 −3 /s). The mean rΔR1 was 1.49, SD 0.45). The mean MOCART score at follow-up was 62.6 points (range 30–95, SD 15.3). Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that repair cartilage resulting from AMIC-aided repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus has a significantly lower glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content than normal hyaline cartilage, but can be regarded as having hyaline-like properties

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienze Morfologico-Biomediche, Sezione di Anatomia ed Istologia, Università di Verona, Verona, I-37194 (Italy)

    2002-06-05

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  20. Enhanced antibody recognition with a magneto-optic surface plasmon resonance (MO-SPR) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, Maria Grazia; Ferreiro-Vila, Elías; Garcia-Martin, José Miguel; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Rella, Roberto

    2014-08-15

    A comparison between sensing performance of traditional SPR (Surface Plasmon Resonance) and magneto-optic SPR (MOSPR) transducing techniques is presented in this work. MOSPR comes from an evolution of traditional SPR platform aiming at modulating Surface Plasmon wave by the application of an external magnetic field in transverse configuration. Previous work demonstrated that, when the Plasmon resonance is excited in these structures, the external magnetic field induces a modification of the coupling of the incident light with the Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPP). Besides, these structures can lead to an enhancement in the magneto-optical (MO) activity when the SPP is excited. This phenomenon is exploited in this work to demonstrate the possibility to use the enhanced MO signal as proper transducer signal for investigating biomolecular interactions in liquid phase. To this purpose, the transducer surface was functionalized by thiol chemistry and used for recording the binding between Bovine Serum Albumin molecules immobilized onto the surface and its complementary target. Higher sensing performance in terms of sensitivity and lower limit of detection of the MOSPR biosensor with respect to traditional SPR sensors is demonstrated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbarbati Andrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI at high field intensity (4.7 T. The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. Methods The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6 and 20-month-old (n = 6 rats. Results At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. Conclusion The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  2. Tunable Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced Photodetector with Double High-Index-Contrast Grating Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists....... Furthermore, the fact that it can be fabricated on a silicon platform offers us a possibility of integration with electronics.......In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists...... of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs...

  3. Prevalence and signal characteristics of late gadolinium enhancement on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Shiro; Matsuoka, Koji; Onishi, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    The background of this study was to determine the prevalence and signal intensity (SI) characteristics of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC). Cine, black-blood T2-weighted and LGE MR images were acquired in 23 patients with TC within 72h of onset. Wall motion abnormality (WMA), edema and LGE were evaluated with a 16-segment model. The SI characteristics of LGE were analyzed using SI distribution in remote normal segments as reference. Follow-up MRI was performed 3 months later. Retrospective analysis of LGE MRI was also performed in 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to compare the SI characteristics between TC and AMI. In acute phase, WMA and edema were observed in 236 (64%) and 205 (56%) of 368 segments. LGE was observed in 10 (2.7%) of 368 segments and in 5 (22%) of 23 patients. All LGE lesions in TC exhibited transmural enhancement. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in TC was significantly lower than that of AMI (3.1±0.3 standard deviations (SD) vs. 6.1±1.2 SD, P<0.01), and CNR value of 4 was useful for distinguishing TC from AMI. Both LGE and WMA disappeared within 12 months. Grey myocardial signal on LGE MRI may be observed in patients with TC. However, the extent of LGE is substantially less than that of WMA and edema, and disappears within 12 months. (author)

  4. Specific imaging characteristic of solitary necrotic nodule of the liver: Marked peripheral rim-like enhancement with internal hypointensity on longer delayed MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jiayang; Yu, Dexin; Ma, Xiangxing; Xiang, Ying; Guo, Lijuan [Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Ji' nan City, Shandong (China); Ma, Xiaoyuan [Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Department of Orthopaedics, Ji' nan City (China)

    2017-09-15

    To obtain specific imaging findings of solitary necrotic nodule of the liver (SNNL) using longer delayed contrast-enhanced MRI and compare them with those of three mimic hepatic diseases. Sixteen patients with SNNL underwent plain and contrast-enhanced triphasic CT and multiphasic MRI with delayed time prolonged to 2 h after contrast bolus injection. Twenty-three patients with mimic lesions including seven with eight HCCs, five with five iCCs and 11 with metastatic lesions served as the control group. Those patients also received plain and multiphasic contrast-enhanced MRI. Imaging features of lesions such as peripheral wash-out time were evaluated. Among the 16 SNNLs, with a prolonged delayed MRI time, the enhancement degree of tumour periphery increased gradually. When it was up to 1 h, all lesions represented moderate/marked peripheral enhancement with internal hypointensity. However, the peripheral wash-out in seven HCCs (87.5%) and all metastatic lesions except three appeared at 10 or 15 min, one iCC (20%) at 30 min and the other lesions at 1 h. Longer MRI with a delayed time of 1-2 h may be useful in diagnosis SNNL, revealing the specific imaging characteristic of SNNL as pronounced peripheral enhancement with internal hypointensity. (orig.)

  5. Electroacupuncture Delays Hypertension Development through Enhancing NO/NOS Activity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Suk Hwang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, this study investigated whether electroacupuncture (EA could reduce early stage hypertension by examining nitric oxide (NO levels in plasma and nitric oxide synthase (NOS levels in the mesenteric resistance artery. EA was applied to the acupuncture point Governor Vessel 20 (GV20 or to a non-acupuncture point in the tail twice weekly for 3 weeks under anesthesia. In conscious SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, blood pressure was determined the day after EA treatment by the tail-cuff method. We measured plasma NO concentration, and evaluated endothelial NO syntheses (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS protein expression in the mesenteric artery. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were lower after 3 weeks of GV20 treatment than EA at non-acupuncture point and no treatment control in SHR. nNOS expression by EA was significantly different between both WKY and no treatment SHR control, and EA at GV20 in SHR. eNOS expression was significantly high in EA at GV 20 compared with no treatment control. In conclusion, EA could attenuate the blood pressure elevation of SHR, along with enhancing NO/NOS activity in the mesenteric artery in SHR.

  6. Cardiac CT diagnosis in acute coronary syndrome. Significance of delayed enhancement effect in myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takayoshi

    2007-01-01

    Authors have found that the effect in the title (DEE) exists in cardiac CT images due to the contrasting agent used for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) done shortly after the onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). To confirm the finding, they compared images of the cardiac CT and blood flow single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) obtained several days after ACS. The cardiac CT images of 17 patients (M 15, F 2; average age 63.6 y) with ACS were obtained 20-30 min after the successfully attained emergent enhanced PCI, with the 4-row multi detector low CT (MDCT) machine Aquilion (Toshiba) in synchronization to R-R interval for processing to multiplanar reconstructed (MPR) images. Thereafter (5.5 days in average), myocardial SPECT was conducted with 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (740 MBq), of which images were also processed to MPR ones. The CT and SPECT images were compared in coronary arterial territories assigned to 17 segments in the left ventricle and to 20 areas in the Bull's-eye Map. Findings due to DEE in the former CT images were confirmed well correspondent with the lesion found in the latter SPECT, indicating that DEE is a useful tool for evaluation of ACS severity. (R.T.)

  7. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of ruptured coronary plaques in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H P Jansen

    Full Text Available X-ray coronary angiography (XCA is the current gold standard for the assessment of lumen encroaching coronary stenosis but XCA does not allow for early detection of rupture-prone vulnerable plaques, which are thought to be the precursor lesions of most acute myocardial infarctions (AMI and sudden death. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance coronary vessel wall imaging (CE-MRCVI for the detection of culprit lesions in the coronary arteries.16 patients (13 male, age 61.9±8.6 years presenting with sub-acute MI underwent CE-MRCVI within 24-72h prior to invasive XCA. CE-MRCVI was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo inversion recovery sequence (3D IR TFE 40±4 minutes following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA on a 3T MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel cardiac coil.14 patients were found to have culprit lesions (7x LAD, 1xLCX, 6xRCA as identified by XCA. Quantitative CE-MRCVI correctly identified the culprit lesion location with a sensitivity of 79% and excluded culprit lesion formation with a specificity of 99%. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR of culprit lesions (9.7±4.1 significantly exceeded CNR values of segments without culprit lesions (2.9±1.9, p<0.001.CE-MRCVI allows the selective visualization of culprit lesions in patients immediately after myocardial infarction (MI. The pronounced contrast uptake in ruptured plaques may represent a surrogate biomarker of plaque activity and/or vulnerability.

  8. Delayed expression of enhanced reactivation and decreased mutagenesis of UV-irradiated adenovirus in UV-irradiated ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.; Rainbow, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the authors examined UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) and UV-enhanced mutagenesis (UVEM) of UV-irradiated adenovirus in AT fibroblasts. UVER factors for Ad V antigen expression were significantly less than normal in AT strains tested when infection occurred immediately after UV-irradiation of cells. However, UVER factors were >1 and similar to those found for normal strains when cells were infected 24 h after UV-irradiation, indicating delay in the expression of UVER for Ad V antigen in AT cells. UV-irradiation of both normal and AT cells 24 h prior to infection also resulted in a significant increase in progeny survival for UV-irradiated Ad. In normal cells, this progeny UVER was concomitant with a significant increase in the mutation frequency for UV-irradiated virus (increase in targeted mutagenesis) suggesting existence of an inducible error-prone DNA repair mode in normal human cells. In contrast, pre-UV-irradiation of AT cells resulted in a significant decrease in the mutation frequency for UV-irradiated virus. (author)

  9. Electron impact ionization of B-like ion N2+. Resonance enhancement of the single-channel cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guohe; Qian Xingzhong; Pan Soufu

    1998-01-01

    The electron impact ionization cross sections of B-like ion N 2+ are calculated in the Coulomb-Born no exchange approximation by using R-matrix method, and the single differential cross section is given. The calculated results exhibit the Rydberg series of resonances. The resonance enhancement of the single-channel cross section is significantly greater than direct ionization cross section. It is agreement with that of Chidichimo

  10. Delayed emergence of methamphetamine’s enhanced cardiovascular effects in nonhuman primates during protracted methamphetamine abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, DB; Schindler, CW; Chefer, S; Belcher, AM; Ahmet, I; Scheidweiler, KB; Huestis, MA; Stein, EA

    2015-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine abuse is linked with brain abnormalities, but its peripheral effects constitute an integral aspect of long-term methamphetamine use. Methods Eight male rhesus monkeys with long histories of intravenous methamphetamine self-administration were evaluated 1 day, and 1, 4, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after their last methamphetamine self-administration session. On test days, isoflurane-anesthetized animals received a 0.35 mg/kg IV methamphetamine challenge. A control group consisted of 10 age and gender matched drug naïve monkeys. Cardiovascular responses to methamphetamine were followed for 2.5 h. Echocardiograms were acquired at 3 and 12 months of abstinence and in the control animals. Results No pre-methamphetamine baseline differences existed among 7 physiological measures across all conditions and controls. As expected, methamphetamine increased heart rate and blood pressure in controls. However, immediately following the self-administration period, the blood pressure response to methamphetamine challenge was reduced when compared to control monkeys. The peak and 150-min average heart rate increases, as well as peak blood pressure increases following methamphetamine were significantly elevated between weeks 12 to 26 of abstinence. These data indicate the development of tolerance followed by sensitization to methamphetamine cardiovascular effects. Echocardiography demonstrated decreased left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output at 3 months of abstinence. Importantly, both cardiovascular sensitization and cardiotoxicity appeared to be reversible as they returned toward control group levels after 1 year of abstinence. Conclusions Enhanced cardiovascular effects may occur after prolonged abstinence in addicts relapsing to methamphetamine and may underlie clinically reported acute cardiotoxic events. PMID:26775284

  11. Improved stochastic resonance algorithm for enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio of high-performance liquid chromatographic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Shaofei; Xiang Bingren; Deng Haishan; Xiang Suyun; Lu Jun

    2007-01-01

    Based on the theory of stochastic resonance, an improved stochastic resonance algorithm with a new criterion for optimizing system parameters to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of HPLC/UV chromatographic signal for trace analysis was presented in this study. Compared with the conventional criterion in stochastic resonance, the proposed one can ensure satisfactory SNR as well as good peak shape of chromatographic peak in output signal. Application of the criterion to experimental weak signals of HPLC/UV was investigated and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses

  12. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  13. Evaluation of focal cartilage lesions of the knee using MRI T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årøen, Asbjørn; Brøgger, Helga; Røtterud, Jan Harald; Sivertsen, Einar Andreas; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-02-11

    Assessment of degenerative changes of the cartilage is important in knee cartilage repair surgery. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) are able to detect early degenerative changes. The hypothesis of the study was that cartilage surrounding a focal cartilage lesion in the knee does not possess degenerative changes. Twenty-eight consecutive patients included in a randomized controlled trial on cartilage repair were evaluated using MRI T2 mapping and dGEMRIC before cartilage treatment was initiated. Inclusion was based on disabling knee problems (Lysholm score of ≤ 75) due to an arthroscopically verified focal femoral condyle cartilage lesion. Furthermore, no major malalignments or knee ligament injuries were accepted. Mean patient age was 33 ± 9.6 years, and the mean duration of knee symptoms was 49 ± 60 months. The MRI T2 mapping and the dGEMRIC measurements were performed at three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) at the medial and lateral femoral condyle, avoiding the cartilage lesion The MRI T2 mapping of the cartilage did not demonstrate significant differences between condyles with or without cartilage lesions. The dGEMRIC results did not show significantly lower values of the affected condyle compared with the opposite condyle and the contra-lateral knee in any of the ROIs. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of the dGEMRIC readings was 0.882. The MRI T2 mapping and the dGEMRIC confirmed the arthroscopic findings that normal articular cartilage surrounded the cartilage lesion, reflecting normal variation in articular cartilage quality. NCT00885729 , registered April 17 2009.

  14. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) of Cadaveric Shoulders: Comparison of Contrast Dynamics in Hyaline and Fibrous Cartilage after Intraarticular Gadolinium Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, E. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)); Hodler, J.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A. (Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic Univ. Hospital Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. Purpose: To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Material and Methods: Transverse T1 maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T1 maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. Results: T1 of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+-34 ms. T1 of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T1(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T1 and ?R1 values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+-16 ms and 1.1+-0.09/s, and 332+-31 ms and 1.2+-0.1/s, respectively. Conclusion: A significant decrease in T1(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium

  15. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) of cadaveric shoulders: comparison of contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage after intraarticular gadolinium injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, E; Hodler, J; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2009-01-01

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a novel method to investigate cartilaginous and fibrocartilaginous structures. To investigate the contrast dynamics in hyaline and fibrous cartilage of the glenohumeral joint after intraarticular injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. Transverse T(1) maps were acquired on a 1.5T scanner before and after intraarticular injection of 2.0 mmol/l gadopentetate dimeglumine in five cadaveric shoulders using a dual flip angle three-dimensional gradient echo (3D-GRE) sequence. The acquisition time for the T(1) maps was 5 min 5 s for the whole shoulder. Measurements were repeated every 15 min over 2.5 hours. Regions of interest (ROIs) covering the glenoid cartilage and the labrum were drawn to assess the temporal evolution of the relaxation parameters. T(1) of unenhanced hyaline cartilage of the glenoid was 568+/-34 ms. T(1) of unenhanced fibrous cartilage of the labrum was 552+/-38 ms. Significant differences (P=0.002 and 0.03) in the relaxation parameters were already measurable after 15 min. After 2 to 2.5 hours, hyaline and fibrous cartilage still demonstrated decreasing relaxation parameters, with a larger range of the T(1)(Gd) values in fibrous cartilage. T(1) and triangle Delta R(1) values of hyaline and fibrous cartilage after 2.5 hours were 351+/-16 ms and 1.1+/-0.09 s(-1), and 332+/-31 ms and 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1), respectively. A significant decrease in T(1)(Gd) was found 15 min after intraarticular contrast injection. Contrast accumulation was faster in hyaline than in fibrous cartilage. After 2.5 hours, contrast accumulation showed a higher rate of decrease in hyaline cartilage, but neither hyaline nor fibrous cartilage had reached equilibrium.

  16. Resonant optical tunneling-induced enhancement of the photonic spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xing; Wang, Qingkai; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuqing; Dai, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yuanjiang

    2018-04-01

    Due to the quantum analogy with optics, the resonant optical tunneling effect (ROTE) has been proposed to investigate both the fundamental physics and the practical applications of optical switches and liquid refractive index sensors. In this paper, the ROTE is used to enhance the spin Hall effect (SHE) of transmitted light. It is demonstrated that sandwiching a layer of a high-refractive-index medium (boron nitride crystal) between two low-refractive-index layers (silica) can effectively enhance the photonic SHE due to the increased refractive index gradient and an enhanced evanescent field near the interface between silica and boron nitride. A maximum transverse shift of the horizontal polarization state in the ROTE structure of about 22.25 µm has been obtained, which is at least three orders of magnitude greater than the transverse shift in the frustrated total internal reflection structure. Moreover, the SHE can be manipulated by controlling the component materials and the thickness of the ROTE structure. These findings open the possibility for future applications of photonic SHE in precision metrology and spin-based photonics.

  17. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Granqvist

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations.

  18. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Niko; Hanning, Anders; Eng, Lars; Tuppurainen, Jussi; Viitala, Tapani

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations. PMID:24217357

  19. Localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced photoluminescence of CdSe QDs in PMMA matrix on silver colloids with different shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Liu; Xu Xiaoliang; Shi Chaoshu; Ming Hai

    2010-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced photoluminescences (PL) from CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on worm-like or quasi-spherical silver colloids have been investigated. The shape of silver colloid film is controlled by annealing temperature (200 o C∼350 o C). Strong PL enhancements of CdSe QDs on both as-grown and annealed silver colloid films are observed. The results show that the PL enhancement factor of CdSe QDs on worm-like silver colloid film reaches as high as 15-fold. Moreover, the enhancement factor is 5 times larger than that obtained from the quasi-spherical silver colloids. The superiority of worm-like silver nanostructure on LSPR enhanced photoluminescence is attributed to its larger size, hot spots and multiple dipole resonance modes coupling, which are induced by aggregation effect.

  20. Bone marrow blood supply in gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Bann, K.; Ridgway, J.P.; Butt, W.P.

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine whether bone blood supply can be assessed on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of 49 patients attending for post-laminectomy examination were reviewed (30 male, 19 female, mean age 46.4 years, age range 23-84 years). Each study included sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences before and after gadolinium administration. Regions of interest were drawn within the L3 vertebral body from a parasagittal slice from each sequence. Signal intensity (SI) values were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. For each patient, changes in receiver gain for pre- and post-gadolinium images were corrected by an image scaling factor. In all cases, a measurable increase in SI was found (mean 15.3%, range 4.4-55.7) due to bone vascularity. The results give no indication of the quantity or timing of blood supply but provide a basis for further work. (orig.)

  1. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  2. Output-Feedback Control of a Chaotic MEMS Resonator for Oscillation Amplitude Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jimenez-Triana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses the problem of chaos control in an electrostatic MEMS resonator by using an output-feedback control scheme. One of the unstable orbits immersed in the chaotic attractor is stabilized in order to produce a sustained oscillation of the movable plate composing the microstructure. The orbit is carefully chosen so as to produce a high amplitude oscillation. This approach allows the enhancement of oscillation amplitude of the resonator at a reduced control effort, since the unstable orbit already exists in the system and it is not necessary to spend energy to create it. Realistic operational conditions of the MEMS are considered including parametric uncertainties in the model and constraints due to the difficulty in measuring the speed of the plates of the microstructure. A control law is constructed recursively by using the technique of backstepping. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to confirm the validity of the developed control scheme and to demonstrate the effect of controlling orbits immersed in the chaotic attractor.

  3. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  4. Replacement of Cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide Bilayer on Gold Nanorod by Alkanethiol Crosslinker for Enhanced Plasmon Resonance Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Justin; Venkataramasubramani, Meenakshi; Wang, Yanyan; Tang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Surface modification of gold nanorods (GNRs) is often problematic due to tightly packed cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB) bilayer. Herein, we performed a double phase transfer ligand exchange to achieve displacement of CTAB on nanorods. During the removal, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) crosslinker is simultaneously assembled on nanorod surfaces to prevent aggregation. The resulting MUDA-GNRs retain the shape and position of plasmon peaks similar to CTAB-capped GNRs. The introduction of carboxyl groups allows covalent conjugation of biological receptors in a facile fashion to construct a robust, label-free biosensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) transduction of biomolecular interaction. More importantly, smaller MUDA layer on the GNRs reduces the distance of target binding to the plasmonic nanostructure interface, leading to a significant enhancement in LSPR assay sensitivity and specificity. Compared to modification using conventional electropolymer adsorption, MUDA-coated gold nanosensor exhibits five times lower detection limit for cardiac troponin I assay with a high selectivity. PMID:23816849

  5. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumours of the central nervous systems: a clinical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graif, M.; Steiner, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of the intravascular paramagnetic contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging of tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) has been assessed over the past 3 years. Various patterns of contrast enhancement were observed, and situations in MRI where the administration of contrast medium may be useful have been defined. These include lesions which are isointense with normal brain matter, the separation of tumour from surrounding oedema, evaluation of the degree of blood-brain barrier breakdown, delineation of tumours obscured by overlying calcification on computed tomography (CT) and in the investigation of lesions in anatomical areas where CT has known limitations (brain, stem, cervical spine). Changes in relaxation times in normal and abnormal tissues following contrast medium, toxicity and dosage of gadolinium-DTPA, and MRI pulse sequence techniques are reviewed. (author)

  6. Nanopolyaniline as immobilization template for signal enhancement of surface plasmon resonance biosensor - A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarun, Dzaraini; Abdul Azem, Nor Hazirah Kamel; Sarijo, Siti Halimah; Mohd, Ahmad Faiza; Abdullah @ Mohd Noor, Mashita

    2012-07-01

    A technique for the enhancement of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) signal for sensing biomolecular interactions is described. Polyaniline (PANI) of particle size in the range of 1 to 15 nm was synthesized and used as the template for the immobilization of protein molecules. Biomolecular interactions of unbound and PANI-bound proteins with antibody molecules were SPR-monitored using a model system comprising of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and anti BSA. A 7-fold increased in the signal was recorded from interactions of the PANI-bound BSA with anti BSA compared to the interactions of its unbound counterpart. This preliminary observation provides new avenue in immunosensor technology for improving the detection sensitivity of SPR biosensor; and thereby increasing the lower detection limit of biomolecules.

  7. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  8. Localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced organic solar cell with gold nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Linfang; Wang, Dan; Ye, Yuqian; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing [Centre for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zuo, Lijian; Chen, Hongzheng [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-03-15

    We use gold nanospheres (Au NSs) to improve the performance of polymer organic solar cells. Au NSs with a diameter of about 5 nm or 15 nm were doped into the buffer layer of organic solar cells. We attribute the efficiency improvement to the size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of Au NSs, which can enhance the light harvest ability of active layer around the Au NSs, and increase the probability of the exciton generation and dissociation. Our results show that solar cells doped with 15 nm-diameter Au NSs exhibit significant improvement of the efficiency (from 1.99% to 2.36%), while solar cells doped with only 5 nm-diameter Au NSs did not give obvious improvement of the performance. (author)

  9. 3D Modeling of Vascular Pathologies from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor Rivera, Diego; Orkisz, Maciej; Arias, Julian; Uriza, Luis Felipe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for generating 3D vascular models from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) using a fast marching algorithm. The main contributions of this work are: the use of the original image for defining a speed function (which determines the movement of the interface) and the calculation of the time in which the interface identifies the artery. The proposed method was validated on pathologic carotid artery images of patients and vascular phantoms. A visual appraisal of vascular models obtained with the method shows a satisfactory extraction of the vascular wall. A quantitative assessment proved that the generated models depend on the values of algorithm parameters. The maximum induced error was equal to 1.34 voxels in the diameter of the measured stenoses.

  10. Radiation Characteristics Enhancement of Dielectric Resonator Antenna Using Solid/Discrete Dielectric Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. E. Malhat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The radiation characteristics of the dielectric resonator antennas (DRA is enhanced using different types of solid and discrete dielectric lenses. One of these approaches is by loading the DRA with planar superstrate, spherical lens, or by discrete lens (transmitarray. The dimensions and dielectric constant of each lens are optimized to maximize the gain of the DRA. A comparison between the radiations characteristics of the DRA loaded with different lenses are introduced. The design of the dielectric transmitarray depends on optimizing the heights of the dielectric material of the unit cell. The optimized transmitarray achieves 7 dBi extra gain over the single DRA with preserving the circular polarization. The proposed antenna is suitable for various applications that need high gain and focused antenna beam.

  11. Enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary perfusion imaging in diagnosing pulmonary embolism: preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaoyong; Du Jing; Zhang Zhaoqi; Guo Xi; Yan Zixu; Jiang Hong; Wang Wei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance pulmonary perfusion imaging (MRPP) in diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) compared with enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography (MRPA) and pulmonary radionuclide perfusion imaging. Methods: Fourteen patients were definitely diagnosed as PE, whose ages were from 19 to 71 years old and mean 45.5 ± 19.8 years old. All patients under went MRPA and MRPP and 3 patients were examined again after thrombolytic treatment. Five patients underwent pulmonary radionuclide perfusion imaging. Setting ROI in top, middle, bottom of lung area and abnormal area respectively, we detected signal intensity and time-signal curve to obtain the transformation rate of signal (TROS) during perfusion peak value. Results: In 14 pulmonary embolism patients, MRPA found 62 branches of pulmonary artery obstruction. Fifty-five abnormal pulmonary perfusion zones were found by MRPP, and the above results were very alike. The coincidence was 88.71%. In 14 cases, MRPP could show 25 subsegments lesion below segments. In 5 patients who had both results Of MRPP and ECT at the same time. MRPP shows 33 perfusion defect zones and 37 segments were found by ECT, the sensitivity was 89.19%. After thrombolytic treatment, both the status of the affected pulmonary artery improved markedly and perfusion defect zones reduced obviously in 3 cases by MRPP and MRPA. TROS in normal perfusion zones perfusion defect zones and low perfusion zones had significant difference (t=22.882, P<0.01). Conclusion: Contrast enhanced MR pulmonary perfusion can show both perfusion defect zones and low perfusion zones in pulmonary embolism. Time-signal curve can show the period of maximum no perfusion zones in pulmonary artery embolism zones. And the amplitude of fluctuation is small with miminum TROS. MRPP has significant values especially in showing pulmonary artery embolism in segments and subsegments. Using both MRPP and

  12. Contrast enhanced liver MRI in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis: inverse appearance of focal confluent fibrosis on delayed phase MR images with hepatocyte specific versus extracellular gadolinium based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Gupta, Rajan T; Ringe, Kristina I; Boll, Daniel T; Merkle, Elmar M

    2011-12-01

    To assess the enhancement pattern of focal confluent fibrosis (FCF) on contrast-enhanced hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hepatocyte-specific (Gd-EOB-DTPA) and extracellular (ECA) gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). After institutional review board approval, 10 patients with PSC (6 male, 4 female; 33-61 years) with 13 FCF were included in this retrospective study. All patients had a Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI exam, and a comparison ECA-enhanced MRI. On each T1-weighted dynamic dataset, the signal intensity (SI) of FCF and the surrounding liver as well as the paraspinal muscle (M) were measured. In the Gd-EOB-DTPA group, hepatocyte phase images were also included. SI FCF/SI M, SI liver/SI M, and [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were compared between the different contrast agents for each dynamic phase using the paired Student's t-test. There was no significant difference in SI FCF/SI M in all imaging phases. SI liver/SI M was significantly higher for the Gd-EOB-DTPA group in the delayed phase (P DTPA group, mean [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were as follows (values for ECA group in parentheses): unenhanced phase: 0.26 (0.26); arterial phase: 0.01 (-0.31); portal venous phase (PVP): -0.05 (-0.26); delayed phase (DP): 0.14 (-0.54); and hepatocyte phase: 0.26. Differences were significant for the DP (P DTPA-enhanced images. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation on dispersion in the active optical waveguide resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zihan; Gao, Yining; Xie, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Introducing active gain in the optical waveguide resonator not only compensates the loss, but also can change the dispersion relationship in the ring resonator. It is demonstrated that the group delay time is negative when the resonator is in the undercoupled condition, which also means the resonator exhibits the fast light effect. Theoretical analysis indicates that fast light effect due to anomalous dispersion, would be manipulated by the gain coefficient controlled by the input pump light power and that fast light would enhance scale factor of the optical resonant gyroscope. Resonance optical gyroscope (ROG)'s scale factor for measuring rotation rate is enhanced by anomalous dispersion with superluminal light propagation. The sensitivity of ROG could be enhanced by anomalous dispersion by coupled resonators even considering the effect of anomalous dispersion and propagation gain on broadened linewidth, and this could result in at least two orders of magnitude enhancement in sensitivity.

  14. A Smart Toy to Enhance the Decision-Making Process at Children’s Psychomotor Delay Screenings: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background EDUCERE (“Ubiquitous Detection Ecosystem to Care and Early Stimulation for Children with Developmental Disorders”) is an ecosystem for ubiquitous detection, care, and early stimulation of children with developmental disorders. The objectives of this Spanish government-funded research and development project are to investigate, develop, and evaluate innovative solutions to detect changes in psychomotor development through the natural interaction of children with toys and everyday objects, and perform stimulation and early attention activities in real environments such as home and school. Thirty multidisciplinary professionals and three nursery schools worked in the EDUCERE project between 2014 and 2017 and they obtained satisfactory results. Related to EDUCERE, we found studies based on providing networks of connected smart objects and the interaction between toys and social networks. Objective This research includes the design, implementation, and validation of an EDUCERE smart toy aimed to automatically detect delays in psychomotor development. The results from initial tests led to enhancing the effectiveness of the original design and deployment. The smart toy, based on stackable cubes, has a data collector module and a smart system for detection of developmental delays, called the EDUCERE developmental delay screening system (DDSS). Methods The pilot study involved 65 toddlers aged between 23 and 37 months (mean=29.02, SD 3.81) who built a tower with five stackable cubes, designed by following the EDUCERE smart toy model. As toddlers made the tower, sensors in the cubes sent data to a collector module through a wireless connection. All trials were video-recorded for further analysis by child development experts. After watching the videos, experts scored the performance of the trials to compare and fine-tune the interpretation of the data automatically gathered by the toy-embedded sensors. Results Judges were highly reliable in an interrater

  15. A Smart Toy to Enhance the Decision-Making Process at Children's Psychomotor Delay Screenings: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez García, María Angeles; Martín Ruiz, María Luisa; Rivera, Diego; Vadillo, Laura; Valero Duboy, Miguel Angel

    2017-05-19

    EDUCERE ("Ubiquitous Detection Ecosystem to Care and Early Stimulation for Children with Developmental Disorders") is an ecosystem for ubiquitous detection, care, and early stimulation of children with developmental disorders. The objectives of this Spanish government-funded research and development project are to investigate, develop, and evaluate innovative solutions to detect changes in psychomotor development through the natural interaction of children with toys and everyday objects, and perform stimulation and early attention activities in real environments such as home and school. Thirty multidisciplinary professionals and three nursery schools worked in the EDUCERE project between 2014 and 2017 and they obtained satisfactory results. Related to EDUCERE, we found studies based on providing networks of connected smart objects and the interaction between toys and social networks. This research includes the design, implementation, and validation of an EDUCERE smart toy aimed to automatically detect delays in psychomotor development. The results from initial tests led to enhancing the effectiveness of the original design and deployment. The smart toy, based on stackable cubes, has a data collector module and a smart system for detection of developmental delays, called the EDUCERE developmental delay screening system (DDSS). The pilot study involved 65 toddlers aged between 23 and 37 months (mean=29.02, SD 3.81) who built a tower with five stackable cubes, designed by following the EDUCERE smart toy model. As toddlers made the tower, sensors in the cubes sent data to a collector module through a wireless connection. All trials were video-recorded for further analysis by child development experts. After watching the videos, experts scored the performance of the trials to compare and fine-tune the interpretation of the data automatically gathered by the toy-embedded sensors. Judges were highly reliable in an interrater agreement analysis (intraclass correlation 0

  16. Delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) can be effectively applied for longitudinal cohort evaluation of articular cartilage regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Lambertus, W.B.; Benink, R.J.; Tsuchida, A.I.; Vincken, K.L.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) facilitates non-invasive evaluation of the glycosaminoglycan content in articular cartilage. The primary aim of this study was to show that the dGEMRIC technique is able to monitor cartilage repair following regenerative cartilage

  17. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Yamazaki, Youichi; Shinohara, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  18. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I Angel-Chavez

    Full Text Available In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV. Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  19. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel-Chavez, Luis I; Acosta-Gómez, Eduardo I; Morales-Avalos, Mario; Castro, Elena; Cruzblanca, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV). Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  20. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s(-1).

  1. Sensitive molecular diagnostics using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan; McKenzie, Fiona; MacRae, Douglas; Ricketts, Alastair; Dougan, Jennifer

    2009-02-01

    Surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) is an analytical technique with several advantages over competitive techniques in terms of improved sensitivity and multiplexing. We have made great progress in the development of SERRS as a quantitative analytical method, in particular for the detection of DNA. SERRS is an extremely sensitive and selective technique which when applied to the detection of labelled DNA sequences allows detection limits to be obtained which rival, and in most cases, are better than fluorescence. Here the conditions are explored which will enable the successful detection of DNA using SERRS. The enhancing surface which is used is crucial and in this case suspensions of nanoparticles were used as they allow quantitative behaviour to be achieved and allow analogous systems to current fluorescence based systems to be made. The aggregation conditions required to obtain SERRS of DNA are crucial and herein we describe the use of spermine as an aggregating agent. The nature of the label which is used, be it fluorescent, positively or negatively charged also effects the SERRS response and these conditions are again explored here. We have clearly demonstrated the ability to identify the components of a mixture of 5 analytes in solution by using two different excitation wavelengths and also of a 6-plex using data analysis techniques. These conditions will allow the use of SERRS for the detection of target DNA in a meaningful diagnostic assay.

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: an experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Sirun; Shen, Si; Zhu, Tianyuan; Liang, Wenbin; Huang, Li; Chen, Hanfang; Wu, Hejia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for monitoring cartilage degeneration. This is a proof-of-concept study in an animal model. Adult New Zealand rabbits were randomly stratified into five groups. Papain was injected intra-articularly in the right knee in four groups to establish the stages of cartilage degeneration. The left knee and group 5 served as controls. Bilateral MRI was performed 24 h after the initial injection of papain, and 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months following three papain injections. Injection of the contrast agent was followed by bilateral MRI examination immediately upon injection, and at 2 and 4 h post-injection. Signal intensities of articular cartilage and peripheral soft tissues were obtained before animals were sacrificed. Post-mortem bilateral cartilage specimens were studied histologically. Histopathology results verified the staged degeneration of papain-treated articular cartilage. Differences in cartilage signal intensity were significant for the staged model using a special three-dimensional MRI method (P 0.05). Contrast-enhanced MRI examination may be a viable tool for early diagnosis of osteoarticular disease. Prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the potential for clinical application. (orig.)

  3. Effect of background parenchymal enhancement on breast cancer detection with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, M; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) may influence the sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging in breast cancer detection. A total of 180 consecutive women with 194 breast cancers underwent MR imaging examination. Women were assigned to two different groups depending on the degree of BPE. Group 1 consisted of women with minimal or mild BPE and group 2 of women with moderate or marked BPE. The distributions of histotypes of tumors within the two groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Difference in sensitivities of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between the two groups was searched for using the Student t-test. No differences in terms of distributions of histotypes of tumors between the two groups of women were found (P=0.5). The 11% difference in sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between group 1 (91/92; 99%; 95% CI: 94-100%) and group 2 (90/102; 88%; 95% CI: 80-94%) was statistically significant (P=0.0058). The sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging is significantly lower in women with moderate and marked BPE as compared with women with minimal and mild BPE regardless of cancer histotype. BPE could represent a limitation for breast MR imaging interpretation and should be indicated in MR imaging reports. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. In vacuo substrate pretreatments for enhancing nanodiamond formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teii, Kungen; Kouzuma, Yutaka; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Substrate pretreatment conditions at low pressures have been examined for enhancing nanocrystalline diamond formation on silicon in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. Three kinds of pretreatments (I) exposure to an ECR H 2 plasma with application of a substrate bias from -100 to +30 V (II) hot-filament heating in H 2 gas, and (III) hot-filament heating in vacuum, were used alone or followed by carburization prior to a two-step process of ion-enhanced nucleation in an ECR plasma and subsequent growth in a hot-filament system. The number density of diamond particles after the final growth step was greatly increased up to the order of 10 7 -10 8 cm -2 when applying pretreatment (I) at the bias of 0 V corresponding to the ion-bombardment energy of around 10 eV. In this treatment, a clean and smooth surface with minimal damage was made by the dominance of anisotropic etching by hydrogen ions over isotropic etching by hydrogen atoms. The number density of diamond particles was still more increased when applying pretreatment (II), but the treated surface was unfavorably contaminated and roughened

  5. Surface plasma resonance enhanced photocurrent generation in NiO photoanode based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhong; Cui, Jin [Michael Grätzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics Department, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Li, Junpeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies for Comprehensive Utilization of Platinum Metals, Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China); Cao, Kun; Yuan, Shuai [Michael Grätzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics Department, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Cheng, Yibing [Michael Grätzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics Department, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wang, Mingkui, E-mail: mingkui.wang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Michael Grätzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics Department, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • SPR effect from Au-nanostructures was first investigated in NiO-based solar cells. • Enhanced photocurrent generation was observed in p-DSC and perovskite solar cell. • Au-nanorods SPR effect induced charge kinetics were investigated. - Abstract: Surface plasma resonance (SPR) effect has been demonstrated to improve solar cell performance. This work reports on the SPR effect from Au nanorod@SiO{sub 2} on p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. Au nanorod@SiO{sub 2} works as an antenna to transform photons with long wavelength into electric field followed by an enhanced excitation of dye. The devices using the NiO electrode containing Au nanorod@SiO{sub 2} shows overall power conversion efficiencies of about 0.2% in combination with I{sup −}/I{sub 3}{sup −} electrolyte, and 0.29% with T{sup −}/T{sub 2} electrolyte, which are superior to those without adding Au nanorods. Detailed investigation including spectroscopy and transient photovoltage decay measurements reveals that plasma effect of Au nanorod@SiO{sub 2} contribute to charge injection efficiency, and thus on the photocurrent. The effect of Au NRs can be further extended to the inverted planar perovskite solar cells, showing obviously improvement in photocurrent.

  6. Enhancing Optically Pumped Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Amplified Spontaneous Emission via Compound Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite has attracted intensive attention from researchers as the gain medium in lasing devices. However, achieving electrically driven lasing remains a significant challenge. Modifying the devices’ structure to enhance the optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE is the key issue. In this work, gold nanoparticles (Au NPs are first doped into PEDOT: PSS buffer layer in a slab waveguide device structure: Quartz/PEDOT: PSS (with or w/o Au NPs/CH3NH3PbBr3. As a result, the facile device shows a significantly enhanced ASE intensity and a narrowed full width at half maximum. Based on experiments and theoretical simulation data, the improvement is mainly a result of the compound surface plasmon resonance, including simultaneous near- and far-field effects, both of which could increase the density of excitons excited state and accelerate the radiative decay process. This method is highly significant for the design and development and fabrication of high-performance organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite lasing diodes.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary bladder carcinoma: tumor staging and gadolinium contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doringer, E.; Joos, H.; Forstner, R.; Schmoller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with urinary bladder carcinomas underwent pre-operative examinations using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The results of the MR examinations were correlated with the clinical-pathological findings following transurethral resection (TUR) and bimanual palpation (n = 47) or radical cystectomy (n = 2). The results of pre-contrast MR tumor staging (T1, T2), viewing stages Tis-T2 collectively, and subsequent to separate assessments of stages T3b-T4b, were correct 76.6% of the time. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced examinations (pre-contrast T1 and after Gd-DTPA) showed a staging accuracy rate of 85.7%. T2-weighted images did not indicate any advantage when compared to T1-weighted images following Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity ratios of tumor/fat and tumor/muscle tissue were measured on T1-weighted pre-contrast images and following Gd-DTPA and then evaluated statistically, whereby the increased tumor signal intensity was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.01). Due to the relatively short examination time needed for T1-weighted images and the specific tumor enhancement, the administration of Gd-DTPA proves valuable in the diagnosis of bladder carcinomas. T2-weighted images are not necessary. (orig.)

  8. Severe trimming and enhanced competition of laterals as a tool to delay ripening in Tempranillo vineyards under semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gonzaga Santesteban

    2017-05-01

    Significance and impact of the study: this study proves the potentiality of the joint use of trimming and increased irrigation to delay ripening, although it is necessary to analyze the implications the obtained delay has on other quality aspects. The lower anthocyanin and phenolic values observed in trimmed vines were not solely due to delayed ripening, as lower values were observed even when data were compared for a given total soluble solid content.

  9. Large enhancement of Faraday rotation by localized surface plasmon resonance in Au nanoparticles embedded in Bi:YIG film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Masuda, Y.; Fujikawa, R.; Baryshev, A.V.; Inoue, M.

    2009-01-01

    A large enhancement of the Faraday rotation, which is associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), was obtained in a sample with Au nanoparticles embedded in a Bi-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG) film. On a quartz substrate, Au nanoparticles were formed by heating an Au thin film, and a Bi:YIG film was then deposited on them. A sample containing the Au nanoparticles produced by 1000 deg. C heating showed a resonant attenuation with narrower bandwidth in the transmission spectrum than nanoparticles of other samples formed by low-temperature heating. The sharp resonant Faraday rotation angle was 4.4 times larger than the estimated intrinsic Bi:YIG film at the LSPR wavelength; the angular difference was 0.14 deg. A discrepancy in the bandwidth between the transmission attenuation and the resonant Faraday rotation is discussed

  10. Stability and delayed fragmentation of highly charged C60 trapped in a conic-electrode electrostatic ion resonator (ConeTrap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Wei, B.; Bourgey, A.; Bredy, R.; Chen, L.; Kerleroux, M.; Martin, S.; Montagne, G.; Salmoun, A.; Terpend-Ordaciere, B.

    2007-01-01

    We employed a conic-electrode electrostatic ion resonator (ConeTrap) to store the recoil ions (C 60 r+ ) resulting from collision between 56keV Ar 8+ ions and C 60 in order to study their stability over a long time range (several milliseconds). The originality of our method, based on the trapping of a single ion to preserve the detection in coincidence of all the products of the collision, is presented in detail. Our results show that C 60 ions produced in such collisions are stable in the considered observation time. By employing the ConeTrap as a secondary mass spectrometer in order to let the ions oscillate only for a single period, we have been able to observe delayed evaporation of cold C 60 3+ ions 20μs after the collision. We interpret quantitatively the relative yields of daughter ions with a cascade model in which the transition rates are estimated via the commonly used Arrhenius law, taking into account the contribution of the radiative decay

  11. Atypical Distribution of Late Gadolinium Enhancement of the Left Ventricle on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Classical Anderson-Fabry Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kasuya, Shusuke; Suzuki, Masayo; Inaoka, Tsutomu; Odashima, Masayuki; Nakatsuka, Tomoya; Ishikawa, Rumiko; Tokuyama, Wataru; Terada, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Approximately 50% of patients with AFD may have cardiac involvement. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is useful for the diagnosis of cardiac involvement of AFD by recognizing typical late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) patterns. We report a 48-year-old man with cardiac involvement in classical AFD, showing atypical distribution of the LGE at the mid-lateral...

  12. Multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced granulomatous prostatitis in five patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawada, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Noda, Yoshifumi; Tanahashi, Yukichi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki [Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    To evaluate the multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced granulomatous prostatitis (GP). Magnetic resonance images obtained from five patients with histopathologically proven BCG-induced GP were retrospectively analyzed for tumor location, size, signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and appearance on gadolinium-enhanced multiphase images. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological findings. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP (size range, 9-40 mm; mean, 21.2 mm) were identified in the peripheral zone in all patients. The T2WI showed lower signal intensity compared with the normal peripheral zone. The DWIs demonstrated high signal intensity and low ADC values (range, 0.44-0.68 x 10(-3) mm2/sec; mean, 0.56 x 10(-3) mm2/sec), which corresponded to GP. Gadolinium-enhanced multiphase MR imaging performed in five patients showed early and prolonged ring enhancement in all cases of GP. Granulomatous tissues with central caseation necrosis were identified histologically, which corresponded to ring enhancement and a central low intensity area on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. The findings on T2WI, DWI, and gadolinium-enhanced images became gradually obscured with time. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP demonstrates early and prolonged ring enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging which might be a key finding to differentiate it from prostate cancer.

  13. Enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance in a non-magnetic cubic doublet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veenendaal, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis two lanthanide compounds are studied which show enhanced nuclear magnetism at low temperatures: Rb 2 NaHoF 6 and CsNaHoF 6 . Chapter II gives a description of the 4 He-circulating refrigerator, which was built to provide the low temperatures required for the polarization of the enhanced nuclear moments. This type of dilution refrigerator was chosen because of its simple design and large cooling power. Chapter III is devoted to a comparison of the different types of dilution refrigerators. A theoretical discussion is given of their performance, starting from the differential equations, which govern the temperature distribution in the refrigerator. In chapter IV the actual performance of the refrigerator, described in chapter II is discussed. In chapter V a description of the NMR-apparatus, developed for very-low-temperature NMR experiments is given. In chapter VI experimental results on the compound Rb 2 NaHoF 6 are presented. The CEF-ground state of this compound is probably the non-magnetic doublet GAMMA 3 , but at a temperature of 170 K a structural phase transition lowers the crystal symmetry from cubic to tetragonal and the doublet is split into two singlets. In chapter VII specific heat, (enhanced) nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetization measurements on the compound Cs 2 NaHoF 6 are presented which also has a GAMMA 3 -doublet ground state. In zero magnetic field the degeneracy of the doublet is removed at a temperature of 393 mK, where a phase transition is induced by quadrupolar interactions. (Auth.)

  14. Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the left atrium-A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.wagner@charite.d [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Rief, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vogtmann, Thomas [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander [Imaging Science Institute Charite Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Beling, Mark [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Butler, Craig [Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Laule, Michael [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: Imaging of the left atrium is regularly performed prior to pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the left atrium using the blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium in comparison to noncontrast MRA. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were examined by free-breathing electrocardiogram-gated whole-heart MRA (reconstructed spatial resolution, 0.7 mm x 0.6 mm x 0.8 mm) with a noncontrast T2-prepared steady state free precession sequence (T2-prep SSFP) and a gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced inversion-recovery SSFP sequence (CE IR-SSFP). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of blood in the left atrium was determined. Depiction of the left atrium was rated by two radiologists in consensus. A cardiologist segmented the MR data sets and rated depiction of the left atrium. Results: Five of 20 patients had irregular breathing patterns with navigator efficiency less than 35% and were excluded from evaluation. CNR was significantly higher for CE IR-SSFP compared with T2-prep SSFP (18.4 {+-} 5.3 vs. 11.7 {+-} 3.5, p < 0.01). Depiction of the left atrium by T2-prep SSFP was rated as good in four patients, moderate in ten patients, and poor in one patient, whereas depiction of the left atrium by CE IR-SSFP was rated as excellent in nine patients, good in four patients, and moderate in two patients. CE IR-SSFP allowed for semiautomated segmentation of the left atrium in 15 patients, whereas T2-prep SSFP allowed for segmentation only in ten patients. Conclusion: Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRA of the left atrium is feasible with significantly improved image quality compared to noncontrast MRA.

  15. Time-domain electric field enhancement on micrometer scale in coupled split ring resonator upon terahertz radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Simon Lehnskov; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present here a novel design for a coupled split ring resonator antenna optimized for time-domain electric field enhancement in the 0.1 to 1 terahertz (THz) range. The antenna is designed to be sensitive to the incident field polarization and seeks to avoid metal damage due to electron bombardm...

  16. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  17. Effects of conjugation length and resonance enhancement on two-photon absorption in phenylene–vinylene oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Mette; Paterson, M.J.; Arnbjerg, J.

    2008-01-01

    . This phenomenon of the so-called resonance enhancement allows for greater control in obtaining an optimal response when using existing two-photon chromophores, and provides a much-needed guide for the systematic development and efficient use of two-photon singlet oxygen sensitizers....

  18. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woutersen, S.; de Milan, J.B.; de Lange, C.A.; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the

  19. Resonant and kinematical enhancement of He scattering from LiF(001) surface and pseudosurface vibrational normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, W.L.; Weare, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    One-phonon cross sections calculated from sagittally polarized vibrational normal modes account for most salient inelastic-scattering intensities seen in He-LiF(001) and measurements published by Brusdeylins, Doak, and Toennies. We have found that most inelastic intensities which cannot be attributed to potential resonances can be explained as kinematically enhanced scattering from both surface and pseudosurface bulk modes

  20. Phenotypic expression in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Francisca; Botelho, Ana; Trigo, Joana; Silva, Joana; Almeida, Inês; Venâncio, Margarida; Pais, João; Sanches, Conceição; Leitão Marques, António

    2014-05-01

    The prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for risk stratification of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients is the subject of disagreement. We set out to examine the association between clinical and morphological variables, risk factors for sudden cardiac death and LGE in HCM patients. From a population of 78 patients with HCM, we studied 53 who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance. They were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of LGE. Ventricular arrhythmias and morbidity and mortality during follow-up were analyzed. Patients with LGE were younger at the time of diagnosis (p=0.046) and more often had a family history of sudden death (p=0.008) and known coronary artery disease (p=0.086). On echocardiography they had greater maximum wall thickness (p=0.007) and left atrial area (p=0.037) and volume (p=0.035), and more often presented a restrictive pattern of diastolic dysfunction (p=0.011) with a higher E/É ratio (p=0.003) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (p=0.038). Cardiac magnetic resonance supported the association between LGE and previous echocardiographic findings: greater left atrial area (p=0.029) and maximum wall thickness (p<0.001) and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (p=0.056). Patients with LGE more often had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) (p=0.015). At follow-up, no differences were found in the frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, appropriate ICD therapies or mortality. The presence of LGE emerges as a risk marker, associated with the classical predictors of sudden cardiac death in this population. However, larger studies are required to confirm its independent association with clinical events. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Resonant creep enhancement in austenitic stainless steels due to pulsed irradiation at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, N.; Amekura, H.; Saito, T.

    1994-01-01

    Steady-state irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels has been extensively studied as one of the most important design parameters in fusion reactors. The steady-state irradiation creep has been evaluated using in-pile and light-ion experiments. Those creep compliances of various austenitic steels range in the vicinity of ε/Gσ = 10 -6 ∼10 -5 (dpa sm-bullet MPa) -1 , depending on chemical composition etc. The mechanism of steady-state irradiation creep has been elucidated, essentially in terms of stress-induced preferential absorption of point defects into dislocations, and their climb motion. From this standpoint, low doses such as 10 -3 ∼10 -1 dpa would not give rise to any serious creep, and the irradiation creep may not be a critical issue for the low-dose fusion devices including ITER. It is, however, possible that pulsed irradiation causes different creep behaviors from the steady-state one due to dynamic unbalance of interstitials and vacancies. The authors have actually observed anomalous creep enhancement due to pulsed irradiation in austenitic stainless steels. The resonant behavior of creep indicates that pulsed irradiation may cause significant deformation in austenitic steels even at such low doses and slow pulsing rates, especially for the SA-materials. The first-wall materials in plasma operation of ∼10 2 s may suffer from unexpected transient creep, even in the near-term fusion deices, such as ITER. Though this effect might be a transient effect for a relatively short period, it should be taken into account that the pulsed irradiation makes influences on stress relaxation of the fusion components and on the irradiation fatigue. The mechanism and the relevant behaviors of pulse-induced creep will be discussed in terms of a point-defect model based on the resonant interstitial enrichment

  2. Search for resonant and enhanced non-resonant di-Higgs production in the yybb channel at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents the run 2 search for di-Higgs production in the yybb channel. In the Standard Model, this process provides a lens on the Higgs self-coupling and it is enhanced, resonantly or non-resonantly, in many extensions to the SM. It is appealing thanks to a clean diphoton trigger, relatively small backgrounds, and excellent diphoton mass resolution. It is also particularly important in the range from 260 to 400 GeV, where QCD backgrounds and combinatorics make other channels (4b, bbtautau) challenging. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 1/fb of proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Search for resonant and enhanced non-resonant di-Higgs production in the yybb channel at 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda Alberich, Leonor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the run 2 search for di-Higgs production in the yybb channel. In the Standard Model, this process provides a lens on the Higgs self-coupling and it is enhanced, resonantly or non-resonantly, in many extensions to the SM. It is appealing thanks to a clean diphoton trigger, relatively small backgrounds, and excellent diphoton mass resolution. It is also particularly important in the range from 260 to 400 GeV, where QCD backgrounds and combinatorics make other channels (4b, bbtautau) challenging. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 1/fb of proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Assessment of myocardial infarction with delayed-enhancement MRI in coronary artery disease: a correlative study with cardiac events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinxiang; Yang Chao; Yang Dakuan; Yuan Shuguang; Yang Xinhuan; Wang Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between recent cardiac events and the score of myocardial infarction by delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Methods: DE-MRI was performed in 40 subjects with coronary artery disease. The score of myocardial infarction by DE-MRI, the ejection fraction (EF) by echocardiography, recent cardiac events (the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year), 6-minute walking distance, as well as the Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ) score were assessed. The Spearman correlation test and Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test were used for the statistics. Results: There were negative correlation between the myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI (median 12, inter-quartile range: 6.0-19.8) and the 6-minute walking distance (378.93±100.53), SAQ score (74.55±11.40) (r was 0.66 and 0.54, P< 0.05). The myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI was strongly correlated with the number of weekly nitroglycerin (median 1; inter-quartile range: 0-2.8), the number of weekly angina episodes (median 3, inter-quartile range: 1-6.5) and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (median 0, inter-quartile range: 0-2) (r was 0.87, 0.85 and 0.89, P<0.05). EF [(49.2±13.72)%] was negative correlation with the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (r were 0.67, 0.73 and 0.73, P<0.05). Conclusion: DE-MRI can be used for evaluation and prediction of future cardiac events. (authors)

  5. Neuromyelitis optica with linear enhancement of corpus callosum in brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Moghadasi, Abdorreza Naser; Owji, Mahsa; Naghshineh, Hoda; Minagar, Alireza

    2015-06-10

    Neuromyelitis optica is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with various patterns of brain lesions. Corpus callosum may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Previous case reports have demonstrated that callosal lesions in neuromyelitis optica are usually large and edematous and have a heterogeneous intensity showing a "marbled pattern" in the acute phase. Their size and intensity may reduce with time or disappear in the chronic stages. In this report, we describe a case of a 25-year-old Caucasian man with neuromyelitis optica who presented clinically with optic neuritis and myelitis. His brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated linear enhancement of the corpus callosum. Brain images with contrast agent added also showed linear ependymal layer enhancement of the lateral ventricles, which has been reported in this disease previously. Linear enhancement of corpus callosum in magnetic resonance imaging with contrast agent could help in diagnosing neuromyelitis optica and differentiating it from other demyelinating disease, especially multiple sclerosis.

  6. Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of VX-2 carcinoma of the rabbit kidney on Tl weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, J.M.; Ackerman, N.; Kaude, J.V.; Googe, R.E.; Fitzsimmons, J.R.; Scott, K.N.; Mancuso, A.A.; Hackett, R.L.; Hager, D.A.; Caballero, S.; Florida Univ., Gainesville

    1987-01-01

    Experimental renal carcinoma was induced by percutaneous injection of VX-2 carcinoma cells into the left kidney in New Zealand white rabbits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 0.15 T before and after intravenous injection of 0.3 mmol gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) per kg body weight. Gd-DTPA enhanced the tumors by increasing the signal intensity on T1 weighted images. The enhancement was evident immediately after Gd-DTPA injection, increasing during the observation time of 30 minutes. Histologically the areas of enhancement corresponded well to the viable tumor tissue. (orig.)

  7. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain using gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; Slegte, R.G.M. de; Crezee, F.C.; Hazenberg, G.J.; Thjaha, S.I.; Nauta, J.J.P.; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns a clinical trial with gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) as an intravenous contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with disorders of the central nervous system. Fifty patients, 30 females and 20 males, were examined without and with Gd-GTPA. The contrast medium was well tolerated by all patients. The results of MRI scanning without and with Gd-DTPA and those obtained with computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast enhancement were compared. This investigation comprised mainly patients with intracranial tumors, multiple sclerosis, and nasopharyngeal tumors. The results may be summarized as follows: 1) MRI with Gd-DTPA (MRI+) gave better results than MRI without Gd as regards delineation of the lesion, blood vessels and edema in cerebral tumors, pituitary adenomas and acute forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI+ was better than CT in 32 of the 50 cases examined; with intracerebral tumors it was better in 15 out of 18 cases. 3) MRI+ was always better than CT in patients with MS. In 3 out of 7 cases MRI demonstrated the acute MS lesions. 4) MRI+ seemed to have advantages also in nasopharyngeal tumors as ascertained from this limited experience. (orig.)

  8. Maximum Entropy Approach in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsani, Zahra Amini; Schmid, Volker J

    2017-01-01

    In the estimation of physiological kinetic parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) data, the determination of the arterial input function (AIF) plays a key role. This paper proposes a Bayesian method to estimate the physiological parameters of DCE-MRI along with the AIF in situations, where no measurement of the AIF is available. In the proposed algorithm, the maximum entropy method (MEM) is combined with the maximum a posterior approach (MAP). To this end, MEM is used to specify a prior probability distribution of the unknown AIF. The ability of this method to estimate the AIF is validated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Subsequently, the kinetic parameters can be estimated with MAP. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with a data set from a breast cancer MRI study. The application shows that the AIF can reliably be determined from the DCE-MRI data using MEM. Kinetic parameters can be estimated subsequently. The maximum entropy method is a powerful tool to reconstructing images from many types of data. This method is useful for generating the probability distribution based on given information. The proposed method gives an alternative way to assess the input function from the existing data. The proposed method allows a good fit of the data and therefore a better estimation of the kinetic parameters. In the end, this allows for a more reliable use of DCE-MRI. Schattauer GmbH.

  9. Optical resonance-enhanced absorption-based near-field immunochip biosensor for allergen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Irene; Morgan, Michael R A; Lindner, Wolfgang; Pittner, Fritz

    2008-04-15

    An optical immunochip biosensor has been developed as a rapid method for allergen detection in complex food matrixes, and its application evaluated for the detection of the egg white allergens, ovalbumin and ovomucoid. The optical near-field phenomenon underlying the basic principle of the sensor design is called resonance-enhanced absorption (REA), which utilizes gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as signal transducers in a highly sensitive interferometric setup. Using this approach, a novel, simple, and rapid colorimetric solid-phase immunoassay on a planar chip substrate was realized in direct and sandwich assay formats, with a detection system that does not require any instrumentation for readout. Semiquantitative immunochemical responses are directly visible to the naked eye of the analyst. The biosensor shows concentration-dependent color development by capturing antibody-functionalized Au NPs on allergen-coated chips and has a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. To establish a rapid method, we took advantage of the physicochemical microenvironment of the Au NP-antibody bioconjugate to be bound directly over an interacting poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) interlayer by an immobilized antigen. In the direct assay format, a coating time with allergen of only 5 min under "soft" nondenaturing conditions was sufficient for accurate reproducibility and sensitivity. In conclusion, the REA-based immunochip sensor is easy to fabricate, is reproducible and selective in its performance, has minimal technical requirements, and will enable high-throughput screening of affinity binding interactions in technological and medical applications.

  10. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-01-01

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL"−"1, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  11. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja; Bae, Jong Myon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image

  12. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  13. Fluorescence-enhanced gadolinium-doped zinc oxide quantum dots for magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlan; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2011-02-01

    We report here the development of Gd-doped ZnO quantum dots (QDs) as dual modal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobes. They are fabricated in a simple, versatile and environmentally friendly method, not only decreasing the difficulty and complexity, but also avoiding the increase of particle's size brought about by silica coating procedure in the synthesis of nanoprobes reported previously. These nanoprobes, with exceptionally small size and enhanced fluorescence resulting from the Gd doping, can label successfully the HeLa cells in short time and present no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth even at the concentration up to 1 mm. These results show that such nanoprobes have low toxicity, especially in comparison with the traditional PEGylated CdSe/ZnS or CdSe/CdS QDs. In MRI studies, they exert strong positive contrast effect with a large longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of water proton of 16 mm(-1) s(-1). Their capability of imaging HeLa cells with MRI implies that they have great potential as MRI contrast agents. Combining the high sensitivity of fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution of MRI, We expect that the as-prepared Gd-doped Zno QDs can provide a better reliability of the collected data and find promising applications in biological, medical and other fields. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing the performances of a resonance detector spectrometer for deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filabozzi, A.; Pace, E.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility is explored to sum up neutron Compton profiles at different scattering angles in deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements within the Resonance Detector (RD) configuration to enhance the statistics for a more reliable extraction of the momentum distribution of the constituents in the target. The RD configuration allows to select the energy of the scattered neutrons up to several tens of electron Volt, thus accessing energy and wave vector transfers well above 1 eV and 30 Å −1 , respectively. In the high-q/ω regime, the final state effects could be considered as negligible, as shown in a series of simulations using a Monte Carlo method with different inverse geometry instrument setups. The simulations show that it could be possible to conceive an instrument set up where the RD configuration allows the proper summation of several spectra at different scattering angles, providing a good separation of the proton recoil signal from that of the heavier atoms, thus avoiding the cell subtraction by fitting procedure.

  15. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/√(Hz) when the transimpedance is about 85 dBΩ). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of ∼3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 MΩ when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect ∼110 charges in a single scan.

  16. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  17. Demonstration of evolution of hemispherical spondysclerosis by contrast enhanced Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Majcen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The purpose of the study was to estimate the value of Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in demonstrating the evolution of hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HSS). Patients and methods. In eighteen patients with chronic low back pain and typical radiographic findings of HSS seen on plain films, Gd-DTPA MRI of the lumbar spine was performed. MRI morphological and signal intensity appearances of HSS were analysed and compared with radiographic changes. Results. On the basis of MRI features, three distinct groups of cases were identifiable. Within the first group the region of dome-shaped osteosclerosis demonstrated low signal intensity on T1-weighted precontrast spin-echo images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and diffuse contrast enhancement on T1-weighted postcontrast images, findings compatible with bone marrow oedema and hyperaemia. The second group showed high signal intensity vertebral body corners surrounded by low signal intensity area, which indicated the combination of fat accumulation and the sclerotic bone. In the third intermediate group anterior disco-vertebral junctions revealed a mixture of MRI appearances characteristic of the first and the second group. Conclusions. Gd-DTPA MRI is capable of demonstrating a spectrum of features which reflect the evolution of HSS. These typical appearances showed by MRI could be of eventual clinical relevance in following the progression of HSS. (author)

  18. Enhancing the Performance of the Microwave Absorbing Materials by Using Dielectric Resonator Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar H. Al-Zoubi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a technique for enhancing the performance of microwave absorbing materials in terms of weight, thickness, and bandwidth. The introduced technique is based on fabricating the microwave absorbing (MA material in a structure comprised of an array of circular cylinder dielectric resonators (CDR backed by a perfect electric conductor (PEC ground plane. Numerical electromagnetic methods are employed to study the properties of the proposed MA array structures, where 3D full wave simulation using finite-element method is implemented. The obtained results show that the performance of the MA-CDR arrays significantly outperforms that of a flat layer composed of the same material and having equivalent thickness. A flat layer of MA material with thickness of 5 mm backed by perfect electric conductor (PEC shows as low as -50 dB reflection loss (RL peak and ~3 GHz 10-dB bandwidth, whereas an MA-CDR array, composed of the same MA material, of height of 4 mm can achieve as low as ~−50 dB RL peak and ~12 GHz 10-dB RL bandwidth.

  19. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian, E-mail: songdq@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL{sup −1}, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  20. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative monitoring of two simultaneously binding species using Label-Enhanced surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Lars; Garcia, Brandon L; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Hanning, Anders

    2018-02-26

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established method for biomolecular interaction studies. SPR monitors the binding of molecules to a solid surface, embodied as refractive index changes close to the surface. One limitation of conventional SPR is the universal nature of the detection that results in an inability to qualitatively discriminate between different binding species. Furthermore, it is impossible to directly discriminate two species simultaneously binding to different sites on a protein, which limits the utility of SPR, for example, in the study of allosteric binders or bi-specific molecules. It is also impossible in principle to discriminate protein conformation changes from actual binding events. Here we demonstrate how Label-Enhanced SPR can be utilized to discriminate and quantitatively monitor the simultaneous binding of two different species - one dye-labeled and one unlabeled - on a standard, single-wavelength SPR instrument. This new technique increases the versatility of SPR technology by opening up application areas where the usefulness of the approach has previously been limited. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm(-2) depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  3. Cross-linkable liposomes stabilize a magnetic resonance contrast-enhancing polymeric fastener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cartney E; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-04-08

    Liposomes are commonly used to deliver drugs and contrast agents to their target site in a controlled manner. One of the greatest obstacles in the performance of such delivery vehicles is their stability in the presence of serum. Here, we demonstrate a method to stabilize a class of liposomes that load gadolinium, a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, as a model cargo on their surfaces. We hypothesized that the sequential adsorption of a gadolinium-binding chitosan fastener on the liposome surface followed by covalent cross-linking of the lipid bilayer would provide enhanced stability and improved MR signal in the presence of human serum. To investigate this hypothesis, liposomes composed of diyne-containing lipids were assembled and functionalized via chitosan conjugated with a hydrophobic anchor and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This postadsorption cross-linking strategy served to stabilize the thermodynamically favorable association between liposome and polymeric fastener. Furthermore, the chitosan-coated, cross-linked liposomes proved more effective as delivery vehicles of gadolinium than uncross-linked liposomes due to the reduced liposome degradation and chitosan desorption. Overall, this study demonstrates a useful method to stabilize a broad class of particles used for systemic delivery of various molecular payloads.

  4. A polymeric fastener can easily functionalize liposome surfaces with gadolinium for enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cartney E; Shkumatov, Artem; Withers, Sarah G; Yang, Binxia; Glockner, James F; Misra, Sanjay; Roy, Edward J; Wong, Chun-Ho; Zimmerman, Steven C; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2013-11-26

    Common methods of loading magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents into nanoparticles often suffer from challenges related to particle formation, complex chemical modification/purification steps, and reduced contrast efficiency. This study presents a simple, yet advanced process to address these issues by loading gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent, exclusively on a liposome surface using a polymeric fastener. The fastener, so named for its ability to physically link the two functional components together, consisted of chitosan substituted with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) to chelate gadolinium, as well as octadecyl chains to stabilize the modified chitosan on the liposome surface. The assembly strategy, mimicking the mechanisms by which viruses and proteins naturally anchor to a cell, provided greater T1 relaxivity than liposomes loaded with gadolinium in both the interior and outer leaflet. Gadolinium-coated liposomes were ultimately evaluated in vivo using murine ischemia models to highlight the diagnostic capability of the system. Taken together, this process decouples particle assembly and functionalization and, therefore, has considerable potential to enhance imaging quality while alleviating many of the difficulties associated with multifunctional particle fabrication.

  5. Acute myocardial ischemia: magnetic resonance contrast enhancement with gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.; Higgins, C.B.; Ehman, R.L.; Revel, D.; Sievers, R.; Brasch, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) was used to improve the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in detecting early ischemia, before the onset of infarction. Following one minute of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, 9 dogs were intraveneously injected with either 0.5 mM/kg of Gd-DTPA (6 dogs) or normal saline (3 dogs). There was no visible difference in intensity or alterations in magnetic relaxation times between normal and ischemic myocardium in the control (saline-injected) animals. The Gd-DTPA-injected dogs had a well-defined segment of high intensity representing the ischemic myocardium in the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Both T1 and T2 were significantly shortened in the normal myocardium of the Gd-DTPA animals, but relatively greater T2 relaxation rate enhancement resulted in reduced intensity of normal myocardium, thus increasing contrast with ischemic myocardium. It is concluded that Gd-DTPA has the potential to expand the sensitivity and diagnostic utility of MR in the study of occlusive coronary artery disease

  6. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  7. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M; Kovanlikaya, Arzu

    2017-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  8. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Askin, Gulce [Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, New York, NY (United States); Beneck, Debra M. [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  9. Photoionization of Xe inside C60: Atom-fullerene hybridization, giant cross-section enhancement, and correlation confinement resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjet, Mohamed E.; Renger, Thomas; Hopper, Dale E.; McCune, Matthew A.; Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Rost, Jan-M.; Manson, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study of the subshell photoionization of the Xe atom endohedrally confined in C 60 is presented. Powerful hybridization of the Xe 5s state with the bottom edge of C 60 π band is found that induces strong structures in the 5s ionization, causing the cross section to differ significantly from earlier results that omit this hybridization. The hybridization also affects the angular distribution asymmetry parameter of Xe 5p ionization near the Cooper minimum. The 5p cross section, on the other hand, is greatly enhanced by borrowing considerable oscillator strength from the C 60 giant plasmon resonance via the atom-fullerene dynamical interchannel coupling. Beyond the C 60 plasmon energy range the atomic subshell cross sections display confinement-induced oscillations in which, over the large 4d shape resonance region, the dominant 4d oscillations induce their ''clones'' in all degenerate weaker channels known as correlation confinement resonances.

  10. Through tissue imaging of a live breast cancer tumour model using handheld surface enhanced spatially offset resonance Raman spectroscopy (SESORRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Fay; Jamieson, Lauren E; Mabbott, Samuel; Plakas, Konstantinos; Shand, Neil C; Detty, Michael R; Graham, Duncan; Faulds, Karen

    2018-04-21

    In order to improve patient survival and reduce the amount of unnecessary and traumatic biopsies, non-invasive detection of cancerous tumours is of imperative and urgent need. Multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) can be used as an ex vivo cancer tumour model, to model in vivo nanoparticle (NP) uptake by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Surface enhanced spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SESORS) combines both surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) to yield enhanced Raman signals at much greater sub-surface levels. By utilizing a reporter that has an electronic transition in resonance with the laser frequency, surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) yields even greater enhancement in Raman signal. Using a handheld SORS spectrometer with back scattering optics, we demonstrate the detection of live breast cancer 3D MTS containing SERRS active NPs through 15 mm of porcine tissue. False color 2D heat intensity maps were used to determine tumour model location. In addition, we demonstrate the tracking of SERRS-active NPs through porcine tissue to depths of up to 25 mm. This unprecedented performance is due to the use of red-shifted chalcogenpyrylium-based Raman reporters to demonstrate the novel technique of surface enhanced spatially offset resonance Raman spectroscopy (SESORRS) for the first time. Our results demonstrate a significant step forward in the ability to detect vibrational fingerprints from a tumour model at depth through tissue. Such an approach offers significant promise for the translation of NPs into clinical applications for non-invasive disease diagnostics based on this new chemical principle of measurement.

  11. Influence of delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol on T2-mapping: is it possible to comprehensively assess knee cartilage composition in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, J; van Tiel, J; Reijman, M; Bron, E E; Klein, S; Verhaar, J A N; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Krestin, G P; Wielopolski, P A; Oei, E H G

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of assessing knee cartilage with T2-mapping and delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla (T). T2 mapping was performed in 10 healthy volunteers at baseline; directly after baseline; after 10 min of cycling; and after 90 min delay, and in 16 osteoarthritis patients before and after intravenous administration of a double dose gadolinium dimeglumine contrast agent, reflecting key dGEMRIC protocol elements. Differences in T2 relaxation times between each timepoint and baseline were calculated for 6 cartilage regions using paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and the smallest detectable change (SDC). After cycling, a significant change in T2 relaxation times was found in the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.0 ms, P = 0.04). After 90 min delay, significant changes were found in the lateral weight-bearing femoral condyle (+1.2 ms, P = 0.03) and the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.3 ms, P = 0.01). In these regions of interests (ROIs), absolute differences were small and lower than the corresponding SDCs. T2-mapping after contrast administration only showed statistically significantly lower T2 relaxation times in the medial posterior femoral condyle (-2.4 ms, P T2 relaxation times that were not consistent and lower than the SDC in the majority of regions, our results suggest that T2-mapping and dGEMRIC can be performed reliably in a single imaging session to assess cartilage biochemical composition in knee osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetically coupled Fano resonance of dielectric pentamer oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fuli; Li, Chang; He, Xuan; Chen, Lei; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Weihong; Zhou, Ji

    2017-01-01

    We present magnetically induced Fano resonance inside a dielectric metamaterial pentamer composed of ceramic bricks. Unlike previous reports where different sizes of dielectric resonators were essential to produce Fano resonance, under external magnetic field excitation, central and outer dielectric bricks with identical sizes exhibit in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic Mie oscillations. An asymmetric line shape of Fano resonance along with enhanced group delay is observed due to the interference between the magnetic resonance of the central brick and the symmetric magnetic resonance of outer bricks. Besides, Fano resonance blueshifts with the increasing resonance of the smaller central brick. The thermal-dependent permittivity of ceramics allows Fano resonance to be reversibly tuned by 300 MHz when temperature varies by 60 °C. (paper)

  13. Delayed accumulation of intestinal coliform bacteria enhances life span and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans fed respiratory deficient E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Fernando; Monsalve, Gabriela C; Tse, Vincent; Saiki, Ryoichi; Weng, Emily; Lee, Laura; Srinivasan, Chandra; Frand, Alison R; Clarke, Catherine F

    2012-12-20

    Studies with the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans have identified conserved biochemical pathways that act to modulate life span. Life span can also be influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome, and C. elegans life span can be dramatically influenced by its diet of Escherichia coli. Although C. elegans is typically fed the standard OP50 strain of E. coli, nematodes fed E. coli strains rendered respiratory deficient, either due to a lack coenzyme Q or the absence of ATP synthase, show significant life span extension. Here we explore the mechanisms accounting for the enhanced nematode life span in response to these diets. The intestinal load of E. coli was monitored by determination of worm-associated colony forming units (cfu/worm or coliform counts) as a function of age. The presence of GFP-expressing E. coli in the worm intestine was also monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Worms fed the standard OP50 E. coli strain have high cfu and GFP-labeled bacteria in their guts at the L4 larval stage, and show saturated coliform counts by day five of adulthood. In contrast, nematodes fed diets of respiratory deficient E. coli lacking coenzyme Q lived significantly longer and failed to accumulate bacteria within the lumen at early ages. Animals fed bacteria deficient in complex V showed intermediate coliform numbers and were not quite as long-lived. The results indicate that respiratory deficient Q-less E. coli are effectively degraded in the early adult worm, either at the pharynx or within the intestine, and do not accumulate in the intestinal tract until day ten of adulthood. The findings of this study suggest that the nematodes fed the respiratory deficient E. coli diet live longer because the delay in bacterial colonization of the gut subjects the worms to less stress compared to worms fed the OP50 E. coli diet. This work suggests that bacterial respiration can act as a virulence factor, influencing the ability of bacteria to colonize and

  14. Delayed accumulation of intestinal coliform bacteria enhances life span and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans fed respiratory deficient E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies with the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans have identified conserved biochemical pathways that act to modulate life span. Life span can also be influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome, and C. elegans life span can be dramatically influenced by its diet of Escherichia coli. Although C. elegans is typically fed the standard OP50 strain of E. coli, nematodes fed E. coli strains rendered respiratory deficient, either due to a lack coenzyme Q or the absence of ATP synthase, show significant life span extension. Here we explore the mechanisms accounting for the enhanced nematode life span in response to these diets. Results The intestinal load of E. coli was monitored by determination of worm-associated colony forming units (cfu/worm or coliform counts as a function of age. The presence of GFP-expressing E. coli in the worm intestine was also monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Worms fed the standard OP50 E. coli strain have high cfu and GFP-labeled bacteria in their guts at the L4 larval stage, and show saturated coliform counts by day five of adulthood. In contrast, nematodes fed diets of respiratory deficient E. coli lacking coenzyme Q lived significantly longer and failed to accumulate bacteria within the lumen at early ages. Animals fed bacteria deficient in complex V showed intermediate coliform numbers and were not quite as long-lived. The results indicate that respiratory deficient Q-less E. coli are effectively degraded in the early adult worm, either at the pharynx or within the intestine, and do not accumulate in the intestinal tract until day ten of adulthood. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that the nematodes fed the respiratory deficient E. coli diet live longer because the delay in bacterial colonization of the gut subjects the worms to less stress compared to worms fed the OP50 E. coli diet. This work suggests that bacterial respiration can act as a virulence factor

  15. Enhanced escape rate for Hg 254 nm resonance radiation in fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, James E; Raizen, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    The potential of the low-cost MAGIS isotopic separation method to improve fluorescent lamp efficacy is explored using resonance radiation transport simulations. New Hg isotopic mixes are discovered that yield escape rates for 254 nm Hg I resonance radiation equal to 117% to 122% of the rate for a natural isotopic mix under the same lamp conditions. (paper)

  16. Theory of the effect of third-harmonic generation on three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization in focused beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Garrett, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization in the region near a three-photon resonance is treated for focused, plane-polarized Gaussian beams with diffraction-limited beam divergence. In this situation, a third-harmonic field is generated within the laser beam. At, and very near, three-photon resonance the driving rate for the upper-state probability amplitude due to one-photon absorption of third-harmonic light becomes nearly equal to the corresponding three-photon rate due to the laser field, but these effects are 180 0 out of phase. As a consequence of this cancellation between two pumping terms, the three-photon resonance line essentially disappears at moderate concentrations and the observed ionization has a line shape that is close to the phase-matching curve for third-harmonic generation. The ionization signal, near but not on the resonance, is due almost entirely to absorption of third-harmonic photons plus other laser photons; three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization by the laser is much weaker. This is particularly true on the blue side of the three-photon resonance at detunings where phase matching occurs. The problem is treated quite generally with predictions of the full line shape for n-photon ionization and third-harmonic light generation near three-photon resonance, including the rather strong influences of positively dispersive buffer gases. We also show that the cancellation between the one-photon and the three-photon process is partially spoiled in the presence of a counterpropagating beam at the same frequency

  17. Utility of bolus dynamic CT for the detection of hypervascular malignant hepatic tumors. Mainly referring to the comparison with delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiromichi; Abe, Kimihiko; Freeny, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to analyze the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, 84 patients who had hepatocellular carcinoma or suspected hypervascular metastases were studied with conventional incremental dynamic CT (CID-CT) or double helical CT (DH-CT). Delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT studies were consecutively performed in all patients. Thirty-six of 84 patients had malignant hepatic neoplasms; six had hepatocellular carcinoma and 30 had metastatic tumors. At first, the detectability of hepatic lesions was evaluated with bolus dynamic CT and delayed phase CT. Dynamic CT has detected more lesions than delayed CT. Some hepatic lesions described as isodensity were missed on CID-CT. Therefore, delayed phase CT cannot be eliminated when CID-CT is performed. Secondly, hepatic lesion detectability with CID-CT was compared with that of DH-CT. DH-CT did not miss the hepatic lesions picked up by delayed phase CT and was expected to provide excellent detectability of hypervascular hepatic neoplasms. In addition, first helical CT showed most hepatic lesions as areas of obvious hyperdensity, while CID-CT did not show their correct vascularities. So-called hypervascular hepatic tumors, however, were not always hypervascular and were demonstrated as areas of iso-hypodensity even on initial helical scanning. Second helical CT was useful to detect these so-called hypervascular, but actually hypovascular lesions. In conclusion, dynamic CT was helpful in detecting hypervascular hepatic malignant neoplasms, and DH-CT was more accurate than-CID-CT for the detection of hepatic lesions and the evaluation of vascular lesion. (author)

  18. Preoperative radiological characterization of hepatic angiomyolipoma using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A hepatic angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumor of the liver composed of a mixture of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and a variable amount of adipose tissue. Differentiating them from malignant liver tumors can often be very difficult. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a large liver mass in the right lobe. The results of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were consistent with a well-demarcated adipose tissue- containing tumor, showing prolonged hyperperfusion in comparison with the surrounding liver tissue. Surgery was performed and the diagnosis of hepatic angiomyolipoma was made with histopathology. Conclusion Preoperative radiological characterization using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography may improve diagnostic accuracy of hepatic angiomyolipoma. Identification of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and adipose tissue with a positive immunohistochemical reaction for HMB-45 is the final evidence for an angiomyolipoma.

  19. Late gadolinium enhancement by magnetic resonance explains adverse cardiac events in individuals with ventricular arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtis, J.; Vasallo, J.; Arabia, L.; Dimitroff, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Tibaldi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predict adverse cardiac events in patients with ventricular arrhythmia. Methods: We selected 74 consecutive patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmia (premature ventricular contractions and ventricular tachycardia) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >55% sent to CMR for evaluation of structural heart disease previously undetected by other complementary methods. LGE, systolic function and volumes of both ventricles were analyzed. At follow-up was assessed a combined end point: hospitalization for ventricular arrhythmia, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy and cardiac death. Results: During a median follow up of 575 days (interquartile range 24-1120 days) and by analyzing the population according to the presence (n=9, 12%) or not (n=65, 88%) LGE was observed that the group with positive Gd had lower LVEF (58% vs. 66% respectively, p=0.01) and larger volumes (EDV: 185 ml vs. 123 ml respectively, p=0.01 and ESV: 81 ml vs. 42 ml respectively, p=0.01) than the other group. Two (22%) patients in the LGE + group vs. one (4%) of those without LGE showed the combined endpoint (p=0.01) and when performing a logistic regression analysis it was found that the LGE is a predictor of adverse cardiac events analyzed (p=0.029). Conclusions: In this consecutive series of patients with ventricular arrhythmia we demonstrate a strong association between myocardial LGE and adverse cardiac events; this supports the hypothesis that myocardial fibrosis is an important arrhythmogenic substrate. In addition, almost all individuals without LGE were free of events during follow-up suggesting that it is possible to identify through the CMR low-risk individuals who can be treated conservatively. (authors) [es

  20. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K trans values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p trans decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p trans values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p e and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K trans values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological properties different from those of the R-18 tumors.

  1. Assessment of Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma Xenografts by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A.M.; Gulliksrud, Kristine M.Sc.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cervical cancer and highly hypoxic primary tumors show increased frequency of locoregional treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival rates. The potential usefulness of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing tumor hypoxia noninvasively was investigated in the present preclinical study. Methods and Materials: CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts transplanted intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) in BALB/c nu/nu mice were subjected to DCE-MRI and measurement of fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumor images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the extracellular volume fraction of the imaged tissue) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data. Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells was measured by using the paired survival curve method. Results: Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells differed significantly among the four tumor groups. The mean values ± SE were determined to be 44% ± 7% (i.m. CK-160), 77% ± 10% (s.c. CK-160), 23% ± 5% (i.m. TS-415), and 52% ± 6% (s.c. TS-415). The four tumor groups differed significantly also in K trans , and there was an unambiguous inverse relationship between K trans and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. On the other hand, significant differences among the groups in v e could not be detected. Conclusions: The study supports the clinical development of DCE-MRI as a method for assessing the extent of hypoxia in carcinoma of the cervix

  2. The use of manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rat radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xiyin; Wang Jiazhou; Zhou Lijun; Zhu Guopei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish a rat model of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) by delivering a single radiation dose to the optic chiasm. The aim of our study was to analysis the feasibility and effectiveness of manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) in RION. Methods: 34 Wistar rats were randomized to the control group(4 rats), the 2-month group(5 rats), the 4-month group(4 rats) and the 6-month group(11 rats) according to the different feeding period after irradiation. MEMRI scan were performed when the respective feeding periods of all groups expired. The rats were then killed for histological studies with hematoxylin and eosin stain, Luxol Fast Blue stain, and electron microscopy analysis. Results: The ratio of RION in the four groups were 0/3, 1/5, 2/4 and 11/11, respectively(χ"2 = 15.443, P < 0.05). There was an inverse correlation between the relative optical density value in the LFB stain and the interval between irradiation and pathological examination(R = -0.643, P < 0.05). The number of glial cells in the HE stain in the four groups were 194±65, 234±19, 124±11 and 345±98, respectively(R = 0.590, P < 0.05). When compared MEMRI scan with the corresponding histological examination, we found that there was loss of signals of optic nerve on MEMRI imaging in one of 5 rats in the 2-month group, while no significant histological difference was found between this rat and the others. Conclusions: RION can be non-invasively detected and semi-quantitative analysed by MEMRI scan. Moreover, RION can be early diagnosed by MEMRI scan which is capable to show physiological change in advance of pathological change. (authors)

  3. Non-Liouvillean ion injection via resonantly enhanced two-photon ionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Knyazev

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The charge-exchange method is now one of the main techniques for ion injection into accelerators and storage rings. The disadvantages of conventional methods, based on the atom or ion stripping in a material target, are emittance growth, energy straggling, and production of ions in many charge states. Recently suggested stripping methods based on direct photoionization require employment of hard-UV lasers, which still do not exist and must obviously be very bulky and expensive. An alternative method, suggested for injection of proton beams, employs excitation of the atom to 3p intermediate state with subsequent Lorentz ionization in a magnetic field gradient. This technique applies rigid requirements to laser characteristic and is not free of growing of the beam divergence. In this paper a variant of the stripping technique based on the resonantly enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI is considered. The technique allows ionization of singly charged ions of the elements from helium to bismuth. A variant of the technique can be used for proton injection. RETPI can be applied for both ion injection and stacking, as well as for diagnostics of ion beam characteristics on the orbit. Stripping efficiency can be about 100% for the singly charged ions having the singlet ground state and decreases for the other ions. Special methods for “cleaning” unwanted atomic states in such ions, that can provide high stripping efficiency, are discussed. Excimer lasers with very moderate parameters can be employed for implementation of this technique for almost all elements. Numerical examples show that for most of the singly charged ions and for hydrogen atom necessary laser-beam energy density is merely 0.5–8  J/cm^{2} for a 1 m interaction region, and is 10 times higher for several light ions.

  4. Enhanced Sensitivity of Anti-Symmetrically Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors with Zinc Oxide Intermediate Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Fu Chiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel design wherein high-refractive-index zinc oxide (ZnO intermediary layers are used in anti-symmetrically structured surface plasmon resonance (SPR devices to enhance signal quality and improve the full width at half maximum (FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curve. The surface plasmon (SP modes of the ZnO intermediary layer were excited by irradiating both sides of the Au film, thus inducing a high electric field at the Au/ZnO interface. We demonstrated that an improvement in the ZnO (002 crystal orientation led to a decrease in the FWHM of the SPR reflectivity curves. We optimized the design of ZnO thin films using different parameters and performed analytical comparisons of the ZnO with conventional chromium (Cr and indium tin oxide (ITO intermediary layers. The present study is based on application of the Fresnel equation, which provides an explanation and verification for the observed narrow SPR reflectivity curve and optical transmittance spectra exhibited by (ZnO/Au, (Cr/Au, and (ITO/Au devices. On exposure to ethanol, the anti-symmetrically structured showed a huge electric field at the Au/ZnO interface and a 2-fold decrease in the FWHM value and a 1.3-fold larger shift in angle interrogation and a 4.5-fold high-sensitivity shift in intensity interrogation. The anti-symmetrically structured of ZnO intermediate layers exhibited a wider linearity range and much higher sensitivity. It also exhibited a good linear relationship between the incident angle and ethanol concentration in the tested range. Thus, we demonstrated a novel and simple method for fabricating high-sensitivity, high-resolution SPR biosensors that provide high accuracy and precision over relevant ranges of analyte measurement.

  5. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  6. Wall enhancement on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Peng; Zhang, Hong-Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Yang, Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Dan-Dan [Capital Medical University, Department of Clinical Pathology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Guan, Shao-Chen [Capital Medical University, Department of Evidence-Based Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-15

    The aneurysm wall has been reported to play a critical role in the formation, development, and even rupture of an aneurysm. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) to investigate the aneurysm wall in an effort to identify evidence of inflammation invasion and define its relationship with aneurysm behavior. Patients with intracranial aneurysms who were prospectively evaluated using HRMRI between July 2013 and June 2014 were enrolled in this study. The aneurysm's wall enhancement and evidence of inflammation invasion were determined. In addition, the relationship between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size and symptoms, including ruptured aneurysms, giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) presenting as mass effect, progressively growing aneurysms, and aneurysms associated with neurological symptoms, was statistically analyzed. Twenty-five patients with 30 aneurysms were available for the current study. Fourteen aneurysms showed wall enhancement, including 6 ruptured and 8 unruptured aneurysms. Evidence of inflammation was identified directly through histological studies and indirectly through intraoperative investigations and clinical courses. The statistical analysis indicated no significant correlation between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size. However, there was a strong correlation between wall enhancement and aneurysm symptoms, with a kappa value of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.68-1). Aneurysm wall enhancement on HRMRI might be a sign of inflammatory change. Symptomatic aneurysms exhibited wall enhancement on HRMRI. Wall enhancement had a high consistent correlation of symptomatic aneurysms. Therefore, wall enhancement on HRMRI might predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm. (orig.)

  7. The histological basis of late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance in a patient with Anderson-Fabry disease

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, J. C.; Sheppard, M.; Reed, E.; Lee, P.; Elliott, P. M.; Pennell, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry Disease (AFD) is a storage disease that mimics hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance occurs in approximately 50% of patients in the basal inferolateral LV wall, but how an intracellular storage disease causes focal LGE is unknown. We present a whole-heart histological validation that LGE is caused by focal myocardial collagen scarring. This scarring may be the substrate for electrical re-entry and sudden arrhythmic d...

  8. Tracer kinetic model selection for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Tanderup, Kari; Duan, Chong

    2014-01-01

    , the TM was optimal in 17.0%, the ETM was optimal in 2.2%, the C-TU in 23.4% and the 2CXM was optimal in 57.3%. Throughout the tumour, a high correlation was found between Ktrans(TM) and Fp(2CXM), ρ = 0.91. Conclusion. The 2CXM was most often optimal in describing the contrast agent enhancement of pre......Background. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) offers a unique capability to probe tumour microvasculature. Different analysis of the acquired data will possibly lead to different conclusions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate under which...

  9. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  10. Graphene photonics for resonator-enhanced electro-optic devices and all-optical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Dirk R.; Gan, Xuetao

    2017-03-21

    Techniques for coupling light into graphene using a planar photonic crystal having a resonant cavity characterized by a mode volume and a quality factor and at least one graphene layer positioned in proximity to the planar photonic crystal to at least partially overlap with an evanescent field of the resonant cavity. At least one mode of the resonant cavity can couple into the graphene layer via evanescent coupling. The optical properties of the graphene layer can be controlled, and characteristics of the graphene-cavity system can be detected. Coupling light into graphene can include electro-optic modulation of light, photodetection, saturable absorption, bistability, and autocorrelation.

  11. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the lung in asthma—Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei-Juan, E-mail: weijuan.zhang@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Niven, Robert M., E-mail: robert.niven@uhsm.nhs.uk [North West Lung Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Southmoor Road, Manchester M23 9LT (United Kingdom); Young, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Young1@astrazeneca.com [Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Liu, Yu-Zhen, E-mail: yu-zhen.liu@astrazeneca.com [Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Parker, Geoffrey J.M., E-mail: Geoff.parker@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Bioxydyn Limited, Rutherford House, Pencroft Way, Manchester M15 6SZ (United Kingdom); Naish, Josephine H., E-mail: Josephine.naish@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Biomedical Imaging Institute, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Oxygen-enhanced MRI may have a role in the estimation of disease severity in asthma. • Heterogeneity of parameter maps reflects localized functional impairment in asthma. • OE-MRI provides non-ionising, spatial and temporal information on oxygen delivery. - Abstract: Objectives: To prospectively estimate the feasibility and reproducibility of dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OE-MRI) in the assessment of regional oxygen delivery, uptake and washout in asthmatic lungs. Materials and methods: The study was approved by the National Research Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained. Dynamic OE-MRI was performed twice at one month apart on four mild asthmatic patients (23 ± 5 years old, FEV{sub 1} = 96 ± 3% of predicted value) and six severe asthmatic patients (41 ± 12 years old, FEV{sub 1} = 60 ± 14% of predicted value) on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a two-dimensional T{sub 1}-weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence. The enhancing fraction (EF), the maximal change in the partial pressure of oxygen in lung tissue (ΔPO{sub 2max{sub l}}) and arterial blood of the aorta (ΔPO{sub 2max{sub a}}), and the oxygen wash-in (τ{sub up{sub l}}, τ{sub up{sub a}}) and wash-out (τ{sub down{sub l}}, τ{sub down{sub a}}) time constants were extracted and compared between groups using the independent-samples t-test (two-tailed). Correlations between imaging readouts and clinical measurements were assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis. Bland–Altman analysis was used to estimate the levels of agreement between the repeat scans and the intra-observer agreement in the MR imaging readouts. Results: The severe asthmatic group had significantly smaller EF (70 ± 16%) and median ΔPO{sub 2max{sub l}} (156 ± 52 mmHg) and significantly larger interquartile range of τ{sub up{sub l}} (0.84 ± 0.26 min) than the mild asthmatic group (95 ± 3%, P = 0.014; 281 ± 40 mmHg, P = 0.004; 0.20 ± 0.07 min, P = 0

  12. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the lung in asthma—Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Juan; Niven, Robert M.; Young, Simon S.; Liu, Yu-Zhen; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.; Naish, Josephine H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen-enhanced MRI may have a role in the estimation of disease severity in asthma. • Heterogeneity of parameter maps reflects localized functional impairment in asthma. • OE-MRI provides non-ionising, spatial and temporal information on oxygen delivery. - Abstract: Objectives: To prospectively estimate the feasibility and reproducibility of dynamic oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OE-MRI) in the assessment of regional oxygen delivery, uptake and washout in asthmatic lungs. Materials and methods: The study was approved by the National Research Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained. Dynamic OE-MRI was performed twice at one month apart on four mild asthmatic patients (23 ± 5 years old, FEV 1 = 96 ± 3% of predicted value) and six severe asthmatic patients (41 ± 12 years old, FEV 1 = 60 ± 14% of predicted value) on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a two-dimensional T 1 -weighted inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence. The enhancing fraction (EF), the maximal change in the partial pressure of oxygen in lung tissue (ΔPO 2max l ) and arterial blood of the aorta (ΔPO 2max a ), and the oxygen wash-in (τ up l , τ up a ) and wash-out (τ down l , τ down a ) time constants were extracted and compared between groups using the independent-samples t-test (two-tailed). Correlations between imaging readouts and clinical measurements were assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis. Bland–Altman analysis was used to estimate the levels of agreement between the repeat scans and the intra-observer agreement in the MR imaging readouts. Results: The severe asthmatic group had significantly smaller EF (70 ± 16%) and median ΔPO 2max l (156 ± 52 mmHg) and significantly larger interquartile range of τ up l (0.84 ± 0.26 min) than the mild asthmatic group (95 ± 3%, P = 0.014; 281 ± 40 mmHg, P = 0.004; 0.20 ± 0.07 min, P = 0.001, respectively). EF, median ΔPO 2max l and τ down l and the interquartile range of τ up l

  13. Enhancing the detection of edges and non-differentiable points in an NMR spectrum using delayed-acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhaoyuan; Walls, Jamie D.

    2018-02-01

    Delayed-acquisition, which is a common technique for improving spectral resolution in Fourier transform based spectroscopies, typically relies upon differences in T2 relaxation rates that are often due to underlying differences in dynamics and/or complexities of the spin systems being studied. After an acquisition delay, the broad signals from fast T2 -relaxing species are more suppressed relative to the sharp signals from slow T2 -relaxing species. In this paper, an alternative source of differential "dephasing" under delayed-acquisition is demonstrated that is based solely upon the mathematical properties of the line shape and is independent of the underlying spin dynamics and/or complexity. Signals associated with frequencies where the line shape either changes sharply and/or is non-differentiable at some finite order dephase at a much slower rate than those signals associated with frequencies where the line shape is smooth. Experiments employing delayed-acquisition to study interfaces in biphasic samples, to measure spatially-dependent longitudinal relaxation, and to highlight sharp features in NMR spectra are presented.

  14. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: Modeling and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Zullo, R.; Gaglio, G.; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), 015205 ISSN 0957-0233 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical resonators * optical sensors * cavity ring-down spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  15. Theory of the effect of odd-photon destructive interference on optical shifts in resonantly enhanced multiphoton excitation and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Deng, L.; Garrett, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a theory for two- and three-photon excitation, optical shifting, and four-wave mixing when a first laser is tuned onto, or near, a two-photon resonance and a second much more intense laser is tuned near or on resonance between the two-photon resonance and a second excited state. When the second excited state has a dipole-allowed transition back to the ground state and the concentration is sufficiently high, a destructive interference is produced between three-photon coupling of the ground state and the second excited state and one-photon coupling between the same states by the internally generated four-wave mixing field. This interference leads to several striking effects. For instance, as the onset of the interference occurs, the optical shifts in the two-photon resonance excitation line shape become smaller in copropagating geometry so that the line shapes for multiphoton ionization enhanced by the two-photon resonance eventually become unaffected by the second laser. In the same range of concentrations the four-wave mixing field evolves to a concentration-independent intensity. With counterpropagating laser beams the line shape exhibits normal optical shifts like those observed for both copropagating and counterpropagating laser beams at very low concentrations. The theoretical work presented here extends our earlier works by including the effect of laser bandwidth and by removing the restriction of having the second laser be tuned far from three-photon resonance. In this way we have now included, as a special case, the effect of both laser bandwidth and interference on laser-induced transparency. Unlike other effects related to odd-photon destructive interference, the effect of a broad bandwidth is to bring about the predicted effects at much lower concentrations. Studies in rubidium show good agreement between theory and experiment for both ionization line shapes and four-wave mixing intensity as a function of concentration. copyright 1998 The

  16. Role of late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the risk stratification of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tevfik F; Jabbour, Andrew; Gulati, Ankur; Mallorie, Amy; Raza, Sadaf; Cowling, Thomas E; Das, Bibek; Khwaja, Jahanzaib; Alpendurada, Francisco D; Wage, Ricardo; Roughton, Michael; McKenna, William J; Moon, James C; Varnava, Amanda; Shakespeare, Carl; Cowie, Martin R; Cook, Stuart A; Elliott, Perry; O'Hanlon, Rory; Pennell, Dudley J; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2014-12-01

    Myocardial fibrosis identified by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with adverse cardiovascular events, but its value as an independent risk factor for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is unknown. We investigated the role of LGE-CMR in the risk stratification of HCM. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a tertiary referral centre. Consecutive patients with HCM (n=711, median age 56.3 years, IQR 46.7-66.6; 70.0% male) underwent LGE-CMR and were followed for a median 3.5 years. The primary end point was SCD or aborted SCD. Overall, 471 patients (66.2%) had myocardial fibrosis (median 5.9% of left ventricular mass, IQR: 2.2-13.3). Twenty-two (3.1%) reached the primary end point. The extent but not the presence of fibrosis was a significant univariable predictor of the primary end point (HR per 5% LGE: 1.24, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.45; p=0.007 and HR for LGE: 2.69, 95% CI 0.91 to 7.97; p=0.073, respectively). However, on multivariable analysis, only LV-EF remained statistically significant (HR: 0.92, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.95; p<0.001). For the secondary outcome of cardiovascular mortality/aborted SCD, the presence and the amount of fibrosis were significant predictors on univariable but not multivariable analysis after adjusting for LV-EF and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. The amount of myocardial fibrosis was a strong univariable predictor of SCD risk. However, this effect was not maintained after adjusting for LV-EF. Further work is required to elucidate the interrelationship between fibrosis and traditional predictors of outcome in HCM. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Modeling, Fabrication and Characterization of Scalable Electroless Gold Plated Nanostructures for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug

    The scientific and industrial demand for controllable thin gold (Au) film and Au nanostructures is increasing in many fields including opto-electronics, photovoltaics, MEMS devices, diagnostics, bio-molecular sensors, spectro-/microscopic surfaces and probes. In this study, a novel continuous flow electroless (CF-EL) Au plating method is developed to fabricate uniform Au thin films in ambient condition. The enhanced local mass transfer rate and continuous deposition resulting from CF-EL plating improved physical uniformity of deposited Au films and thermally transformed nanoparticles (NPs). Au films and NPs exhibited improved optical photoluminescence (PL) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, relative to batch immersion EL (BI-EL) plating. Suggested mass transfer models of Au mole deposition are consistent with optical feature of CF-EL and BI-EL films. The prototype CF-EL plating system is upgraded an automated scalable CF-EL plating system with real-time transmission UV-vis (T-UV) spectroscopy which provides the advantage of CF-EL plating, such as more uniform surface morphology, and overcomes the disadvantages of conventional EL plating, such as no continuous process and low deposition rate, using continuous process and controllable deposition rate. Throughout this work, dynamic morphological and chemical transitions during redox-driven self-assembly of Ag and Au film on silica surfaces under kinetic and equilibrium conditions are distinguished by correlating real-time T-UV spectroscopy with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The characterization suggests that four previously unrecognized time-dependent physicochemical regimes occur during consecutive EL deposition of silver (Ag) and Au onto tin-sensitized silica surfaces: self-limiting Ag activation; transitory Ag NP formation; transitional Au-Ag alloy formation during galvanic replacement of Ag by Au; and uniform morphology formation under

  18. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enables In Vivo Confirmation of Peri-Infarct Restoration Following Stem Cell Therapy in a Porcine Ischemia-Reperfusion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Rajesh; Kim, Paul J; Matsuura, Yuka; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Metzler, Scott; Huang, Ngan F; Lyons, Jennifer K; Nguyen, Patricia K; Ge, Xiaohu; Foo, Cheryl Wong Po; McConnell, Michael V; Wu, Joseph C; Yeung, Alan C; Harnish, Phillip; Yang, Phillip C

    2015-07-27

    The exact mechanism of stem cell therapy in augmenting the function of ischemic cardiomyopathy is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that increased viability of the peri-infarct region (PIR) produces restorative benefits after stem cell engraftment. A novel multimodality imaging approach simultaneously assessed myocardial viability (manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [MEMRI]), myocardial scar (delayed gadolinium enhancement MRI), and transplanted stem cell engraftment (positron emission tomography reporter gene) in the injured porcine hearts. Twelve adult swine underwent ischemia-reperfusion injury. Digital subtraction of MEMRI-negative myocardium (intrainfarct region) from delayed gadolinium enhancement MRI-positive myocardium (PIR and intrainfarct region) clearly delineated the PIR in which the MEMRI-positive signal reflected PIR viability. Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) represent a unique population of immunomodulatory mesodermal stem cells that restored the murine PIR. Immediately following hAMSC delivery, MEMRI demonstrated an increased PIR viability signal compared with control. Direct PIR viability remained higher in hAMSC-treated hearts for >6 weeks. Increased PIR viability correlated with improved regional contractility, left ventricular ejection fraction, infarct size, and hAMSC engraftment, as confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Increased MEMRI and positron emission tomography reporter gene signal in the intrainfarct region and the PIR correlated with sustained functional augmentation (global and regional) within the hAMSC group (mean change, left ventricular ejection fraction: hAMSC 85±60%, control 8±10%; P<0.05) and reduced chamber dilatation (left ventricular end-diastole volume increase: hAMSC 24±8%, control 110±30%; P<0.05). The positron emission tomography reporter gene signal of hAMSC engraftment correlates with the improved MEMRI signal in the PIR. The increased MEMRI signal represents PIR viability and the

  19. Enhanced absorption in Au nanoparticles/a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells exploiting Au surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Sacchetti, Alberto; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Au nanoparticles (NPs)/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions have been deposited combining plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour deposition (PECVD) with Au sputtering. We demonstrate that a density of {proportional_to}1.3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} of Au nanoparticles with an approximately 20 nm diameter deposited onto (n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si heterojunctions enhance performance exploiting the improved absorption of light by the surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs. In particular, Au NPs/(n-type)a-Si:H/(p-type)c-Si show an enhancement of 20% in the short-circuit current, J{sub SC}, 25% in the power output, P{sub max} and 3% in the fill factor, FF, compared to heterojunctions without Au NPs. Structures have been characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and current-voltage (I-V) measurements to correlate the plasmon resonance-induced enhanced absorption of light with photovoltaic performance. (author)

  20. Modeling and Simulation of a Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. W. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated and analyzed a resonant-cavity-enhancedd InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot n-i-n photodiode using Crosslight Apsys package. The resonant cavity has a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR at one side. Comparing with the conventional photodetectors, the resonant-cavity-enhanced photodiode (RCE-PD showed higher detection efficiency, faster response speed, and better wavelength selectivity and spatial orientation selectivity. Our simulation results also showed that when an AlAs layer is inserted into the device structure as a blocking layer, ultralow dark current can be achieved, with dark current densities 0.0034 A/cm at 0 V and 0.026 A/cm at a reverse bias of 2 V. We discussed the mechanism producing the photocurrent at various reverse bias. A high quantum efficiency of 87.9% was achieved at resonant wavelength of 1030 nm with a FWHM of about 3 nm. We also simulated InAs QD RCE-PD to compare with InGaAs QD. At last, the photocapacitance characteristic of the model has been discussed under different frequencies.

  1. The double-resonance enhancement of stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in silver-capped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. N.; Butsen, A. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ivanova, A. K.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Levchenko, A. O.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric nano- and (sub)microparticles exhibit magnetic and electrical dipolar Mie-resonances, which makes them useful as efficient basic elements in surface-enhanced spectroscopy, non-linear light conversion and nanoscale light control. We report the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) of a nanosecond ruby laser radiation (central wavelength λ = 694.3 nm (full-width at half-maximum ≈ 0.015 cm-1), gaussian 1/e-intensity pulsewidth τ ≈ 20 ns, TEM00-mode pulse energy Emax ≈ 0.3 J) in nanodiamond (R ≈ 120 nm) hydrosols, induced via optomechanical coherent excitation of fundamental breathing eigen-modes, and the two-fold enhancement of SLFRS in Ag-decorated nanodiamonds, characterized by hybrid dipolar resonances of electrical (silver) and magnetic (diamond) nature. Hybrid metal-dielectric particles were prepared by means of nanosecond IR-laser ablation of solid silver target in diamond hydrosols with consecutive Ag-capping of diamonds, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis, photoluminescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Intensities of the SLFR-scattered components and their size-dependent spectral shifts were measured in the highly sensitive stimulated scattering regime, indicating the high (≈ 30%) SLFRS conversion efficiency and the resonant character of the scattering species.

  2. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic and static gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid(Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated as measures of joint inflammation in arthritis, by a comparison with macroscopic and microscopic signs of synovitis. Furthermore, the importance of the size...

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, a biodegradable nanosized magnetic resonance contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzuo Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongzuo Xu1, Todd Lyle Kaneshiro1, Eun-Kee Jeong2, Dennis L Parker2, Zheng-Rong Lu31Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has been recently shown to be effective for diagnostic urography. High-resolution urographic images can be acquired with T1 contrast agents for the kidney and urinary tract with minimal noise in the abdomen. Currently, clinical contrast agents are low molecular weight agents and can rapidly extravasate from blood circulation, leading to slow contrast agent elimination through kidney and consequently providing limited contrast enhancement in urinary tract. In this study, a new biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent, nanoglobule-G4-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, was prepared by conjugating Gd-DO3A chelates on the surface of a generation 4 nanoglobule, poly-l-lysine octa(3-aminopropylsilsesquioxane dendrimer, via a disulfide spacer, where the carrier had a precisely defined nanosize that is far smaller than the renal filtration threshold. The in vivo contrast enhancement and dynamic imaging of the urinary tract of the agent was evaluated in nude mice using a low molecular weight agent Gd(DTPA-BMA as a control. The agent eliminated rapidly from blood circulation and accumulated more abundantly in urinary tract than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The fast elimination kinetics is ideal for functional evaluation of the kidneys. The morphology of the kidneys and urinary tract was better visualized by the biodegradable nanoglobular contrast agent than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The agent also resulted in low liver contrast enhancement, indicating low nonspecific tissue deposition. These features render the G4 nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A conjugate a promising contrast agent for magnetic

  4. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: modeling and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgini, A; Avino, S; Malara, P; Zullo, R; Gagliardi, G; Homola, J; De Natale, P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of a surface-plasmon-resonance refractive-index (RI) sensor based on an optical resonator. The resonator transforms RI changes of liquid samples, interacting with the surface plasmon excited by near-infrared light, into a variation of the intra-cavity optical loss. Cavity ring-down measurements are provided as a proof of concept of RI sensing on calibrated mixtures. A characterization of the overall sensor response and noise features as well as a discussion on possible improvements is carried out. A reproducibility analysis shows that a resolution of 10 −7 –10 −8  RIU is within reach over observation times of 1–30 s. The ultimate resolution is set only by intrinsic noise features of the cavity-based method, pointing to a potential limit below 10 −10  RIU/√Hz. (paper)

  5. Enhancing the resonance stability of a high-Q micro/nanoresonator by an optical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Lin, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    High-quality optical resonators underlie many important applications ranging from optical frequency metrology, precision measurement, nonlinear/quantum photonics, to diverse sensing such as detecting single biomolecule, electromagnetic field, mechanical acceleration/rotation, among many others. All these applications rely essentially on the stability of optical resonances, which, however, is ultimately limited by the fundamental thermal fluctuations of the devices. The resulting thermo-refractive and thermo-elastic noises have been widely accepted for nearly two decades as the fundamental thermodynamic limit of an optical resonator, limiting its resonance uncertainty to a magnitude 10-12 at room temperature. Here we report a novel approach that is able to significantly improve the resonance stability of an optical resonator. We show that, in contrast to the common belief, the fundamental temperature fluctuations of a high-Q micro/nanoresonator can be suppressed remarkably by pure optical means without cooling the device temperature, which we term as temperature squeezing. An optical wave with only a fairly moderate power launched into the device is able to produce strong photothermal backaction that dramatically suppresses the spectral intensity of temperature fluctuations by five orders of magnitudes and squeezes the overall level (root-mean-square value) of temperature fluctuations by two orders of magnitude. The proposed approach is universally applicable to various micro/nanoresonator platforms and the optimal temperature squeezing can be achieved with an optical Q around 106-107 that is readily available in various current devices. The proposed photothermal temperature squeezing is expected to have profound impact on broad applications of high-Q cavities in sensing, metrology, and integrated nonlinear/quantum photonics.

  6. Distribution patterns of Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Nakoto; Ozawa, Shun

    1994-01-01

    In patients who received thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we observed 3 distinct patterns in gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. To clarify the significance of these distribution patterns of Gd-DTPA, 20 consecutive patients underwent Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging 7-10 days after AMI. All of the patients received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) within 6 h of onset. Echocardiograms were obtained prior to and serially over 10 days, and interpreted for regional wall motion. Coronary angiograms were obtained the day before discharge. None of the 6 patients with a closed infarct-related artery, and 9 of the 14 patients with an open artery, demonstrated subendocardial enhancement (p<0.05). All of these latter 9 patients demonstrated a significant improvement in wall motion between days 1 and 10 after AMI. In contrast, only 1 of the 7 patients with transmural enhancement and none of the 4 patients with non-homogeneous enhancement demonstrated improvement of wall motion on day 10 (p<0.05). We concluded that subendocardial enhancement was a fair prognostic sign for restoration of regional cardiac function in patients who received IVTPA during AMI. (author)

  7. Manipulating the wavelength-drift of a Tm laser for resonance enhancement in an intra-cavity pumped Ho laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haizhou; Huang, Jianhong; Liu, Huagang; Li, Jinhui; Lin, Zixiong; Ge, Yan; Dai, Shutao; Deng, Jing; Lin, Wenxiong

    2018-03-05

    We demonstrate an enhancement mechanism and thermal model for intra-cavity pumped lasers, where resonance enhancement in intra-cavity pumped Ho laser was achieved by manipulating the wavelength-drift nature of the Tm laser for the first time. Optical conversion efficiency of 37.5% from an absorbed 785 nm diode laser to a Ho laser was obtained with a maximum output power of 7.51 W at 2122 nm, which is comparable to the conversion efficiency in 1.9 μm LD pumped Ho lasers. Meanwhile, more severe thermal effects in the Ho-doped gain medium than the Tm-doped one at high power operation were verified based on the built thermal model. This work benefits the design or evaluation of intra-cavity pumped lasers, and the resonance enhancement originated from the difference in reabsorption loss between stark levels at the lasing manifolds of quasi-three-level rare-earth ions has great interest to improve the existing intra-cavity pumped lasers or explore novel lasers.

  8. Relation of photofission cross sections and delayed neutron photoproduction in the range of E1-giant resonance. Sootnoshenie mezhdu secheniyami fotodeleniya i fotoobrazovaniya zapazdyvayushchikh nejtronov v oblasti E1-gigantskogo rezonansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganich, P P; Parlag, O A; Sikora, D I; Sychev, S I

    1989-03-01

    Relation between yields and cross sections of photofission and photoproduction is studied in order to use them in the methods for analysis of fissile nuclides. Total yield of delayed neutrons from the {sup 232}Th target and ratios of total yields from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th targets were measured in the M=300 microtron in 6-18 MeV energy range. Efficiency of the suggested method for refining the {sup 238}U photofission cross sections in the range of E1-giant resonance is shown.

  9. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg-1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20-0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98-1.03, and R values between 0.92-1.01. From the Bland-Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, -0.01 (-0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (-0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, -0.05 (-0.29, 0.20) or  -0.07 (-0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, -0.03 (-0.30, 0.24) or  -0.09 (-0.43, 0.26) at rest or under stress. With the

  10. Heterologous expression of wheat VERNALIZATION 2 (TaVRN2 gene in Arabidopsis delays flowering and enhances freezing tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou Diallo

    Full Text Available The vernalization gene 2 (VRN2, is a major flowering repressor in temperate cereals that is regulated by low temperature and photoperiod. Here we show that the gene from Triticum aestivum (TaVRN2 is also regulated by salt, heat shock, dehydration, wounding and abscissic acid. Promoter analysis indicates that TaVRN2 regulatory region possesses all the specific responsive elements to these stresses. This suggests pleiotropic effects of TaVRN2 in wheat development and adaptability to the environment. To test if TaVRN2 can act as a flowering repressor in species different from the temperate cereals, the gene was ectopically expressed in the model plant Arabidopsis. Transgenic plants showed no alteration in morphology, but their flowering time was significantly delayed compared to controls plants, indicating that TaVRN2, although having no ortholog in Brassicaceae, can act as a flowering repressor in these species. To identify the possible mechanism by which TaVRN2 gene delays flowering in Arabidopsis, the expression level of several genes involved in flowering time regulation was determined. The analysis indicates that the late flowering of the 35S::TaVRN2 plants was associated with a complex pattern of expression of the major flowering control genes, FCA, FLC, FT, FVE and SOC1. This suggests that heterologous expression of TaVRN2 in Arabidopsis can delay flowering by modulating several floral inductive pathways. Furthermore, transgenic plants showed higher freezing tolerance, likely due to the accumulation of CBF2, CBF3 and the COR genes. Overall, our data suggests that TaVRN2 gene could modulate a common regulator of the two interacting pathways that regulate flowering time and the induction of cold tolerance. The results also demonstrate that TaVRN2 could be used to manipulate flowering time and improve cold tolerance in other species.

  11. Off-resonance plasmonic enhanced femtosecond laser optoporation and transfection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Judith; Humbert, Laure; Boulais, Étienne; Lachaine, Rémi; Lebrun, Jean-Jaques; Meunier, Michel

    2012-03-01

    A femtosecond laser based transfection method using off-resonance plasmonic gold nanoparticles is described. For human cancer melanoma cells, the treatment leads to a very high perforation rate of 70%, transfection efficiency three times higher than for conventional lipofection, and very low toxicity (transfection for skin cancer treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure Determination of Anionic Metal Clusters via Infrared Resonance Enhanced Multiple Photon Electron Detachment Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haertelt, M.; Lapoutre, V. J. F.; Bakker, J. M.; Redlich, B.; Harding, D. J.; Fielicke, A.; Meijer, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report vibrational spectra of anionic metal clusters, measured via electron detachment following resonant absorption of multiple infrared photons. To facilitate the sequential absorption of the required large number of photons, the cluster beam interacts with the infrared radiation inside the

  13. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy for (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of atomic bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Shin; Jung, Young Jae; Kang, Wee Kyung; Jung, Kyung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Two-photon resonant third photon ionization of atomic bromine (4p 5 2 P 3/2 and 2 P 1/2 ) has been studied using a photoelectron imaging spectroscopy in the wavelength region 250-278 nm. The technique has yielded simultaneously both relative branching ratios to the three levels of Br + ( 3 P 2 , 3 P 0,1 and 1 D 2 ) with 4p 4 configuration and the angular distributions of outgoing photoelectrons. The product branching ratios reveal a strong propensity to populate particular levels in many cases. Several pathways have been documented for selective formation of Br + ( 3 P 2 ) and Br + ( 3 P 0,1 ) ions. In general, the final ion level distributions are dominated by the preservation of the ion core configuration of a resonant excited state. Some deviations from this simple picture are discussed in terms of the configuration interaction of resonant states and the autoionization in the continuum. The photoelectron angular distributions are qualitatively similar for all transitions, with a positive A 2 anisotropy coefficient of 1.0 - 2.0 and negligible A 4 in most cases, which suggests that the angular distribution is mainly determined by the single-photon ionization process of a resonant excited state induced from the third photon absorption

  14. Reliability of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings and their correlation with clinical outcome in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-11-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) is often performed in the evaluation of patients with persistent sciatica after lumbar disc surgery. However, correlation between enhancement and clinical findings is debated, and limited data are available regarding the reliability of enhancement findings. To evaluate the reliability of Gd-MRI findings and their correlation with clinical findings in patients with sciatica. Prospective observational evaluation of patients who were enrolled in a randomized trial with 1-year follow-up. Patients with 6- to 12-week sciatica, who participated in a multicentre randomized clinical trial comparing an early surgery strategy with prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. In total 204 patients underwent Gd-MRI at baseline and after 1 year. Patients were assessed by means of the Roland Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) for sciatica, visual analog scale (VAS) for leg pain, and patient-reported perceived recovery at 1 year. Kappa coefficients were used to assess interobserver reliability. In total, 204 patients underwent Gd-MRI at baseline and after 1 year. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were correlated to the outcome measures using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data and Fisher exact tests for categorical data. Poor-to-moderate agreement was observed regarding Gd enhancement of the herniated disc and compressed nerve root (kappa0.95). Of the 59 patients with an enhancing herniated disc at 1 year, 86% reported recovery compared with 100% of the 12 patients with nonenhancing herniated discs (p=.34). Of the 12 patients with enhancement of the most affected nerve root at 1 year, 83% reported recovery compared with 85% of the 192 patients with no enhancement (p=.69). Patients with and without enhancing herniated discs or nerve roots at 1 year reported comparable outcomes on RDQ and VAS-leg pain. Reliability of Gd-MRI findings was poor-to-moderate and no correlation was observed between enhancement and

  15. Resonantly-enhanced transmission through a periodic array of subwavelength apertures in heavily-doped conducting polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Vardeny, Z. Valy; Agrawal, Amit; Nahata, Ajay; Menon, Reghu

    2006-02-01

    We observed resonantly-enhanced terahertz transmission through two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of subwavelength apertures with various periodicities fabricated on metallic organic conducting polymer films of polypyrrole heavily doped with PF6 molecules [PPy(PF6)]. The "anomalous transmission" spectra are in good agreement with a model involving surface plasmon polariton excitations on the film surfaces. We also found that the `anomalous transmission' peaks are broader in the exotic metallic PPy (PF6) films compared to those formed in 2D aperture array in regular metallic films such as silver, showing that the surface plasmon polaritons on the PPy (PF6) film surfaces have higher attenuation.

  16. Enhancement of the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect via resonant tunneling in trilayers containing magneto-optical metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girón-Sedas, J. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, AA 25360, Cali (Colombia); Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Bioinformática y Fotónica - CIBioFI, AA 25360 Cali (Colombia); Mejía-Salazar, J. R., E-mail: jrmejia3146@gmail.com [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Moncada-Villa, E.; Porras-Montenegro, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, AA 25360, Cali (Colombia)

    2016-07-18

    We propose a way to enhance the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect, by the excitation of resonant tunneling modes, in subwavelength trilayer structures featuring a dielectric slab sandwiched between two magneto-optical metallic layers. Depending on the magneto-optical layer widths, the proposed system may exhibit an extraordinary transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect, which makes it very attractive for the design and engineering of thin-film magneto-optical-based devices for future photonic circuits or fiber optical-communication systems.

  17. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual progress report, March 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the author will review the progress made in his studies of ion rotational distributions resulting from resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of excited electronic states and from single-photon ionization of ground electronic states of jet-cooled molecules by coherent VUV and XUV radiation. To do so he will select a few examples from his studies which serve to highlight his progress and to identify the background and significance of the specific spectral features and systems he has chosen to study

  18. The histological basis of late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance in a patient with Anderson-Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James C; Sheppard, Mary; Reed, Emma; Lee, Phillip; Elliott, Perry M; Pennell, Dudley J

    2006-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry Disease (AFD) is a storage disease that mimics hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance occurs in approximately 50% of patients in the basal inferolateral LV wall, but how an intracellular storage disease causes focal LGE is unknown. We present a whole-heart histological validation that LGE is caused by focal myocardial collagen scarring. This scarring may be the substrate for electrical re-entry and sudden arrhythmic death. The reasons for this distribution of fibrosis are unclear, but may reflect inhomogeneous left ventricular wall stress.

  19. Evaluation of heart perfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Dirks, Christina G

    2004-01-01

    with acute transmural myocardial infarction were studied using a Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) MRI sequence to monitor the first pass of an extravascular contrast agent (CA), gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Quantitation of perfusion, expressed as Ki (mL/100 g/minute), in five......PURPOSE: To investigate the diagnostic ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) heart perfusion in acute heart patients, a fast, multislice dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequence was applied to patients with acute myocardial infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients...

  20. Resonant enhancement of band-to-band tunneling in in-plane MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tatsuya; Mori, Nobuya

    2018-04-01

    The band-to-band (BTB) tunneling current J through in-plane MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions is calculated by the nonequilibrium Green function method combined with tight-binding approximation. Types A and B of band configurations are considered. For type-A (type-B) heterojunctions, a potential notch exists (or is absent) at the heterointerface. Both type-A and type-B MoS2/WS2 heterojunctions can support a higher BTB current than MoS2 and WS2 homojunctions. For type-A heterojunctions, the resonant enhancement of J occurs resulting in a significantly higher BTB tunneling current.

  1. The Effect of the Degree of Luminal Contrast-Enhancement on CT Measurement of Plaque Size: A Comparison with T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Hur, Jin; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Choe, Kyu Ok; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    We studied early and delayed contrast-enhanced CT to determine the effects of the degree of luminal enhancement on the measurement of plaque size compared to T1-weighted MRI. T1-weighted MRI and a two-phase contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 5 New Zealand white rabbits with atherosclerosis. Early-phase images were acquired during an expected peak enhancement period of the lumen; delayed-phase images were acquired 240 sec after administration of the contrast media. Anteroposterior and lateral luminal diameters (APD, LD), luminal area (LA), total vessel area (TVA), and plaque area (PA) of the aorta were measured on MRI and CT, respectively and compared to each other. A total of 78 slices of the aorta were analyzed. PA, measured on T1-weighted MR images, was significantly greater than PA for both early-phase and delayed-phase CT (p 2 (p 2 (p 2 (p = 0.159) for MRI vs. early-phase CT, MRI vs. delayed-phase CT, and early-phase CT vs. delayed-phase CT, respectively. Different luminal densities by contrast enhancement do not affect the CT measurement of plaque area for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease

  2. Delayed nerve stimulation promotes axon-protective neurofilament phosphorylation, accelerates immune cell clearance and enhances remyelination in vivo in focally demyelinated nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki A McLean

    Full Text Available Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies.

  3. Delayed nerve stimulation promotes axon-protective neurofilament phosphorylation, accelerates immune cell clearance and enhances remyelination in vivo in focally demyelinated nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Nikki A; Popescu, Bogdan F; Gordon, Tessa; Zochodne, Douglas W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and efficient axon remyelination aids in restoring strong electrochemical communication with end organs and in preventing axonal degeneration often observed in demyelinating neuropathies. The signals from axons that can trigger more effective remyelination in vivo are still being elucidated. Here we report the remarkable effect of delayed brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES; 1 hour @ 20 Hz 5 days post-demyelination) on ensuing reparative events in a focally demyelinated adult rat peripheral nerve. ES impacted many parameters underlying successful remyelination. It effected increased neurofilament expression and phosphorylation, both implicated in axon protection. ES increased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and promoted node of Ranvier re-organization, both of which coincided with the early reappearance of remyelinated axons, effects not observed at the same time points in non-stimulated demyelinated nerves. The improved ES-associated remyelination was accompanied by enhanced clearance of ED-1 positive macrophages and attenuation of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in accompanying Schwann cells, suggesting a more rapid clearance of myelin debris and return of Schwann cells to a nonreactive myelinating state. These benefits of ES correlated with increased levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the acute demyelination zone, a key molecule in the initiation of the myelination program. In conclusion, the tremendous impact of delayed brief nerve stimulation on enhancement of the innate capacity of a focally demyelinated nerve to successfully remyelinate identifies manipulation of this axis as a novel therapeutic target for demyelinating pathologies.

  4. Comparison of digital subtraction angiography with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, J.; O'Callaghan, J.; Varghese, J.C.; Lee, M.J.; Walshe, J.; O'Brien, E.

    1999-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a treatable cause of hypertension and renal failure for which no ideal screening technique is currently available. We evaluated the use of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of RAS. Sixty-two patients with secondary hypertension were enrolled in the study. All patients had conventional renal angiography and gadolinium enhanced MRA. The sequence used was a 3D FMP SPGR sequence with the following parameters (TR: 26 ms, TE: 6.9 ms, flip angle 40 , field of view 36 x 36 cm, matrix 246 x 256, 1 excitation). Gadolinium 0.3 mmol/kg was administered and 60 1.5-mm-thick partitions were obtained over a duration of 3.5 min. The MRA images were then compared with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. Conventional DSA demonstrated 138 renal arteries, whereas gadolinium-enhanced MRA demonstrated 129 (93 %). Twenty-one renal artery stenoses and four occluded arteries were seen at conventional DSA. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA had a sensitivity of 88 %, specificity of 98 %, accuracy of 96 %, positive predictive value of 92 % and negative predictive value of 97 % when compared with conventional DSA. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA is an accurate technique for identifying patients with RAS. It is less sensitive in picking up accessory renal arteries. (orig.)

  5. Distribution of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values in patients receiving contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoji, Keigo; Aoki, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the distribution of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values in patients who underwent gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at different types of hospitals. We retrospectively studied 2,550 patients who underwent MRI at five institutions. We recorded the date and value of each patient's eGFR test. The distribution of eGFR values was compared with that in the general Japanese population. A total of 84.3% of patients had their eGFRs evaluated before GBCA-enhanced MRI. Of these, 84.7% were evaluated within 3 months before the GBCA-enhanced MRI, and 1.3% were evaluated on the day of the GBCA-enhanced MRI. A total of 87.2% of patients tested had an eGFR of ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ; 12.8% had an eGFR of 2 , and no patients had an eGFR of 2 . The rate of renal function evaluation differed among hospitals. The prevalence of low eGFR values was greater in Juntendo Tokyo Koto Geriatric Medical Center than in the other hospitals, and the prevalence of low eGFR values was greater in patients who underwent GBCA-enhanced MRI than in the general Japanese population. (author)

  6. Quantitative assessment of synovial inflammation by dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. A study of the effect of intra-articular methylprednisolone on the rate of early synovial enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Henriksen, O

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra-articular methylpredn......The effect of temporary inflammatory suppression on synovial membrane enhancement, as determined by dynamic and static gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was studied. MRI of 18 arthritic knees was performed before and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after intra...

  7. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and morphologic MRI of cartilage in the long-term follow-up after Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, Arne; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the detection of cartilage changes versus morphologic imaging in the long-term course of Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease (LCPD). A total of 31 hips in 26 patients (mean age, 30.0 years; range, 18–54 years) who were diagnosed with LCPD in childhood were included. Twenty-one radiographically normal contralateral hips served as controls. dGEMRIC indices of femoral and acetabular cartilage in the weight-bearing zone. Cartilage morphology was classified on radial PD-weighted images according to the modified Outerbridge classification. Mean dGEMRIC values of cartilage were significantly lower in hips after LCPD than in the radiographically normal contralateral hips (513 ± 100 ms vs. 579 ± 103 ms; P = 0.026). In 24 out of 31 LCPD hips and in 4 out of 21 radiographically normal contralateral hips, morphological cartilage changes were noted. Analysis of variance analysis revealed a significant influence of Outerbridge grading on decreased T1-values (P = 0.031). Our results suggest that dGEMRIC at 1.5 T is suitable to assess cartilage quality changes in the long-term follow-up after LCPD. The evaluation of biochemical cartilage quality with dGEMRIC may provide additional information about early cartilage changes occurring without visible alterations of cartilage morphology.

  8. Enhancement of Energy Harvesting Performance by a Coupled Bluff Splitter Body and PVEH Plate through Vortex Induced Vibration near Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ken Chin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by vortex induced vibration energy harvesting development as a new source of renewable energy, a T-shaped design vibration energy harvester is introduced with the aim of enhancing its performance through vortex induced vibration at near resonance conditions. The T-shaped structural model designed consists of a fixed boundary aluminum bluff splitter body coupled with a cantilever piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters (PVEH plate model which is a piezoelectric bimorph plate made of a brass plate sandwiched between 2 lead zirconate titanate (PZT