WorldWideScience

Sample records for resonance biosensor chip

  1. Localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor integrated with microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengjun; Bonroy, Kristien; Reekmans, Gunter; Laureyn, Wim; Verhaegen, Katarina; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2009-08-01

    A sensitive and low-cost microfluidic integrated biosensor is developed based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of gold nanoparticles, which allows label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions in real-time. A novel quadrant detection scheme is introduced which continuously measures the change of the light transmitted through the nanoparticle-coated sensor surface. Using a green light emitting diode (LED) as a light source in combination with the quadrant detection scheme, a resolution of 10(-4) in refractive index units (RIU) is determined. This performance is comparable to conventional LSPR-based biosensors. The biological sensing is demonstrated using an antigen/antibody (biotin/anti-biotin) system with an optimized gold nanoparticle film. The immobilization of biotin on a thiol-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the subsequent affinity binding of anti-biotin are quantitatively detected by the microfluidic integrated biosensor and a detection limit of 270 ng/mL of anti-biotin was achieved. The microfluidic chip is capable of transporting a precise amount of biological samples to the detection areas to achieve highly sensitive and specific biosensing with decreased reaction time and less reagent consumption. The obtained results are compared with those measured by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based Biacore system for the same binding event. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the integration of LSPR-based biosensing with microfluidic technologies, resulting in a low-cost and portable biosensor candidate compared to the larger and more expensive commercial instruments.

  2. Immobilizing topoisomerase I on a surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip to screen for inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chiao-En

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The topoisomerase I (TopI reaction intermediate consists of an enzyme covalently linked to a nicked DNA molecule, known as a TopI-DNA complex, that can be trapped by inhibitors and results in failure of re-ligation. Attempts at new derivative designs for TopI inhibition are enthusiastically being pursued, and TopI inhibitors were developed for a variety of applications. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR was recently used in TopI-inhibition studies. However, most such immobilized small molecules or short-sequence nucleotides are used as ligands onto sensor chips, and TopI was used as the analyte that flowed through the sensor chip. Methods We established a sensor chip on which the TopI protein is immobilized to evaluate TopI inhibition by SPR. Camptothecin (CPT targeting the DNA-TopI complex was used as a representative inhibitor to validate this label-free method. Results Purified recombinant human TopI was covalently coupled to the sensor chip for the SPR assay. The binding of anti-human (hTopI antibodies and plasmid pUC19, respectively, to the immobilized hTopI was observed with dose-dependent increases in resonance units (RU suggesting that the immobilized hTopI retains its DNA-binding activity. Neither CPT nor evodiamine alone in the analyte flowing through the sensor chip showed a significant increase in RU. The combination of pUC19 and TopI inhibitors as the analyte flowing through the sensor chip caused increases in RU. This confirms its reliability for binding kinetic studies of DNA-TopI binders for interaction and for primary screening of TopI inhibitors. Conclusions TopI immobilized on the chip retained its bioactivities of DNA binding and catalysis of intermediates of the DNA-TopI complex. This provides DNA-TopI binders for interaction and primary screening with a label-free method. In addition, this biochip can also ensure the reliability of binding kinetic studies of TopI.

  3. Biosensors-on-chip: a topical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sensen; Shamsi, Mohtashim H.

    2017-08-01

    This review will examine the integration of two fields that are currently at the forefront of science, i.e. biosensors and microfluidics. As a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, microfluidics has been enriched by the integration of various detection tools for analyte detection and quantitation. The application of such microfluidic platforms is greatly increased in the area of biosensors geared towards point-of-care diagnostics. Together, the merger of microfluidics and biosensors has generated miniaturized devices for sample processing and sensitive detection with quantitation. We believe that microfluidic biosensors (biosensors-on-chip) are essential for developing robust and cost effective point-of-care diagnostics. This review is relevant to a variety of disciplines, such as medical science, clinical diagnostics, LOC technologies including MEMs/NEMs, and analytical science. Specifically, this review will appeal to scientists working in the two overlapping fields of biosensors and microfluidics, and will also help new scientists to find their directions in developing point-of-care devices.

  4. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Novel application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor chips for measurement of advanced glycation end products in serum of Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sook; Yi, So Yeon; Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Moonil; Kim, Chan-Sik; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sook

    2009-09-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in diabetic complications. To measure AGEs, especially N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), in sera from Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF) and Zucker lean rats (ZL), we used a novel method of protein chip and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI). Serum samples were obtained from male ZDF and ZL rats at 20 weeks of age. Antibodies to AGEs or CML were immobilized on a gold surface, which was modified by cysteine-tagged, protein-G constructs. The gold chip upon which the serum was spotted was optically coupled with a prism coupler. The reflected images from the gold chip were obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The direct analysis of the glycated proteins and products using SPRI showed that AGEs and CML levels were elevated in ZDF serum, compared with ZL serum. The lowest detection limit of AGEs was 10 ng/ml, with a working range covering the physiological range. These results indicate that the protein chip and SPRI system is very suitable for the measurement of glycated proteins and end products in serum samples. This system offers high sensitivity without any fluorescent or other labeling of the components and saves a substantial amount of time, resources, and labor. Our results suggest that SPRI systems can be used as a tool to diagnose diabetic complications.

  6. Development of optical WGM resonators for biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, I.; Pirktina, A.; Ubele, A.; Grundsteins, K.; Atvars, A.; Viter, R.; Alnis, J.

    2017-12-01

    Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) resonators are very sensitive to nanoparticles attaching to the surface. We simulate this process using COMSOL Wave Optics module. Our spherical WGM resonators are produced by melting a tip of an optical fiber and we measure optical Q factors in the 105 range. Molecular oxygen lines of the air in the 760 nm region are used as reference markers when looking for the shifts of the WGM resonance lines. We demonstrate WGM microresonator surface coating with a layer of ZnO nanorods as well as with polystyrene microspheres. Coatings produce increased contact surface. Additional layer of antigens/antibodies will be coated to make high-specificity biosensors.

  7. New trends in instrumental design for surface plasmon resonance-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Abdennour; Linman, Matthew J.; Cheng, Quan

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensing is one of the most advanced label free, real time detection technologies. Numerous research groups with divergent scientific backgrounds have investigated the application of SPR biosensors and studied the fundamental aspects of surface plasmon polaritons that led to new, related instrumentation. As a result, this field continues to be at the forefront of evolving sensing technology. This review emphasizes the new developments in the field of SPR-related instrumentation including optical platforms, chips design, nanoscale approach and new materials. The current tendencies in SPR-based biosensing are identified and the future direction of SPR biosensor technology is broadly discussed. PMID:20951566

  8. Graphene oxide-based SPR biosensor chip for immunoassay applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Liu, Kou-Chen

    2014-01-01

    ...)-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips. This sensing film, which is formed by chemically modifying a GOS surface, has covalent bonds that strongly interact with the bovine serum albumin (BSA...

  9. Breakthroughs in photonics 2012: 2012 breakthroughs in lab-on-a-chip and optical biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, Daphné; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in 2012 in the field of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and optical biosensors. We will specially focus on optical label-free biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on manuscripts demonstrating bioanalytical applications. © 2009-2012 IEEE.

  10. Recent advances in nanoplasmonic biosensors: applications and lab-on-a-chip integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gerardo A.; Estevez, M.-Carmen; Soler, Maria; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progress in the nanofabrication field and the increasing demand for cost-effective, portable, and easy-to-use point-of-care platforms, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensors have been subjected to a great scientific interest in the last few years. The progress observed in the research of this nanoplasmonic technology is remarkable not only from a nanostructure fabrication point of view but also in the complete development and integration of operative devices and their application. The potential benefits that LSPR biosensors can offer, such as sensor miniaturization, multiplexing opportunities, and enhanced performances, have quickly positioned them as an interesting candidate in the design of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) optical biosensor platforms. This review covers specifically the most significant achievements that occurred in recent years towards the integration of this technology in compact devices, with views of obtaining LOC devices. We also discuss the most relevant examples of the use of the nanoplasmonic biosensors for real bioanalytical and clinical applications from assay development and validation to the identification of the implications, requirements, and challenges to be surpassed to achieve fully operative devices.

  11. Recent advances in nanoplasmonic biosensors: applications and lab-on-a-chip integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Gerardo A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the recent progress in the nanofabrication field and the increasing demand for cost-effective, portable, and easy-to-use point-of-care platforms, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR biosensors have been subjected to a great scientific interest in the last few years. The progress observed in the research of this nanoplasmonic technology is remarkable not only from a nanostructure fabrication point of view but also in the complete development and integration of operative devices and their application. The potential benefits that LSPR biosensors can offer, such as sensor miniaturization, multiplexing opportunities, and enhanced performances, have quickly positioned them as an interesting candidate in the design of lab-on-a-chip (LOC optical biosensor platforms. This review covers specifically the most significant achievements that occurred in recent years towards the integration of this technology in compact devices, with views of obtaining LOC devices. We also discuss the most relevant examples of the use of the nanoplasmonic biosensors for real bioanalytical and clinical applications from assay development and validation to the identification of the implications, requirements, and challenges to be surpassed to achieve fully operative devices.

  12. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the photonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic mode, cantilever is efficiently...

  13. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Sun, Ying; Wang, Liying; Zhu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the core/shell Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were prepared and applied in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. And the detailed investigation of Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites was separately performed by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. As the magnetic property and exceptional optical properties, the Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites were used as the solid support for the goat anti-human IgM, which could be immobilized on the surface of SPR biosensor chip by a magnetic pillar. This novel method of immobilizing goat anti-human IgM simplified experimental procedures and facilitated the regeneration of the sensing membrane. In addition, the different diameter of Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites could be obtained with the different amount of MPA in the solution. And the effect of Fe3O4/Au nanocomposites with different diameters on the sensitivity of SPR biosensor was also explored. As a result, the SPR biosensor exhibits a satisfactory response for human IgM in the concentration range of 0.30-20.00 μg ml(-1) and the increasing nanocomposite diameter is in favor of the sensitivity enhancement of SPR biosensor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fabrication LSPR sensor chip of Ag NPs and their biosensor application based on interparticle coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neishaboorynejad, T. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arsalani, S. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Medicine, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor of silver nanoparticles on hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin film were synthetized by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • Samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, AFM, and UV visible. • DNA primer at fM concentration was detected based on breaking of inter-particles coupling. • Dipolar plasmon of isolated Ag NPs, coupled Ag NPs plasmons, in-plane and out-plane coupling, and quadrupole plasmon modes were considered to explain biosensor properties. • The initial response, wavelength shift sensitivity, and response time of LSPR sensors were compared by morphology. - Abstract: We introduce a simple method to synthesize localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Ag NPs on the hydrogenated amorphous carbon by co-deposition of RF-Sputtering and RF-PECVD. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the content of Ag and C atoms. X-ray diffraction profile and atomic force microscopy indicate that the Ag NPs have fcc crystal structure and spherical shape and by increasing deposition time, particle sizes do not vary and only Ag NPs aggregation occurs, resulting in LSPR wavelength shift. Firstly, by increasing Ag NPs content, in-plan interparticles coupling is dominant and causes redshift in LSPR. At the early stage of agglomeration, out-plane coupling occurs and in-plane coupling is reduced, resulting a blueshift in the LSPR. By further increasing of Ag NPs content, agglomeration is completed on the substrate and in-plan coupling rises, resulting significant redshift in the LSPR. Results were used to implement biosensor application of chips. Detection of DNA primer at fM concentration was achieved based on breaking interparticles coupling of Ag NPs. A significant wavelength shift sensitivity of 30 nm and a short response time of 30 min were obtained, where both of these are prerequisite for biosensor applications.

  15. A lab-on-chip cell-based biosensor for label-free sensing of water toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Nordin, A N; Li, F; Voiculescu, I

    2014-04-07

    This paper presents a lab-on-chip biosensor containing an enclosed fluidic cell culturing well seeded with live cells for rapid screening of toxicants in drinking water. The sensor is based on the innovative placement of the working electrode for the electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique as the top electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonator. Cell damage induced by toxic water will cause a decrease in impedance, as well as an increase in the resonant frequency. For water toxicity tests, the biosensor's unique capabilities of performing two complementary measurements simultaneously (impedance and mass-sensing) will increase the accuracy of detection while decreasing the false-positive rate. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were used as toxicity sensing cells. The effects of the toxicants, ammonia, nicotine and aldicarb, on cells were monitored with both the QCM and the ECIS technique. The lab-on-chip was demonstrated to be sensitive to low concentrations of toxicants. The responses of BAECs to toxic samples occurred during the initial 5 to 20 minutes depending on the type of chemical and concentrations. Testing the multiparameter biosensor with aldicarb also demonstrated the hypothesis that using two different sensors to monitor the same cell monolayer provides cross validation and increases the accuracy of detection. For low concentrations of aldicarb, the variations in impedance measurements are insignificant in comparison with the shifts of resonant frequency monitored using the QCM resonator. A highly linear correlation between signal shifts and chemical concentrations was demonstrated for each toxicant.

  16. Fabrication LSPR sensor chip of Ag NPs and their biosensor application based on interparticle coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Neishaboorynejad, T.; Arsalani, S.

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a simple method to synthesize localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Ag NPs on the hydrogenated amorphous carbon by co-deposition of RF-Sputtering and RF-PECVD. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the content of Ag and C atoms. X-ray diffraction profile and atomic force microscopy indicate that the Ag NPs have fcc crystal structure and spherical shape and by increasing deposition time, particle sizes do not vary and only Ag NPs aggregation occurs, resulting in LSPR wavelength shift. Firstly, by increasing Ag NPs content, in-plan interparticles coupling is dominant and causes redshift in LSPR. At the early stage of agglomeration, out-plane coupling occurs and in-plane coupling is reduced, resulting a blueshift in the LSPR. By further increasing of Ag NPs content, agglomeration is completed on the substrate and in-plan coupling rises, resulting significant redshift in the LSPR. Results were used to implement biosensor application of chips. Detection of DNA primer at fM concentration was achieved based on breaking interparticles coupling of Ag NPs. A significant wavelength shift sensitivity of 30 nm and a short response time of 30 min were obtained, where both of these are prerequisite for biosensor applications.

  17. Hybrid Macro-Micro Fluidics System for a Chip-Based Biosensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamanaha, C. R; Whitman, L. J; Colton, R.J

    2002-01-01

    We describe the engineering of a hybrid fluidics platform for a chip-based biosensor system that combines high-performance microfluidics components with powerful, yet compact, millimeter-scale pump and valve actuators...

  18. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-06-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere.

  19. A BIOSENSOR USING COUPLED PLASMON WAVEGUIDE RESONANCE COMBINED WITH HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHAN DU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a biosensor that is capable for simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensing and hyperspectral fluorescence analysis in this paper. A symmetrical metal-dielectric slab scheme is employed for the excitation of coupled plasmon waveguide resonance (CPWR in the present work. Resonance between surface plasmon mode and the guided waveguide mode generates narrower full width half-maximum of the reflective curves which leads to increased precision for the determination of refractive index over conventional SPR sensors. In addition, CPWR also offers longer surface propagation depths and higher surface electric field strengths that enable the excitation of fluorescence with hyperspectral technique to maintain an appreciable signal-to-noise ratio. The refractive index information obtained from SPR sensing and the chemical properties obtained through hyperspectral fluorescence analysis confirm each other to exclude false-positive or false-negative cases. The sensor provides a comprehensive understanding of the biological events on the sensor chips.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor for extracellular vesicle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Agnes T; Ferrer, Nicolas-Guillermo; Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Lim, Sai Kiang; Dostálek, Jakub

    2017-10-09

    The sensitive analysis of small lipid extracellular vesicles (EVs) by using a grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GC-SPR) biosensor has been reported. In order to enable the analysis of trace amounts of EVs present in complex liquid samples, the target analyte is pre-concentrated on the sensor surface by using magnetic nanoparticles and its affinity binding is probed by wavelength interrogation of SPR. The GC-SPR has been demonstrated to allow for the implementation of efficient pulling of EVs to the sensor surface by using magnetic nanoparticles and an external magnetic field gradient applied through the sensor chip. This approach overcomes slow diffusion-limited mass transfer and greatly enhances the measured sensor response. The specific detection of different EV populations secreted from mesenchymal stem cells is achieved with a SPR sensor chip modified with antibodies against the surface marker CD81 and magnetic nanoparticles binding the vesicles via annexin V and cholera toxin B chain.

  1. Theory and Applications of Surface Plasmon Resonance, Resonant Mirror, Resonant Waveguide Grating, and Dual Polarization Interferometry Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy W. Day

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors have been used extensively in the scientific community for several purposes, most notably to determine association and dissociation kinetics, protein-ligand, protein-protein, or nucleic acid hybridization interactions. A number of different types of biosensors are available in the field, each with real or perceived benefits over the others. This review discusses the basic theory and operational arrangements of four commercially available types of optical biosensors: surface plasmon resonance, resonant mirror, resonance waveguide grating, and dual polarization interferometry. The different applications these techniques offer are discussed from experiments and results reported in recently published literature. Additionally, recent advancements or modifications to the current techniques are also discussed.

  2. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X. (Xuedong); Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  3. Biosensors in Health Care: The Milestones Achieved in Their Development towards Lab-on-Chip-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprava Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immense potentiality of biosensors in medical diagnostics has driven scientists in evolution of biosensor technologies and innovating newer tools in time. The cornerstone of the popularity of biosensors in sensing wide range of biomolecules in medical diagnostics is due to their simplicity in operation, higher sensitivity, ability to perform multiplex analysis, and capability to be integrated with different function by the same chip. There remains a huge challenge to meet the demands of performance and yield to its simplicity and affordability. Ultimate goal stands for providing point-of-care testing facility to the remote areas worldwide, particularly the developing countries. It entails continuous development in technology towards multiplexing ability, fabrication, and miniaturization of biosensor devices so that they can provide lab-on-chip-analysis systems to the community.

  4. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Lung Cancer Biomarker Using Nanoporous Biosensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Coupled with Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a nanobiosensor to evaluate a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The nanobiosensor is based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO chip and functions on the principles of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR and interferometry. The pore-depth of the fabricated nanoporous AAO chip was 1 µm and was obtained using a two-step electrochemical anodization process. The sensor chip is sensitive to the refractive index (RI changes of the surrounding medium and also provides simple and label-free detection when specific antibodies are immobilized on the gold-deposited surface of the AAO chip. In order to confirm the effectiveness of the sensor, the antibodies were immobilized on the surface of the AAO chip, and the lung cancer-specific biomarker was applied atop of the immobilized-antibody layer using the self-assembled monolayer method. The nanoporous AAO chip was used as a sensor system to detect serum amyloid A1, which is a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The specific reaction of the antigen-antibody contributes to the change in the RI. This in turn causes a shift in the resonance spectrum in the refractive interference pattern. The limit of detection (LOD was found to be 100 ag/mL and the biosensor had high sensitivity over a wide concentration range.

  5. Lipopolysaccharides detection on a grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance smartphone biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinling; Khan, Imran; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaohu; Dostalek, Jakub; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2018-01-15

    We report a smartphone label-free biosensor platform based on grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GC-SPR). The sensor system relies on the smartphone's built-in flash light source and camera, a disposable sensor chip with Au diffraction grating and a compact disk (CD) as the spectra dispersive unit. The Au grating sensor chip was modified with a synthetic peptide receptor and employed on the GC-SPR detection of lipopolysaccharides (known as endotoxins) with detection limit of 32.5ng/mL in water. Upon incubation of various small and macro-molecules with the synthetic peptide modified sensor chips, we concluded the good selectivity of the sensor for LPS detection. In addition, the sensor shows feasibility for the detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, such as clinical-grade 0.9% sodium chloride intravenous infusion, compound sodium lactate intravenous infusion and insulin aspart. The developed sensor platform offers the advantage of portability and simplicity, which is attractive for point-of-care and remote detection of biomedical and environmental targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  7. Silicon Photonic Biosensors for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Zinoviev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, we have witnessed a remarkable progress in the development of biosensor devices and their application in areas such as environmental monitoring, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security, among others. The technology of optical biosensors has reached a high degree of maturity and several commercial products are on the market. But problems of stability, sensitivity, and size have prevented the general use of optical biosensors for real field applications. Integrated photonic biosensors based on silicon technology could solve such drawbacks, offering early diagnostic tools with better sensitivity, specificity, and reliability, which could improve the effectiveness of in-vivo and in-vitro diagnostics. Our last developments in silicon photonic biosensors will be showed, mainly related to the development of portable and highly sensitive integrated photonic sensing platforms.

  8. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone’s LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone’s camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-10

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone's LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone's camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  10. Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  11. Detection of egg yolk antibodies reflecting Salmonella enteritidis infections using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, M.E.; Bouma, A.; Eerden, van E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Knapen, van F.; Stegeman, J.A.; Bergwerff, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor assay was developed on the basis of a lipopolysaccharide antigen of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis (S. enterica serovar enteritidis) to detect egg yolk antibodies against S. enterica serovar enteritidis. This biosensor assay was compared to two

  12. Compact Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Fieldwork Environmental Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Margrethe; Drake, Madison; Stipe, Kristian; Serban, Monica; Turner, Ivana; Thomas, Aaron; Macaluso, David

    2017-04-01

    The ability to accurately and reliably detect biomolecular targets is important in innumerable applications, including the identification of food-borne parasites, viral pathogens in human tissue, and environmental pollutants. While detection methods do exist, they are typically slow, expensive, and restricted to laboratory use. The method of surface plasmon resonance based biosensing offers a unique opportunity to characterize molecular targets while avoiding these constraints. By incorporating a plasmon-supporting gold film within a prism/laser optical system, it is possible to reliably detect and quantify the presence of specific biomolecules of interest in real time. This detection is accomplished by observing shifts in plasmon formation energies corresponding to optical absorption due to changes in index of refraction near the gold-prism interface caused by the binding of target molecules. A compact, inexpensive, battery-powered surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on this method is being developed at the University of Montana to detect waterborne pollutants in field-based environmental research.

  13. Analysis of Mycotoxins in Beer Using a Portable Nanostructured Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sweccha; Annida, Rumaisha M; Zuilhof, Han; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-11-02

    A competitive inhibition immunoassay is described for the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer using a portable nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, also referred to as imaging nanoplasmonics. The toxins were directly and covalently immobilized on a 3-dimensional carboxymethylated dextran (CMD) layer on a nanostructured iSPR chip. The assay is based on competition between the immobilized mycotoxins and free mycotoxins in the solution for binding to specific antibodies. The chip surface was regenerated after each cycle, and the combination of CMD and direct immobilization of toxins allowed the chips to be used for more than 450 cycles. The limits of detection (LODs) in beer were 17 ng/mL for DON and 7 ng/mL for OTA (or 0.09 ng/mL after 75 times enrichment). These LODs allowed detection of even less than 10% depletion of the tolerable daily intake of DON and OTA by beer. Significant cross-reactivity of anti-DON was observed toward DON-3-glucoside and 3-acetyl-DON, while no cross-reactivity was seen for 15-acetyl-DON. A preliminary in-house validation with 20 different batches of beer showed that both toxins can be detected at the considered theoretical safe level for beer. The assay can be used for in-field or at-line detection of DON in beer and also in barley without preconcentration, while OTA in beer requires an additional enrichment step, thus making the latter in its present form less suitable for field applications.

  14. On the effect of broadband, multi-angular excitation and detection in guided-mode resonance biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threm, Daniela; Jahns, Sabrina; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Ziegler, Martin; Hansen, Mirko; Kohlstedt, Hermann; Adam, Jost; Gerken, Martina

    2013-05-01

    Guided mode resonance biosensors are of emerging interest as they allow integration on chip with fabrication on mass scale. The guided mode resonances (GMRs), observed in the transmission or reflection spectrum, are sensitive to refractive index changes in the vicinity of the photonic crystal (PhC) surface. Standard measurement setups utilize a collecting lens, focusing the extracted light intensity onto a single-point photo detector. In order to achieve highly miniaturized devices, we consider the integration of planar emitting and detector structures, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photo detectors (OPDs), together with the PhC based biosensors, on a single chip. This approach, however, consequently leads to a broadband, multi-angular light excitation as well as to a broadband and multi-angular contribution to the OPD photon count. While GMR effects in PhC slabs with directional light sources have been widely studied, this lens-less scenario requires a deep understanding regarding the broadband and the angular influence of both incident and reflected or transmitted light. We performed finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations for GMR effects in two-dimensional (2D) PhC slabs. We study the effects for broadband emission in the visible spectrum, together with an angular incident beam divergence of up to 80°. We verified the simulated results by performing angle-resolved spectral measurements with a light emitting diode (LED) in a macroscopic, lens-less setup. We further utilize this numerical setup to provide a deeper understanding of the modal behaviour of our proposed OLED and OPD-based integrated biosensor concept.

  15. A disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted biosensors for optical detection of anesthetic propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chien-Chong; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hong, Chian-Lang

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted biosensors for optical detection of anesthetic propofol. So far, the methods to detect anesthetic propofol in hospitals are liquid chromatography (LC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). These conventional instruments are bulky, expensive, and not ease of access. In this work, a novel plastic microfluidic biochip with on-chip anesthetic biosensor has been developed and characterized for rapid detection of anesthetic propofol. The template-molecule imprinted polymers were integrated into microfluidic biochips to be used for detecting anesthetic propofol optically at 655 nm wavelength after the reaction of propofol with color reagent. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) biosensor is 6.47 mV/(ppm mm(2)). The specific binding of MIP to non-imprinted polymer (NIP) is up to 456%. And the detection limit of the microsystem is 0.25 ppm with a linear detection range from 0.25 to 10 ppm. The disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip anesthetic biosensor using molecularly imprinted polymers presented in this work showed excellent performance in separation and sensing of anesthetic propofol molecules. While compared to large-scale conventional instruments, the developed microfluidic biochips with on-chip MIP biosensors have the advantages of compact size, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low cost, and fast response. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical analysis of microring resonator-based biosensor with high resolution and free of temperature influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Aoqun; Zou, Lu; Tang, Haiquan; Duan, Qianqian; Ji, Jianlong; Zhang, Qianwu; Zhang, Xuming; Sang, Shengbo

    2017-06-01

    The issue of thermal effects is inevitable for the ultrahigh refractive index (RI) measurement. A biosensor with parallel-coupled dual-microring resonator configuration is proposed to achieve high resolution and free thermal effects measurement. Based on the coupled-resonator-induced transparency effect, the design and principle of the biosensor are introduced in detail, and the performance of the sensor is deduced by simulations. Compared to the biosensor based on a single-ring configuration, the designed biosensor has a 10-fold increased Q value according to the simulation results, thus the sensor is expected to achieve a particularly high resolution. In addition, the output signal of the mathematical model of the proposed sensor can eliminate the thermal influence by adopting an algorithm. This work is expected to have great application potentials in the areas of high-resolution RI measurement, such as biomedical discoveries, virus screening, and drinking water safety.

  17. Sensitivity and Limit of Detection of biosensors based on ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a study of the Sensitivity (S and Limit of Detection (LOD of microring based photonic biosensors as a function of the waveguide composition and dimensions. The target is Aflatoxin, which is a toxin of major concern for south Europe dairy industry. The sensing device is based on an array of multiple SiON microring resonators, fiber-coupled to both an 850 nm VCSEL and a silicon photodetectors, packaged with a microfluidic circuit. Volumetric sensing with glucose–water solutions of various concentrations yields a best sensitivity of 112 nm/RIU. To link these results to the Limit of Detection of the sensors, we also measured the noise of our experimental readout system and then calculated the LOD of our sensors. We found a best value of LOD of 1.6 × 10−6 RIU (referred to volumetric sensing. Finally, we detected Aflatoxin in solutions of various concentrations (down to 1.58 nM by functionalized sensors. The functionalization is based on a wet silanization and specific DNA-aptamer binding on the chip. Reproducibility and re-usability of the sensor are investigated by several chemical treatments. Optimum procedure allows multiple sequential measurements with a good endurance. This work was supported by the FP7 EU project “Symphony” (Grant agreement no.: 610580.

  18. Integrated electrochemical DNA biosensors for lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Mònica; Homs, Antoni; Samitier, Josep

    2009-10-01

    Analytical devices able to perform accurate and fast automatic DNA detection or sequencing procedures have many potential benefits in the biomedical and environmental fields. The conversion of biological or biochemical responses into quantifiable optical, mechanical or electronic signals is achieved by means of biosensors. Most of these transducing elements can be miniaturized and incorporated into lab-on-a-chip devices, also known as Micro Total Analysis Systems. The use of multiple DNA biosensors integrated in these miniaturized laboratories, which perform several analytical operations at the microscale, has many cost and efficiency advantages. Tiny amounts of reagents and samples are needed and highly sensitive, fast and parallel assays can be done at low cost. A particular type of DNA biosensors are the ones used based on electrochemical principles. These sensors offer several advantages over the popular fluorescence-based detection schemes. The resulting signal is electrical and can be processed by conventional electronics in a very cheap and fast manner. Furthermore, the integration and miniaturization of electrochemical transducers in a microsystem makes easier its fabrication in front of the most common currently used detection method. In this review, different electrochemical DNA biosensors integrated in analytical microfluidic devices are discussed and some early stage commercial products based on this strategy are presented.

  19. Exploring minimal biotinylation conditions for biosensor analysis using capture chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Giuseppe; Myszka, David

    2010-08-01

    Using Biacore's new regenerateable streptavidin capture (CAP) sensor chips, we investigated a number of biotinylation conditions for target ligands. We explored standard amine as well as the less commonly used carboxyl biotinylation methods. We illustrate the time scales required for efficient biotinylation as well as the hazards of overbiotinylation. We evaluated a range of desalting methods, including spin columns, dialysis membranes, and filters. Finally, we tested the effects of common buffer components, such as Tris and glycerol, on the biotinylation process. Together, our results serve as a general guide of the steps to consider when minimally biotinylating a target ligand. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-04-07

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications.

  1. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian, E-mail: songdq@jlu.edu.cn

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL{sup −1}, which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. - Highlights: • A sensitive and versatile SPR biosensor was constructed for detection of pig IgG. • Biofunctional gold nanostars were used to amplify the response signals. • The strategy employed carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide as biosensing substrate. • The detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  2. Phase interrogation of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on electro-optic modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzyy-Jiann; Hsieh, Chih-Wei

    2007-09-01

    A resolution-tunable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor employing electro-optically modulated phase interrogation is presented. This biosensor modulates the analyte-dependent LSPR phase characteristic through electro-optic effect by varying the wave vector of lightwave for exciting surface plasmon. The induced LSPR phase change is measured by the collinear heterodyne technique and its relation with the applied voltage is utilized to determine the analyte concentration. Experimental results show that the regression slope of the phase-voltage relation decreases with the analyte concentration and the detection sensitivity can be increased by widening the waveguide width and using thinner gold film beneath gold nanoparticles. Detection resolution of this LSPR biosensor can be enhanced by increasing the applied voltage to enlarge the induced phase change. The presented LSPR biosensor employing phase interrogation has the features of resolution tunability, fast modulation speed, high modulation stability, and noise reduction.

  3. Electro-optically modulated localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzyy-Jiann; Lin, Wen-Shao

    2006-10-01

    An integrated-optic biosensor based on electro-optically modulated localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. This biosensor utilizes the electro-optic effect to modulate the wave vector of incident lightwave used to excite localized surface plasmons. Electro-optically modulated LSPR results in the analyte-dependent variation of output intensity with the applied voltage. The linear regression slope of this relation is used to determine the analyte concentration. On the sensing region of LSPR biosensor, human serum albumin is self-assembled on gold nanoparticles in order to sense the beta-blocker concentration. The use of the presented biosensor has the features of no intensity drift problem, no absorption diversity problem in different sample media, and noise reduction by linear regression analysis.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance based biosensor: A new platform for rapid diagnosis of livestock diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravas Ranjan Sahoo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR based biosensors are the most advanced and developed optical label-free biosensor technique used for powerful detection with vast applications in environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security as well in livestock sector. The livestock sector which contributes the largest economy of India, harbors many bacterial, viral, and fungal diseases impacting a great loss to the production and productive potential which is a major concern in both small and large ruminants. Hence, an accurate, sensitive, and rapid diagnosis is required for prevention of these above-mentioned diseases. SPR based biosensor assay may fulfill the above characteristics which lead to a greater platform for rapid diagnosis of different livestock diseases. Hence, this review may give a detail idea about the principle, recent development of SPR based biosensor techniques and its application in livestock sector.

  5. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J R [National Institute of Agricultural Engineering, RDA, 249 Seodun-dong, Suwon, Republic of Korea 441-100 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G [National Institute of Agricultural Engineering, RDA, 249 Seodun-dong, Suwon, Republic of Korea 441-100 (Korea, Republic of); Kothapalli, A [Department of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA 47907 (United States); Morgan, M T [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA 47907 (United States); Ess, D [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA 47907 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 10{sup 5} cfu/ml.

  6. The application of neoglycopeptides in the development of sensitive surface plasmon resonance-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, C.E.P.; de Souza, A.C.; Halkes, K.M.; Upton, P.J.; Reeman, S.M.; André, S.; Gabius, H.-J.; McDonnell, M.B.; Kamerling, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070433941

    2008-01-01

    The development of a biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance is described for the detection of carbohydrate-binding proteins in solution on a Biacore 2000 instrument, using immobilized glycopeptides as ligands. Their selection was based on previous screenings of solid-phase glycopeptide

  7. Detection of bisphenol A using a novel surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hegnerová, Kateřina; Piliarik, Marek; Šteinbachová, M.; Flegelová, Z.; Černohorská, H.; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 5 (2010), s. 1963-1966 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance biosensor * bisphenol A * endocrine disruptor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  8. Analysis of Mycotoxins in Beer Using a Portable Nanostructured Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha; Annida, Rumaisha M.; Zuilhof, Han; Beek, van Teris A.; Nielen, Michel W.F.

    2016-01-01

    A competitive inhibition immunoassay is described for the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer using a portable nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, also referred to as imaging nanoplasmonics. The toxins were directly and covalently

  9. Enhanced sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor by using oblique deposited silver nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Chia; Wu, Pin Chieh; Tseng, Ming Lun; Lin, Wen-Chi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor is demonstrated to be enhanced by oblique deposited silver nanorods. Silver nanorods are thermally deposited on silver nanothin film by oblique angle deposition (OAD). The length of the nanorods can be tuned by controlling the deposition parameters of thermal deposition. By measuring the phase difference between the p and s waves of surface plasmon resonance heterodyne interferometer with different wavelength of incident l...

  10. On-chip electrochromic micro display for a disposable bio-sensor chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjun; Tsukamoto, Takashiro; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports an on-chip electrochromic micro display made of polyaniline (PANi) which can be easily made on a CMOS chip. Micro-patterned PANi thin films were selectively deposited on pre-patterned microelectrodes by using electrodeposition. The optimum conditions for deposition and electrochromism were investigated. An 8-pixel on-chip micro display was made on a Si chip. The color of each PANi film could be independently but simultaneously controlled, which means any 1-byte digital data could be displayed on the display. The PANi display had a response time as fast as about 100 ms, which means the transfer data rate was as fast as 80 bits per second.

  11. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  12. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro)quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, A-C; Charlier, C; Singh, G; Godefroy, S Benrejeb; Leivo, J; Vehniäinen, M; Nielen, M W F; Weigel, S; Delahaut, Ph

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various quinolone derivatives on the sensor chip and tested binding of a range of different antibodies (polyclonal and one engineered antibody) in the presence and absence of free (fluoro)quinolones. The main challenge was to detect flumequine in an assay giving good results for the other compounds. One antigen-antibody combination proved satisfactory: polyclonal antibodies raised against a dual immunogen and, on the sensor chip, a fluoroquinolone derivative. It was the first time that this concept of the bi-active antibody was described in the literature. The assay, optimised for detection in three matrices (poultry muscle, fish, and egg), was tested on incurred samples prepared by liquid extraction followed by two washing steps. This rapid, simple method proved adequate for detecting at least 13 (fluoro)quinolones at concentrations below established maximum residue levels (MRLs). The reference molecule norfloxacin could be detected in the range of 0.1-10 microg kg(-1) in extracts of egg and poultry meat and in the range of 0.1-100 microg kg(-1) in extracts of fish. The determined midpoints of these calibration curves were about 1, 1.5 and 3 microg kg(-1) in poultry meat, egg and fish, respectively.

  13. Development of silicon photonic microring resonator biosensors for multiplexed cytokine assays and in vitro diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchansky, Matthew Sam

    In order to guide critical care therapies that are personalized to a patient's unique disease state, a diagnostic or theranostic medical device must quickly provide a detailed biomolecular understanding of disease onset and progression. This detailed molecular understanding of cellular processes and pathways requires the ability to measure multiple analytes in parallel. Though many traditional sensing technologies for biomarker analysis and fundamental biological studies (i.e. enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, etc.) rely on single-parameter measurements, it has become increasingly clear that the inherent complexity of many human illnesses and pathways necessitates quantitative and multiparameter analysis of biological samples. Currently used analytical methods are deficient in that they often provide either highly quantitative data for a single biomarker or qualitative data for many targets, but methods that simultaneously provide highly quantitative analysis of many targets have yet to be adequately developed. Fields such as medical diagnostics and cellular biology would benefit greatly from a technology that enables rapid, quantitative and reproducible assays for many targets within a single sample. In an effort to fill this unmet need, this doctoral dissertation describes the development of a clinically translational biosensing technology based on silicon photonics and developed in the chemistry research laboratory of Ryan C. Bailey. Silicon photonic microring resonators, a class of high-Q optical sensors, represent a promising platform for rapid, multiparameter in vitro measurements. The original device design utilizes 32-ring arrays for real-time biomolecular sensing without fluorescent labels, and these optical biosensors display great potential for more highly multiplexed (100s-1000s) measurements based on the impressive scalability of silicon device fabrication. Though this technology can be used to detect a variety of

  14. Fabrication Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor chip of gold nanoparticles and detection lipase–osmolytes interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hoornam, S. [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Science, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vesaghi, M.A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, B.; Azizi, A. [Department of Biophysics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mobasheri, H. [Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, PO Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Research Institute (BRC), University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We synthesized localized surface plasmon resonance sensor of gold nanoparticles by RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • LSPR sensor was characterized by TEM, XPS, AFM. • LSPR sensor was utilized to detect interaction between sorbitol and trehalose, with Pesudomonace Cepacia Lipase (PCL). • Unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. • Refractive index of PCL was obtained by Mie theory modeling. - Abstract: Co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD from acetylene gas and Au target were used to prepare sensor chip of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Deposition conditions were optimized to reach a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Au NPs with particle size less than 10 nm. The RF power was set at 180 W and the initial gas pressure was set at 0.035 mbar. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data were used to investigate particles size and surface morphology of LSPR sensor chip. The Au and C content of the LSPR sensor chip of Au NPs was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin film was used as intermediate material to immobilize Au NPs on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. The interaction between two types of osmolytes, i.e. sorbitol and trehalose, with Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL) were detected by the prepared LSPR biosensor chip. The detection mechanism is based on LSPR spectroscopy in which the wavelength of absorption peak is sensitive to the refractive index of the environment of the Au NPs. This mechanism eliminates the use of a probe or immobilization of PCL on the Au NPs of LSPR sensor chip. The interaction between PCL and osmolytes can change refractive index of the mixture or solution. We found that unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. This interaction increases refractive index of the PCL and sorbitol mixture. Refractive index of PCL in the presence of different concentration of sorbitol was

  15. Isothermal and rapid detection of pathogenic microorganisms using a nano-rolling circle amplification-surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dachuan; Huang, Junfu; Chuai, Zhengran; Chen, Dong; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Huan; Peng, Jia; Wu, Haiyan; Huang, Qing; Fu, Weiling

    2014-12-15

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA is a sensitive and cost effective method for the rapid identification of pathogens without the need for sequencing. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance DNA biosensor based on RCA with a gold (Au) nanoparticle surface was established for isothermal identification of DNA. The probes included a specific padlock probe, a capture probe (CP), which is bound to biotin, and an Au nanoparticle-modified probe, which hybridizes with the RCA products. The CP was assembled on gold nanoparticles to increase its ability to bind and hybridize. The linear padlock probe, which was designed to circularize by ligation upon recognition of the bacterial pathogen-specific sequence in 16S rDNA, hybridizes to fully complementary sequences within the CP. Upon recognition, each target gene DNA is distinguished by localization onto the corresponding channel on the chip surface. Then, the immobilized CPs act as primers to begin the in situ solid-phase RCA reaction, which produces long single-stranded DNA. The RCA products fixed on the chip surface cause significant surface plasmon resonance angle changes. We demonstrated that six different bacterial pathogens can be identified simultaneously and that 0.5 pM of synthetic oligonucleotides and 0.5 pg μl(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected by this method with low background signals. Therefore, the multiplex diagnostic method provides a highly sensitive and specific approach for the rapid identification of positive samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasensitive Terahertz Biosensors Based on Fano Resonance of a Graphene/Waveguide Hybrid Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banxian Ruan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene terahertz (THz surface plasmons provide hope for developing functional devices in the THz frequency. By coupling graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs and a planar waveguide (PWG mode, Fano resonances are demonstrated to realize an ultrasensitive terahertz biosensor. By analyzing the dispersion relation of graphene SPPs and PWG, the tunable Fano resonances in the terahertz frequency are discussed. It is found that the asymmetric lineshape of Fano resonances can be manipulated by changing the Fermi level of graphene, and the influence of the thickness of coupling layer and air layer in sandwich structure on the Fano resonances is also discussed in detail. We then apply the proposed Fano resonance to realize the ultrasensitive terahertz biosensors, it is shown that the highest sensitivities of 3260 RIU−1 are realized. Our result is two orders of a conventional surface plasmon resonance sensor. Furthermore, we find that when sensing medium is in the vicinity of water in THz, the sensitivity increases with increasing refractive index of the sensing medium.

  17. A cCPE-based xenon biosensor for magnetic resonance imaging of claudin-expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Anna; Witte, Christopher; May Rose, Honor; Eichner, Miriam; Protze, Jonas; Krause, Gerd; Piontek, Jörg; Schröder, Leif

    2017-06-01

    The majority of malignant tumors originate from epithelial cells, and many of them are characterized by an overexpression of claudins (Cldns) and their mislocalization out of tight junctions. We utilized the C-terminal claudin-binding domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE), with its high affinity to specific members of the claudin family, as the targeting unit for a claudin-sensitive cancer biosensor. To overcome the poor sensitivity of conventional relaxivity-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, we utilized the superior sensitivity of xenon Hyper-CEST biosensors. We labeled cCPE for both xenon MRI and fluorescence detection. As one readout module, we employed a cryptophane (CrA) monoacid and, as the second, a fluorescein molecule. Both were conjugated separately to a biotin molecule via a polyethyleneglycol chemical spacer and later via avidin linked to GST-cCPE. Nontransfected HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells stably expressing Cldn4-FLAG were incubated with the cCPE-based biosensor. Fluorescence-based flow cytometry and xenon MRI demonstrated binding of the biosensor specifically to Cldn4-expressing cells. This study provides proof of concept for the use of cCPE as a carrier for diagnostic contrast agents, a novel approach for potential detection of Cldn3/-4-overexpressing tumors for noninvasive early cancer detection. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Quantitative detection of bovine and porcine gelatin difference using surface plasmon resonance based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardani, Devy P.; Arifin, Muhammad; Suharyadi, Edi; Abraha, Kamsul

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin is a biopolymer derived from collagen that is widely used in food and pharmaceutical products. Due to some religion restrictions and health issues regarding the gelatin consumption which is extracted from certain species, it is necessary to establish a robust, reliable, sensitive and simple quantitative method to detect gelatin from different parent collagen species. To the best of our knowledge, there has not been a gelatin differentiation method based on optical sensor that could detect gelatin from different species quantitatively. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensor is known to be a sensitive, simple and label free optical method for detecting biomaterials that is able to do quantitative detection. Therefore, we have utilized SPR-based biosensor to detect the differentiation between bovine and porcine gelatin in various concentration, from 0% to 10% (w/w). Here, we report the ability of SPR-based biosensor to detect difference between both gelatins, its sensitivity toward the gelatin concentration change, its reliability and limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the sensor. The sensor's LOD and LOQ towards bovine gelatin concentration are 0.38% and 1.26% (w/w), while towards porcine gelatin concentration are 0.66% and 2.20% (w/w), respectively. The results show that SPR-based biosensor is a promising tool for detecting gelatin from different raw materials quantitatively.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor by using oblique deposited silver nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Chia; Wu, Pin Chieh; Tseng, Ming Lun; Lin, Wen-Chi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2014-09-01

    Sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance phase-interrogation biosensor is demonstrated to be enhanced by oblique deposited silver nanorods. Silver nanorods are thermally deposited on silver nanothin film by oblique angle deposition (OAD). The length of the nanorods can be tuned by controlling the deposition parameters of thermal deposition. By measuring the phase difference between the p and s waves of surface plasmon resonance heterodyne interferometer with different wavelength of incident light, we have demonstrated that maximum sensitivity of glucose detection down to 7.1 × 10-8 refractive index units could be achieved with optimal deposition parameters of silver nanorods.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance: A Versatile Technique for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Hiep Nguyen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions. The technique makes it possible to measure interactions in real-time with high sensitivity and without the need of labels. This review article discusses a wide range of applications in optical-based sensors using either surface plasmon resonance (SPR or surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI. Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields. In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review.

  1. Optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Numerical Study of Opto-Fluidic Ring Resonators for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Keun Cho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR biosensor is numerically characterized in whispering gallery mode (WGM. The ring resonator includes a ring, a waveguide and a gap separating the ring and the waveguide. Dependence of the resonance characteristics on the resonator size parameters such as the ring diameter, the ring thickness, the waveguide width, and the gap width between the ring and the waveguide are investigated. For this purpose, we use the finite element method with COMSOL Multiphysics software to solve the Maxwell’s equations. The resonance frequencies, the free spectral ranges (FSR, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM, finesse (F, and quality factor of the resonances (Q are examined. The resonant frequencies are dominantly affected by the resonator diameter while the gap width, the ring thickness and the waveguide width have negligible effects on the resonant frequencies. FWHM, the quality factor Q and the finesse F are most strongly affected by the gap width and moderately influenced by the ring diameter, the waveguide width and the ring thickness. In addition, our simulation demonstrates that there is an optimum range of the waveguide width for a given ring resonator and this value is between ~2.25 μm and ~2.75 μm in our case.

  3. Resonant efficiency improvement design of piezoelectric biosensor for bacteria gravimetric sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Chen, Ching-Jung; Shie, Dung-Ting; Liu, Jen-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    The piezoelectric biosensor have been widely used in ultra-small mass detection of biomolecular, based on PZT piezoelectric material can create a variety of compositions geometrically; it could widely develop a high-frequency resonator and measure the change of the slightest mass while improve the limited detection simultaneously. Therefore, the piezoelectric biosensor of this study was fabricated by a spin-coating method and backside etching process for improving the characteristic of piezoelectric biosensor. The result exhibited that the 250 μm × 250 μm working size has the most favorable piezoelectric characteristic. The tunability was approximately 38.56 % and it showed that reducing the substrate thickness could obtain a clear resonance signal in a range of 60 to 380 MHz. In theory calculated for gravimetric sensing, it could achieve 0.1 ng sensing sensitivity. In gravimetric sensing, the sensing range was between 50,000~100,000 CFU/ml. Sensing range was lower in clinical urinary tract infection (100,000 CFU/ml), thus demonstrating its usefulness for preventive medicine. It can understand the piezoelectric sensor of this study has potential application in the future for biomedical gravimetric sensing.

  4. Immunoassay of fumonisins by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, W; Lai, E P; Yeung, J M

    1998-05-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor is developed to determine concentrations of the mycotoxin, fumonisin B1 (FB1), in spiked samples. Polyclonal antibodies produced against FB1 are adsorbed onto a thin gold film substrate, which is coupled to a glass prism in the Kretschmann configuration. The output beam of a planar light-emitting diode is focused through the prism to excite SPR at the surface of the gold film. When a sample containing FB1 is added to a cell on the outside of the gold film, the angular profile of reflected light intensity shifts. This changes the resonance angle and the reflected beam intensity at a selected angle, both of which are proportional to the FB1 concentration. After optimization of the antibody overlayer, a detection limit of 50 ng/mL is obtained for the direct assay with an analysis time under 10 min. Multiple sample additions and large-volume sample circulation can be used with the high-affinity antibodies to achieve lower detection limits.

  5. An integrated lab-on-a-chip-based electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Yildiz; Narter, Fehmi; Sağlam, Erkin; Köktürk, Güzin; Gök, M Yağmur; Akgün, Mete; Barut, Serkan; Budak, Sinan

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in the area of biosensor technology and microfluidic applications have enabled the miniaturisation of the sensing platforms. Here we describe a new integrated and fully automated lab-on-a-chip-based biosensor device prototype (MiSens) that has potential to be used for point-of-care cancer biomarker testing. The key features of the device include a new biochip, a device integrated microfluidic system and real-time amperometric measurements during the flow of enzyme substrate. For ease of use, a new plug and play type sensor chip docking station has been designed. This system allows the formation of an ∼7 μL capacity flow cell on the electrode array with the necessary microfluidic and electronic connections with one move of a handle. As a case study, the developed prototype has been utilised for the detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in serum that is routinely used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The patient samples from a nearby hospital have been collected and tested using the MiSens device, and the results have been compared to the hospital results. The obtained results indicate the potential of the MiSens device as a useful tool for point-of-care testing. Graphical abstract Microfluidics integrated and automated electrochemical biosensor device "MiSens" has been designed and fabricated by a multidisciplinary team and utilised to detect PSA from clinical samples.

  6. Regenerating silicon biosensors through thermal ablation with a hot plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Leahy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosensor development is time-consuming and expensive because it requires a great deal of prototyping and specialized experimental testing using, in many cases, one-time use chips. Several biosensor regeneration techniques have been proposed so that chips may be reused, but these techniques are not convenient for rapid prototyping and experimental testing. A convenient biosensor regeneration technique using thermal ablation with a hot plate is presented. Bound biological material is removed from a Poly-L-Lysine-functionalized silicon biosensor used for testing Escherichia coli by heating the biosensor to 370 °C for 10 min. Images and resonant frequency shifts indicate that regeneration is about 82% effective. This regeneration technique may be further improved by using a higher heating rate and a higher temperature.

  7. A programmable energy efficient readout chip for a multiparameter highly integrated implantable biosensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawito, M.; Richter, H.; Stett, A.; Burghartz, J. N.

    2015-11-01

    In this work an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for an implantable electrochemical biosensor system (SMART implant, Stett et al., 2014) is presented. The ASIC drives the measurement electrodes and performs amperometric measurements for determining the oxygen concentration, potentiometric measurements for evaluating the pH-level as well as temperature measurements. A 10-bit pipeline analog to digital (ADC) is used to digitize the acquired analog samples and is implemented as a single stage to reduce power consumption and chip area. For pH measurements, an offset subtraction technique is employed to raise the resolution to 12-bits. Charge integration is utilized for oxygen and temperature measurements with the capability to cover current ranges between 30 nA and 1 μA. In order to achieve good performance over a wide range of supply and process variations, internal reference voltages are generated from a programmable band-gap regulated circuit and biasing currents are supplied from a wide-range bootstrap current reference. To accommodate the limited available electrical power, all components are designed for low power operation. Also a sequential operation approach is applied, in which essential circuit building blocks are time multiplexed between different measurement types. All measurement sequences and parameters are programmable and can be adjusted for different tissues and media. The chip communicates with external unites through a full duplex two-wire Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), which receives operational instructions and at the same time outputs the internally stored measurement data. The circuit has been fabricated in a standard 0.5-μm CMOS process and operates on a supply as low as 2.7 V. Measurement results show good performance and agree with circuit simulation. It consumes a maximum of 500 μA DC current and is clocked between 500 kHz and 4 MHz according to the measurement parameters. Measurement results of the on-chip ADC show a

  8. Processing Chip for Thin Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Mass Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at portable application, a new integrated process chip for thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR mass sensor is proposed and verified with 0.18 um CMOS processing in this paper. The longitudinal mode FBAR with back-etched structure is fabricated, which has resonant frequency 1.878 GHz and factor 1200. The FBAR oscillator, based on the current-reuse structure, is designed with Modified Butterworth Van Dyke (MBVD model. The result shows that the FBAR oscillator operates at 1.878 GHz with a phase noise of −107 dBc/Hz and −135 dBc/Hz at 10 KHz and 100 KHz frequency offset, respectively. The whole process chip size with pads is 1300 μm × 950 μm. The FBAR and process chip are bonded together to sense tiny mass. The measurement results show that this chip precision is 1 KHz with the FBAR frequency gap from 25 kHz to 25 MHz.

  9. Enhancing Surface Plasmon Resonance Detection Using Nanostructured Au Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indutnyi, Ivan; Ushenin, Yuriy; Hegemann, Dirk; Vandenbossche, Marianne; Myn'ko, Victor; Lukaniuk, Mariia; Shepeliavyi, Petro; Korchovyi, Andrii; Khrystosenko, Roman

    2016-12-01

    The increase of the sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) refractometers was studied experimentally by forming a periodic relief in the form of a grating with submicron period on the surface of the Au-coated chip. Periodic reliefs of different depths and spatial frequency were formed on the Au film surface using interference lithography and vacuum chalcogenide photoresists. Spatial frequencies of the grating were selected close to the conditions of Bragg reflection of plasmons for the working wavelength of the SPR refractometer and the used environment (solution of glycerol in water). It was found that the degree of refractometer sensitivity enhancement and the value of the interval of environment refractive index variation, Δ n, in which this enhancement is observed, depend on the depth of the grating relief. By increasing the depth of relief from 13.5 ± 2 nm to 21.0 ± 2 nm, Δ n decreased from 0.009 to 0.0031, whereas sensitivity increased from 110 deg./RIU (refractive index unit) for a standard chip up to 264 and 484 deg./RIU for the nanostructured chips, respectively. Finally, it was shown that the working range of the sensor can be adjusted to the refractive index of the studied environment by changing the spatial frequency of the grating, by modification of the chip surface or by rotation of the chip.

  10. On-Chip Glass Microspherical Shell Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenchen; Cocking, Alexander; Freeman, Eugene; Liu, Zhiwen; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2017-11-02

    Arrays of on-chip spherical glass shells of hundreds of micrometers in diameter with ultra-smooth surfaces and sub-micrometer wall thicknesses have been fabricated and have been shown to sustain optical resonance modes with high Q-factors of greater than 50 million. The resonators exhibit temperature sensitivity of -1.8 GHz K-1 and can be configured as ultra-high sensitivity thermal sensors for a broad range of applications. By virtue of the geometry's strong light-matter interaction, the inner surface provides an excellent on-chip sensing platform that truly opens up the possibility for reproducible, chip scale, ultra-high sensitivity microfluidic sensor arrays. As a proof of concept we demonstrate the sensitivity of the resonance frequency as water is filled inside the microspherical shell and is allowed to evaporate. By COMSOL modeling, the dependence of this interaction on glass shell thickness is elucidated and the experimentally measured sensitivities for two different shell thicknesses are explained.

  11. Resonant-energy-transfer-based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivalent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance- dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant fluorescence energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GMI has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction.

  12. A low cost surface plasmon resonance biosensor using a laser line generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruipeng; Wang, Manping; Wang, Shun; Liang, Hao; Hu, Xinran; Sun, Xiaohui; Zhu, Juanhua; Ma, Liuzheng; Jiang, Min; Hu, Jiandong; Li, Jianwei

    2015-08-01

    Due to the instrument designed by using a common surface plasmon resonance biosensor is extremely expensive, we established a portable and cost-effective surface plasmon resonance biosensing system. It is mainly composed of laser line generator, P-polarizer, customized prism, microfluidic cell, and line Charge Coupled Device (CCD) array. Microprocessor PIC24FJ128GA006 with embedded A/D converter, communication interface circuit and photoelectric signal amplifier circuit are used to obtain the weak signals from the biosensing system. Moreover, the line CCD module is checked and optimized on the number of pixels, pixels dimension, output amplifier and the timing diagram. The micro-flow cell is made of stainless steel with a high thermal conductivity, and the microprocessor based Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) temperature-controlled algorithm was designed to keep the constant temperature (25 °C) of the sample solutions. Correspondingly, the data algorithms designed especially to this biosensing system including amplitude-limiting filtering algorithm, data normalization and curve plotting were programmed efficiently. To validate the performance of the biosensor, ethanol solution samples at the concentrations of 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15% in volumetric fractions were used, respectively. The fitting equation ΔRU = - 752987.265 + 570237.348 × RI with the R-Square of 0.97344 was established by delta response units (ΔRUs) to refractive indexes (RI). The maximum relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% was obtained.

  13. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  14. Disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for online parallelized cell adhesion kinetics analysis on quartz crystal resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cama, G.; Jacobs, T.; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for the online analysis of adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on quartz crystal resonators (QCRs). The device was conceived for the parallel cultivation of cells providing the same experimental conditions...

  15. In Situ Regeneration of Si-based ARROW-B Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Feng; Lin, Yen-Ting; Huang, Yang-Tung; Lu, Ming-Feng; Chen, Chyong-Hua

    Si-based antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide type B (ARROW-B) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors allow label-free high-sensitivity detection of biomolecular interactions in real time. The ARROW-B waveguide, which has a thick guiding layer, provides efficient coupling with a single-mode fiber. The Si-based ARROW-B SPR biosensors were fabricated by using the standard semiconductor fabrication processes with a single-step lithography. A fluid flow system was designed to transport samples or analytes. The waveguide consists of propagation and SPR sensing regions. The propagation regions in the front and rear of the SPR sensing region have a symmetric cladding structure to isolate them from environmental changes. A high-index O-ring is used to seal the liquid flow channel. The intensity interrogation method was used to characterize the sensors. The sensitivity of the biosensors was 3.0 × 10(3) µW/RIU (refractive index unit) with a resolution of 6.2 × 10(-5) RIU. An in situ regeneration process was designed to make the sensors reusable and eliminate re-alignment of the optical measurement system. The regeneration was realized using ammonia-hydrogen peroxide mixture solutions to remove molecules bound on the sensor surface, such as self-assembled 11-mercapto-1undecanoic acid and bovine serum albumin. SPR was used to monitor the regeneration processes. The experimental results show that the sensing response did not significantly change after the sensor was reused more than 10 times. In situ regenerations of the sensors were achieved.

  16. Analysis of the interaction between human interleukin-5 and the soluble domain of its receptor using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, T A; Bennett, D B; Appelbaum, E R; Cusimano, D M; Johanson, K O; Matico, R E; Young, P R; Doyle, M; Chaiken, I M

    1994-03-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was used to study the interaction of human interleukin-5 (hIL5) with its receptor. IL5 is a major growth factor in the production and activation of eosinophils. The receptor for IL5 is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta. The alpha subunit provides the specificity for IL5 and consists of an extracellular soluble domain, a single transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic tail. We expressed the soluble domain of the human IL5 receptor alpha subunit (shIL5R alpha) and human IL5 (hIL5) in Drosophila. Both hIL5 and shIL5R alpha were immobilized separately through amine groups onto the carboxylated dextran layer of sensor chips of the BIAcore (Pharmacia) SPR biosensor after N-hydroxysuccinimide/carbodiimide activation of the chip surface. Interactions were measured for the complementary macromolecule, either shIL5R alpha or hIL5, in solution. Kinetics of binding of soluble analyte to immobilized ligand were measured and from this the association rate constant, dissociation rate constant and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) were derived. With immobilized shIL5R alpha and soluble hIL5, the measured Kd was 2 nM. A similar value was obtained by titration calorimetry. The Kd for Drosophila expressed receptor and IL5 is higher than the values reported for proteins expressed in different systems, likely due to differences in the methods of interaction analysis used or differences in protein glycosylation. Receptor-IL5 binding was relatively pH independent between pH 6.5 and 9.5. Outside this range, the dissociation rate increased with comparatively little increase in association rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Enhancing sensitivity for surface plasmon resonance biosensors using periodic structures and spectro-angular image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Colin James

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a phenomena whereby photons are made to couple energy to a surface electron density wave traveling on a metal-dielectric interface. The coupling occurs at a specific energy and momentum, collectively referred to as the resonance condition, causing a dip in the reflected light. The characteristics of the dip are a function of the material properties at the interface; therefore monitoring the dip provides information about the local surface environment. Recent years have seen a push in SPR technology towards miniaturization, increased sensitivity, high throughput and multimodal approaches. This thesis focuses on two methods for improving the performance of SPR biosensors. First, SPR sensitivity is improved through the use of a surface plasmon bandgap structure. It is shown here that operating an SPR biosensor in angular interrogation mode near the edge of such a bandgap will result in a six fold increase in the sensitivity compared to SPR on a flat metallic surface under the same conditions. Second, a method for improving the detection limit is shown using a novel data analysis technique based on image processing. A multimodal surface plasmon interrogation technique is used to create a 2-D image of the spectro-angular dispersion from a surface; which is then used to extract information about the surface environment using an eigenvector analysis technique developed to exploit the spectro-angular information. Using the novel eigenvector technique, designated as the Double Projection Method (DPM), on the spectro-angular data results in refractive index estimates over a wide dynamic range with a theoretical detection limit of 5x10-9 refractive index units (RIU); which is superior to the current highest sensitivity phase-based methods. Experimental work shows the DPM method capable of monitoring biomolecular interactions with small molecular weight reactants (˜400 Daltons) in real-time with an achieved resolution of 2x10-6 RIU.

  18. Highly Sensitive Aluminum-Based Biosensors using Tailorable Fano Resonances in Capped Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuang-Li; Hsu, Hsuan-Yeh; You, Meng-Lin; Chang, Chia-Chun; Pan, Ming-Yang; Shi, Xu; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2017-03-01

    Metallic nanostructure-based surface plasmon sensors are capable of real-time, label-free, and multiplexed detections for chemical and biomedical applications. Recently, the studies of aluminum-based biosensors have attracted a large attention because aluminum is a more cost-effective metal and relatively stable. However, the intrinsic properties of aluminum, having a large imaginary part of the dielectric function and a longer evanescent length, limit its sensing capability. Here we show that capped aluminum nanoslits fabricated on plastic films using hot embossing lithography can provide tailorable Fano resonances. Changing height of nanostructures and deposited metal film thickness modulated the transmission spectrum, which varied from Wood’s anomaly-dominant resonance, asymmetric Fano profile to surface plasmon-dominant resonance. For biolayer detections, the maximum surface sensitivity occurred at the dip of asymmetric Fano profile. The optimal Fano factor was close to -1.3. The wavelength and intensity sensitivities for surface thickness were up to 2.58 nm/nm and 90%/nm, respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) of thickness reached 0.018 nm. We attributed the enhanced surface sensitivity for capped aluminum nanoslits to a reduced evanescent length and sharp slope of the asymmetric Fano profile. The protein-protein interaction experiments verified the high sensitivity of capped nanostructures. The LOD was down to 236 fg/mL.

  19. Ultra-high sensitivity optical biosensor based on Vernier effect in triangular ring resonators (TRRs) with SPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Ryong; Kim, Hong-Seung; Li, Jun; Oh, Geum-Yoon; Kim, Doo-Gun; Choi, Young-Wan

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, surface plasmon resonance triangular ring resonator (SPR-TRR) Vernier structure based on InP is simulated for index variation from 1.33 to 1.35. Sensing area of SPR-TRR is achieved to make an ultra-compact SPR mirror by deposition of Au film layer which is designed to deposit on vertex of TRR. The possibility of mass production is shown by a deposition of SPR mirror on the triangular ring resonator (TRR). Also, the sensitivity enhancement of an envelope signal for Vernier effect is confirmed by FDTD simulation compared to SPR-TRR. As simulation results, the sensitivity is enhanced 20 nm / RIU to 480 nm / RIU. Thus, SPR-TRR Vernier structure is used for a biosensor to enhance the sensitivity of biosensor.

  20. DNA Hybridization Detection Based on Resonance Frequency Readout in Graphene on Au SPR Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Biplob Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a numerical modeling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor for detecting DNA hybridization by recording the resonance frequency characteristics (RFC. The proposed sensor is designed based on graphene material as biomolecular recognition elements (BRE and the sharp SPR curve of gold (Au. Numerical analysis shows that the variation of RFC for mismatched DNA strands is quiet negligible whereas that for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Here, graphene is used to perform faster immobilization between target DNA and probe DNA. The usage of graphene also changes the RFC that ensure hybridization of DNA event by utilizing its optochemical property. In addition, proposed sensor successfully distinguishes between hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP by observing the variation level of RFC and maximum transmittance. Therefore, the proposed frequency readout based SPR sensor could potentially open a new window of detection for biomolecular interactions. We also highlight the advantage of using graphene sublayer by performing the sensitivity analysis. Sandwiching of each graphene sublayer enhances 95% sensitivity comparing with conventional SPR sensor.

  1. An optical fiber surface plasmon resonance biosensor for wide range detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kai; Guo, Jia; Wang, Meiyu; Dang, Peng; Wang, Fucheng; Zhang, Yungang; Wang, Meiting

    2017-10-01

    An optical fiber surface plasmon resonance biosensor is presented that allows to numerically demonstrate, using transfer matrix method and the finite difference time domain method, the detection range is very wide. Two different structures of graphene photonic crystal multilayer (i.e. sensor I and sensor II) are constructed in the cladding region of single-mode fiber. Graphene is used as the plasma layer instead of the traditional metal. According to the analysis, the properties of graphene can be changed by adjusting the chemical potential µc. In the spectral region of 1.667|µc| < ћω < 2|µc|, the imaginary part of conductivity σ″ becomes negative. Thus the weakly bounded low-less TE-SPR is supported by graphene. The results of the numerical simulation show that the relationship between refractive index and resonant wavelength is linear. The sensor I can detect the refractive index range of 1.33-1.4, and the sensitivity is 1942 nm/RIU. The sensor II can detect the refractive index range of 1.41-1.67, and the sensitivity is up to 2315.4 nm/RIU. Therefore, the detection of wide refractive index range of 1.33-1.67 or simultaneous detection of different biological medium concentration is realized by the sensor.

  2. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Leduc, A.; Barbeau, J.; Saoudi, B.; Yahia, L'H.; DeCrescenzo, G.

    2006-08-01

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  3. Validation of cold plasma treatment for protein inactivation: a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C [Laboratoire d' Innovation et d' Analyse de Bioperformance (LIAB), Institut de Genie Biomedical, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada); Leduc, A [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Faculte de Medecine Dentaire, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Barbeau, J [Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Faculte de Medecine Dentaire, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saoudi, B [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Yahia, L' H [Laboratoire d' Innovation et d' Analyse de Bioperformance (LIAB), Institut de Genie Biomedical, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada); Crescenzo, G De [Groupe Bio-P2, Departement de Genie Chimique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal Qc, H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2006-08-21

    Gas plasma is being proposed as an interesting and promising tool to achieve sterilization. The efficacy of gas plasma to destroy bacterial spores (the most resistant living microorganisms) has been demonstrated and documented over the last ten years. In addition to causing damage to deoxyribonucleic acid by UV radiation emitted by excited species originating from the plasma, gas plasma has been shown to promote erosion of the microorganism in addition to possible oxidation reactions within the microorganism. In this work, we used lysozyme as a protein model to assess the effect of gas plasma on protein inactivation. Lysozyme samples have been subjected to the flowing afterglow of a gas discharge achieved in a nitrogen-oxygen mixture. The efficiency of this plasma treatment on lysozyme has been tested by two different assays. These are an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor assay. The two methods showed that exposure to gas plasma can abrogate lysozyme interactions with lysozyme-specific antibodies, more likely by destroying the epitopes responsible for the interaction. More specifically, two SPR-based assays were developed since our ELISA approach did not allow us to discriminate between background and low, but still intact, quantities of lysozyme epitope after plasma treatment. Our SPR results clearly demonstrated that significant protein destruction or desorption was achieved when amounts of lysozyme less than 12.5 ng had been deposited in polystyrene 96-well ELISA plates. At higher lysozyme amounts, traces of available lysozyme epitopes were detected by SPR through indirect measurements. Finally, we demonstrated that a direct SPR approach in which biosensor-immobilized lysozyme activity is directly measured prior and after plasma treatment is more sensitive, and thus, more appropriate to define plasma treatment efficacy with more certainty.

  4. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip; Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-04-29

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to {approx}37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g{sub 0}=2{pi}.300 MHz respectively C{sub 0}=210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [German] In der vorliegenden Dissertation werden Experimente zur Resonator-Quantenelektrodynamik auf einem Mikrofallenchip beschrieben. Dabei konnte u. a. erstmals einzelne, in einer Chipfalle gefangene Atome detektiert werden. Hier fuer wurde im Rahmen dieser Arbeit ein neuartiger optischer Mikroresonator entwickelt, der sich dank seiner Miniaturisierung mit der in unserer Arbeitsgruppe

  5. Single-Chip Multiple-Frequency RF MEMS Resonant Platform for Wireless Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel, single-chip, multiple-frequency platform for RF/IF filtering and clock reference based on contour-mode aluminum nitride (AlN) MEMS piezoelectric resonators...

  6. Fiber Surface Modification Technology for Fiber-Optic Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun Xiong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable studies have been performed on the development of optical fiber sensors modified by gold nanoparticles based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR technique. The current paper presents a new approach in fiber surface modification technology for biosensors. Star-shaped gold nanoparticles obtained through the seed-mediated solution growth method were found to self-assemble on the surface of tapered optical fibers via amino- and mercapto-silane coupling agents. Transmitted power spectra of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (APTMS-modified fiber were obtained, which can verify that the silane coupling agent surface modification method is successful. Transmission spectra are characterized in different concentrations of ethanol and gentian violet solutions to validate the sensitivity of the modified fiber. Assembly using star-shaped gold nanoparticles and amino/mercapto silane coupling agent are analyzed and compared. The transmission spectra of the gold nanoparticles show that the nanoparticles are sensitive to the dielectric properties of the surrounding medium. After the fibers are treated in t-dodecylmercaptan to obtain their transmission spectra, APTMS-modified fiber becomes less sensitive to different media, except that modified by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxy silane (MPTMS. Experimental results of the transmission spectra show that the surface modified by the gold nanoparticles using MPTMS is firmer compared to that obtained using APTMS.

  7. Sensitivity improved surface plasmon resonance biosensor for cancer biomarker detection based on plasmonic enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing-Cheung; Yong, Ken-Tye; Baev, Alexander; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-06-28

    In this study, we report the development of a nanoparticle-enhanced biosensor by integrating both the nanoparticles and immunoassay sensing technologies into a phase interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system for detecting antigen at a concentration as low as the femtomolar range. Our work has demonstrated that the plasmonic field extension generated from the gold film to gold nanorod (GNR) has led to a drastic sensitivity enhancement. Antibody-functionalized sensing film, together with antibody-conjugated GNRs, was readily served as a plasmonic coupling partner that can be used as a powerful ultrasensitive sandwich immunoassay for cancer-related disease detection. Experimentally, it was found that the bioconjugated GNR labels enhance the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antigen signal with more than 40-fold increase compared to the traditional SPR biosensing technique. The underlying principle was analyzed by simulating the near-field coupling between the sensing film and the GNR. The results have shown that GNRs were readily served as promising amplification labels in SPR sensing technology.

  8. Detection of Citrus tristeza virus by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Taha Roodbar; Salleh, Mohamad Amran Mohd; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mohsenifar, Afshin; Safarnejad, Reza; Tabatabaei, Meisam

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low titer or uneven distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in field samples, detection of CTV by using conventional detection techniques may be difficult. Therefore, in the present work, the cadmium-telluride quantum dots (QDs) was conjugated with a specific antibody against coat protein (CP) of CTV, and the CP were immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to develop a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanobiosensor for detecting CTV. The maximum FRET efficiency for the developed nano-biosensor was observed at 60% in AuNPs-CP/QDs-Ab ratio of 1:8.5. The designed system showed higher sensitivity and specificity over enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a limit of detection of 0.13 μg mL- 1 and 93% and 94% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. As designed sensor is rapid, sensitive, specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications, surveillance and plant certification program.

  9. Nanostructured biosensor for detecting glucose in tear by applying fluorescence resonance energy transfer quenching mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyi; Tse, Wai Hei; Chen, Yi; McDonald, Matthew W; Melling, James; Zhang, Jin

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, a nanostructured biosensor is developed to detect glucose in tear by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenching mechanism. The designed FRET pair, including the donor, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), and the acceptor, dextran-binding malachite green (MG-dextran), was conjugated to concanavalin A (Con A), an enzyme with specific affinity to glucose. In the presence of glucose, the quenched emission of QDs through the FRET mechanism is restored by displacing the dextran from Con A. To have a dual-modulation sensor for convenient and accurate detection, the nanostructured FRET sensors were assembled onto a patterned ZnO nanorod array deposited on the synthetic silicone hydrogel. Consequently, the concentration of glucose detected by the patterned sensor can be converted to fluorescence spectra with high signal-to-noise ratio and calibrated image pixel value. The photoluminescence intensity of the patterned FRET sensor increases linearly with increasing concentration of glucose from 0.03mmol/L to 3mmol/L, which covers the range of tear glucose levels for both diabetics and healthy subjects. Meanwhile, the calibrated values of pixel intensities of the fluorescence images captured by a handhold fluorescence microscope increases with increasing glucose. Four male Sprague-Dawley rats with different blood glucose concentrations were utilized to demonstrate the quick response of the patterned FRET sensor to 2µL of tear samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors with Special Boronic Acid Derivative to Detect Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We proposed and demonstrated a novel tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR label-free biosensor via a special boronic acid derivative to detect glycoprotein with high sensitivity and selectivity. TFBG, as an effective sensing element for optical sensing in near-infrared wavelengths, possess the unique capability of easily exciting the SPR effect on fiber surface which coated with a nano-scale metal layer. SPR properties can be accurately detected by measuring the variation of transmitted spectra at optical communication wavelengths. In our experiment, a 10° TFBG coated with a 50 nm gold film was manufactured to stimulate SPR on a sensor surface. To detect glycoprotein selectively, the sensor was immobilized using designed phenylboronic acid as the recognition molecule, which can covalently bond with 1,2- or 1,3-diols to form five- or six-membered cyclic complexes for attaching diol-containing biomolecules and proteins. The phenylboronic acid was synthetized with long alkyl groups offering more flexible space, which was able to improve the capability of binding glycoprotein. The proposed TFBG-SPR sensors exhibit good selectivity and repeatability with a protein concentration sensitivity up to 2.867 dB/ (mg/mL and a limit of detection (LOD of 15.56 nM.

  11. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Granqvist

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon resonance (SPR is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations.

  12. Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Niko; Hanning, Anders; Eng, Lars; Tuppurainen, Jussi; Viitala, Tapani

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations. PMID:24217357

  13. A Highly Sensitive Gold-Coated Photonic Crystal Fiber Biosensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rabiul Hasan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a two-layer circular lattice photonic crystal fiber (PCF biosensor based on the principle of surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The finite element method (FEM with circular perfectly matched layer (PML boundary condition is applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. A thin gold layer is deposited outside the PCF structure, which acts as the plasmonic material for this design. The sensing layer (analyte is implemented in the outermost layer, which permits easy and more practical fabrication process compared to analyte is put inside the air holes. It is demonstrated that, at gold layer thickness of 40 nm, the proposed sensor shows maximum sensitivity of 2200 nm/RIU using the wavelength interrogation method in the sensing range between 1.33–1.36. Besides, using an amplitude interrogation method, a maximum sensitivity of 266 RIU−1 and a maximum sensor resolution of 3.75 × 10−5 RIU are obtained. We also discuss how phase matching points are varied with different fiber parameters. Owing to high sensitivity and simple design, the proposed sensor may find important applications in biochemical and biological analyte detection.

  14. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  15. Application of surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the detection of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2016-02-01

    In this study, surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) was developed for the detection of Candida albicans which is a causal agent of oral infection. The detection was based on the sandwich assay. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on the mixed self assemble monolayers (SAMs). The ratio of mixed SAMs between 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 3-mercaptopropanol was varied to find the optimal ratio for use as a sensor surface. The results showed that the suitable surface for C. albicans detection was SAM of carboxylic (mixed SAMs 1:0), even though mixed SAMs 1:40 had a high detection signal in comparison to mixed SAMs 1:0, but the non-specific signal was higher. The detection limit was 107 cells/ml for direct detection, and was increased to 106 cells/ml with sandwich antibody. The use of polyclonal C. albicans antibody as capture and sandwich antibody showed good selectivity against the relevant oral bacteria including Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutan, Staphylococcus aureus, β-streptococci, and Lactobacillus casei. SPR platform in this study could detect C. albicans from the mixed microbial suspension without requirement of skillful technician. This SPR imaging biosensor could be applied for Candida identification after cultivation.

  16. Localized surface plasmon resonance-based abscisic acid biosensor using aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Wang

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA plays an important role in abiotic stress response and physiological signal transduction resisting to the adverse environment. Therefore, it is very essential for the quantitative detection of abscisic acid (ABA due to its indispensable role in plant physiological activities. Herein, a new detection method based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR using aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs is developed without using expensive instrument and antibody. In the presence of ABA, ABA specifically bind with their aptamers to form the ABA-aptamer complexes with G-quadruplex-like structure and lose the ability to stabilize AuNPs against NaCl-induced aggregation. Meanwhile, the changes of the LSPR spectra of AuNP solution occur and therefore the detection of ABA achieved. Under optimized conditions, this method showed a good linear range covering from 5×10-7 M to 5×10-5 M with a detection limit of 0.33 μM. In practice, the usage of this novel method has been demonstrated by its application to detect ABA from fresh leaves of rice with the relative error of 6.59%-7.93% compared with ELISA bioassay. The experimental results confirmed that this LSPR-based biosensor is simple, selective and sensitive for the detection of ABA. The proposed LSPR method could offer a new analytical platform for the detection of other plant hormones by changing the corresponding aptamer.

  17. Localized surface plasmon resonance-based abscisic acid biosensor using aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun; Li, Wei; Chang, Keke; Liu, Juan; Guo, Qingqian; Sun, Haifeng; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Jing; Hu, Jiandong

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in abiotic stress response and physiological signal transduction resisting to the adverse environment. Therefore, it is very essential for the quantitative detection of abscisic acid (ABA) due to its indispensable role in plant physiological activities. Herein, a new detection method based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) using aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is developed without using expensive instrument and antibody. In the presence of ABA, ABA specifically bind with their aptamers to form the ABA-aptamer complexes with G-quadruplex-like structure and lose the ability to stabilize AuNPs against NaCl-induced aggregation. Meanwhile, the changes of the LSPR spectra of AuNP solution occur and therefore the detection of ABA achieved. Under optimized conditions, this method showed a good linear range covering from 5×10-7 M to 5×10-5 M with a detection limit of 0.33 μM. In practice, the usage of this novel method has been demonstrated by its application to detect ABA from fresh leaves of rice with the relative error of 6.59%-7.93% compared with ELISA bioassay. The experimental results confirmed that this LSPR-based biosensor is simple, selective and sensitive for the detection of ABA. The proposed LSPR method could offer a new analytical platform for the detection of other plant hormones by changing the corresponding aptamer.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging of cell signaling from in vitro to in vivo: basis of biosensor construction, live imaging, and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuhiro; Kamioka, Yuji; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2013-05-01

    The progress in imaging technology with fluorescent proteins has uncovered a wide range of biological processes in developmental biology. In particular, genetically-encoded biosensors based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been used to visualize spatial and temporal dynamics of intracellular signaling in living cells. However, development of sensitive FRET biosensors and their application to developmental biology remain challenging tasks, which has prevented their widespread use in developmental biology. In this review, we first overview general procedures and tips of imaging with FRET biosensors. We then describe recent advances in FRET imaging - namely, the use of optimized backbones for intramolecular FRET biosensors and transposon-mediated gene transfer to generate stable cell lines and transgenic mice expressing FRET biosensors. Finally, we discuss future perspectives of FRET imaging in developmental biology. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. Electrowetting on dielectric digital microfluidic platform with nanostructured biosensor interface for enhanced two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance imaging detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija

    The sensitive and specific detection of biomolecular interactions is at the heart of many routine analyses in fundamental research, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. In contrast to laborious and costly multiwell plate assays, recent years have witnessed a significant progress in miniaturized and integrated biosensors, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), tailored to these applications. While the design of various SPR biosensors has been described in literature, a robust, multichannel, low-cost and highly sensitive solution has not yet been presented. Specifically, an integrated system that can allow surface functionalization in array format, low-volume multichannel fluidic interfacing, and increased sensitivity is sought. This thesis describes a novel electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device with integrated nanostructured biosensor interface that addresses the aforementioned issues for enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection. We have taken the opportunity of the most recent advances in microfabrication, nanotechnology and SPR technique to develop this integrated platform. EWOD device is employed for the dynamic immobilization of bioreceptors on SPRi biosensor surface in an array fashion from sub-muL volume solutions. Programmable EWOD electric interface allows the application of an electric field at the biosensor surface for active control of the immobilized probe density and orientation, enhancing SPRi detection. Two-dimensional SPRi detection is achieved by coupling the EWOD device to SPRi instrumentation. Parallel manipulation of individual droplets allows more efficient exploitation of the biosensor surface by separating different samples for simultaneous and selective SPRi detection. Periodic gold structures (nanoposts, nanogratings and nanogrooves) residing on a surface of glass and plastic substrates are investigated to improve the SPRi sensitivity. The corresponding electromagnetic field

  20. A novel upconversion, fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor (FRET) for sensitive detection of lead ions in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sai; Xu, Shihan; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xu, Wen; Zhou, Pingwei; Zhou, Chunyang; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2014-10-01

    There has been great progress in the development of fluorescence biosensors based on quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of lead ions. However, most methods are detecting lead ions in aqueous solution rather than in human serum due to the influence of protein autofluorescence in serum excited by visible light. Thus, we developed a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor by choosing the upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+/Tm3+ nanoparticles as the energy donor and the CdTe QDs as the energy acceptor for lead ion detection. It is the first near infrared (NIR)-excited fluorescent probe for determination of lead ions in serum that is capable of overcoming self-luminescence from serum excitation with visible light. The sensor also shows high selectivity, a low detection limit (80 nm) and good linear Stern-Volmer characteristics (R = 0.996), both in the buffer and serum. This biosensor has great potential for versatile applications in lead ion detection in biological and analytical fields.There has been great progress in the development of fluorescence biosensors based on quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of lead ions. However, most methods are detecting lead ions in aqueous solution rather than in human serum due to the influence of protein autofluorescence in serum excited by visible light. Thus, we developed a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor by choosing the upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+/Tm3+ nanoparticles as the energy donor and the CdTe QDs as the energy acceptor for lead ion detection. It is the first near infrared (NIR)-excited fluorescent probe for determination of lead ions in serum that is capable of overcoming self-luminescence from serum excitation with visible light. The sensor also shows high selectivity, a low detection limit (80 nm) and good linear Stern-Volmer characteristics (R = 0.996), both in the buffer and serum. This biosensor has great potential for versatile applications in lead ion detection in biological and

  1. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Method for Palytoxin Detection Based on Na+,K+-ATPase Affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin (PLTX, produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (kobs. From the representation of kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (KD for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is KD = 6.38 × 10−7 ± 6.67 × 10−8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods.

  2. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Method for Palytoxin Detection Based on Na+,K+-ATPase Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Amparo; Pazos, María-José; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Tobio, Araceli; Alfonso, Carmen; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX), produced by dinoflagellates from the genus Ostreopsis was first discovered, isolated, and purified from zoanthids belonging to the genus Palythoa. The detection of this toxin in contaminated shellfish is essential for human health preservation. A broad range of studies indicate that mammalian Na+,K+-ATPase is a high affinity cellular receptor for PLTX. The toxin converts the pump into an open channel that stimulates sodium influx and potassium efflux. In this work we develop a detection method for PLTX based on its binding to the Na+,K+-ATPase. The method was developed by using the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to monitor biomolecular reactions. This technique does not require any labeling of components. The interaction of PLTX over immobilized Na+,K+-ATPase is quantified by injecting different concentrations of toxin in the biosensor and checking the binding rate constant (kobs). From the representation of kobs versus PLTX concentration, the kinetic equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association can be calculated. The value of this constant is KD = 6.38 × 10−7 ± 6.67 × 10−8 M PLTX. In this way the PLTX-Na+,K+-ATPase association was used as a suitable method for determination of the toxin concentration in a sample. This method represents a new and useful approach to easily detect the presence of PLTX-like compounds in marine products using the mechanism of action of these toxins and in this way reduce the use of other more expensive and animal based methods. PMID:24379088

  3. Preparation of surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on magnetic core/shell Fe3O4/SiO2 and Fe3O4/Ag/SiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Sun, Ying; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jian; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on magnetic core/shell Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2) and Fe(3)O(4)/Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles were developed for immunoassay. With Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(3)O(4)/Ag nanoparticles being used as seeding materials, Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2) and Fe(3)O(4)/Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles were formed by hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The aldehyde group functionalized magnetic nanoparticles provide organic functionality for bioconjugation. The products were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), FTIR and UV-vis absorption spectrometry. The magnetic nanoparticles possess the unique superparamagnetism property, exceptional optical properties and good compatibilities, and could be used as immobilization matrix for goat anti-rabbit IgG. The magnetic nanoparticles can be easily immobilized on the surface of SPR biosensor chip by a magnetic pillar. The effects of Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2) and Fe(3)O(4)/Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles on the sensitivity of SPR biosensors were also investigated. As a result, the SPR biosensors based on Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2) nanoparticles and Fe(3)O(4)/Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles exhibit a response for rabbit IgG in the concentration range of 1.25-20.00 μg ml(-1) and 0.30-20.00 μg ml(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, George; Ahmadi, Ali; Najjaran, Homayoun; Alocilja, Evangelyn; DeRosa, Maria; Wolthers, Kirsten; Malki, Ahmed; Aziz, Hassan; Althani, Asmaa; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-12-01

    A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter), increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture.

  5. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, George; Ahmadi, Ali; Najjaran, Homayoun; Alocilja, Evangelyn; DeRosa, Maria; Wolthers, Kirsten; Malki, Ahmed; Aziz, Hassan; Althani, Asmaa; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-01-01

    A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter), increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture. PMID:26633409

  6. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Luka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter, increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture.

  7. Integration of field effect transistor-based biosensors with a digital microfluidic device for a lab-on-a-chip application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyungyong; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Ji-Min; Im, Maesoon; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-04-21

    A new platform for lab-on-a-chip system is suggested that utilizes a biosensor array embedded in a digital microfluidic device. With field effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors embedded in the middle of droplet-driving electrodes, the proposed digital microfluidic device can electrically detect avian influenza antibody (anti-AI) in real time by tracing the drain current of the FET-based biosensor without a labeling process. Digitized transport of a target droplet enclosing anti-AI from an inlet to the embedded sensor is enabled by the actuation of electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD). A reduction of the drain current is observed when the target droplet is merged with a pre-existing droplet on the embedded sensor. This reduction of the drain current is attributed to the specific binding of the antigen and the antibody of the AI. The proposed hybrid device consisting of the FET-based sensor and an EWOD device, built on a coplanar substrate by monolithic integration, is fully compatible with current fabrication technology for control and read-out circuitry. Such a completely electrical manner of inducing the transport of bio-molecules, the detection of bio-molecules, the recording of signals, signal processing, and the data transmission process does not require a pump, a fluidic channel, or a bulky transducer. Thus, the proposed platform can contribute to the construction of an all-in-one chip.

  8. Intensity-based readout of resonant-waveguide grating biosensors: Systems and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Moritz; Jahns, Sabrina; Gerken, Martina

    2017-09-01

    Resonant waveguide gratings (RWG) - also called photonic crystal slabs (PCS) - have been established as reliable optical transducers for label-free biochemical assays as well as for cell-based assays. Current readout systems are based on mechanical scanning and spectrometric measurements with system sizes suitable for laboratory equipment. Here, we review recent progress in compact intensity-based readout systems for point-of-care (POC) applications. We briefly introduce PCSs as sensitive optical transducers and introduce different approaches for intensity-based readout systems. Photometric measurements have been realized with a simple combination of a light source and a photodetector. Recently a 96-channel, intensity-based readout system for both biochemical interaction analyses as well as cellular assays was presented employing the intensity change of a near cut-off mode. As an alternative for multiparametric detection, a camera system for imaging detection has been implemented. A portable, camera-based system of size 13 cm × 4.9 cm × 3.5 cm with six detection areas on an RWG surface area of 11 mm × 7 mm has been demonstrated for the parallel detection of six protein binding kinetics. The signal-to-noise ratio of this system corresponds to a limit of detection of 168 M (24 ng/ml). To further improve the signal-to-noise ratio advanced nanostructure designs are investigated for RWGs. Here, results on multiperiodic and deterministic aperiodic nanostructures are presented. These advanced nanostructures allow for the design of the number and wavelengths of the RWG resonances. In the context of intensity-based readout systems they are particularly interesting for the realization of multi-LED systems. These recent trends suggest that compact point-of-care systems employing disposable test chips with RWG functional areas may reach market in the near future.

  9. Highly Sensitive and Wearable In2O3Nanoribbon Transistor Biosensors with Integrated On-Chip Gate for Glucose Monitoring in Body Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingzhou; Liu, Yihang; Wu, Fanqi; Cao, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Alharbi, Mervat; Abbas, Ahmad N; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2018-02-27

    Nanoribbon- and nanowire-based field-effect transistor (FET) biosensors have stimulated a lot of interest. However, most FET biosensors were achieved by using bulky Ag/AgCl electrodes or metal wire gates, which have prevented the biosensors from becoming truly wearable. Here, we demonstrate highly sensitive and conformal In 2 O 3 nanoribbon FET biosensors with a fully integrated on-chip gold side gate, which have been laminated onto various surfaces, such as artificial arms and watches, and have enabled glucose detection in various body fluids, such as sweat and saliva. The shadow-mask-fabricated devices show good electrical performance with gate voltage applied using a gold side gate electrode and through an aqueous electrolyte. The resulting transistors show mobilities of ∼22 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in 0.1× phosphate-buffered saline, a high on-off ratio (10 5 ), and good mechanical robustness. With the electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase, chitosan, and single-walled carbon nanotubes, the glucose sensors show a very wide detection range spanning at least 5 orders of magnitude and a detection limit down to 10 nM. Therefore, our high-performance In 2 O 3 nanoribbon sensing platform has great potential to work as indispensable components for wearable healthcare electronics.

  10. Magnetic particles: From preparation to lab-on-a-chip, biosensors, microsystems and microfluidics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jamshaid, Talha; Tenorio-Neto, Ernandes Taveira; Eissa, Mohamed M.; Zine, Nadia; Kunita, Marcos Hiroiuqui; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Magnetic particles are largely used in various applications and particularly in in-vitro biomedical diagnostic and bionanotechnology. In fact, they have been employed for extraction of various biomolecules even from crude samples and as solid support in numerous samples' preparation for in-vitro diagnosis. Nowadays, they are also successfully being exploited as a carrier of biomolecules in microsystems, microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip and for detection in specific biosens...

  11. Monitoring of bacterial film formation and its breakdown with an angular-based surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion-Côté, Sandrine; Melaine, Feriel; Kirk, Andrew G; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2017-06-26

    Bacterial biofilms are a leading cause of infection in health-care settings. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors stand as valuable tools not only for the detection of biological entities and the characterisation of biomaterials but also as a suitable means to monitor bacterial film formation. This article reports on a proof-of-concept study for the use of an angular-based SPR biosensor for the monitoring of bacterial cell growth and biofilm formation and removal under the effect of different cleaning agents. The benefit of this custom-made SPR instrument is that it records simultaneously both the critical and resonant angles. This provides unique information on the growth of bacterial cells which is otherwise not obtainable with commonly used intensity-based SPR systems. The results clearly showed that a multilayer biofilm can be formed in 48 hours and the steps involved can be monitored in real-time with the SPR instrument through the measurement of the refractive index change and following the evolution in the shape of the SPR curve. The number, the depth and the sharpness of the reflection ripples varied as the film became thicker. Simulation results confirmed that the number of layers of bacteria affected the number of ripples at the critical angle. Real-time monitoring of the film breakdown with three cleaning agents indicated that bleach solution at 4.5% was the most effective in disrupting the biofilm from the gold sensor. Our overall findings suggest that the SPR biosensor with angular modulation presented in this article can perform real-time monitoring of biofilm formation and has the potential to be used as a platform to test the efficiency of disinfectants.

  12. Nanophotonic label-free biosensors for environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocarro-Ruiz, Blanca; Fernández-Gavela, Adrián; Herranz, Sonia; Lechuga, Laura M

    2017-06-01

    The field of environmental monitoring has experienced a substantial progress in the last years but still the on-site control of contaminants is an elusive problem. In addition, the growing number of pollutant sources is accompanied by an increasing need of having efficient early warning systems. Several years ago biosensor devices emerged as promising environmental monitoring tools, but their level of miniaturization and their fully operation outside the laboratory prevented their use on-site. In the last period, nanophotonic biosensors based on evanescent sensing have emerged as an outstanding choice for portable point-of-care diagnosis thanks to their capability, among others, of miniaturization, multiplexing, label-free detection and integration in lab-on-chip platforms. This review covers the most relevant nanophotonic biosensors which have been proposed (including interferometric waveguides, grating-couplers, microcavity resonators, photonic crystals and localized surface plasmon resonance sensors) and their recent application for environmental surveillance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Integration of an Optical Ring Resonator Biosensor into a Self-Contained Microfluidic Cartridge with Active, Single-Shot Micropumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Geidel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While there have been huge advances in the field of biosensors during the last decade, their integration into a microfluidic environment avoiding external tubing and pumping is still neglected. Herein, we show a new microfluidic design that integrates multiple reservoirs for reagent storage and single-use electrochemical pumps for time-controlled delivery of the liquids. The cartridge has been tested and validated with a silicon nitride-based photonic biosensor incorporating multiple optical ring resonators as sensing elements and an immunoassay as a potential target application. Based on experimental results obtained with a demonstration model, subcomponents were designed and existing protocols were adapted. The newly-designed microfluidic cartridges and photonic sensors were separately characterized on a technical basis and performed well. Afterwards, the sensor was functionalized for a protein detection. The microfluidic cartridge was loaded with the necessary assay reagents. The integrated pumps were programmed to drive the single process steps of an immunoassay. The prototype worked selectively, but only with a low sensitivity. Further work must be carried out to optimize biofunctionalization of the optical ring resonators and to have a more suitable flow velocity progression to enhance the system’s reproducibility.

  14. A Phase-Intensity Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Avian Influenza A (H5N1 Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Lok Wong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a phase-intensity surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor and demonstrate its use for avian influenza A (H5N1 antibody biomarker detection. The sensor probes the intensity variation produced by the steep phase response at surface plasmon excitation. The prism sensor head is fixed between a pair of polarizers with a perpendicular orientation angle and a forbidden transmission path. At SPR, a steep phase change is introduced between the p- and s-polarized light, and this rotates the polarization ellipse of the transmission beam. This allows the light at resonance to be transmitted and a corresponding intensity change to be detected. Neither time-consuming interference fringe analysis nor a phase extraction process is required. In refractive index sensing experiments, the sensor resolution was determined to be 6.3 × 10−6 refractive index values (RIU. The sensor has been further applied for H5N1 antibody biomarker detection, and the sensor resolution was determined to be 193.3 ng mL−1, compared to 1 μg mL−1 and 0.5 μg mL−1, as reported in literature for influenza antibody detection using commercial Biacore systems. It represents a 517.3% and 258.7% improvement in detection limit, respectively. With the unique features of label-free, real-time, and sensitive detection, the phase-intensity SPR biosensor has promising potential applications in influenza detection.

  15. A Phase-Intensity Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Chua, Marissa; Mittman, Heather; Choo, Li Xian; Lim, Hann Qian; Olivo, Malini

    2017-10-16

    In this paper, we present a phase-intensity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor and demonstrate its use for avian influenza A (H5N1) antibody biomarker detection. The sensor probes the intensity variation produced by the steep phase response at surface plasmon excitation. The prism sensor head is fixed between a pair of polarizers with a perpendicular orientation angle and a forbidden transmission path. At SPR, a steep phase change is introduced between the p- and s-polarized light, and this rotates the polarization ellipse of the transmission beam. This allows the light at resonance to be transmitted and a corresponding intensity change to be detected. Neither time-consuming interference fringe analysis nor a phase extraction process is required. In refractive index sensing experiments, the sensor resolution was determined to be 6.3 × 10-6 refractive index values (RIU). The sensor has been further applied for H5N1 antibody biomarker detection, and the sensor resolution was determined to be 193.3 ng mL-1, compared to 1 μg mL-1 and 0.5 μg mL-1, as reported in literature for influenza antibody detection using commercial Biacore systems. It represents a 517.3% and 258.7% improvement in detection limit, respectively. With the unique features of label-free, real-time, and sensitive detection, the phase-intensity SPR biosensor has promising potential applications in influenza detection.

  16. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Chip for Label-Free Detection of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin; Krüger, Asger Christian; Groothoff, Nathaniel

    Narrow polarization-mixing resonances in planar photonic crystals are studied as candidate components for label-free refractive index sensors for detecting bacteria causing sepsis through the identification of DNA strands....

  17. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit, E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan [Omega Optics, Inc., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Chen, Ray T., E-mail: raychen@uts.cc.utexas.edu [Omega Optics, Inc., Austin, Texas 78757 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  18. Monitoring Microalgae Population Growth by using Fe3O4 Nanoparticles-based Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurrohman, D. T.; Oktivina, M.; Suharyadi, E.; Suyono, E. A.; Abraha, K.

    2017-05-01

    The population growth of microalgae has been successfully monitored by using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor activated by using PEG-4000 functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. The SPR-based biosensor in this work used Kretchmann configuration and Ha-Ne laser beam (λ = 633nm). The population of microalgae were estimated by using calibration curve. The shift of SPR angle happens due to the change of dielectric medium from prism/Au/air system to prism/Au/Fe3O4+PEG+microalgae/cover glass system. The change of dielectric medium occurs due to deposition of Fe3O4+PEG+microalgae samples that were monitored for seven days. The population of microalgae on the first day was estimated of 1188146 cell/ml and SPR angle had shifted from 42.80 to 69.00. The SPR angle shifted as much as 26.20. The population of microalga grew significantly on the third day as much as 1649106 cell/ml and the SPR angle had shifted 43.80 to 71.10. The SPR angle shifted as much as 27.30. On fourth to seventh day, the population of microalgae decreased. The population of microalgae on the seventh day was estimated of 1206961 cell/ml and the SPR angle had shifted from 44.00 to 68.80. The SPR angle shifted as much as 24.8 degrees. The shift of SPR angle was influenced by the population of microalgae so that the SPR-based biosensor has the potential for use in monitoring the microalgae population.

  19. Study on VCSEL laser heating chip in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Binquan; Wu, Wenfeng; Jia, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, atomic gyroscope has become an important direction of inertial navigation. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope has a stronger advantage in the miniaturization of the size. In atomic gyroscope, the lasers are indispensable devices which has an important effect on the improvement of the gyroscope performance. The frequency stability of the VCSEL lasers requires high precision control of temperature. However, the heating current of the laser will definitely bring in the magnetic field, and the sensitive device, alkali vapor cell, is very sensitive to the magnetic field, so that the metal pattern of the heating chip should be designed ingeniously to eliminate the magnetic field introduced by the heating current. In this paper, a heating chip was fabricated by MEMS process, i.e. depositing platinum on semiconductor substrates. Platinum has long been considered as a good resistance material used for measuring temperature The VCSEL laser chip is fixed in the center of the heating chip. The thermometer resistor measures the temperature of the heating chip, which can be considered as the same temperature of the VCSEL laser chip, by turning the temperature signal into voltage signal. The FPGA chip is used as a micro controller, and combined with PID control algorithm constitute a closed loop control circuit. The voltage applied to the heating resistor wire is modified to achieve the temperature control of the VCSEL laser. In this way, the laser frequency can be controlled stably and easily. Ultimately, the temperature stability can be achieved better than 100mK.

  20. Design and numerical analysis of highly sensitive Au-MoS2-graphene based hybrid surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Saifur; Anower, Md. Shamim; Hasan, Md. Rabiul; Hossain, Md. Biplob; Haque, Md. Ismail

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive Au-MoS2-Graphene based hybrid surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for the detection of DNA hybridization. The performance parameters of the proposed sensor are investigated in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy and quality factor at operating wavelength of 633 nm. We observed in the numerical study that sensitivity can be greatly increased by adding MoS2 layer in the middle of a Graphene-on-Au layer. It is shown that by using single layer of MoS2 in between gold and graphene layer, the proposed biosensor exhibits simultaneously high sensitivity of 87.8 deg/RIU, high detection accuracy of 1.28 and quality factor of 17.56 with gold layer thickness of 50 nm. This increased performance is due to the absorption ability and optical characteristics of graphene biomolecules and high fluorescence quenching ability of MoS2. On the basis of changing in SPR angle and minimum reflectance, the proposed sensor can sense nucleotides bonding happened between double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) helix structures. Therefore, this sensor can successfully detect the hybridization of target DNAs to the probe DNAs pre-immobilized on the Au-MoS2-Graphene hybrid with capability of distinguishing single-base mismatch.

  1. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noremylia Mohd Bakhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10−9 M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  2. Surface characterization and antifouling properties of nanostructured gold chips for imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, S.; Pellacani, P.; Beek, van T.A.; Zuilhof, H.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) optical sensing is a label-free technique for real-time monitoring of biomolecular interactions. Recently, a portable imaging SPR (iSPR) prototype instrument, featuring a nanostructured gold chip, has been developed. In the present work, we investigated the crucial

  3. Peptide-protein microarrays and surface plasmon resonance detection: biosensors for versatile biomolecular interaction analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Cortes, Sandra; Brakha, Carine; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Marquette, Christophe; Deny, Paul; Livache, Thierry; Marche, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Biosensors in microarray format provide promising tools for high-throughput analyses of complex samples. Although they are able to detect, quantify and characterize a multitude of compounds, most of the available devices are specialized in the analysis of one type of interaction, limiting their application to a define area. The aim of our work was to develop and characterize versatile protein (or peptide) microarrays suitable for the simultaneous analysis of a large pa...

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging biosensor for cystatin determination based on the application of bromelain, ficin and chymopapain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Breczko, Joanna; Sankiewicz, Anna

    2012-04-24

    A Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI) sensor based on bromelain or chymopapain or ficin has been developed for specific cystatin determination. Cystatin was captured from a solution by immobilized bromelain or chymopapain or ficin due to the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex on the biosensor surface. The influence of bromelain, chymopapain or ficin concentration, as well as the pH of the interaction on the SPRI signal, was investigated and optimized. Sensor dynamic response range is between 0-0.6 μg/ml and the detection limit is equal to 0.1 μg/ml. In order to demonstrate the sensor potential, cystatin was determined in blood plasma, urine and saliva, showing good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  5. A novel graphene coated surface plasmon resonance biosensor with tungsten disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Saifur; Hasan, Md. Rabiul; Rikta, Khaleda Akter; Anower, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a rigorous configuration of graphene coated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization. The present configuration is consisted of prism (SF10 glass), Gold (Au), WS2- graphene and sensing medium. We perform the performance parameters of the proposed sensor in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy and quality factor. Here we report a dramatic enhancement of the overall performance. Addition of graphene layers increase the sensitivity but decrease the other performance parameters. To increase the all performance parameters we add WS2 between metal and graphene layer. Furthermore in this paper, the thickness effect of Gold (Au) is also analyzed. Numerical analysis shows that the variation of SPR angle for mismatched DNA strands is quiet negligible whereas that for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Therefore, the proposed biosensor opens a new window towards detection for biomolecular interactions.

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging biosensor for cystatin determination based on the application of bromelain, ficin and chymopapain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sankiewicz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI sensor based on bromelain or chymopapain or ficin has been developed for specific cystatin determination. Cystatin was captured from a solution by immobilized bromelain or chymopapain or ficin due to the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex on the biosensor surface. The influence of bromelain, chymopapain or ficin concentration, as well as the pH of the interaction on the SPRI signal, was investigated and optimized. Sensor dynamic response range is between 0–0.6 μg/ml and the detection limit is equal to 0.1 μg/ml. In order to demonstrate the sensor potential, cystatin was determined in blood plasma, urine and saliva, showing good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  7. Benchtop chemistry for the rapid prototyping of label-free biosensors: Transmission localized surface plasmon resonance platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ssu; Chen, Xin; Yang, Tinglu; Castellana, Edward T.; Chen, Jixin; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, a simple label-free biosensor fabrication method is demonstrated based on transmission localized surface plasmon resonance (T-LSPR). The platform, which consists of a silver nanoparticle array, can be prepared in just a few minutes using benchtop chemistry. The array was made by a templating technique in conjunction with the photoreduction of Ag ions from solution. This metal surface was functionalized with biotin-linked thiol ligands for binding streptavidin molecules from solution. For an array of 19 nm diameter silver nanoparticles, a redshift in the T-LSPR spectrum of 24 nm was observed upon protein-ligand binding at saturation. The binding constant was found to be 2 × 1012 M–1. Platforms were also fabricated with silver nanoparticles of 34, 55, and 72 nm diameters. The maximum LSPR wavelength shift was nanoparticle size dependent and the maximum sensitivity was obtained with the smaller nanoparticles. PMID:20408728

  8. High-sensitivity optical biosensor based on cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer and ring resonator using Vernier effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianxin; Chen, Yangqing; Yu, Fang; Tang, Longhua; Li, Mingyu; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh sensitivity silicon photonic biosensor based on cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and ring resonator with the Vernier effect using wavelength interrogation. Experimental results show that the sensitivities reached 2870 nm/RIU and 21,500 nm/RIU for MZI sensor and MZI-ring sensor, respectively. A biosensing application was demonstrated by monitoring the interaction between goat and antigoat immunoglobulin G (IgG) pairs. The measured results show that 1 ng/ml IgG resulted in 0.035 nm and 0.5 nm wavelength shift for MZI sensor and MZI-ring sensor, respectively. This high performance sensor is promising for medical diagnostic applications.

  9. Sensitive spin detection using an on-chip SQUID-waveguide resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, G.; Chen, L.; Barreda, J.; Bevara, V.; Hu, L.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Andrei, P.; Bertaina, S.; Chiorescu, I.

    2017-11-01

    Precise detection of spin resonance is of paramount importance to achieve coherent spin control in quantum computing. We present a setup for spin resonance measurements, which uses a dc-SQUID flux detector coupled to an antenna from a coplanar waveguide. The SQUID and the waveguide are fabricated from a 20 nm Nb thin film, allowing high magnetic field operation with the field applied parallel to the chip. We observe a resonance signal between the first and third excited states of Gd spins S = 7/2 in a CaWO4 crystal, relevant for state control in multi-level systems.

  10. Ultrahigh Q whispering gallery mode electro-optic resonators on a silicon photonic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohammad; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Schlafer, John; Ryan, Colm; Maleki, Lute

    2016-09-15

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) electro-optic resonators made of LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 are critical for a wide range of applications in nonlinear and quantum optics, as well as RF photonics, due to their remarkably ultrahigh Q(>108) and large electro-optic coefficient. Achieving efficient coupling of these resonators to planar on-chip optical waveguides is essential for any high-yield and robust practical applications. However, it has been very challenging to demonstrate such coupling while preserving the ultrahigh Q properties of the resonators. Here, we show how the silicon photonic platform can overcome this long-standing challenge. Silicon waveguides with appropriate designs enable efficient and strong coupling to these WGM electro-optic resonators. We discuss various integration architectures of these resonators onto a silicon chip and experimentally demonstrate critical coupling of a planar Si waveguide and an ultrahigh QLiTaO3 resonator (Q∼108). Our results show a promising path for widespread and practical applications of these resonators on a silicon photonic platform.

  11. Design and Optimization of SiON Ring Resonator-Based Biosensors for Aflatoxin M1 Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we designed and studied silicon oxynitride (SiON microring-based photonic structures for biosensing applications. We designed waveguides, directional couplers, and racetrack resonators in order to measure refractive index changes smaller than 10−6 refractive index units (RIU. We tested various samples with different SiON refractive indexes as well as the waveguide dimensions for selecting the sensor with the best performance. Propagation losses and bending losses have been measured on test structures, along with a complete characterization of the resonator’s performances. Sensitivities and limit of detection (LOD were also measured using glucose-water solutions and compared with expected results from simulations. Finally, we functionalized the resonator and performed sensing experiments with Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1. We were able to detect the binding of aflatoxin for concentrations as low as 12.5 nm. The results open up the path for designing cost-effective biosensors for a fast and reliable sensitive analysis of AFM1 in milk.

  12. A new biosensor for glucose determination in serum based on up-converting fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianhong; Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Jialan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-10-15

    In this work, a new glucose sensor based on up-converting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (UC-FRET) was developed. Up-converting phosphors (UCPs, NaYF(4): Yb, Er), which were covalently labeled with Concanavalin A (ConA), were used as the energy donor with thiolated β-cyclodextrins (SH-β-CDs) functionalized gold nanoparticles as the energy acceptor. Due to the combination between ConA and SH-β-CDs, the energy donor and the acceptor were brought to close proximity, resulting in the quenching of the fluorescence of UCPs by gold nanoparticles. In the presence of glucose which competed with SH-β-CDs towards the binding sites of ConA, the biosensor (UCPs-ConA-SH-β-CDs-Au) was decomposed and the energy donor was separated from the acceptor. Therefore, the fluorescence of UCPs was restored dependent on the concentration of glucose. The increase of UCPs fluorescence intensity was proportional to glucose concentration within the range from 0.4 μM to 10μM in aqueous buffer, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.043 μM. A same linear range of glucose concentration was obtained in a human serum matrix (which was pretreated and thus contained no glucose) with a slightly higher LOD (0.065 μM). The glucose sensor was applied to real human serum samples with the results consistent with that of a classic hexokinase (HK) method, indicating that the UC-FRET biosensor was competent for directly sensing glucose in serum samples without optical interference, which benefited from the near infrared (NIR) excitation nature of UCPs. The results of this work suggested that the UC-FRET technique could be a promising alternative for detecting biomolecules in complex biological sample matrixes for diagnostic purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-tuning interfacial architecture for Estradiol detection by surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltovets, Praskoviya; Shinkaruk, Svitlana; Vellutini, Luc; Snopok, Borys

    2017-04-15

    This study reports the operation principles for reusable SPR biosensors utilizing nanoscale-specific electrostatic levitation phenomena in their sensitive layer design. Functional macromolecular building blocks localized near the "charged" surface by a variety of weak electrostatic interactions create a flexible and structurally variable architecture. A proof-of-concept is demonstrated by an immunospecific detection of 17β-Estradiol (E2) following the competitive inhibition format. The sensing interfacial architecture is based on the BSA-E2 conjugate within the BSA matrix immobilized on the "charged" (as a result of guanidine thiocyanate treatment) gold surface at pH 5.0. Kinetic analysis for different E2 concentrations shows that using parameter β of the stretched exponential function ~(1-exp(-(t/τ) β ) as an analyte-specific response measure allows one to substantially decrease the low detection limit (down to 10 -3 ng/ml) and increase the dynamic range (10 -3 -10 3 ng/ml) of the SPR biosensor. Finally, it's concluded that the created interfacial architecture is a typical complex system, where SPR response is formed by the stochastic interactions within the whole variety of processes in the system. The E2 addition destroys the uniformity of the reaction space (where an interaction of the antibody (Ab) and the analog of E2 in the self-tuneable matrix takes place) by the redistribution of the immunospecific complexes Ab(E2) x (x=0, 1, 2) dependent on E2 concentration. Binding dynamics changes are reflected in the values of β which summarize in compact form all "hidden" information specific for the evolving distributed interfacial system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modification and characterization of an aptamer-based surface plasmon resonance sensor chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Junpeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, aptamer-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors have become increasingly popular due to their high specificity, high sensitivity, real-time detection capabilities, and label-free features. The core component of an aptamer-based SPR sensor is a chip. This paper presents the modification steps and the characterization results of a sensor chip for the construction of a 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene-targeted, aptamer-based, SPR sensor. After cleaning the aptamer-based SPR sensor chip, polyethylene glycol (PEG with functional thiol groups at one end was added to the chip surface by Au-S covalent bonds to form a self-assembled film. Then, the carboxyl groups at the other end of PEG and the carboxyl groups of trinitrophenyl-glycine (TNP-Gly were activated and connected via ethylenediamine (EDA. This effectively completed the chip’s modification. During the modification process, relevant experimental conditions were optimized. The chip’s surface elements, as well as their chemical states, were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results, outlined in the following study, demonstrate that this modification of an aptamer-based SPR sensor chip adhered to normative expectations. Thus, the modification process proposed here establishes an important foundation for subsequent study of TNT detection.

  15. On-chip sensing with high-Q amorphous silicon microdisk resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, T.; Amthor, J.; Müller, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present a low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon microdisk resonator which is employed for evanescent field refractive index sensing. The resonances of the whispering gallery modes have extinction ratios of measurements the resonators intrinsic limit of detection was calculated to be LOD=3.3x10-4 and the minimum detectable amount of NaCl diluted in DI-water was determined to be 0.0375%. The early results prove that photonic microdisk resonators that are fabricated with low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon material can be applied in a variety of different areas for label-free lab-on-chip sensing, including chemical, medical and bio-sensing applications.

  16. Design of a Label-Free, Distributed Bragg Grating Resonator Based Dielectric Waveguide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Kehl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a resonant, dielectric waveguide device based on distributed Bragg gratings for label-free biosensing applications. The refractive index sensitive optical transducer aims at improving the performance of planar waveguide grating sensor systems with limited Q-factor and dynamic range by combing the advantages of resonant cavities, such as a multitude of resonance peaks with high finesse, with the manageable complexity of waveguide grating couplers. The general sensor concept is introduced and supported by theoretical considerations as well as numerical simulations based on Coupled Mode Theory. In contrast to a single Bragg grating reflector, the presented Fabry-Pérot type distributed Bragg resonator exhibits an extended measurement range as well as relaxed fabrication tolerances. The resulting, relatively simple sensor structure can be fabricated with standard lithographic means and is independent of expensive light-sources and/or detectors, making an affordable but sensitive device, potentially suitable for point-of-care applications.

  17. Fano resonance in graphene-MoS2 heterostructure-based surface plasmon resonance biosensor and its potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gaige; Zou, Xiujuan; Chen, Yunyun; Xu, Linhua; Rao, Weifeng

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new configuration of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor that is based on graphene-MoS2 hybrid structures for ultrasensitive detection of molecules. The present configuration is consisted of chalcogenide glass (2S2G) prism, Ag, coupling layer, guiding layer, graphene-MoS2 heterostructure and analyte. We perform numerical and analytical study of the impact of the thickness and refractive index (RI) of the coupling and guiding layer in a planar sensing structure within the Kretschmann configuration on the resonance properties of the excitation. Results of reflectivity calculations clearly demonstrate the sharp Fano-type resonance appears in the curve of SPR because of the coupling between surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and planar waveguide (PWG) modes. The properties of the Fano resonance (FR) strongly depend on the parameters of the structure. The calculated magnetic field profiles manifest that the hybrid nature of the electromagnetic (EM) modes excited in the present structure. The proposed system displays an enhancement factor of sensitivity by intensity more than 2 × 103-fold when compared to the SPR sensing scheme.

  18. A novel surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on the PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform for horse IgG detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Di; Deng, Xinyu; Sun, Ying; Wang, Xinghua; Ma, Pinyi; Song, Daqian

    2018-02-01

    Herein we report a novel polydopamine-silver nanoparticle-polydopamine-gold (PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au) film based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for horse IgG detection. The PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform was built on Au-film via layer-by-layer self-assembly. Ag ion was reduced in situ to AgNPs in presence of PDA. The top PDA layer can prevent AgNPs from being oxidized and connect with antibody via Schiff alkali reaction directly. The morphology and thickness of the modified gold film were characterized using scanning electron microscope and Talystep. Experimental results show that the PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform is stable, regenerative and sensitive for horse IgG detection. The detection limit of horse IgG obtained with the present biosensor is 0.625 μg mL- 1, which is 2-fold and 4-fold lower than that obtained with biosensor based on PDA modified Au film and conventional biosensor based on MPA, respectively. Furthermore, when challenged to real serum samples, our sensor exhibited excellent specificity to horse IgG, suggesting its potential for industrial application.

  19. Single-chip electron spin resonance detectors operating at 50GHz, 92GHz, and 146GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, Alessandro V; Gualco, Gabriele; Jeong, Minki; Zivkovic, Ivica; Brugger, Jürgen; Rønnow, Henrik M; Anders, Jens; Boero, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    We report on the design and characterization of single-chip electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors operating at 50GHz, 92GHz, and 146GHz. The core of the single-chip ESR detectors is an integrated LC-oscillator, formed by a single turn aluminum planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. On the same chip, a second, nominally identical, LC-oscillator together with a mixer and an output buffer are also integrated. Thanks to the slightly asymmetric capacitance of the mixer inputs, a signal at a few hundreds of MHz is obtained at the output of the mixer. The mixer is used for frequency down-conversion, with the aim to obtain an output signal at a frequency easily manageable off-chip. The coil diameters are 120μm, 70μm, and 45μm for the U-band, W-band, and the D-band oscillators, respectively. The experimental frequency noises at 100kHz offset from the carrier are 90Hz/Hz 1/2 , 300Hz/Hz 1/2 , and 700Hz/Hz 1/2 at 300K, respectively. The ESR spectra are obtained by measuring the frequency variations of the single-chip oscillators as a function of the applied magnetic field. The experimental spin sensitivities, as measured with a sample of α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA)/benzene complex, are 1×10 8 spins/Hz 1/2 , 4×10 7 spins/Hz 1/2 , 2×10 7 spins/Hz 1/2 at 300K, respectively. We also show the possibility to perform experiments up to 360GHz by means of the higher harmonics in the microwave field produced by the integrated single-chip LC-oscillators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tubular optical waveguide particle plasmon resonance biosensor for multiplex real-time and label-free detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Han; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2013-05-01

    A tubular optical waveguide particle plasmon resonance (TW-PPR) sensor is demonstrated for higher-throughput and sensitive label-free biochemical detections. Compared to other evanescent field absorption sensors, the TW-PPR sensor possesses merits of itself being a microchamber of a defined sample volume, a mechanical support for sensor coatings, and ease of systematic multichannel expansion. The sensor resolution is estimated to be 2.6 × 10-6 RIU in measuring solutions of various refractive indices (RIs). Additionally, the multichannel TW-PPR sensing system can perform independent measurements simultaneously and its limit of detection (LOD) of anti-DNP antibody and streptavidin separately measured by DNP-functionalized and biotin-functionalized TW-PPR microchambers is demonstrated to be 1.21 × 10-10 and 2.27 × 10-10 g/ml, respectively. Accurate determinations of these molecules with known concentrations spiked in artificial urine are examined and the sensor responses give excellent correlation with results demonstrated in standard buffer examinations, supporting the utility of the device for analyte screening in more complex media. The TWPPR sensor can be inexpensively fabricated and has a special niche as high-sensitivity refractive index sensor as well as biosensor for label-free monitoring biomolecular interactions in real-time. It is ideally suitable for disposable uses, especially promising for convenient higher-throughput biochemical sensing applications.

  1. Combination of Wearable Multi-Biosensor Platform and Resonance Frequency Training for Stress Management of the Unemployed Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanqing Wu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently considerable research is being directed toward developing methodologies for controlling emotion or releasing stress. An applied branch of the basic field of psychophysiology, known as biofeedback, has been developed to fulfill clinical and non-clinical needs related to such control. Wearable medical devices have permitted unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs and emerging biofeedback services in a pervasive manner. With the global recession, unemployment has become one of the most serious social problems; therefore, the combination of biofeedback techniques with wearable technology for stress management of unemployed population is undoubtedly meaningful. This article describes a wearable biofeedback system based on combining integrated multi-biosensor platform with resonance frequency training (RFT biofeedback strategy for stress management of unemployed population. Compared to commercial system, in situ experiments with multiple subjects indicated that our biofeedback system was discreet, easy to wear, and capable of offering ambulatory RFT biofeedback.Moreover, the comparative studies on the altered autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation before and after three week RFT biofeedback training was performed in unemployed population with the aid of our wearable biofeedback system. The achieved results suggested that RFT biofeedback in combination with wearable technology was capable of significantly increasingoverall HRV, which indicated by decreasing sympathetic activities, increasing parasympathetic activities, and increasing ANS synchronization. After 3-week RFT-based respiration training, the ANS’s regulating function and coping ability of unemployed population have doubled, and tended toward a dynamic balance.

  2. Plasmonic Photonic-Crystal Slabs: Visualization of the Bloch Surface Wave Resonance for an Ultrasensitive, Robust and Reusable Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Baryshev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC with termination by a metal film—a plasmonic photonic-crystal slab—has been theoretically analyzed for its optical response at a variation of the dielectric permittivity of an analyte and at a condition simulating the molecular binding event. Visualization of the Bloch surface wave resonance (SWR was done with the aid of plasmon absorption in a dielectric/metal/dielectric sandwich terminating a PhC. An SWR peak in spectra of such a plasmonic photonic crystal (PPhC slab comprising a noble or base metal layer was shown to be sensitive to a negligible variation of refractive index of a medium adjoining to the slab. As a consequence, the considered PPhC-based optical sensors exhibited an enhanced sensitivity and a good robustness in comparison with the conventional surface-plasmon and Bloch surface wave sensors. The PPhC biosensors can be of practical importance because the metal layer is protected by a capping dielectric layer from contact with analytes and, consequently, from deterioration.

  3. Single-chip ring resonator-based 1 x 8 optical beam forming network in CMOS-compatible waveguide technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Heideman, Rene; Borreman, A.; Meijerink, Arjan; van Etten, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Optical ring resonators (ORRs) are good candidates to provide continuously tunable delay in optical beam forming networks (OBFNs) for phased array antenna systems. Delay and splitting/combining elements can be integrated on a single optical chip to form an OBFN. A state-of-the-art ring resonator-

  4. Heterogeneity of phosphatidic acid levels and distribution at the plasma membrane in living cells as visualized by a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Teruko; Frohman, Michael A; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2010-11-12

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is one of the major phospholipids in the plasma membrane. Although it has been reported that PA plays key roles in cell survival and morphology, it remains unknown when and where PA is produced in the living cell. Based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we generated PA biosensor, and named Pii (phosphatidic acid indicator). In these biosensors, the lipid-binding domain of DOCK2 is sandwiched with the cyan fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein and is tagged with the plasma membrane-targeting sequence of K-Ras. The addition of synthetic PA, or the activation of phospholipase D or diacylglycerol kinase at the plasma membrane, changed the level of FRET in Pii-expressing cells, demonstrating the response of Pii to PA. The biosensor also detected divergent PA content among various cell lines as well as within one cell line. Interestingly, the growth factor-induced increment in PA content correlated negatively with the basal PA content before stimulation, suggesting the presence of an upper threshold in the PA concentration at the plasma membrane. The biosensor also revealed uneven PA distribution within the cell, i.e. the basal level and growth factor-induced accumulation of PA was higher at the cell-free edges than at the cell-cell contact region. An insufficient increase in PA may account for ineffective Ras activation at areas of cell-cell contact. In conclusion, the PA biosensor Pii is a versatile tool for examining heterogeneity in the content and distribution of PA in single cells as well as among different cells.

  5. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Wireless Charge Based Capacitance Measurement Circuits with On-Chip Spiral Inductor for Radio Frequency Identification Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Boram; Uno, Shigeyasu; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2012-04-01

    A wireless measuring system of charge based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit has been designed and demonstrated for biomedical applications. The radio frequency identification (RFID) chip that includes on-chip spiral inductor tag antenna, and RFID circuit, and CBCM sensor chip are fabricated within standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The capacitance change caused by DNA detection can be converted into the voltage output using capacitance-to-voltage conversion circuit. To confirm the transmission of the capacitance, the poly-capacitor of fixed capacitance and on-chip spiral inductor tag antenna were fabricated using 1.2 µm, 2-metal, 2-poly CMOS technology. As a result of measurement, three different capacitances (34, 141, 564 fF) were detected wirelessly.

  7. Future of biosensors: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Frieder W; Yarman, Aysu; Bachmann, Till; Hirsch, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan; Renneberg, Reinhard; Schumacher, Soeren; Wollenberger, Ulla; Teller, Carsten; Bier, Frank F

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors representing the technological counterpart of living senses have found routine application in amperometric enzyme electrodes for decentralized blood glucose measurement, interaction analysis by surface plasmon resonance in drug development, and to some extent DNA chips for expression analysis and enzyme polymorphisms. These technologies have already reached a highly advanced level and need minor improvement at most. The dream of the "100-dollar" personal genome may come true in the next few years provided that the technological hurdles of nanopore technology or of polymerase-based single molecule sequencing can be overcome. Tailor-made recognition elements for biosensors including membrane-bound enzymes and receptors will be prepared by cell-free protein synthesis. As alternatives for biological recognition elements, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been created. They have the potential to substitute antibodies in biosensors and biochips for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances, proteins, viruses, and living cells. They are more stable than proteins and can be produced in large amounts by chemical synthesis. Integration of nanomaterials, especially of graphene, could lead to new miniaturized biosensors with high sensitivity and ultrafast response. In the future individual therapy will include genetic profiling of isoenzymes and polymorphic forms of drug-metabolizing enzymes especially of the cytochrome P450 family. For defining the pharmacokinetics including the clearance of a given genotype enzyme electrodes will be a useful tool. For decentralized online patient control or the integration into everyday "consumables" such as drinking water, foods, hygienic articles, clothing, or for control of air conditioners in buildings and cars and swimming pools, a new generation of "autonomous" biosensors will emerge.

  8. Biomolecular Interaction Analysis Using an Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor: The Marquardt Algorithm vs Newton Iteration Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiandong; Ma, Liuzheng; Wang, Shun; Yang, Jianming; Chang, Keke; Hu, Xinran; Sun, Xiaohui; Chen, Ruipeng; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Juanhua; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of biomolecular interactions are powerfully used to quantify the binding kinetic constants for the determination of a complex formed or dissociated within a given time span. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors provide an essential approach in the analysis of the biomolecular interactions including the interaction process of antigen-antibody and receptors-ligand. The binding affinity of the antibody to the antigen (or the receptor to the ligand) reflects the biological activities of the control antibodies (or receptors) and the corresponding immune signal responses in the pathologic process. Moreover, both the association rate and dissociation rate of the receptor to ligand are the substantial parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. A number of experimental data may lead to complicated real-time curves that do not fit well to the kinetic model. This paper presented an analysis approach of biomolecular interactions established by utilizing the Marquardt algorithm. This algorithm was intensively considered to implement in the homemade bioanalyzer to perform the nonlinear curve-fitting of the association and disassociation process of the receptor to ligand. Compared with the results from the Newton iteration algorithm, it shows that the Marquardt algorithm does not only reduce the dependence of the initial value to avoid the divergence but also can greatly reduce the iterative regression times. The association and dissociation rate constants, ka, kd and the affinity parameters for the biomolecular interaction, KA, KD, were experimentally obtained 6.969×10(5) mL·g(-1)·s(-1), 0.00073 s(-1), 9.5466×10(8) mL·g(-1) and 1.0475×10(-9) g·mL(-1), respectively from the injection of the HBsAg solution with the concentration of 16 ng·mL(-1). The kinetic constants were evaluated distinctly by using the obtained data from the curve-fitting results.

  9. A saliva molecular imprinted localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for wine astringency estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, J Rafaela L; Teixeira, Natércia; De Freitas, Victor; Sales, M Goreti F; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2017-10-15

    Wine astringency was evaluated based on the interaction of two complex matrices (red wine and saliva) by combining localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) at gold nanodisks as an alternative to sensorial analysis. The main objective of the work was to simulate wine astringency inside the mouth by mimicking this biological system. The LSPR/MIP sensor provided a linear response for astringency expressed in pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) units in concentrations ranging from 1 to 140μmol/L. The sensor was also applied to wine samples correlating well with sensorial analysis obtained by a trained panel. The correlation of astringency and wine composition was also evaluated showing that anthocyanins may have an important role, not only for pigmentation but also in astringency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acriflavine-immobilized eggshell membrane as a new solid-state biosensor for Sudan I-IV detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Anyi; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Shiping

    2017-12-15

    A novel solid-surface fluorescence biosensor for rapid detection of Sudan I-IV was proposed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing acriflavine (AY) on the eggshell membrane (ESM) with glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. FRET mechanism was demonstrated by using AY and Sudan dyes as donor and acceptor respectively, an efficient energy transfer in the present system was indicated by the sufficient spectral overlap integral (J) and proper Förster critical distance (R 0 ). Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence of the AY-ESM could be efficiently quenched by Sudan I-IV and the corresponding linear range was 0.5-60μM with the detection limits (3σ/slope) of 0.16, 0.26, 0.21 and 0.17μM respectively. Compared to the detection of Sudan dyes in solution-state, the membrane biosensor exhibited advantages of low detection limits, high sensitivity and selectivity, as well as excellent stability. Recovery tests in spiked real samples also achieved satisfactory results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Food allergens profiling with an imaging surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebe Raz, Sabina; Liu, Hong; Norde, Willem; Bremer, Maria G E G

    2010-10-15

    Food allergy is a growing health concern, which currently affects approximately 4% of adults and 8% of infants. For consumer protection purposes, food producers are required by law to disclose on the product label whether a major allergen is used during the production process. The commonly employed monitoring methods are highly laborious, time-consuming, and often expensive when screening for multiple allergens. Here, we utilize imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) in combination with antibody array for rapid, quantitative, and multianalyte food allergens detection. We demonstrate how the use of this technology provides a complete allergen profile within short measurement time and with adequate sensitivity. The successful applicability of this approach is demonstrated by analyzing cookies and dark chocolate products from different manufacturers. Hazelnut content of the tested food products is also determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and is found to correlate well with the hazelnut content determined by iSPR. This newly developed method opens the door to automated and high-throughput allergen analysis, ultimately aiming at providing the consumer with safer food.

  12. Semiconductor quantum dots as Förster resonance energy transfer donors for intracellularly-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Lauren D.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2017-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies currently comprise a significant portion of intracellularly based sensors. Although extremely useful, the fluorescent protein pairs typically utilized in such sensors are still plagued by many photophysical issues including significant direct acceptor excitation, small changes in FRET efficiency, and limited photostability. Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are characterized by many unique optical properties including size-tunable photoluminescence, broad excitation profiles coupled to narrow emission profiles, and resistance to photobleaching, which can cumulatively overcome many of the issues associated with use of fluorescent protein FRET donors. Utilizing QDs for intracellular FRET-based sensing still requires significant development in many areas including materials optimization, bioconjugation, cellular delivery and assay design and implementation. We are currently developing several QD-based FRET sensors for various intracellular applications. These include sensors targeting intracellular proteolytic activity along with those based on theranostic nanodevices for monitoring drug release. The protease sensor is based on a unique design where an intracellularly expressed fluorescent acceptor protein substrate assembles onto a QD donor following microinjection, forming an active complex that can be monitored in live cells over time. In the theranostic configuration, the QD is conjugated to a carrier protein-drug analogue complex to visualize real-time intracellular release of the drug from its carrier in response to an external stimulus. The focus of this talk will be on the design, properties, photophysical characterization and cellular application of these sensor constructs.

  13. Phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensors: methodology, instrumentation and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.H. [Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (Singapore); Ho, H.P. [Department of Electronic Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Kong, S.K. [Programme of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (China); Kabashin, A.V. [Laboratoire Lasers, Plasmas et Procedes Photoniques (LP3, UMR 7341 CNRS), Faculte des Sciences de Luminy, Aix-Marseille University, 163 Avenue de Luminy, C. P. 917, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2012-11-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) has become a central tool for label-free characterization of biomolecular interactions. Based on monitoring of amplitude characteristics, conventional SPR sensors have been extensively explored, commercialized and applied for studies of many important interactions (antigen-antibody, protein-ligand etc), but this technology still lacks of sensitivity for the detection of relatively small and low copy number compounds. Phase-sensitive SPR has recently emerged as an upgrade of this technology to resolve the sensitivity issue. Profiting from a sharp phase jump under SPR and ultra-sensitive tools of its control, this technology offers up to 100-time improvement of the detection limit, giving access to the detection of trace amounts of small molecular weight analytes (drugs etc). This paper intends to provide a tutorial on basic concepts of phase detection in SPR sensing, compare the performance of phase- and amplitude-sensitive sensors, review recent progress in the development and applications of phase-sensitive SPR sensors, and outline future prospects and trends of this technology. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Analysis of the performance of interferometry, surface plasmon resonance and luminescence as biosensors and chemosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ince, R. [Faculty of Arts and Science, Physics Department, Yeditepe University 34755, Istanbul (Turkey); Narayanaswamy, R. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Faraday Building, Sackville Street, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ramaier.narayanaswamy@manchester.ac.uk

    2006-05-31

    Sensitivity, dynamic range and resolution have been calculated and compared from a range of analytes sensed in the literature using the techniques of interferometry, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and luminescence. A detailed explanation of the physical and chemical/biological properties required of optical sensors is included along with the principle of operation of the sensors. Theoretical sensitivities of interferometry and SPR are also detailed along with parameters affecting these sensitivities. In the literature discussed in this review paper, the technique of luminescence, which relies intrinsically on 'labelling', offers the best resolutions for sensing of biomolecules (protein and DNA). Interference techniques offer the best resolutions for low molecular weight chemical liquids/vapours. Techniques which are 'label-free' are often desirable and it is demonstrated here that by combining the techniques of SPR with interferometry, it is possible to sense proteins with a resolution similar to that of luminescence. The future of chemo- and bio-sensing is discussed in terms of potential for multi-channel analysis, their continuous miniaturisation and their impending nanotechnology revolution.

  15. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stebunov, Yury V.; Aftenieva, Olga A.; Arsenin, Aleksey V.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sen......, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing....... sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover...

  16. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebunov, Yury V; Aftenieva, Olga A; Arsenin, Aleksey V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2015-10-07

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing.

  17. Rapid and label-free bioanalytical method of alpha fetoprotein detection using LSPR chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Kim, Jinwoon; Kwak, Cheol Hwan; Heo, Nam Su; Oh, Seo Yeong; Lee, Hoomin; Lee, Go-Woon; Vilian, A. T. Ezhil; Han, Young-Kyu; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kim, Gi-bum; Kwon, Soonjo; Huh, Yun Suk

    2017-07-01

    Alpha fetoprotein (AFP) is a cancer marker, particularly for hepatocellular carcinoma. Normal levels of AFP are less than 20 ng/mL; however, its levels can reach more than 400 ng/mL in patients with HCC. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) have been employed for clinical diagnosis of AFP; however, these methods are time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, we developed a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based biosensor for simple and rapid detection of AFP. This biosensor consists of a UV-Vis spectrometer, a cuvette cell, and a biosensor chip nanopatterned with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In our LSPR biosensor, binding of AFP to the surface of the sensor chip led to an increasing magnitude of the LSPR signals, which was measured by an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. Our LSPR biosensor showed sufficient detectability of AFP at concentrations of 1 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL. Moreover, the overall procedure for detection of AFP was completed within 20 min. This biosensor could also be utilized for a point of care test (POCT) by employing a portable UV-Vis spectrometer. Owing to the simplicity and rapidity of the detection process, our LSPR biosensor is expected to replace traditional diagnostic methods for the early detection of diseases.

  18. Analysis of a flip-chip bonded tunable high-temperature superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator using the conformal mapping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, M [Research Center for Superconductor Photonics, Osaka University, Osaka 565 0871 (Japan); Kataria, N D [Research Center for Superconductor Photonics, Osaka University, Osaka 565 0871 (Japan); Murakami, H [Research Center for Superconductor Photonics, Osaka University, Osaka 565 0871 (Japan); Tonouchi, M [Research Center for Superconductor Photonics, Osaka University, Osaka 565 0871 (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    We have studied the tuning properties of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) half-wavelength coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator operating at 5 GHz. The tuning schemes are based on flip-chip bonding of an electrically tunable ferroelectric (FE) thin film and a mechanically movable low-loss single crystal on top of the resonator. Using the conformal mapping method, closed-form analytical expressions have been derived for a flip-chip bonded conductor-backed and top-shielded CPW transmission line. The obtained expressions are used to analyse the volume effect of the FE thin film and the gap between the flip-chip and the CPW resonator on the tuning properties of the device. It has been found that large frequency modulation of the resonator produces impedance mismatch, which can considerably enhance the insertion loss of high-performance HTS microwave devices. Analysis also suggests that, for electrically tunable devices, flip-chip bonded FE thin films on HTS CPW devices provide a relatively higher performance compared to bilayer HTS/FE tunable devices.

  19. Analysis of a flip-chip bonded tunable high-temperature superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator using the conformal mapping technique

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, M; Murakami, H; Tonouchi, M

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the tuning properties of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) half-wavelength coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator operating at 5 GHz. The tuning schemes are based on flip-chip bonding of an electrically tunable ferroelectric (FE) thin film and a mechanically movable low-loss single crystal on top of the resonator. Using the conformal mapping method, closed-form analytical expressions have been derived for a flip-chip bonded conductor-backed and top-shielded CPW transmission line. The obtained expressions are used to analyse the volume effect of the FE thin film and the gap between the flip-chip and the CPW resonator on the tuning properties of the device. It has been found that large frequency modulation of the resonator produces impedance mismatch, which can considerably enhance the insertion loss of high-performance HTS microwave devices. Analysis also suggests that, for electrically tunable devices, flip-chip bonded FE thin films on HTS CPW devices provide a relatively higher performance...

  20. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  1. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  2. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Leonardis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  3. Detection of Bax protein conformational change using a surface plasmon resonance imaging-based antibody chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonil; Jung, Sun Ok; Park, Kyoungsook; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Seol, Dai-Wu; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2005-12-30

    We describe an antibody chip technology that uses a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system to examine the conformational change of a protein. In this study, we used Bax protein, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, as a model protein to investigate the conformational alteration triggered by a TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a potent inducer of apoptosis. To develop the antibody chip for detecting the Bax conformational change, we immobilized Bax monoclonal antibody 6A7, which recognizes only a conformationally changed Bax protein on a gold surface. The resultant immobilized Bax antibodies provided specific and accurate measurements of the active conformation-specific epitope in the apoptotic cancer cells treated with the TRAIL; these measurements corresponded to the data obtained by immunoprecipitation analysis using an active conformation-specific Bax antibody (6A7). The results of our study indicated that TRAIL-induced Bax structural change could be monitored quickly and simply using an SPR imaging system, thus demonstrating the potential for using such a system for the analysis of conformational properties of target proteins.

  4. Micromachined On-Chip Dielectric Resonator Antenna Operating at 60 GHz

    KAUST Repository

    Sallam, Mai

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA) suitable for millimeter-wave on-chip systems. The antenna was fabricated from a single high resistivity silicon wafer via micromachining technology. The new antenna was characterized using HFSS and experimentally with good agreement been found between the simulations and experiment. The proposed DRA has good radiation characteristics, where its gain and radiation efficiency are 7 dBi and 79.35%, respectively. These properties are reasonably constant over the working frequency bandwidth of the antenna. The return loss bandwidth was 2.23 GHz, which corresponds to 3.78% around 60 GHz. The antenna was primarily a broadside radiator with -15 dB cross polarization level.

  5. Single-chip pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a 32-bit microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Shinya; Domalain, Thierry; Kose, Katsumi

    2007-08-01

    A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse programmer has been developed using a single-chip microcontroller (ADmicroC7026). The microcontroller includes all the components required for the MRI pulse programmer: a 32-bit RISC CPU core, 62 kbytes of flash memory, 8 kbytes of SRAM, two 32-bit timers, four 12-bit DA converters, and 40 bits of general purpose I/O. An evaluation board for the microcontroller was connected to a host personal computer (PC), an MRI transceiver, and a gradient driver using interface circuitry. Target (embedded) and host PC programs were developed to enable MRI pulse sequence generation by the microcontroller. The pulse programmer achieved a (nominal) time resolution of approximately 100 ns and a minimum time delay between successive events of approximately 9 micros. Imaging experiments using the pulse programmer demonstrated the effectiveness of our approach.

  6. Development of a lab-on-chip electrochemical biosensor for water quality analysis based on microalgal photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopela, A; Laborde, A; Salvagnac, L; Ventalon, V; Bedel-Pereira, E; Séguy, I; Temple-Boyer, P; Juneau, P; Izquierdo, R; Launay, J

    2016-05-15

    The present work was dedicated to the development of a lab-on-chip device for water toxicity analysis and more particularly herbicide detection in water. It consists in a portable system for on-site detection composed of three-electrode electrochemical microcells, integrated on a fluidic platform constructed on a glass substrate. The final goal is to yield a system that gives the possibility of conducting double, complementary detection: electrochemical and optical and therefore all materials used for the fabrication of the lab-on-chip platform were selected in order to obtain a device compatible with optical technology. The basic detection principle consisted in electrochemically monitoring disturbances in metabolic photosynthetic activities of algae induced by the presence of Diuron herbicide. Algal response, evaluated through oxygen (O2) monitoring through photosynthesis was different for each herbicide concentration in the examined sample. A concentration-dependent inhibition effect of the herbicide on photosynthesis was demonstrated. Herbicide detection was achieved through a range (blank - 1 µM Diuron herbicide solution) covering the limit of maximum acceptable concentration imposed by Canadian government (0.64 µM), using a halogen white light source for the stimulation of algal photosynthetic apparatus. Superior sensitivity results (limit of detection of around 0.1 µM) were obtained with an organic light emitting diode (OLED), having an emission spectrum adapted to algal absorption spectrum and assembled on the final system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of a ligand for tumor necrosis factor receptor from Chinese herbs by combination of surface plasmon resonance biosensor and UPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Li, Ying-Hua; Lv, Di-Ya; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Lang-Dong; Zhu, Zhen-Yu; Chai, Yi-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Identification of bioactive compounds directly from complex herbal extracts is a key issue in the study of Chinese herbs. The present study describes the establishment and application of a sensitive, efficient, and convenient method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors for screening active ingredients targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 (TNF-R1) from Chinese herbs. Concentration-adjusted herbal extracts were subjected to SPR binding assay, and a remarkable response signal was observed in Rheum officinale extract. Then, the TNF-R1-bound ingredients were recovered, enriched, and analyzed by UPLC-QTOF/MS. As a result, physcion-8-O-β-D-monoglucoside (PMG) was identified as a bioactive compound, and the affinity constant of PMG to TNF-R1 was determined by SPR affinity analysis (K D  = 376 nM). Pharmacological assays revealed that PMG inhibited TNF-α-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in L929 cells via TNF-R1. Although PMG was a trace component in the chemical constituents of the R. officinale extract, it had considerable anti-inflammatory activities. It was found for the first time that PMG was a ligand for TNF receptor from herbal medicines. The proposed SPR-based screening method may prove to be an effective solution to analyzing bioactive components of Chinese herbs and other complex drug systems. Graphical abstract Scheme of the method based on SPR biosensor for screening and recovering active ingredients from complex herbal extracts and UPLC-MS for identifying them. Scheme of the method based on SPR biosensor for screening and recovering active ingredients from complex herbal extracts and UPLC-MS for identifying them.

  8. Dependence of cancer cell adhesion kinetics on integrin ligand surface density measured by a high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Peter, Beatrix; Bősze, Szilvia; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2014-02-01

    A novel high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating (RWG) imager biosensor, the Epic® BenchTop (BT), was utilized to determine the dependence of cell spreading kinetics on the average surface density (vRGD) of integrin ligand RGD-motifs. vRGD was tuned over four orders of magnitude by co-adsorbing the biologically inactive PLL-g-PEG and the RGD-functionalized PLL-g-PEG-RGD synthetic copolymers from their mixed solutions onto the sensor surface. Using highly adherent human cervical tumor (HeLa) cells as a model system, cell adhesion kinetic data of unprecedented quality were obtained. Spreading kinetics were fitted with the logistic equation to obtain the spreading rate constant (r) and the maximum biosensor response (Δλmax), which is assumed to be directly proportional to the maximum spread contact area (Amax). r was found to be independent of the surface density of integrin ligands. In contrast, Δλmax increased with increasing RGD surface density until saturation at high densities. Interpreting the latter behavior with a simple kinetic mass action model, a 2D dissociation constant of 1753 +/- 243 μm-2 (corresponding to a 3D dissociation constant of ~30 μM) was obtained for the binding between RGD-specific integrins embedded in the cell membrane and PLL-g-PEG-RGD. All of these results were obtained completely noninvasively without using any labels.

  9. A high-performance lab-on-a-chip liquid sensor employing surface acoustic wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustanovich, K.; Yantchev, V.; Kirejev, V.; Jeffries, G. D. M.; Lobovkina, T.; Jesorka, A.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate herein a new concept for lab-on-a-chip in-liquid sensing, through integration of surface acoustic wave resonance (SAR) in a one-port configuration with a soft polymer microfluidic delivery system. In this concept, the reflective gratings of a one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator are employed as mass loading-sensing elements, while the SAW transducer is protected from the measurement environment. We describe the design, fabrication, implementation, and characterization using liquid medium. The sensor operates at a frequency of 185 MHz and has demonstrated a comparable sensitivity to other SAW in-liquid sensors, while offering quality factor (Q) value in water of about 250, low impedance and fairly low susceptibility to viscous damping. For proof of principle, sensing performance was evaluated by means of binding 40 nm neutravidin-coated SiO2 nanoparticles to a biotin-labeled lipid bilayer deposited over the reflectors. Frequency shifts were determined for every step of the affinity assay. Demonstration of this integrated technology highlights the potential of SAR technology for in-liquid sensing.

  10. [Use of soybean trypsin inhibitor for modification of gold surface of the sensor chips in surface plasmon resonance spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, S V; Aleksandrova, N O; Kunda, Ie M; Verevka, S V; Shyrshov, Iu M

    2004-01-01

    Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) and glutaraldehyde are used to create an interlayer for proteins immobilization on the gold surface of the sensor chips of surface plasmon resonance spectrometer. Human serum albumin (HSA), goat Ig G and bovine eye lens alpha-crystallin are immobilized via the proposed interlayer. We studied the effects of the duration of storage of the sensor chips before use and pre-treatment by "piranha" solution on the STI adsorption by the gold surface. The influence of STI surface concentration, as well as the effect of the duration of storage of STI-modified sensor chips on the HSA immobilization are investigated. The binding of specific antibodies to the immobilized proteins and non-specific binding to the modified surfaces are studied. HSA immobilization on the bare gold surface is compared to that on the surfaces, modified by different methods.

  11. Resonant Cavity Enhanced On-Chip Raman Spectrometer Array with Precisely Positioned Metallic Nano-Gaps for Single Molecule Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    REPORT Resonant Cavity Enhanced On-Chip Raman Spectrometer Array with Precisely Positioned Metallic Nano-Gaps for Single Molecule Detection 14...with Precisely Positioned Metallic Nano-Gaps for Single Molecule Detection Report Title ABSTRACT During the Phase I program, our theoretical and...size is below 5 nano-meter (nm). Early single molecule SERS experiments are done typically with aggregates of colloidal nanoparticles where the “hot

  12. Optical biosensor with dispersion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W; Thirstrup, C; Sørensen, M H; Pedersen, H C

    2005-05-15

    Dispersion limits performance in many optical systems. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors, the sensing area is an optical element in which the dispersion depends on the effective refractive index of the biochemical compounds to be measured. We report a method of compensating for wavelength dispersion in SPR biosensors employing two integrated diffractive optical coupling elements in a polymer substrate. The dispersion compensation is achieved over the whole dynamic measurement range and provides a biosensor more robust to wavelength fluctuations than prism-coupler SPR systems. The concept can readily be employed in other types of sensor measuring refractive-index changes.

  13. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  14. On-chip broadband magnetic resonance spectroscopy down to ultralow temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, Conrad

    2014-12-03

    This thesis presents a novel technical realization to perform electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) based on superconducting coplanar waveguides (CPWs) and superconducting CPW resonators. This technique allows for the investigation of magnetic properties of the material under study at basically any arbitrary frequency. The compact design radically facilitates the implementation into dilution refrigerators to probe the samples at temperatures in the milli Kelvin regime. The working principle of the devices is explained and further substantiated by analytical calculations and 3D-electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the microwave EM fields of the given chip structures. The proof of principle was demonstrated on an organic radical with spin 1/2 and on a ruby single crystal with S=3/2, as a more complex spin system. The technique was then utilized to characterize a Gd-based single-ion magnet and to investigate the magnetic properties of the ground states of a heavy-fermion metal. Both materials were studied in detail at temperatures as low as 40 mK, far below the typical low-temperature limit of conventional EPR equipment at around 1 K. The results of the heavy-fermion compound reveal intriguing behavior of the spin-relaxation mechanisms and local magnetic fields at the lowest achievable temperatures and at the phase transitions and crossover regimes of the phase diagram. The thesis is a pioneering work outlining the great potential regarding the range of applicability of the introduced technique and provides a starting point for future improvements and further functional enhancements.

  15. In situ electrochemical-transmission surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for poly(pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid) thin-film-based biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmanee, Rapiphun; Baba, Akira; Phanichphant, Sukon; Sriwichai, Saengrawee; Shinbo, Kazunari; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we describe the combination of transmission surface plasmon resonance (TSPR) and electrochemical techniques for the application to biosensors with conducting polymers. Electropolymerization was employed to construct poly(pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid) (PP3C) film on a gold-coated grating substrate using pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid (P3C) monomer solution in 0.5 M H(2)SO(4). In situ electrochemical-transmission surface plasmon resonance (EC-TSPR) measurements were carried out to study the kinetic and electroactivity properties of PP3C film. Immobilization of antihuman IgG on the activated surface and the binding process of human IgG and antihuman IgG in neutral solution could be detected in situ by EC-TSPR measurement. The surface modification steps on the PP3C layer led to an increase in intensity of the transmission peak. The performance, sensitivity, and utility of EC-TSPR spectroscopy showed obvious advantages for the detection of binding process with the simple experimental setup, and could be applied to the study of biomolecular interactions in various systems.

  16. Live imaging of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase A activities during thrombus formation in mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, T; Sano, T; Kato, H; Komatsu, N; Imajo, M; Kamioka, Y; Sumiyama, K; Banno, F; Miyata, T; Matsuda, M

    2017-07-01

    Essentials Spatiotemporal regulation of protein kinases during thrombus formation remains elusive in vivo. Activities of protein kinases were live imaged in mouse platelets at laser-ablated arterioles. Protein kinase A was activated in the dislodging platelets at the downstream side of the thrombus. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase was activated at the core of contracting platelet aggregates. Background The dynamic features of thrombus formation have been visualized by conventional video widefield microscopy or confocal microscopy in live mice. However, owing to technical limitations, the precise spatiotemporal regulation of intracellular signaling molecule activities, which have been extensively studied in vitro, remains elusive in vivo. Objectives To visualize, by the use of two-photon excitation microscopy of transgenic mice expressing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase A (PKA), ERK and PKA activities during thrombus formation in laser-injured subcutaneous arterioles. Results When a core of densely packed platelets had developed, ERK activity was increased from the basal region close to the injured arterioles. PKA was activated at the downstream side of an unstable shell overlaying the core of platelets. Intravenous administration of a MEK inhibitor, PD0325901, suppressed platelet tethering and dislodged platelet aggregates, indicating that ERK activity is indispensable for both initiation and maintenance of the thrombus. A cAMP analog, dbcAMP, inhibited platelet tethering but failed to dislodge the preformed platelet aggregates, suggesting that PKA can antagonize thrombus formation only in the early phase. Conclusion In vivo imaging of transgenic mice expressing FRET biosensors will open a new opportunity to visualize the spatiotemporal changes in signaling molecule activities not only during thrombus formation but also in other hematologic disorders. © 2017 International

  17. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Low-fouling surface plasmon resonance biosensor for multi-step detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens in complex food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisocherová-Lísalová, Hana; Víšová, Ivana; Ermini, Maria Laura; Špringer, Tomáš; Song, Xue Chadtová; Mrázek, Jan; Lamačová, Josefína; Scott Lynn, N; Šedivák, Petr; Homola, Jiří

    2016-06-15

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illnesses have shown that foodborne bacterial pathogens present a significant threat to public health, resulting in an increased need for technologies capable of fast and reliable screening of food commodities. The optimal method of pathogen detection in foods should: (i) be rapid, specific, and sensitive; (ii) require minimum sample preparation; and (iii) be robust and cost-effective, thus enabling use in the field. Here we report the use of a SPR biosensor based on ultra-low fouling and functionalizable poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA) brushes for the rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens in crude food samples utilizing a three-step detection assay. We studied both the surface resistance to fouling and the functional capabilities of these brushes with respect to each step of the assay, namely: (I) incubation of the sensor with crude food samples, resulting in the capture of bacteria by antibodies immobilized to the pCBAA coating, (II) binding of secondary biotinylated antibody (Ab2) to previously captured bacteria, and (III) binding of streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles to the biotinylated Ab2 in order to enhance the sensor response. We also investigated the effects of the brush thickness on the biorecognition capabilities of the gold-grafted functionalized pCBAA coatings. We demonstrate that pCBAA-compared to standard low-fouling OEG-based alkanethiolate self-assemabled monolayers-exhibits superior surface resistance regarding both fouling from complex food samples as well as the non-specific binding of S-AuNPs. We further demonstrate that a SPR biosensor based on a pCBAA brush with a thickness as low as 20 nm was capable of detecting E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella sp. in complex hamburger and cucumber samples with extraordinary sensitivity and specificity. The limits of detection for the two bacteria in cucumber and hamburger extracts were determined to be 57 CFU/mL and 17 CFU/mL for E. coli and 7.4 × 10

  19. Nonconcentric triple-microring resonator for label-free on-chip sensing with high figure-of-merit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhanqiang; Zhang, Youkun; Yang, Min; Wei, Shixiu; Zhang, Meizhi; He, Fengtao

    2017-07-01

    A nonconcentric triple-microring resonator employing a silicon-on-insulator platform is proposed and analyzed for label-free sensing applications. The numerical simulations are carried out based on the finite-difference time-domain with perfectly matched layer boundary condition and transmission matrix methods. Its physical aspects and specific applications are highlighted. The results show that, in the optimized structure, a Q factor of 3.06×109 is achieved under weak coupling conditions. It is 3 orders of magnitude larger than that of a dual-ring resonator and 6 orders of magnitude larger than that of a single-ring resonator with lossless waveguide. In addition, to validate the proposed scheme, the designed ring resonator-based photonic sensor achieves refractive index sensing with resonance wavelength sensitivity of 101 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) and figure-of-merit of 11,211 RIU-1. Correspondingly, the detection limit of refractive index variation will be improved significantly compared with those of nonconcentric single-/dual-ring resonator and concentric triple-ring resonator. It is very useful for label-free on-chip biochemical sensing.

  20. A new technique to detect antibody-antigen reaction (biological interactions) on a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based nano ripple gold chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Iram; Widger, William; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate that the gold nano-ripple localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) chip is a low cost and a label-free method for detecting the presence of an antigen. A uniform stable layer of an antibody was coated on the surface of a nano-ripple gold pattern chip followed by the addition of different concentrations of the antigen. A red shift was observed in the LSPR spectral peak caused by the change in the local refractive index in the vicinity of the nanostructure. The LSPR chip was fabricated using oblique gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation. The plasmon-resonance intensity of the scattered light was measured by a simple optical spectroscope. The gold nano ripple chip shows monolayer scale sensitivity and high selectivity. The LSPR substrate was used to detect antibody-antigen reaction of rabbit X-DENTT antibody and DENTT blocking peptide (antigen).

  1. On-chip food safety monitoring: multi-analyte screening with imaging surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebe, S.

    2010-01-01

    Food safety is an increasing health concern, recognised and promoted by many institutions across the globe. Food products can be contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms, environmental pollutants, veterinary drug residues, allergens and toxins. Public health concerns which have been raised in

  2. A molecular imprinted SPR biosensor for sensitive determination of citrinin in red yeast rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Necip; Eren, Tanju; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi

    2015-10-01

    A novel and sensitive molecular imprinted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was developed for selective determination of citrinin (CIT) in red yeast rice. Firstly, the gold surface of SPR chip was modified with allyl mercaptane. Then, CIT-imprinted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methacryloylamidoglutamic acid) (p(HEMA-MAGA)) film was generated on the gold surface modified with allyl mercaptane. The unmodified and imprinted surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 0.005-1.0 ng/mL and 0.0017 ng/mL, respectively. The SPR biosensor was applied to determination of CIT in red yeast rice sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Refractive index-based detection of gradient elution liquid chromatography using chip-integrated microring resonator arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, James H; Bailey, Ryan C

    2014-01-07

    Refractive index-based sensors offer attractive characteristics as nondestructive and universal detectors for liquid chromatographic separations, but a small dynamic range and sensitivity to minor thermal perturbations limit the utility of commercial RI detectors for many potential applications, especially those requiring the use of gradient elutions. As such, RI detectors find use almost exclusively in sample abundant, isocratic separations when interfaced with high-performance liquid chromatography. Silicon photonic microring resonators are refractive index-sensitive optical devices that feature good sensitivity and tremendous dynamic range. The large dynamic range of microring resonators allows the sensors to function across a wide spectrum of refractive indices, such as that encountered when moving from an aqueous to organic mobile phase during a gradient elution, a key analytical advantage not supported in commercial RI detectors. Microrings are easily configured into sensor arrays, and chip-integrated control microrings enable real-time corrections of thermal drift. Thermal controls allow for analyses at any temperature and, in the absence of rigorous temperature control, obviates extended detector equilibration wait times. Herein, proof of concept isocratic and gradient elution separations were performed using well-characterized model analytes (e.g., caffeine, ibuprofen) in both neat buffer and more complex sample matrices. These experiments demonstrate the ability of microring arrays to perform isocratic and gradient elutions under ambient conditions, avoiding two major limitations of commercial RI-based detectors and maintaining comparable bulk RI sensitivity. Further benefit may be realized in the future through selective surface functionalization to impart degrees of postcolumn (bio)molecular specificity at the detection phase of a separation. The chip-based and microscale nature of microring resonators also make it an attractive potential detection

  4. A new technique to detect antibody-antigen reaction (biological interactions) on a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based nano ripple gold chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, Iram, E-mail: iiram.qau@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Widger, William, E-mail: widger@uh.edu [Department of Biology and Biochemistry and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Chu, Wei-Kan, E-mail: wkchu@uh.edu [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • The nano ripple LSPR chip has monolayer molecule-coating sensitivity and specific selectivity. • Gold nano-ripple sensing chip is a low cost, and a label-free method for detecting the antibody-antigen reaction. • The plasmonic resonance shift depends upon the concentration of the biomolecules attached on the surface of the nano ripple pattern. - Abstract: We demonstrate that the gold nano-ripple localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) chip is a low cost and a label-free method for detecting the presence of an antigen. A uniform stable layer of an antibody was coated on the surface of a nano-ripple gold pattern chip followed by the addition of different concentrations of the antigen. A red shift was observed in the LSPR spectral peak caused by the change in the local refractive index in the vicinity of the nanostructure. The LSPR chip was fabricated using oblique gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation. The plasmon-resonance intensity of the scattered light was measured by a simple optical spectroscope. The gold nano ripple chip shows monolayer scale sensitivity and high selectivity. The LSPR substrate was used to detect antibody-antigen reaction of rabbit X-DENTT antibody and DENTT blocking peptide (antigen).

  5. Studies of gold nanorod-iron oxide nanohybrids for immunoassay based on SPR biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Sun, Ying; Gao, Shang; Zhang, Hanqi; Zhang, Jia; Bai, Yu; Song, Daqian

    2014-07-01

    A wavelength modulation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on gold nanorods-Fe3O4 (GNR-Fe3O4) nanohybrids was developed for the determination of mouse IgG. The premade negatively charged Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated on the surface of positively charged GNRs through electrostatic interaction. The synthetic method was simple, quick and easy operation. The aldehyde group functionalized GNR-Fe3O4 nanohybrids possess unique magnetic property, exceptional optical property and good biocompatibility, which can be used as immobilization matrix for biomolecules. The magnetic nanohybrids can be easily immobilized on the surface of SPR biosensor chip with a magnetic pillar, which simplifies the experimental procedure. The effects of GNR-Fe3O4 nanohybrids on the sensitivity of SPR biosensor were also studied. The SPR biosensor based on GNR-Fe3O4 nanohybrids shows a good response to mouse IgG in the concentration range of 0.15-40.00 μg mL(-1), while the biosensor based on MPA and Fe3O4 nanoparticles show a good response to mouse IgG in the concentration range of 2.50-40.00 μg mL(-1) and 1.25-40.00 μg mL(-1), respectively. As a result, when GNR-Fe3O4 nanohybrids were used in SPR biosensor, the sensitivity for the determination of mouse IgG is significantly enhanced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of ProteinInteractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E..

    2005-08-03

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length.

  7. Introduction to biosensors from electric circuits to immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    This book equips students with a thorough understanding of various types of sensors and biosensors that can be used for chemical, biological, and biomedical applications, including but not limited to temperature sensors, strain sensor, light sensors, spectrophotometric sensors, pulse oximeter, optical fiber probes, fluorescence sensors, pH sensor, ion-selective electrodes, piezoelectric sensors, glucose sensors, DNA and immunosensors, lab-on-a-chip biosensors, paper-based lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and microcontroller-based sensors. The author treats the study of biosensors with an applications-based approach, including over 15 extensive, hands-on labs given at the end of each chapter. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors, and ending with more complicated biosensors. New to this second edition are sections on op-amp filters, pulse oximetry, meat quality monitoring, advanced fluorescent dyes, autofluorescence, various...

  8. Microwave bio-sensor based on symmetrical split ring resonator with spurline filters for therapeutic goods detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammah A Alahnomi

    Full Text Available A novel symmetrical split ring resonator (SSRR based microwave sensor with spurline filters for detecting and characterizing the properties of solid materials has been developed. Due to the weak perturbation in the interaction of material under test (MUT and planar microwave sensor, spurline filters were embedded to the SSRR microwave sensor which effectively enhanced Q-factor with suppressing the undesired harmonic frequency. The spurline filter structures force the presented sensor to resonate at a fundamental frequency of 2.2 GHz with the capabilities of suppressing rejected harmonic frequency and miniaturization in circuit size. A wide bandwidth rejection is achieved by using double spurlines filters with high Q-factor achievement (up to 652.94 compared to single spurline filter. The new SSRR sensor with spurline filters displayed desired properties such as high sensitivity, accuracy, and performance with a 1.3% typical percentage error in the measurement results. Furthermore, the sensor has been successfully applied for detecting and characterizing solid materials (such as Roger 5880, Roger 4350, and FR4 and evidently demonstrated that it can suppress the harmonic frequency effectively. This novel design with harmonic suppression is useful for various applications such as food industry (meat, fruit, vegetables, biological medicine (derived from proteins and other substances produced by the body, and Therapeutic goods (antiseptics, vitamins, anti-psychotics, and other medicines.

  9. Microwave bio-sensor based on symmetrical split ring resonator with spurline filters for therapeutic goods detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahnomi, Rammah A; Zakaria, Z; Ruslan, E; Ab Rashid, S R; Mohd Bahar, Amyrul Azuan; Shaaban, Azizah

    2017-01-01

    A novel symmetrical split ring resonator (SSRR) based microwave sensor with spurline filters for detecting and characterizing the properties of solid materials has been developed. Due to the weak perturbation in the interaction of material under test (MUT) and planar microwave sensor, spurline filters were embedded to the SSRR microwave sensor which effectively enhanced Q-factor with suppressing the undesired harmonic frequency. The spurline filter structures force the presented sensor to resonate at a fundamental frequency of 2.2 GHz with the capabilities of suppressing rejected harmonic frequency and miniaturization in circuit size. A wide bandwidth rejection is achieved by using double spurlines filters with high Q-factor achievement (up to 652.94) compared to single spurline filter. The new SSRR sensor with spurline filters displayed desired properties such as high sensitivity, accuracy, and performance with a 1.3% typical percentage error in the measurement results. Furthermore, the sensor has been successfully applied for detecting and characterizing solid materials (such as Roger 5880, Roger 4350, and FR4) and evidently demonstrated that it can suppress the harmonic frequency effectively. This novel design with harmonic suppression is useful for various applications such as food industry (meat, fruit, vegetables), biological medicine (derived from proteins and other substances produced by the body), and Therapeutic goods (antiseptics, vitamins, anti-psychotics, and other medicines).

  10. Simulation and fabrication of a new novel 3D injectable biosensor for high throughput genomics and proteomics in a lab-on-a-chip device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used for the detection of biochemical molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Traditional techniques, such as enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA), are sensitive but require several hours to yield a result and usually require the attachment of a fluorophore molecule to the target molecule. Micromachined biosensors that employ electrical detection are now being developed. Here we describe one such device, which is ultrasensitive, real-time, label free and localized. It is called the nanoneedle biosensor and shows promise to overcome some of the current limitations of biosensors. The key element of this device is a 10 nm wide annular gap at the end of the needle, which is the sensitive part of the sensor. The total diameter of the sensor is about 100 nm. Any change in the population of molecules in this gap results in a change of impedance across the gap. Single molecule detection should be possible because the sensory part of the sensor is in the range of bio-molecules of interest. To increase throughput we can flow the solution containing the target molecules over an array of such structures, each with its own integrated read-out circuitry to allow ‘real-time’ detection (i.e. several minutes) of label free molecules without sacrificing sensitivity. To fabricate the arrays we used electron beam lithography together with associated pattern transfer techniques. Preliminary measurements on individual needle structures in water are consistent with the design. Since the proposed sensor has a rigid nano-structure, this technology, once fully developed, could ultimately be used to directly monitor protein quantities within a single living cell, an application that would have significant utility for drug screening and studying various intracellular signaling pathways.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Biosensors for Exploring the Influence of Alkaloids on Aggregation of Amyloid-β Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the presented study was the development of a simple analytical tool for exploring the influence of naturally occurring compounds on the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ40 in order to find potential anti-neurodegenerative drugs. The gold discs used for surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements were modified with thioaliphatic acid. The surface functionalized with carboxylic groups was used for covalent attaching of Aβ40 probe by creation of amide bonds in the presence of EDC/NHS. The modified SPR gold discs were used for exploring the Aβ40 aggregation process in the presence of selected alkaloids: arecoline hydrobromide, pseudopelletierine hydrochloride, trigonelline hydrochloride and α-lobeline hydrochloride. The obtained results were discussed with other parameters which govern the phenomenon studied such as lipophilicity/ hydrophilicy and Aβ40-alkaloid association constants.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of gold nanocrown arrays on a gold film for a high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Munsik; Kim, Nak-hyeon; Eom, Seyoung [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woo [School of East–West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Kyung Min, E-mail: kmbyun@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyeong-Ho, E-mail: hyeongho.park@kanc.re.kr [Nano Process Division, Korea Advanced Nano Fab Center, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    We report on a versatile method to fabricate gold nanocrown arrays on a thin gold film based on ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography and tilted evaporation technique. We realize highly ordered 2-dimensional nanocrown arrays and characterize their sizes and morphologies using scanning electron microscopy. To demonstrate an enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection by the fabricated gold nanocrown samples, biosensing experiments are performed by measuring SPR angle shift for biotin–streptavidin interaction and bulk refractive index change of dielectric medium. We hope that the suggested plasmonic platform with a high sensitivity could be extended to a variety of biomolecular binding reactions. - Highlights: • Gold nanocrown arrays are produced by nanoimprint lithography and tilted evaporation. • Use of gold nanocrown arrays can improve the sensor sensitivity significantly. • Improved sensitivity is due to enhanced field–matter interaction at gold nanocrowns.

  13. Using Monoclonal Antibody to Determine Lead Ions with a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Fiber-optic Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mon-Fu Chung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reflection-based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR fiber-optic probe has been developed to determine the heavy metal lead ion concentration. Monoclonal antibody as the detecting probe containing massive amino groups to capture Pb(II-chelate complexes was immobilized onto gold nanoparticle-modified optical fiber (NMAuOF. The optimal immobilizing conditions of monoclonal antibody on to the NMAuOF are 189 μg/mL in pH7.4 PBS for 2 h at 25°C. The absorbability of the functionalized NMAuOF sensor increases to 12.2 % upon changing the Pb(II-EDTA level from 10 to 100 ppb with a detection limit of 0.27 ppb. The sensor retains 92.7 % of its original activity and gives reproducible results after storage in 5% D-( -Trehalose dehydrate solution at 4°C for 35 days. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibody-functionalized NMAuOF sensor shows a promising result for determining the concentration of Pb(II with high sensitivity.

  14. Measuring a Quantum Dot with an Impedance-Matching On-Chip Superconducting L C Resonator at Gigahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harabula, M.-C.; Hasler, T.; Fülöp, G.; Jung, M.; Ranjan, V.; Schönenberger, C.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the realization of a bonded-bridge on-chip superconducting coil and its use in impedance matching a highly ohmic quantum dot (QD) to a 3-GHz measurement setup. The coil, modeled as a lumped-element L C resonator, is more compact and has a wider bandwidth than resonators based on coplanar transmission lines (e.g., λ /4 impedance transformers and stub tuners), at potentially better signal-to-noise ratios. Specifically, for measurements of radiation emitted by the device, such as shot noise, the 50 ×-larger bandwidth reduces the time to acquire the spectral density. The resonance frequency, close to 3.25 GHz, is 3 times higher than that of the one previously reported, a wire-bonded coil. As a proof of principle, we fabricate an L C circuit that achieves impedance matching to an approximately 15 -k Ω load and validate it with a load defined by a carbon nanotube QD, whose shot noise we measure in the Coulomb-blockade regime.

  15. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones.

  16. Multifunctional all-dielectric nano-optical systems using collective multipole Mie resonances: Towards on-chip integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, Swarnabha

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the optical response of a class of on-chip integrated nano-photonic systems comprising all-dielectric building block based multifunctional light manipulating units (LMU) integrated with quantum dot (QD) light sources. The multiple functions (such as focusing excitation light, QD emission rate enhancement, photon guidance, and lossless propagation) are simultaneously realized using the collective Mie resonances of dipole and higher order multipole modes of the dielectric building blocks (DBBs) constituting a single structural unit, the LMU. Using analytical formulation based on Mie theory we demonstrate enhancement of the excitation light simultaneously with the guiding and propagation of the emitted light from a QD emitter integrated with the DBB based LMU. The QD-DBB integrated structures can serve as the basic element for building nano-optical active circuits for optical information processing in both classical and quantum realms.

  17. Emission and absorption quantum noise measurement with an on-chip resonant circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, J; Bouchiat, H; Deblock, R

    2010-10-15

    Using a quantum detector, a superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction, we probe separately the emission and absorption noise in the quantum regime of a superconducting resonant circuit at equilibrium. At low temperature the resonant circuit exhibits only absorption noise related to zero point fluctuations, whereas at higher temperature emission noise is also present. By coupling a Josephson junction, biased above the superconducting gap, to the same resonant circuit, we directly measure the noise power of quasiparticles tunneling through the junction at two resonance frequencies. It exhibits a strong frequency dependence, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  18. Compact on-Chip Temperature Sensors Based on Dielectric-Loaded Plasmonic Waveguide-Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of a waveguide-ring resonator based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides as a temperature sensor is demonstrated in this paper and the influence of temperature change to the transmission through the waveguide-ring resonator system is comprehensively analyzed. The results show that the roundtrip phase change in the ring resonator due to the temperature change is the major reason for the transmission variation. The performance of the temperature sensor is also discussed and it is shown that for a waveguide-ring resonator with the resonator radius around 5 mm and waveguide-ring gap of 500 nm which gives a footprint around 140 µm2, the temperature sensitivity at the order of 10−2 K can be achieved with the input power of 100 mW within the measurement sensitivity limit of a practical optical detector.

  19. The smallest resonator arrays in atmosphere by chip-size-grown nanowires with tunable Q-factor and frequency for subnanometer thickness detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengming; Tang, Chaolong; Song, Jinhui

    2015-02-11

    A chip-size vertically aligned nanowire (NW) resonator arrays (VNRs) device has been fabricated with simple one-step lithography process by using grown self-assembled zinc oxide (ZnO) NW arrays. VNR has cantilever diameter of 50 nm, which breakthroughs smallest resonator record (>100 nm) functioning in atmosphere. A new atomic displacement sensing method by using atomic force microscopy is developed to effectively identify the resonance of NW resonator with diameter 50 nm in atmosphere. Size-effect and half-dimensional properties of the NW resonator have been systematically studied. Additionally, VNR has been demonstrated with the ability of detecting nanofilm thickness with subnanometer (<10(-9)m) resolution.

  20. Application of Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance for ABO Blood Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanida Tangkawsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a long-range surface plasmon resonance (LR-SPR biosensor for the detection of whole cell by captured antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs as a model. The LR-SPR sensor chip consists of high-refractive index glass, a Cytop film layer, and a thin gold (Au film, which makes the evanescent field intensity and the penetration depth longer than conventional SPR. Therefore, the LR-SPR biosensor has improved capability for detecting large analytes, such as RBCs. The antibodies specific to blood group A and group B (Anti-A and Anti-B are covalently immobilized on a grafting self-assembled monolayer (SAM/Au surface on the biosensor. For blood typing, RBC samples can be detected by the LR-SPR biosensor through a change in the refractive index. We determined that the results of blood typing using the LR-SPR biosensor are consistent with the results obtained from the agglutination test. We obtained the lowest detection limits of 1.58 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-A and 3.83 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-B, indicating that the LR-SPR chip has a higher sensitivity than conventional SPR biosensors (3.3 × 108 cells/ml. The surface of the biosensor can be efficiently regenerated using 20 mM NaOH. In summary, as the LR-SPR technique is sensitive and has a simple experimental setup, it can easily be applied for ABO blood group typing.

  1. ICP polishing of silicon for high quality optical resonators on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Laliotis, A; Cotter, J P; Lewis, G; Kraft, M; Hinds, E A

    2012-01-01

    Miniature concave hollows, made by wet etching silicon through a circular mask, can be used as mirror substrates for building optical micro-cavities on a chip. In this paper we investigate how ICP polishing improves both shape and roughness of the mirror substrates. We characterise the evolution of the surfaces during the ICP polishing using white-light optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy. A surface roughness of 1 nm is reached, which reduces to 0.5 nm after coating with a high reflectivity dielectric. With such smooth mirrors, the optical cavity finesse is now limited by the shape of the underlying mirror.

  2. Development of an RNA-based theophylline-specific microarray biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine M.

    We are developing an extremely sensitive and compact biosensor that is adaptable to a variety of target analytes. Hammerhead ribozymes have been engineered such that they rearrange from a catalytically inactive to an active conformation upon binding to a target molecule. A donor-acceptor fluorophore pair is coupled to the substrate RNA of such an aptamer, to form a complex referred to as an aptazyme, to monitor real-time cleavage activity in a fluid environment. The fluorophores interact by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) until binding of the target molecule, when the FRET signal breaks down as the substrate is cleaved and the products dissociate. FRET assays with immobilized aptazymes and using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy on the single-molecule scale are presented showing an enhancement of substrate cleavage in the presence of theophylline over background. The aptazyme is hybridized onto a DNA microarray and incorporated into a chip specifically designed to allow for measurement in a controlled fluid environment. The use of these microarrays allows for either one spot, or a series of spots, to be addressed independently within the biosensor. This allows for multiple analytes to be tested simultaneously. An enhancement in the substrate cleavage is again observed in the presence of theophylline. Results are presented toward the characterization of a theophylline-specific aptamer-based biosensor using this RNA microarray platform and analogous measurement techniques.

  3. Cantilever-Based Microwave Biosensors: Analysis, Designs and Optimizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Jónasson, Sævar Þór

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel microwave readout scheme for measuring deflection of cantilevers in nanometer range. The cantilever deflection can be sensed by the variation of transmission levels or resonant frequencies of microwave signals. The sensitivity of the cantilever biosensor based on LC...... resonators is at first theoretically analyzed. A LC resonator based biosensor with beams is designed and optimized by using 3D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, where the beam is a typical variation of cantilevers. The sensitivity of the lossless biosensor is predicted as 4.6MHz/nm. The 3-dB bandwidths...... of the resonances are narrowed for improving the resolution of distinguishing resonances by reducing conductive loss of electrodes. The lossy biosensor can achieve the highest sensitivity as 5.6 MHz/nm and narrowest 3-dB bandwidth as 5 GHz....

  4. On-chip beamsplitter operation on single photons from quasi-resonantly excited quantum dots embedded in GaAs rib waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengstl, U.; Schwartz, M.; Herzog, T.; Hargart, F.; Paul, M.; Portalupi, S. L.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P., E-mail: p.michler@ihfg.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflächen and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-07-13

    We present an on-chip beamsplitter operating on a single-photon level by means of a quasi-resonantly driven InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot. The single photons are guided by rib waveguides and split into two arms by an evanescent field coupler. Although the waveguides themselves support the fundamental TE and TM modes, the measured degree of polarization (∼90%) reveals the main excitation and propagation of the TE mode. We observe the preserved single-photon nature of a quasi-resonantly excited quantum dot by performing a cross-correlation measurement on the two output arms of the beamsplitter. Additionally, the same quantum dot is investigated under resonant excitation, where the same splitting ratio is observed. An autocorrelation measurement with an off-chip beamsplitter on a single output arm reveal the single-photon nature after evanescent coupling inside the on-chip splitter. Due to their robustness, adjustable splitting ratio, and their easy implementation, rib waveguide beamsplitters with embedded quantum dots provide a promising step towards fully integrated quantum circuits.

  5. Selective in situ functionalization of biosensors on LOC devices using laminar co-flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parra-Cabrera, C.; Sporer, C.; Rodriguez-Villareal, I.

    2012-01-01

    Many applications involving lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices are prevented from entering the market because of difficulties to achieve mass production and impart suitable properties allowing long-term storage. To integrate biosensors on these microfluidic chips, one of the main restrictions is the fab......Many applications involving lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices are prevented from entering the market because of difficulties to achieve mass production and impart suitable properties allowing long-term storage. To integrate biosensors on these microfluidic chips, one of the main restrictions...

  6. Optimal Design of Silicon-based Chips for Piezo-induced Ultrasound Resonances in Embedded Microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garofalo, F.; Laurell, T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    .e. the lateral motion of particle dragged by the axial main flow, is particularly strong. Finally, the connection between the mechanical and electrical degrees of freedom of the system is addressed. This is important for proper determination of the dissipated power, and it may lead to the detection of resonance...

  7. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors.......Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes...

  8. Invited Article: Electrically tunable silicon-based on-chip microdisk resonator for integrated microwave photonic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics with advantages of small footprint, compatibility with the mature CMOS fabrication technology, and its potential for seamless integration with electronics is making a significant difference in realizing on-chip integration of photonic systems. A microdisk resonator (MDR with a strong capacity in trapping and storing photons is a versatile element in photonic integrated circuits. Thanks to the large index contrast, a silicon-based MDR with an ultra-compact footprint has a great potential for large-scale and high-density integrations. However, the existence of multiple whispering gallery modes (WGMs and resonance splitting in an MDR imposes inherent limitations on its widespread applications. In addition, the waveguide structure of an MDR is incompatible with that of a lateral PN junction, which leads to the deprivation of its electrical tunability. To circumvent these limitations, in this paper we propose a novel design of a silicon-based MDR by introducing a specifically designed slab waveguide to surround the disk and the lateral sides of the bus waveguide to suppress higher-order WGMs and to support the incorporation of a lateral PN junction for electrical tunability. An MDR based on the proposed design is fabricated and its optical performance is evaluated. The fabricated MDR exhibits single-mode operation with a free spectral range of 28.85 nm. Its electrical tunability is also demonstrated and an electro-optic frequency response with a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of ∼30.5 GHz is measured. The use of the fabricated MDR for the implementation of an electrically tunable optical delay-line and a tunable fractional-order temporal photonic differentiator is demonstrated.

  9. Invited Article: Electrically tunable silicon-based on-chip microdisk resonator for integrated microwave photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Silicon photonics with advantages of small footprint, compatibility with the mature CMOS fabrication technology, and its potential for seamless integration with electronics is making a significant difference in realizing on-chip integration of photonic systems. A microdisk resonator (MDR) with a strong capacity in trapping and storing photons is a versatile element in photonic integrated circuits. Thanks to the large index contrast, a silicon-based MDR with an ultra-compact footprint has a great potential for large-scale and high-density integrations. However, the existence of multiple whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and resonance splitting in an MDR imposes inherent limitations on its widespread applications. In addition, the waveguide structure of an MDR is incompatible with that of a lateral PN junction, which leads to the deprivation of its electrical tunability. To circumvent these limitations, in this paper we propose a novel design of a silicon-based MDR by introducing a specifically designed slab waveguide to surround the disk and the lateral sides of the bus waveguide to suppress higher-order WGMs and to support the incorporation of a lateral PN junction for electrical tunability. An MDR based on the proposed design is fabricated and its optical performance is evaluated. The fabricated MDR exhibits single-mode operation with a free spectral range of 28.85 nm. Its electrical tunability is also demonstrated and an electro-optic frequency response with a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of ˜30.5 GHz is measured. The use of the fabricated MDR for the implementation of an electrically tunable optical delay-line and a tunable fractional-order temporal photonic differentiator is demonstrated.

  10. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhathan, P., E-mail: PPrabhathan@ntu.edu.sg; Murukeshan, V. M. [Centre for Optical and Laser Engineering (COLE), School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-09-15

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ∼60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  11. Detection of amyloid-β42 using a waveguide-coupled bimetallic surface plasmon resonance sensor chip in the intensity measurement mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Kyung; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Won Mok; Sohn, Young-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The waveguide-coupled bimetallic (WcBiM) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip had been utilized in the intensity interrogation detection mode to detect amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), a biomarker of the Alzheimer disease. The SPR reflectance curve of the WcBiM chip has the narrower full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) compared with the SPR reflectance curve of the conventional gold (Au) chip, resulting in the steeper gradient. For the enhancement of resolution, the light source was fixed at an angle where the slope of the reflectance curve is the steepest, and the change in the reflectance was monitored. For the detection of Aβ42, the antibody of Aβ42 (anti-Aβ42) was immobilized on the WcBiM SPR chip using the self-assembled monolayer. The SPR responses, the average changes in the reflectance to the Aβ42 at the concentrations of 100 pg/ml, 250 pg/ml, 500 pg/ml, 750 pg/ml, 1,000 pg/ml, and 2,000 pg/ml were 0.0111%, 0.0305%, 0.0867%, 0.1712%, 0.3021%, and 0.5577%, respectively, for the three replicates. From linear regression analysis, the calibration curve indicated that the SPR response had a linear relation with Aβ42 with the concentration in the range of 100 pg/ml to 2,000 pg/ml. A control experiment showed the anti-Aβ42-modified surface of the WcBiM chip had a high specificity to Aβ42. Thus, the enhanced resolution by utilizing the WcBiM SPR chip in the intensity interrogation detection mode aids the diagnosis of the Alzheimer disease by detecting the Aβ42 around the criteria concentration (500 pg/ml) without any labeling.

  12. Detection of amyloid-β42 using a waveguide-coupled bimetallic surface plasmon resonance sensor chip in the intensity measurement mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available The waveguide-coupled bimetallic (WcBiM surface plasmon resonance (SPR chip had been utilized in the intensity interrogation detection mode to detect amyloid-β42 (Aβ42, a biomarker of the Alzheimer disease. The SPR reflectance curve of the WcBiM chip has the narrower full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM compared with the SPR reflectance curve of the conventional gold (Au chip, resulting in the steeper gradient. For the enhancement of resolution, the light source was fixed at an angle where the slope of the reflectance curve is the steepest, and the change in the reflectance was monitored. For the detection of Aβ42, the antibody of Aβ42 (anti-Aβ42 was immobilized on the WcBiM SPR chip using the self-assembled monolayer. The SPR responses, the average changes in the reflectance to the Aβ42 at the concentrations of 100 pg/ml, 250 pg/ml, 500 pg/ml, 750 pg/ml, 1,000 pg/ml, and 2,000 pg/ml were 0.0111%, 0.0305%, 0.0867%, 0.1712%, 0.3021%, and 0.5577%, respectively, for the three replicates. From linear regression analysis, the calibration curve indicated that the SPR response had a linear relation with Aβ42 with the concentration in the range of 100 pg/ml to 2,000 pg/ml. A control experiment showed the anti-Aβ42-modified surface of the WcBiM chip had a high specificity to Aβ42. Thus, the enhanced resolution by utilizing the WcBiM SPR chip in the intensity interrogation detection mode aids the diagnosis of the Alzheimer disease by detecting the Aβ42 around the criteria concentration (500 pg/ml without any labeling.

  13. Development of FRET biosensors for mammalian and plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, D.; van Voorst Vader, L.; Borst, J.W.; Goedhart, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors are increasingly used in visualising signalling processes in different organisms. Sensors based on green fluorescent protein technology are providing a great opportunity for using Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a tool that allows for monitoring dynamic

  14. PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WAVEGUIDE BIOSENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. ZANISHEVSKAYA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The hollow core photonic crystal waveguide biosensor is designed and described. The biosensor was tested in experiments for artificial sweetener identification in drinks. The photonic crystal waveguide biosensor has a high sensitivity to the optical properties of liquids filling up the hollow core. The compactness, good integration ability to different optical systems and compatibility for use in industrial settings make such biosensor very promising for various biomedical applications.

  15. Deep-probe metal-clad waveguide biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Horvath, Robert; Thinggaard, S.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of metal-clad waveguide biosensors, so-called dip-type and peak-type, are analyzed and tested. Their performances are benchmarked against the well-known surface-plasmon resonance biosensor, showing improved probe characteristics for adlayer thicknesses above 150-200 nm. The dip-type metal......-clad waveguide sensor is shown to be the best all-round alternative to the surface-plasmon resonance biosensor. Both metal-clad waveguides are tested experimentally for cell detection, showing a detection linut of 8-9 cells/mm(2). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. High efficiency on-chip Dielectric Resonator Antennna using micromachining technology

    KAUST Repository

    Sallam, Mai O.

    2015-10-26

    In this paper, a novel cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA) operating at 60 GHz is introduced. The antenna is fabricated using a high-resistivity silicon wafer. The DR is defined in the wafer using micromachining technology. The feeding network is located at the other side of the wafer. The proposed antenna is simulated using HFSS and the results are verified by measurements. The antenna radiation is mainly along the broadside direction. The measured gain, radiation efficiency, and bandwidth are 7 dBi, 74.65%, and 2.23 GHz respectively. The antenna is characterized by high polarization purity where the maximum cross-polarization is -15 dB. © 2015 IEEE.

  17. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Handheld highly selective plasmonic chem/biosensor using engineered binding proteins for extreme conformational changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciolek, Derek J.; Sonar, Ajay; Lepak, Lori A.; Schnatz, Peter; Bendoym, Igor; Brown, Mia C.; Koder, Ronald L.; Crouse, David T.

    2017-08-01

    In this project we develop a handheld, portable, highly selective and sensitive chem/biosensor that has potential applications in both airborne and water-based environmental sensing. The device relies on a plasmonic chip of subwavelength-scale periodic gold rods engineered to resonate in the near infrared. The chip is functionalized with a novel class of proteins that exhibit large conformational changes upon binding to a specific target analyte. The subsequent change in local refractive index near the surface of the gold is one to two orders of magnitude greater than current conventional methods, which produces a readily measurable 5 to 10 percent difference in light transmission. This allows us to forgo traditional, bulky tabletop setups in favor of a compact form factor. Using commercially available optics to construct a transmission-based optical train, measured changes in bulk refractive index are presented here. While synthesis of binding protein efforts are focused on heme as analyte for proof of concept validation, the functionalized protein can be engineered to pair with a wide variety of analytes with minimal alterations to the plasmonic chip or device design. Such flexibility allows for this device to potentially meet the needs of first responders and health care professionals in a multitude of scenarios.

  19. Optimization of Sensitivity and Stability of Gold/Silver bi-Layer Thin Films Used in Surface Plasmon Resonance Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanpour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is experimental assay of sensitivity and stability of a bimetallic silver/gold SPR sensor chip. This chip utilizes the sensitivity of the silver and the stability of the gold. Moreover, the Silver layer (instead of usual Cr or Ti layer was used as an adhesive intermediate layer between the Gold layer and the glass substrate. The optimization of the Gold/Silver thickness using SPR analysis and physical and chemical stability tests showed that the 20/30 gold/silver composite resulting in a better precision and more stable SPR sensing chip.

  20. Nanostructure-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špašková, Barbora; Lynn, Nicholas S.; Slabý, Jiří Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    There remains a need for the multiplexed detection of biomolecules at extremely low concentrations in fields of medical diagnostics, food safety, and security. Surface plasmon resonance imaging is an established biosensing approach in which the measurement of the intensity of light across a sensor chip is correlated with the amount of target biomolecules captured by the respective areas on the chip. In this work, we present a new approach for this method allowing for enhanced bioanalytical performance via the introduction of nanostructured sensing chip and polarization contrast measurement, which enable the exploitation of both amplitude and phase properties of plasmonic resonances on the nanostructures. Here we will discuss a complex theoretical analysis of the sensor performance, whereby we investigate aspects related to both the optical performance as well as the transport of the analyte molecules to the functionalized surfaces. This analysis accounts for the geometrical parameters of the nanostructured sensing surface, the properties of functional coatings, and parameters related to the detection assay. Based on the results of the theoretical analysis, we fabricated sensing chips comprised of arrays of gold nanoparticles (by electron-beam lithography), which were modified by a biofunctional coating to allow for the selective capturing of the target biomolecules in the regions with high sensitivity. In addition, we developed a compact optical reader with an integrated microfluidic cell, allowing for the measurement from 50 independent sensing channels. The performance of this biosensor is demonstrated through the sensitive detection of short oligonucleotides down to the low picomolar level.

  1. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  2. Chip, Chip, Hooray!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science laboratory using different brands of potato chips in which students test their oiliness, size, thickness, saltiness, quality, and cost, then analyze the results to determine the best chip. Gives a brief history of potato chips. (YDS)

  3. Biosensors and bioelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Karunakaran, Chandran; Benjamin, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics presents the rapidly evolving methodologies that are relevant to biosensors and bioelectronics fabrication and characterization. The book provides a comprehensive understanding of biosensor functionality, and is an interdisciplinary reference that includes a range of interwoven contributing subjects, including electrochemistry, nanoparticles, and conducting polymers. Authored by a team of bioinstrumentation experts, this book serves as a blueprint for performing advanced fabrication and characterization of sensor systems-arming readers with an application-based re

  4. Microcontroller based closed-loop control of a 2D quasi-static/resonant microscanner with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroedter, Richard; Schwarzenberg, Markus; Dreyhaupt, André; Barth, Robert; Sandner, Thilo; Janschek, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present a 2D raster scanning quasi-static/resonant micro mirror being controlled in both axes in closed-loop with on-chip piezo-resistive sensor feedback. While the resonant axis oscillates with a given frequency, the quasi-static axis allows static as well as dynamic deflection up to its eigenfrequency because of its staggered vertical comb (SVC) drive arrangement. Due to the high quality factor of the very low damped spring-masssystem, an adapted trajectory planning using jerk limitation is applied for the quasi-static axis [1]. Nevertheless, inaccuracies of the applied nonlinear micro mirror model and external disturbances lead to undesired residual oscillation in open-loop control mode. To achieve high precise and fast beam positioning, we implement a flatness-based control algorithm with feedback to on-chip piezo-resistive deflection sensors. In comparison to previous work [2, 3], we developed a micro controller setup for driving the microscanner, that is equipped with an analog Bessel filter increasing the sensor signal quality significantly. In this study we demonstrate a small size and low power micro mirror driver including high-voltage generation and a microcontroller for real-time control as well as a head circuit board for high resolution sensing. We discuss experimental results of open-loop and closed-loop control for 2D raster scanning operation. Finally, the outlook is given to the intrinsic capability to compensate temperature drifts influencing the piezo-resistive sensor signal.

  5. Thin Hydrogel Films for Optical Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateescu, Anca; Wang, Yi; Dostalek, Jakub; Jonas, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic, while providing high optical quality and transparency. The present review focuses on some of the most interesting aspects of surface-attached hydrogel films as active binding matrices in optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy. In particular, the chemical nature, specific properties, and applications of such hydrogel surface architectures for highly sensitive affinity biosensors based on evanescent wave optics are discussed. The specific class of responsive hydrogel systems, which can change their physical state in response to externally applied stimuli, have found large interest as sophisticated materials that provide a complex behavior to hydrogel-based sensing devices. PMID:24957962

  6. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...... of the book: how connotations of past meanings may resonate through time, in new contexts, assuming new meanings without surrendering the old....

  7. Acousto-plasmofluidics: Acoustic modulation of surface plasmon resonance in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Daniel; Peng, Xiaolei; Ozcelik, Adem; Zheng, Yuebing; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-09-01

    We acoustically modulated the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of metal nanostructures integrated within microfluidic systems. An acoustically driven micromixing device based on bubble microstreaming quickly and homogeneously mixes multiple laminar flows of different refractive indices. The altered refractive index of the mixed fluids enables rapid modulation of the LSPRs of gold nanodisk arrays embedded within the microfluidic channel. The device features fast response for dynamic operation, and the refractive index within the channel is tailorable. With these unique features, our "acousto-plasmofluidic" device can be useful in applications such as optical switches, modulators, filters, biosensors, and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  8. Direct measurements of oscillatory glycolysis in pancreatic islet β-cells using novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors for pyruvate kinase M2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrins, Matthew J; Van Dyke, Aaron R; Mapp, Anna K; Rizzo, Mark A; Satin, Leslie S

    2013-11-15

    Pulses of insulin released from pancreatic β-cells maintain blood glucose in a narrow range, although the source of these pulses is unclear. We and others have proposed that positive feedback mediated by the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1) enables β-cells to generate metabolic oscillations via autocatalytic activation by its product fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Although much indirect evidence has accumulated in favor of this hypothesis, a direct measurement of oscillating glycolytic intermediates has been lacking. To probe glycolysis directly, we engineered a family of inter- and intramolecular FRET biosensors based on the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKAR; pyruvate kinase activity reporter), which multimerizes and is activated upon binding FBP. When introduced into Min6 β-cells, PKAR FRET efficiency increased rapidly in response to glucose. Importantly, however, metabolites entering downstream of PFK1 (glyceraldehyde, pyruvate, and ketoisocaproate) failed to activate PKAR, consistent with sensor activation by FBP; the dependence of PKAR on FBP was further confirmed using purified sensor in vitro. Using a novel imaging modality for monitoring mitochondrial flavin fluorescence in mouse islets, we show that slow oscillations in mitochondrial redox potential stimulated by 10 mm glucose are in phase with glycolytic efflux through PKM2, measured simultaneously from neighboring islet β-cells expressing PKAR. These results indicate that PKM2 activity in β-cells is oscillatory and are consistent with pulsatile PFK1 being the mediator of slow glycolytic oscillations.

  9. Direct Measurements of Oscillatory Glycolysis in Pancreatic Islet β-Cells Using Novel Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Biosensors for Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activity*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrins, Matthew J.; Van Dyke, Aaron R.; Mapp, Anna K.; Rizzo, Mark A.; Satin, Leslie S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulses of insulin released from pancreatic β-cells maintain blood glucose in a narrow range, although the source of these pulses is unclear. We and others have proposed that positive feedback mediated by the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1) enables β-cells to generate metabolic oscillations via autocatalytic activation by its product fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Although much indirect evidence has accumulated in favor of this hypothesis, a direct measurement of oscillating glycolytic intermediates has been lacking. To probe glycolysis directly, we engineered a family of inter- and intramolecular FRET biosensors based on the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 (PKAR; pyruvate kinase activity reporter), which multimerizes and is activated upon binding FBP. When introduced into Min6 β-cells, PKAR FRET efficiency increased rapidly in response to glucose. Importantly, however, metabolites entering downstream of PFK1 (glyceraldehyde, pyruvate, and ketoisocaproate) failed to activate PKAR, consistent with sensor activation by FBP; the dependence of PKAR on FBP was further confirmed using purified sensor in vitro. Using a novel imaging modality for monitoring mitochondrial flavin fluorescence in mouse islets, we show that slow oscillations in mitochondrial redox potential stimulated by 10 mm glucose are in phase with glycolytic efflux through PKM2, measured simultaneously from neighboring islet β-cells expressing PKAR. These results indicate that PKM2 activity in β-cells is oscillatory and are consistent with pulsatile PFK1 being the mediator of slow glycolytic oscillations. PMID:24100037

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  11. Impedimetric Biosensors and Immunosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamas I. Prodromidis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods targeting the direct monitoring of antibody-antigen interactions is particularly attractive. The design of label-free affinity-based probing concepts is the objective of much current research, at both academic and industrial levels, towards establishing alternative methods to the already existing ELISA-based immunoassays. Among these, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS represents one of the most powerful methods, due to the ability of EIS-based sensors to be more easily integrated into multi-array or microprocessor- controlled diagnostic tools. During the last decade, EIS and the concept of biochemical capacitors have been widely used for probing various types of biomolecular interactions (immunosensors, DNA hybridization, protein-protein interactions. So far, impedimetric or capacitive immunosensors have been successfully applied at the academic level. However, no prototypes have been released into the market, since major fundamental issues still exist. Even though this fact has brought the reliability of impedimetric immunosensors into question, features associated with electrochemical approaches, namely the ability to be miniaturized, remote control of implanted sensors, low cost of electrode mass production, and cost effective instrumentation (without need of high-energy sources keep impedimetric sensors particularly attractive as compared to other approaches based on microbalances, surface plasmon resonance or ellipsometry. This lecture outlines the theoretical background of impedimetric immunosensors and presents different types of impedimetric biosensors as well as the instrumental approaches that have been so far proposed in the literature.

  12. Lateral field excitation (LFE) of thickness shear mode (TSM) acoustic waves in thin film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) as a potential biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickherber, Anthony; Corso, Christopher D; Hunt, William

    2006-01-01

    Lateral field excitation (LFE) of a thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is an ideal platform for biomedical sensors. A thickness shear mode (TSM) acoustic wave in a piezoelectric thin film is desirable for probing liquid samples because of the poor coupling of shear waves into the liquid. The resonator becomes an effective sensor by coating the surface with a bio- or chemi-specific layer. Perturbations of the surface can be detected by monitoring the resonance condition. Furthermore, FBARs can be easily fabricated to operate at higher frequencies, yielding greater sensitivity. An array of sensors offers the possibility of redundancy, allowing for statistical decision making as well as immediate corroboration of results. Array structures also offer the possibility of signature detection, by monitoring multiple targets in a sample simultaneously. This technology has immediate application to cancer and infectious disease diagnostics and also could serve as a tool for general proteomic research.

  13. Sense and sensitivity in bioprocessing-detecting cellular metabolites with biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Linda; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-10-01

    Biosensors use biological elements to detect or quantify an analyte of interest. In bioprocessing, biosensors are employed to monitor key metabolites. There are two main types: fully biological systems or biological recognition coupled with physical/chemical detection. New developments in chemical biosensors include multiplexed detection using microfluidics. Synthetic biology can be used to engineer new biological biosensors with improved characteristics. Although there have been few biosensors developed for bioprocessing thus far, emerging trends can be applied in the future. A range of new platform technologies will enable rapid engineering of new biosensors based on transcriptional activation, riboswitches, and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. However, translation to industry remains a challenge and more research into the robustness biosensors at scale is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-Invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Ye

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial and temporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamics with spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation. Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a new dimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors including resonant waveguide grating (RWG) biosensor manifest a physiologica...

  15. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  16. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  17. Zwitterionic polymer-modified silicon microring resonators for label-free biosensing in undiluted human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, James T.; Brault, Norman D.; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Jiang, Shaoyi; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    A widely acknowledged goal in personalized medicine is to radically reduce the costs of highly parallelized, small fluid volume, point-of-care and home-based diagnostics. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon photonic circuits for biosensing, with the promise of producing chip-scale integrated devices containing thousands of orthogonal sensors, at minimal cost on a per-chip basis. A central challenge in biosensor translation is to engineer devices that are both sensitive and specific to a target analyte within unprocessed biological fluids. Despite advances in the sensitivity of silicon photonic biosensors, poor biological specificity at the sensor surface remains a significant factor limiting assay performance in complex media (i.e. whole blood, plasma, serum) due to the non-specific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. Here, we chemically modify the surface of silicon microring resonator biosensors for the label-free detection of an analyte in undiluted human plasma. This work highlights the first application of a non-fouling zwitterionic surface coating to enable silicon photonic-based label-free detection of a protein analyte at clinically relevant sensitivities in undiluted human plasma. PMID:23202337

  18. Structural shimming for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Herbert; Smith, Alison; Utz, Marcel

    2014-05-21

    High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy is well-established as a tool for metabolomic analysis of biological fluids at the macro scale. Its full potential has, however, not been realised yet in the context of microfluidic devices. While microfabricated NMR detectors offer substantial gains in sensitivity, limited spectral resolution resulting from mismatches in the magnetic susceptibility of the sample fluid and the chip material remains a major hurdle. In this contribution, we show that susceptibility broadening can be avoided even in the presence of substantial mismatch by including suitably shaped compensation structures into the chip design. An efficient algorithm for the calculation of field maps from arbitrary chip layouts based on Gaussian quadrature is used to optimise the shape of the compensation structure to ensure a flat field distribution inside the sample area. Previously, the complexity of microfluidic NMR systems has been restricted to simple capillaries to avoid susceptibility broadening. The structural shimming approach introduced here can be adapted to virtually any shape of sample chamber and surrounding fluidic network, thereby greatly expanding the design space and enabling true lab-on-a-chip systems suitable for high-resolution NMR detection.

  19. QCM Biosensor Based on Polydopamine Surface for Real-Time Analysis of the Binding Kinetics of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensor based on polydopamine (PDA surface was developed for real-time analysis of the binding kinetics of protein-protein interactions. The biosensor was fabricated by simply immersing the gold sensor chip into an aqueous dopamine solution at pH 8.5 leading to a spontaneous deposition of PDA film onto the sensor chip surface, which was followed by incubation with the protein to immobilize it onto the PDA-coated sensor chip surface via Michael addition and/or Schiff base reactions. In this paper, the interaction between monoclonal anti-myoglobin 7005 antibody (IgG1 and its antigen human cardiac myoglobin was used as a model system for real-time analysis of biomolecule interactions on the biosensor surface. The kinetic parameters of the interaction between anti-myoglobin 7005 and myoglobin were studied on the biosensor surface, which were consistent with the results obtained via amine coupling. The biosensor based on PDA surface has excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and specificity. Compared with the most frequently/typically used amine coupling method for immobilization of proteins on carboxylated substrates, the modification methodology presented in this paper is simple, mild and is not subjected to the limitations of the isoelectric point (pI of the protein. In addition, the PDA biosensor chip can be easily reused, which makes QCM biosensor analysis more efficient and cost effective.

  20. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a mani- festation of an intrinsic property of the nucleus, i.e. nuclear spin angular momen- tum. Spin angular momentum gives rise to magnetic moments. Thus, nuclei that pos- sess net magnetic moments behave like very small bar magnets. NMR spectroscopy in- volves the study of the ...

  1. Introduction to biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  2. Engineering the bioelectrochemical interface using functional nanomaterials and microchip technique toward sensitive and portable electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofang; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2016-02-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have played active roles at the forefront of bioanalysis because they have the potential to achieve sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and many others. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with functional nanomaterials leads to novel electrochemical biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and simplicity. Functional nanomaterials possess good conductivity, catalytic activity, biocompatibility and high surface area. Coupled with bio-recognition elements, these features can amplify signal transduction and biorecognition events, resulting in highly sensitive biosensing. Additionally, microfluidic electrochemical biosensors have attracted considerable attention on account of their miniature, portable and low-cost systems as well as high fabrication throughput and ease of scaleup. For example, electrochemical enzymetic biosensors and aptamer biosensors (aptasensors) based on the integrated microchip can be used for portable point-of-care diagnostics and environmental monitoring. This review is a summary of our recent progress in the field of electrochemical biosensors, including aptasensors, cytosensors, enzymatic biosensors and self-powered biosensors based on biofuel cells. We presented the advantages that functional nanomaterials and microfluidic chip technology bring to the electrochemical biosensors, together with future prospects and possible challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuously tunable photonic fractional Hilbert transformer using ring resonators for on-chip microwave photonic signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Beeker, Willem; Beeker, W.P.; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, Rene; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2012-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a wideband photonic fractional Hilbert transformer implemented using a ring resonator-based optical all-pass filter. The full programmability of the ring resonators allows variable and arbitrary fractional order of the Hilbert transformer. The implemented all-pass filter

  4. Silicon carbide: a versatile material for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Alexandra; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; Saddow, Stephen E

    2013-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has been around for more than 100 years as an industrial material and has found wide and varied applications because of its unique electrical and thermal properties. In recent years there has been increased attention to SiC as a viable material for biomedical applications. Of particular interest in this review is its potential for application as a biotransducer in biosensors. Among these applications are those where SiC is used as a substrate material, taking advantage of its surface chemical, tribological and electrical properties. In addition, its potential for integration as system on a chip and those applications where SiC is used as an active material make it a suitable substrate for micro-device fabrication. This review highlights the critical properties of SiC for application as a biosensor and reviews recent work reported on using SiC as an active or passive material in biotransducers and biosensors.

  5. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review, with 19 references, is given on challenges and possible opportunities for the development of biosensors for environmental monitoring applications. The high cost and slow turnaround times typically associated with the measurement of regulated pollutants clearly indicates...

  6. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs, which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today’s society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  7. Applications of commercial biosensors in clinical, food, environmental, and biothreat/biowarfare analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-01

    The lack of specific, low-cost, rapid, sensitive, and easy detection of biomolecules has resulted in the development of biosensor technology. Innovations in biosensor technology have enabled many biosensors to be commercialized and have enabled biomolecules to be detected onsite. Moreover, the emerging technologies of lab-on-a-chip microdevices and nanosensors offer opportunities for the development of new biosensors with much better performance. Biosensors were first introduced into the laboratory by Clark and Lyons. They developed the first glucose biosensor for laboratory conditions. Then in 1973, a glucose biosensor was commercialized by Yellow Springs Instruments. The commercial biosensors have small size and simple construction and they are ideal for point-of-care biosensing. In addition to glucose, a wide variety of metabolites such as lactate, cholesterol, and creatinine can be detected by using commercial biosensors. Like the glucose biosensors (tests) other commercial tests such as for pregnancy (hCG), Escherichia coli O157, influenza A and B viruses, Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis, and malaria have achieved success. Apart from their use in clinical analysis, commercial tests are also used in environmental (such as biochemical oxygen demand, nitrate, pesticide), food (such as glutamate, glutamine, sucrose, lactose, alcohol, ascorbic acid), and biothreat/biowarfare (Bacillus anthracis, Salmonella, Botulinum toxin) analysis. In this review, commercial biosensors in clinical, environmental, food, and biowarfare analysis are summarized and the commercial biosensors are compared in terms of their important characteristics. This is the first review in which all the commercially available tests are compiled together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On-chip modulation for rotating sensing of gyroscope based on ring resonator coupled with Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Chen, Jiayang; Jin, Junjie; Lin, Jian; Zhao, Long; Bi, Zhuanfang; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-01-22

    An improving structure for resonance optical gyro inserting a Mach-Zehnder Interferomete (MZI) into coupler region between ring resonator and straight waveguide was proposed. The different reference phase shift parameters in the MZI arms are tunable by thermo-optic effect and can be optimized at every rotation angular rate point without additional phase bias. Four optimum paths are formed to make the gyroscope to work always at the highest sensitivity.

  9. A Protocol for Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-force Biosensors to Measure Mechanical Forces across the Nuclear LINC Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenovic, Paul T; Bathula, Kranthidhar; Conway, Daniel E

    2017-04-11

    The LINC complex has been hypothesized to be the critical structure that mediates the transfer of mechanical forces from the cytoskeleton to the nucleus. Nesprin-2G is a key component of the LINC complex that connects the actin cytoskeleton to membrane proteins (SUN domain proteins) in the perinuclear space. These membrane proteins connect to lamins inside the nucleus. Recently, a Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-force probe was cloned into mini-Nesprin-2G (Nesprin-TS (tension sensor)) and used to measure tension across Nesprin-2G in live NIH3T3 fibroblasts. This paper describes the process of using Nesprin-TS to measure LINC complex forces in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. To extract FRET information from Nesprin-TS, an outline of how to spectrally unmix raw spectral images into acceptor and donor fluorescent channels is also presented. Using open-source software (ImageJ), images are pre-processed and transformed into ratiometric images. Finally, FRET data of Nesprin-TS is presented, along with strategies for how to compare data across different experimental groups.

  10. Molecular Approaches to Optical Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fierke, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was to develop methodologies for the optimization of field-deployable optical biosensors, in general, and, in particular, to optimize a carbonic anhydrase-based fiber optic zinc biosensor...

  11. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticles and gold nanorods: Near-infrared responsive biosensor for streptavidin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Wen; Chen, Boting; Yu, Wei; Xu, Lin; Song, Hongwei, E-mail: songhw@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-03-15

    We represent a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and the gold nanorods (GNRs) as the energy donor–acceptor pair for directly determining streptavidin in near-infrared (NIR) region. NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm UCNPs, which had a strong emission at 800 nm under 980-nm excitation, were adopted as the energy donor. The GNRs, which demonstrated strong surface plasmon absorption around 800 nm, were chosen as acceptor to quench the 800 nm emissions of the UCNPs. There had the spectral overlap between the emission of the donor nanoparticles (UCNPs) and the absorption of the acceptor nanoparticles (GNRs). This UCNP-based FRET system was then used to determine the amount of streptavidin. In this system, NaYF{sub 4}:Yb,Tm UCNPs conjugated with biotin, while GNRs conjugated with streptavidin. When added GNRs into UCNPs, the streptavidin were preferred to bind with biotin and decreased spacing between the donor and acceptor NPs. Consequently, FRET occurred and a linear relationship between the luminescence quenching efficiency and the concentration of streptavidin was obtained. Owing to the aforementioned merits of UCNPs as an energy donor and the strong quenching ability of GNRs, satisfactory analytical performances have been acquired. -- Highlights: • NaYF4:Yb,Tm and GNRs are as NIR energy donor and quenching acceptor for FRET. • Linkage between biotin and streptavidin make the distance between the donors and the acceptors short enough for FRET. • The FRET system in this work was applicable for the detection of streptavidin. • The donor and acceptor NPs can be modified by proper molecules for other biological molecules detection.

  12. Fluorescence-Free Biosensor Methods in Detection of Food Pathogens with a Special Focus on Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajeswaran; Poltronieri, Palmiro

    2017-12-20

    Food pathogens contaminate food products that allow their growth on the shelf and also under refrigerated conditions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to lower the limit of detection (LOD) of the method used and to obtain the results within hours to few days. Biosensor methods exploit the available technologies to individuate and provide an approximate quantification of the bacteria present in a sample. The main bottleneck of these methods depends on the aspecific binding to the surfaces and on a change in sensitivity when bacteria are in a complex food matrix with respect to bacteria in a liquid food sample. In this review, we introduce surface plasmon resonance (SPR), new advancements in SPR techniques, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), as fluorescence-free biosensing technologies for detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The application of the two methods has facilitated L. monocytogenes detection with LOD of 1 log CFU/mL. Further advancements are envisaged through the combination of biosensor methods with immunoseparation of bacteria from larger volumes, application of lab-on-chip technologies, and EIS sensing methods for multiplex pathogen detection. Validation efforts are being conducted to demonstrate the robustness of detection, reproducibility and variability in multi-site installations.

  13. Enhanced Biosensor Platforms for Detecting the Atherosclerotic Biomarker VCAM1 Based on Bioconjugation with Uniformly Oriented VCAM1-Targeting Nanobodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy Tien Ta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface bioconjugation of biomolecules has gained enormous attention for developing advanced biomaterials including biosensors. While conventional immobilization (by physisorption or covalent couplings using the functional groups of the endogenous amino acids usually results in surfaces with low activity, reproducibility and reusability, the application of methods that allow for a covalent and uniformly oriented coupling can circumvent these limitations. In this study, the nanobody targeting Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (NbVCAM1, an atherosclerotic biomarker, is engineered with a C-terminal alkyne function via Expressed Protein Ligation (EPL. Conjugation of this nanobody to azidified silicon wafers and Biacore™ C1 sensor chips is achieved via Copper(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC “click” chemistry to detect VCAM1 binding via ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, respectively. The resulting surfaces, covered with uniformly oriented nanobodies, clearly show an increased antigen binding affinity, sensitivity, detection limit, quantitation limit and reusability as compared to surfaces prepared by random conjugation. These findings demonstrate the added value of a combined EPL and CuAAC approach as it results in strong control over the surface orientation of the nanobodies and an improved detecting power of their targets—a must for the development of advanced miniaturized, multi-biomarker biosensor platforms.

  14. Over-the-Counter Biosensors: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ming-Hung Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The demand for specific, low cost, rapid, sensitive and easy detection of biomolecules is huge. A well-known example is the glucose meters used by diabetics to monitor their blood glucose levels. Nowadays, a vast majority of the glucose meters are based on electrochemical biosensor technology. The inherent small size and simple construction of the electrochemical transducer and instrument are ideally suited for pointof-care biosensing. Besides glucose, a wide variety of electrochemical biosensors have been developed for the measurements of some other key metabolites, proteins, and nucleic acids. Nevertheless, unlike the glucose meters, limited success has been achieved for the commercialization of the protein and nucleic acid biosensors. In this review article, key technologies on the electrochemical detection of key metabolites, proteins, and DNAs are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on those that are compatible to home-use setting. Moreover, emerging technologies of lab-on-a-chip microdevices and nanosensors (i.e., silicon and carbon nanotube field-effect sensors offer opportunities for the construction of new generation biosensors with much better performances. Together with the continuous innovations in the basic components of biosensors (i.e., transducers, biorecognition molecules, immobilization and signal transduction schemes, consumers could soon buy different kinds of biosensing devices in the pharmacy stores.

  15. Photonic ring resonance is a versatile platform for performing multiplex immunoassays in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudumba, Sasi; de Alba, Sophia; Romero, Randy; Cherwien, Carli; Wu, Alice; Wang, Jue; Gleeson, Martin A; Iqbal, Muzammil; Burlingame, Rufus W

    2017-09-01

    Photonic ring resonance is a property of light where in certain circumstances specific wavelengths are trapped in a ring resonator. Sensors based on silicon photonic ring resonators function by detecting the interaction between light circulating inside the sensor and matter deposited on the sensor surface. Binding of biological material results in a localized change in refractive index on the sensor surface, which affects the circulating optical field extending beyond the sensor boundary. That is, the resonant wavelength will change when the refractive index of the medium around the ring resonator changes. Ring resonators can be fabricated onto small silicon chips, allowing development of a miniature multiplex array of ring based biosensors. This paper describes the properties of such a system when responding to the refractive index changed in a simple and precise way by changing the ionic strength of the surrounding media, and in a more useful way by the binding of macromolecules to the surface above the resonators. Specifically, a capture immunoassay is described that measures the change of resonant wavelength as a patient serum sample with anti-SS-A autoantibodies is flowed over a chip spotted with SS-A antigen and amplified with anti-IgG. The technology has been miniaturized and etched into a 4×6mm silicon chip that can measure 32 different reactions in quadruplicate simultaneously. The variability between 128 rings on a chip as measured by 2M salt assays averaged 0.6% CV. The output of the assays is the average shift per cluster of 4 rings, and the assays averaged 0.5% CV between clusters. The variability between chips averaged 1.8%. Running the same array on multiple instruments showed that after some improvements to the wavelength referencing system, the upper boundary of variation was 3% between 13 different instruments. The immunoassay displayed about 2% higher variability than the salt assays. There are several outstanding features of this system. The

  16. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Introduction to biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Biosensors in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickx, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is a device that uses biological materials to detect and monitor the presence of specific chemicals in an area. Traditional methods of volatile detection used by law enforcement agencies and rescue teams typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. This concept of using dogs to detect specific substances is quite old. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. Thus, the possibility of using other organisms as biosensors including rats, dolphins, honeybees, and parasitic wasps for detecting explosives, narcotics and cadavers has been developed. Insects have several advantages unshared by mammals. Insects are sensitive, cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical-detection task. Moreover, insects might be a preferred sensing method in scenarios that are deemed too dangerous to use mammals. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the biosensors used in forensic sciences.

  19. Roughness effect on the efficiency of dimer antenna based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barchiesi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication process of nanodevices is continually improved. However, most of the nanodevices, such as biosensors present rough surfaces with mean roughness of some nanometers even if the deposition rate of material is more controlled. The effect of roughness on performance of biosensors was fully addressed for plane biosensors and gratings, but rarely addressed for biosensors based on Local Plasmon Resonance. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate numerically the influence of nanometric roughness on the efficiency of a dimer nano-biosensor (two levels of roughness are considered. Therefore, we propose a general numerical method, that can be applied to any other nanometric shape, to take into account the roughness in a three dimensional model. The study focuses on both the far-field, which corresponds to the experimental detected data, and the near-field, responsible for exciting and then detecting biological molecules. The results suggest that the biosensor efficiency is highly sensitive to the surface roughness. The roughness can produce important shifts of the extinction efficiency peak and a decrease of its amplitude resulting from changes in the distribution of near-field and absorbed electric field intensities.

  20. Multiplex biosensor immunoassays for antibiotics in the food chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals may result in unwanted residues in food products. The main objective of the present research was to study the development and application of fast and automated multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor immunoassays (BIAs), based on

  1. Development of FRET biosensors for mammalian and plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, D.S.; Voorst Vader, van L.; Borst, J.W.; Goedhart, J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors are increasingly used in visualising signalling processes in different organisms. Sensors based on green fluorescent protein technology are providing a great opportunity for using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a tool that allows for monitoring dynamic

  2. The blocking reagent optimization for the magnetoelastic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiajia; Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Wikle, Howard C.; Wang, Feng'en; Du, Songtao; Chin, Bryan A.; Hu, Jing

    2015-06-01

    The wireless phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensor has proven to be promising for real-time detection of pathogenic bacteria on fresh produces. The ME biosensor consists of a freestanding ME resonator as the signal transducer and filamentous phage as the biomolecular-recognition element, which can specifically bind to a pathogen of interest. Due to the Joule magnetostriction effect, the biosensors can be placed into mechanical resonance when subjected to a time-varying magnetic field alternating at the sensor's resonant frequency. Upon the attachment of the target pathogen, the mass of the biosensor increases, thereby decreasing its resonant frequency. This paper presents an investigation of blocking reagents immobilization for detecting Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh food surfaces. Three different blocking reagents (BSA, SuperBlock blocking buffer, and blocker BLOTTO) were used and compared. The optical microscope was used for bacterial cells binding observation. Student t-test was used to statistically analysis the experiment results. The results shows that SuperBlock blocking buffer and blocker BLOTTO have much better blocking performance than usually used BSA.

  3. Chemical surface modifications for the development of silicon-based label-free integrated optical (IO) biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, María-José; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2013-05-13

    Increasing interest has been paid to label-free biosensors in recent years. Among them, refractive index (RI) optical biosensors enable high density and the chip-scale integration of optical components. This makes them more appealing to help develop lab-on-a-chip devices. Today, many RI integrated optical (IO) devices are made using silicon-based materials. A key issue in their development is the biofunctionalization of sensing surfaces because they provide a specific, sensitive response to the analyte of interest. This review critically discusses the biofunctionalization procedures, assay formats and characterization techniques employed in setting up IO biosensors. In addition, it provides the most relevant results obtained from using these devices for real sample biosensing. Finally, an overview of the most promising future developments in the fields of chemical surface modification and capture agent attachment for IO biosensors follows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biosensors and their applications – A review

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrotra, Parikha

    2016-01-01

    The various types of biosensors such as enzyme-based, tissue-based, immunosensors, DNA biosensors, thermal and piezoelectric biosensors have been deliberated here to highlight their indispensable applications in multitudinous fields.

  8. An AC electrokinetics facilitated biosensor cassette for rapid pathogen identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E; Sin, Mandy L Y; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-07-07

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieving robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency through electrokinetics induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetics for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future.

  9. AC Electrokinetics Facilitated Biosensor Cassette for Rapid Pathogen Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Mengxing; Mohan, Ruchika; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Mach, Kathleen E.; Sin, Mandy L. Y.; McComb, Mason; Joshi, Janhvi; Gau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    To develop a portable point-of-care system based on biosensors for common infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, the sensing process needs to be implemented within an enclosed fluidic system. On chip sample preparation of clinical samples remains a significant obstacle to achieve robust sensor performance. Herein AC electrokinetics is applied in an electrochemical biosensor cassette to enhance molecular convection and hybridization efficiency though electrokinetic induced fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation. Using E. coli as an exemplary pathogen, we determined the optimal electrokinetic parameters for detecting bacterial 16S rRNA in the biosensor cassette based on the current output, signal-to-noise ratio, and limit of detection. In addition, a panel of six probe sets targeting common uropathogenic bacteria was demonstrated. The optimized parameters were also validated using patient-derived clinical urine samples. The effectiveness of electrokinetic for on chip sample preparation will facilitate the implementation of point-of-care diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the future. PMID:23626988

  10. Recent Advances in Magnetic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Giouroudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of portable biosening devices for the detection of biological entities such as biomolecules, pathogens, and cells has become extremely significant over the past years. Scientific research, driven by the promise for miniaturization and integration of complex laboratory equipment on inexpensive, reliable, and accurate devices, has successfully shifted several analytical and diagnostic methods to the submillimeter scale. The miniaturization process was made possible with the birth of microfluidics, a technology that could confine, manipulate, and mix very small volumes of liquids on devices integrated on standard silicon technology chips. Such devices are then directly translating the presence of these entities into an electronic signal that can be read out with a portable instrumentation. For the aforementioned tasks, the use of magnetic markers (magnetic particles—MPs—functionalized with ligands in combination with the application of magnetic fields is being strongly investigated by research groups worldwide. The greatest merits of using magnetic fields are that they can be applied either externally or from integrated microconductors and they can be well-tuned by adjusting the applied current on the microconductors. Moreover, the magnetic markers can be manipulated inside microfluidic channels by high gradient magnetic fields that can in turn be detected by magnetic sensors. All the above make this technology an ideal candidate for the development of such microfluidic biosensors. In this review, focus is given only to very recent advances in biosensors that use microfluidics in combination with magnetic sensors and magnetic markers/nanoparticles.

  11. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  12. A label-free nanostructured plasmonic biosensor based on Blu-ray discs with integrated microfluidics for sensitive biodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Estevez, M-Carmen; Peláez-Gutierrez, E Cristina; Homs-Corbera, Antoni; García-Hernandez, M Carmen; Imbaud, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2017-10-15

    Nanostructure-based plasmonic biosensors have quickly positioned themselves as interesting candidates for the design of portable optical biosensor platforms considering the potential benefits they can offer in integration, miniaturization, multiplexing, and real-time label-free detection. We have developed a simple integrated nanoplasmonic sensor taking advantage of the periodic nanostructured array of commercial Blu-ray discs. Sensors with two gold film thicknesses (50 and 100nm) were fabricated and optically characterized by varying the oblique-angle of the incident light in optical reflectance measurements. Contrary to the use normal light incidence previously reported with other optical discs, we observed an enhancement in sensitivity and a narrowing of the resonant linewidths as the light incidence angle was increased, which could be related to the generation of Fano resonant modes. The new sensors achieve a figure of merit (FOM) up to 35 RIU-1 and a competitive bulk limit of detection (LOD) of 6.3×10-6 RIU. These values significantly improve previously reported results obtained with normal light incidence reflectance measurements using similar structures. The sensor has been combined with versatile, simple, ease to-fabricate microfluidics. The integrated chip is only 1cm2 (including a PDMS flow cell with a 50µm height microfluidic channel fabricated with double-sided adhesive tape) and all the optical components are mounted on a 10cm×10cm portable prototype, illustrating its facile miniaturization, integration and potential portability. Finally, to assess the label-free biosensing capability of the new sensor, we have evaluated the presence of specific antibodies against the GTF2b protein, a tumor-associate antigen (TAA) related to colorectal cancer. We have achieved a LOD in the pM order and have assessed the feasibility of directly measuring biological samples such as human serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in arsenic biosensor development--a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Rabindra; Babu, J Nagendra; Mittal, Sunil

    2015-01-15

    Biosensors are analytical devices having high sensitivity, portability, small sample requirement and ease of use for qualitative and quantitative monitoring of various analytes of human importance. Arsenic (As), owing to its widespread presence in nature and high toxicity to living creatures, requires frequent determination in water, soil, agricultural and food samples. The present review is an effort to highlight the various advancements made so far in the development of arsenic biosensors based either on recombinant whole cells or on certain arsenic-binding oligonucleotides or proteins. The role of futuristic approaches like surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and aptamer technology has also been discussed. The biomethods employed and their general mechanisms, advantages and limitations in relevance to arsenic biosensors developed so far are intended to be discussed in this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient Convection, Diffusion, and Adsorption in Surface-Based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus; Bruus, Henrik; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    microfluidic surface-based biosensors, operating under flow conditions. A widely adopted approximate quasi-steady theory to capture convective and diffusive mass transport is reviewed, and an analytical solution is presented. An expression of the Damköhler number is derived in terms of the nondimensional......This paper presents a theoretical and computational investigation of convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The work, however, is equally relevant for other...... concentration to the maximum surface capacity is critical for reliable use of the quasi-steady theory. Finally, our results provide users of surface-based biosensors with a tool for correcting experimentally obtained adsorption rate constants....

  15. Recent developments in optical detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Ulrik; Hoivik, Nils

    2014-08-21

    The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a) study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b) integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance.

  16. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  17. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  19. Multiplexed specific label-free detection of NCI-H358 lung cancer cell line lysates with silicon based photonic crystal microcavity biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Drabkin, Harry A; Gemmill, Robert M; Simon, George R; Chin, Steve H; Chen, Ray T

    2013-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate label-free photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to detect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factor, ZEB1, in minute volumes of sample. Multiplexed specific detection of ZEB1 in lysates from NCI-H358 lung cancer cells down to an estimated concentration of 2 cells per micro-liter is demonstrated. L13 photonic crystal microcavities, coupled to W1 photonic crystal waveguides, are employed in which resonances show high Q in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS). When the sensor surface is derivatized with a specific antibody, the binding of the corresponding antigen from a complex whole-cell lysate generates a change in refractive index in the vicinity of the photonic crystal microcavity, leading to a change in the resonance wavelength of the resonance modes of the photonic crystal microcavity. The shift in the resonance wavelength reveals the presence of the antigen. The sensor cavity has a surface area of ∼11μm(2). Multiplexed sensors permit simultaneous detection of many binding interactions with specific immobilized antibodies from the same bio-sample at the same instant of time. Specificity was demonstrated using a sandwich assay which further amplifies the detection sensitivity at low concentrations. The device represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of label-free, high throughput, multiplexed detection of cancer cells with specificity and sensitivity on a silicon chip platform. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoplasmonic biosensors: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherji, Soumyo; Shukla,Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Gauri M Shukla, Soumyo MukherjiDepartment of Bioscience and Bioengineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: Recent advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have helped develop a wide variety of nanostructured platforms for use as nanoplasmonic biosensors. These can either be in solution phase or be confined on a substrate in the form of metallic nanofilms or periodic arrays. Plasmonic properties of these nanostructures depend on the size, shape, position, orientation, et...

  1. Towards optoelectronic urea biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, ?ukasz

    2015-01-01

    Integration of immobilized enzymes with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) leads to the development of optoelectronic enzyme-based biosensors. In this work, urease, used as a model enzyme, immobilized in the form of?an open-tubular microbioreactor or biosensing membrane that has been integrated with two red LEDs. It forms complete, fiberless, miniaturized, and extremely economic biooptoelectronic devices useful for nonstationary measurements under flow analysis conditions. Both enzyme-based biodevi...

  2. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  3. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Cui

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 µm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip.

  4. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  5. 1-D grating based SPR biosensor for the detection of lung cancer biomarkers using Vroman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teotia, Pradeep Kumar; Kaler, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    Grating based surface plasmon resonance waveguide biosensor have been reported for the detection of lung cancer biomarkers using Vroman effect. The proposed grating based multilayered biosensor is designed with high detection accuracy for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and also analysed to show high detection accuracy with acceptable sensitivity for both cancer biomarkers. The introduction of periodic grating with multilayer metals generates a good resonance that make it possible for early detection of cancerous cells. Using finite difference time domain method, it is observed wavelength of biosensor get red-shifted on variations of the refractive index due to the presence of both the cancerous bio-markers. The reported detection accuracy and sensitivity of proposed biosensor is quite acceptable for both lung cancer biomarkers i.e. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which further offer us label free early detection of lung cancer using these biomarkers.

  6. 40 GHz RF biosensor based on microwave coplanar waveguide transmission line for cancer cells (HepG2) dielectric characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fu; Wu, Hung-Wei; Hong, Yong-Han; Lee, Hsin-Ying

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents a 40-GHz RF biosensor that involves using a microwave coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission line for the dielectric characterization of cancer cells (Hepatoma G2, HepG2). In the past, conventional resonator-based biosensors were designed to operate at a specific resonant peak; however, the dielectric sensitivity of the cells was restricted to a narrow bandwidth. To provide a very wide bandwidth (1-40 GHz), biosensors were based on a microwave CPW transmission line. The proposed biosensor can rapidly measure two frequency-dependent cell-based dielectric parameters of HepG2 cells, microwave attenuation (α(f)cell) and the dielectric constant (εr(f)cell), while removing the microwave parasitic effects (including the cultured medium and substrate materials). The proposed biosensor can be applied in postoperative cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  8. Electrochemical and optical biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Rui; Li, Chang Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2011-06-01

    Nanomaterials and nanostructures exhibit unique size-tunable and shape-dependent physicochemical properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Advances of nanomaterials and nanostructures open a new door to develop various novel biosensors. The present work has reviewed the recent progress in electrochemical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescent biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures. An emphasis is put on the research that demonstrates how the performance of biosensors such as the limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity is improved by the use of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  9. Determination of High-affinity Antibody-antigen Binding Kinetics Using Four Biosensor Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Label-free optical biosensors are powerful tools in drug discovery for the characterization of biomolecular interactions. In this study, we describe the use of four routinely used biosensor platforms in our laboratory to evaluate the binding affinity and kinetics of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9). While both Biacore T100 and ProteOn XPR36 are derived from the well-established Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) te...

  10. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Ga?tan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a F?rster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally r...

  11. Aptamer Based Microsphere Biosensor for Thrombin Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Fan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optical microsphere resonator biosensor using aptamer asreceptor for the measurement of the important biomolecule thrombin. The sphere surface ismodified with anti-thrombin aptamer, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivityfor thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the sphere surface is monitored by the spectralposition of the microsphere’s whispering gallery mode resonances. A detection limit on theorder of 1 NIH Unit/mL is demonstrated. Control experiments with non-aptameroligonucleotide and BSA are also carried out to confirm the specific binding betweenaptamer and thrombin. We expect that this demonstration will lead to the development ofhighly sensitive biomarker sensors based on aptamer with lower cost and higher throughputthan current technology.

  12. MEMS-Based Multi-Analyte Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, I. H.; Sohn, L. L.

    2004-03-01

    We present a MEMS-based multi-analyte biosensor consisting of an array of micropores ( ˜1 μm diameter) fabricated on a single chip. The micropores are embedded in PDMS using micromolding techniques, and then sealed to a glass substrate that has previously-defined electrodes for electrical measurement of the pores. Detection of analytes is accomplished using a resistive pulse technique [1-3] which senses the change in size (as small as 2 nm) of derivatized colloids when they react with different analytes. Each pore can sense several analytes if derivatized colloids of different sizes are employed; consequently, an array of pores can be used to detect a large number of analytes simultaneously on a single chip. In this talk, we will describe our multipore array sensor and present preliminary results demonstrating its capabilities. 1. O.A. Saleh and L.L. Sohn, Rev. Sci. Inst. 72, 4449 (2001). 2. O.A. Saleh and L.L. Sohn, NanoLetters 3, 37 (2003). 3. O.A. Saleh and L.L. Sohn, PNAS 100, 820 (2003).

  13. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  14. Affinity biosensors: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Kim R; Mulchandani, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    ..., and government to begin or expand their biosensors research. This volume, Methods in Biotechnology vol. 7: Affinity Biosensors: Techniques and Protocols, describes a variety of classical and emerging transduction technologies that have been interfaced to bioaffinity elements (e.g., antibodies and receptors). Some of the reas...

  15. Recent Advances in DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA based biosensors have recently gained much importance for detection of target genes responsible for diseases, in food industry, environment and in agriculture. This article describes different types of DNA based biosensors, their advantages and basic principle of operating system. The DNA biosensors provide fast, simple, economical, sensitive and selective detection of target genes by hybridization with specific probe. Various new strategies for DNA based biosensors have described along with recent trends and challenges in development of technology. Electrochemical biosensor has more advantages due to electrochemical behaviour of the labels towards the hybridization reaction on electrode surface or in solution in the presence of redox indicators. PCR free DNA biochip is emerging new tools in the field of diagnosis.

  16. Polymer ring resonators for high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haishan

    2009-12-01

    Electrical interconnect based on the copper wires will be the bottleneck for the future performance improvement of multi-core CPUs. Chip scale optical interconnect based on high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration is one of the feasible solutions. Ring resonators are promising photonic components serving as building blocks. High density integration of ring resonators is also important for high throughput lab-on-a-chip biosensors and opto-microwave integrated circuits. Polymer materials are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes. Polymers can be easily doped with rare earth ions, quantum dots etc. to make active optical devices. Especially, over several hundreds pm/V electro-optic (EO) coefficients and femtosecond scale response time of EO polymers enables photonic devices with sub 1V to millivolt drive voltages and terahertz bandwidth. This dissertation describes several technologies about design, simulation, fabrication, integration with electronic circuits and fiber optics of polymer ring resonators, and demonstrates three application examples of polymer ring resonators in communications and biochemical sensing. First the Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and the matrix analysis are combined to provide a fast circuit level simulation and design procedure of polymer ring resonators. Several low cost fabrication techniques based on electron beam irradiation effects on EO polymers are introduced. For the practical electronicphotonic integration, a hybrid integration scheme of EO polymer waveguide devices with Si integrated circuits is developed. One application is an all-dielectric RF sensor or receiver with sensitivity of 100 V/m and theoretical bandwidth over 100 GHz. This device is based on a novel structure with polymer ring resonator directly coupled to a side polished optical fiber. The other two examples are biochemical sensors based on multi-slot waveguide and ring resonator reflector structures.

  17. Development of a micro-planar amperometric bile acid biosensor for urinalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, S; Ito, N; Karube, I

    2007-04-15

    The determination of bile acid concentration in urine is useful for the screening and diagnosis of various hepatobiliary diseases. Currently, there is no concise method to determine bile acid concentration in urine. This study describes a bile acid biosensor fabricated by electrochemical technique for urinalysis. The micro-planar electrodes employed for the study consisted of a working electrode (platinum), a counter electrode (platinum) and a reference electrode (silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl)). The sensor chip was coated with Nafion using a spin-coater in order to both eliminate many interference species in urine and achieve long-term stability of the reference electrode. Nafion coating allowed the sensor chip to prevent the electrode reaction from interference species in urine, because it is charged negative strongly (Nafion contains sulfonic acid group). Three enzymes (bile acid sulfate sulfatase: BSS, beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: beta-HSD, and NADH oxidase: NHO) were immobilized by glutaraldehyde (GA: cross-linker) onto the sensor chip, because the immobilization of enzymes by GA is simple and commonly carried out. The sensor chip was able to detect bile acid in buffer solution. The optimum enzyme ratio immobilized onto the sensor chip was BSS:beta-HSD:NHO=4:4:20 U/1 chip. There was a relationship between the concentration of bile acid and the response current value. The dynamic range of the sensor chip was 2-100 microM for bile acid. Additionally, bile acid in the urine specimen could be detected using this bile acid biosensor. We present a simple and rapid bile acid biosensor with high sensitivity and high reproducibility.

  18. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. On-chip multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using spatial profiles of immobilized quantum dots and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M. Omair; Tavares, Anthony J.; Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Solid-phase multiplexed QD-FRET nucleic acid assay in electrokinetic fluidic chip. •Concurrent detection of two oligonucleotides based on channel length coverage. •Selection of “turn-on” and “turn-off” signals from two acceptor dyes and two colors of immobilized QDs, respectively. •No loss in assay sensitivity when implementing multiplexed assay format. -- Abstract: A microfluidic based solid-phase assay for the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid hybridization using quantum dot (QD) mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is described herein. The glass surface of hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels was chemically modified to assemble the biorecognition interface. Multiplexing was demonstrated using a detection system that was comprised of two colors of immobilized semi-conductor QDs and two different oligonucleotide probe sequences. Green-emitting and red-emitting QDs were paired with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) labeled oligonucleotides, respectively. The QDs served as energy donors for the transduction of dye labeled oligonucleotide targets. The in-channel assembly of the biorecognition interface and the subsequent introduction of oligonucleotide targets was accomplished within minutes using a combination of electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic force. The concurrent quantification of femtomole quantities of two target sequences was possible by measuring the spatial coverage of FRET sensitized emission along the length of the channel. In previous reports, multiplexed QD-FRET hybridization assays that employed a ratiometric method for quantification had challenges associated with lower analytical sensitivity arising from both donor and acceptor dilution that resulted in reduced energy transfer pathways as compared to single-color hybridization assays. Herein, a spatial method for quantification that is based on in-channel QD-FRET profiles provided higher analytical

  20. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750-800, 900, and 130-180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  1. Silaffin peptides as a novel signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong-O; Sang, Byoung-In; Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2013-05-01

    Application of biomimetic silica formation to gravimetric biosensors has been conducted for the first time. As a model system, silaffin peptides fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were immobilized on a gold quartz crystal resonator for quartz crystal microbalances using a self-assembled monolayer. When a solution of silicic acid was supplied, silica particles were successfully deposited on the Au surface, resulting in a significant change in resonance frequency (i.e., signal enhancement) with the silaffin-GFP. However, frequency was not altered when bare GFP was used as a control. The novel peptide enhancer is advantageous because it can be readily and quantitatively conjugated with sensing proteins using recombinant DNA technology. As a proof of concept, this study shows that the silaffin domains can be employed as a novel and efficient biomolecular signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

  2. Sensitive optical biosensors for unlabeled targets: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Xudong [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, 240D, Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 E. Rollins Street, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)], E-mail: fanxud@missouri.edu; White, Ian M.; Shopova, Siyka I.; Zhu Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Sun Yuze [Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, 240D, Bond Life Sciences Center, 1201 E. Rollins Street, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2008-07-14

    This article reviews the recent progress in optical biosensors that use the label-free detection protocol, in which biomolecules are unlabeled or unmodified, and are detected in their natural forms. In particular, it will focus on the optical biosensors that utilize the refractive index change as the sensing transduction signal. Various optical label-free biosensing platforms will be introduced, including, but not limited to, surface plasmon resonance, interferometers, waveguides, fiber gratings, ring resonators, and photonic crystals. Emphasis will be given to the description of optical structures and their respective sensing mechanisms. Examples of detecting various types of biomolecules will be presented. Wherever possible, the sensing performance of each optical structure will be evaluated and compared in terms of sensitivity and detection limit.

  3. Comparative study of thermal stability of magnetostrictive biosensor between two kinds of biorecognition elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xue-mei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Guntupalli, R.; Lakshmanan, R.S.; Chin, Bryan A. [Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States); Hu, Jing, E-mail: jinghoo@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Materials Research and Education Center, Auburn University, AL 36849 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Magnetostrictive biosensors specific to Salmonella typhimurium were prepared by immobilizing antibody or phage as biorecognition elements onto the magnetostrictive sensor platform. The sensors were stored at temperatures of 25 °C (room temperature), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively, and the ability to bind S. typhimurium was detected by testing the resonant frequency shift using a HP network analyzer after exposure to 1 mL of 1 × 10{sup 9} cfu/mL of S. typhimurium at a predetermined schedule. The binding of S. typhimurium to biosensors was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that there existed an initial sudden drop in the average density of S. typhimurium bound to the biosensor surface versus duration at different temperatures for the two kinds of recognition elements, and the binding ability to S. typhimurium of phage-immobilized biosensors was much better than that of antibody-immobilized biosensors, with longevity longer than 30 days at all tested temperatures, though decreasing gradually over the testing period. While the longevity of antibody-immobilized biosensors was only about 30, 8 and 5 days at room temperature (25 °C), 45 °C and 65 °C, respectively. Meanwhile, the activation energy of the two kinds of biosensors was investigated, and it was found that phage immobilized sensors showed much higher activation energy than antibody immobilized sensors, which resulted in less dependency on temperature and thus having much better thermal stability than antibody immobilized sensors. - Highlights: • Phage immobilized biosensors has much better thermal stability. • The longevity of phage immobilized biosensors was longer than 30 days even at 65 °C. • The activation energy of phage immobilized biosensors is much higher.

  4. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  5. CMOS capacitive biosensors for highly sensitive biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, An-Yu; Lu, Michael S-C

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic microbeads are widely used in biotechnology and biomedical research for manipulation and detection of cells and biomolecules. Most lab-on-chip systems capable of performing manipulation and detection require external instruments to perform one of the functions, leading to increased size and cost. This work aims at developing an integrated platform to perform these two functions by implementing electromagnetic microcoils and capacitive biosensors on a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) chip. Compared to most magnetic-type sensors, our detection method requires no externally applied magnetic fields and the associated fabrication is less complicated. In our experiment, microbeads coated with streptavidin were driven to the sensors located in the center of microcoils with functionalized anti-streptavidin antibody. Detection of a single microbead was successfully demonstrated using a capacitance-to-frequency readout. The average capacitance changes for the experimental and control groups were -5.3 fF and -0.2 fF, respectively.

  6. A novel gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic chip for rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yi; Phuoc Long, Truong; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based biosensors are emerging technologies for rapid detection of pathogens. However, it is very challenging to develop chip-based AuNP-biosensors for whole cells. This paper describes a novel AuNPs-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic assay which allows DNA aptamers to be detac......Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based biosensors are emerging technologies for rapid detection of pathogens. However, it is very challenging to develop chip-based AuNP-biosensors for whole cells. This paper describes a novel AuNPs-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic assay which allows DNA aptamers...... to be detached from AuNPs when interacting with bacteria. The new strategy greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of chip-based whole-cell biosensing....

  7. On-chip entangled photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E.

    2016-11-22

    Various technologies pertaining to an on-chip entangled photon source are described herein. A light source is used to pump two resonator cavities that are resonant at two different respective wavelengths and two different respective polarizations. The resonator cavities are coupled to a four-wave mixing cavity that receives the light at the two wavelengths and outputs polarization-entangled photons.

  8. Comparison of the efficiency control of mycotoxins by some optical immune biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyshyk, N. F.; Starodub, N. F.

    2013-11-01

    It was compared the efficiency of patulin control at the application of such optical biosensors which were based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nano-porous silicon (sNPS). In last case the intensity of the immune reaction was registered by measuring level of chemiluminescence (ChL) or photocurrent of nPS. The sensitivity of this mycotoxin determination by first type of immune biosensor was 0.05-10 mg/L Approximately the same sensitivity as well as the overall time analysis were demonstrated by the immune biosensor based on the nPS too. Nevertheless, the last type of biosensor was simpler in technical aspect and the cost of analysis was cheapest. That is why, it was recommend the nPS based immune biosensor for wide screening application and SPR one for some additional control or verification of preliminary obtained results. In this article a special attention was given to condition of sample preparation for analysis, in particular, micotoxin extraction from potao and some juices. Moreover, it was compared the efficiency of the above mentioned immune biosensors with such traditional approach of mycotoxin determination as the ELISA-method. In the result of investigation and discussion of obtained data it was concluded that both type of the immune biosensors are able to fulfill modern practice demand in respect sensitivity, rapidity, simplicity and cheapness of analysis.

  9. An infrared biosensor based on graphene plasmonic for integrated nanofluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Nong, Jinpeng; Zhang, Guiwen; Zhu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    We propose an infrared biosensor for nanofluidic analysis based on graphene plasmonics, which consists of a nanochannel etching on a silicon substrate and a graphene sheet covered on the top of the channel. The change of refractive index due to the absorption of biomolecules in the nanochannel can be measured by detecting the wavelength shifts of resonant dips. To achieve the best optical performances of the biosensor, an optical model based on finite element method is built to optimize the structure parameters of the biosensor. Numerical simulation results show that a biosensor with a larger top width and a higher depth shows a better overall performance and a high sensitivity value of up to 1920nm/RIU can be achieved in an optimized structure. In addition, the biosensor can dynamically work at a wide range of infrared region by adjusting the Fermi level of graphene. Graphene is pre-coated with poly methyl methacrylate to overcome the effect that the portion of graphene over the nanochannel will be strained and the influence of the thickness of this coated layer on the performances of biosensor is very small. The designed graphene plasmonics devices will advance further applications of graphene in integrated nanofluidic analysis and infrared biosensors.

  10. The enzyme thermistor--a realistic biosensor concept. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, Maria; Bhand, Sunil; Danielsson, Bengt

    2013-03-05

    This review describes principles and features of thermal biosensors and microbiosensors in flow injection analysis. Examples are given that illustrate the great versatility and excellent operational stability offered by thermal biosensors. The examples are mostly from work with the original type of enzyme thermistor operating with an enzyme column, but there will also be work described involving miniaturised devices including thermal lab-on-chip constructions and other types of sensing materials, such as MIPs (molecularly imprinted polymers) for both affinity and catalytic reactions. Several recently presented thermal biosensor concepts are reviewed including a thermal-electrochemical hybrid sensor for lactose based on immobilised cellobiose dehydrogenase. Another recent method is the determination of fructose using a fructose-6-phosphate kinase column. Operation with complex sample matrices such as blood, plasma and milk and how to avoid non-specific temperature effects are considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  12. Functionalized Xenon as a Biosensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megan M. Spence; Seth M. Rubin; Ivan E. Dimitrov; E. Janette Ruiz; David E. Wemmer; Alexander Pines; Shao Qin Yao; Feng Tian; Peter G. Schultz

    2001-01-01

    .... We have developed an NMR-based xenon biosensor that capitalizes on the enhanced signal-to-noise, spectral simplicity, and chemical-shift sensitivity of laser-polarized xenon to detect specific...

  13. Investigation of thin polymer layers for biosensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saftics, András; Agócs, Emil [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Fodor, Bálint [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Patkó, Dániel; Petrik, Péter [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary); Kolari, Kai; Aalto, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PL 1000, Tietotie 3, 02044 Espoo (Finland); Fürjes, Péter [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, Robert [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary); Kurunczi, Sándor, E-mail: kurunczi.sandor@ttk.mta.hu [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences–H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Doctoral School of Molecular- and Nanotechnologies, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, H-8200 Egyetem u.10, Veszprém (Hungary)

    2013-09-15

    Novel biosensors made of polymers may offer advantages over conventional technology such as possibility of mass production and tunability of the material properties. With the ongoing work on the polymer photonic chip fabrication in our project, simple model samples were tested parallel for future immobilization and accessing conditions for applications in typical aqueous buffers. The model samples consist of a thin, high refractive index polyimide film on top of TEOS on Si wafer. These model samples were measured by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry using different aqueous buffers. The experiments revealed a high drift in aqueous solutions; the drift in the ellipsometric parameters (delta, psi) can be evaluated and presented as changes in thickness and refractive index of the polyimide layer. The first molecular layer of immobilization is based on polyethyleneimine (PEI). The signal for the PEI adsorption was detected on a stable baseline, only after a long conditioning. The stability of polyimide films in aqueous buffer solutions should be improved toward the real biosensor application. Preliminary results are shown on the possibilities to protect the polyimide. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS) has been used to demonstrate the shielding effect of the thin TiO{sub 2} adlayer in biosensor applications.

  14. Arrays of SOI photonic wire biosensors for label-free molecular detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Adam; Xu, Dan-Xia; Vachon, Martin; Janz, Siegfried; Ma, Rubin; Li, Yunhui; Lopinski, Gregory; Luebbert, Christian C.; Liu, Qing Y.; Schmid, Jens H.; Delâge, André; Cheben, Pavel

    2010-02-01

    We present an SOI biosensor microarray chip that allows multiple molecular binding reactions to be simultaneously monitored. The individual biosensors are formed using 0.26 × 0.45 μm2 silicon photonic wire waveguides, which are arranged in compact Mach-Zehnder interferometer geometries with near temperature independent response. The sharp bend radius permitted by the photonic wires is exploited to form dense spiral waveguide structures that provide several millimeters of path length in a compact 130 μm diameter circular area. This design provides the high sensitivity of a long waveguide, while maintaining compatibility with commercial microarray spotting tools. For low volume analyte delivery the sensor array chip contains a monolithically integrated microfluidic channel formed in an SU-8 overlayer. Multiple antibody-antigen reactions are observed in real-time by using an infrared camera to monitor the optical powers emerging from the sensor array output waveguides.

  15. Lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Bumsang

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors.

  16. Imaging of Metabolic Status in 3D Cultures with an Improved AMPK FRET Biosensor for FLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Chennell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe an approach to non-invasively map spatiotemporal biochemical and physiological changes in 3D cell culture using Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET biosensors expressed in tumour spheroids. In particular, we present an improved Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK FRET biosensor, mTurquoise2 AMPK Activity Reporter (T2AMPKAR, for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM readouts that we have evaluated in 2D and 3D cultures. Our results in 2D cell culture indicate that replacing the FRET donor, enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP, in the original FRET biosensor, AMPK activity reporter (AMPKAR, with mTurquoise2 (mTq2FP, increases the dynamic range of the response to activation of AMPK, as demonstrated using the direct AMPK activator, 991. We demonstrated 3D FLIM of this T2AMPKAR FRET biosensor expressed in tumour spheroids using two-photon excitation.

  17. Imaging of Metabolic Status in 3D Cultures with an Improved AMPK FRET Biosensor for FLIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennell, George; Willows, Robin J W; Warren, Sean C; Carling, David; French, Paul M W; Dunsby, Chris; Sardini, Alessandro

    2016-08-19

    We describe an approach to non-invasively map spatiotemporal biochemical and physiological changes in 3D cell culture using Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) biosensors expressed in tumour spheroids. In particular, we present an improved Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP) Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) FRET biosensor, mTurquoise2 AMPK Activity Reporter (T2AMPKAR), for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) readouts that we have evaluated in 2D and 3D cultures. Our results in 2D cell culture indicate that replacing the FRET donor, enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), in the original FRET biosensor, AMPK activity reporter (AMPKAR), with mTurquoise2 (mTq2FP), increases the dynamic range of the response to activation of AMPK, as demonstrated using the direct AMPK activator, 991. We demonstrated 3D FLIM of this T2AMPKAR FRET biosensor expressed in tumour spheroids using two-photon excitation.

  18. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation. PMID:27624869

  19. Development and testing of a fluorescence biosensor for glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Sapsford, Kim

    2012-06-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive biosensors for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance management of diabetes mellitus and improve patient outcome in intensive care settings. Recent studies have indicated that implantable biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) can provide high sensitivity in quantifying glucose concentrations. However, standard approaches for determining the potential for interference from other biological constituents have not been established. The aim of this work was to design and optimize a FRET-based glucose sensor and assess its specificity to glucose. A sensor based on competitive binding between concanavalin A and dextran, labeled with long-wavelength acceptor and donor fluorophores, was developed. This process included optimization of dextran molecular weight and donor concentration, acceptor to donor ratio, and hydrogel concentration, as well as the number of polymer layers for encapsulation. The biosensor performance was characterized in terms of its response to clinically relevant glucose concentrations. The potential for interference and the development of test methods to evaluate this effect were studied using a potential clinical interferent, maltose. Results indicated that our biosensor had a prediction accuracy of better than 11% and that the robustness to maltose was highly dependent on glucose level.

  20. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  1. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hochreiter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a cleavage; (b conformational-change; (c mechanical force and (d changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  2. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of microring resonators for biospecific interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalyan, Tatevik; Besselink, Geert A. J.; Heideman, Rene G.; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    Integrated optical biosensors based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometers and Microring Resonators are widely used for food/drug monitoring and protein studies thank to their high intrinsic sensitivity, easy integration and miniaturization, and low cost.1, 2 In this study, we present a system to perform antibody interaction analysis using a photonic chip made of an array of six microring resonators (MRRs) based on the TriPleX platform. A compact system is presented where the input light is provided by a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) pigtailed to a single mode fiber and operating at a ≍ 850nm wavelength. The output signal is detected by PIN photodetectors placed in the optical signal read-out module (the so-called OSROM) and processed by an easy-to-use Fourier Transform algorithm. Bulk sensitivity (Sb=98+/-2.1 nm/RIU) and Limit of Detection (LOD=(7.5+/- 0.5) x10-6 RIU) are measured and appeared to be very similar for the six MRRs on the same chip,3 which is an important property for multianalyte detection. An analysis of the anti-biotin interaction with immobilized biotin is performed by using different concentrations of anti-biotin antibody. The dependence of the resonance wavelength shift from the antibody concentration, as well as the association and the dissociation rate constants are calculated. For the average dissociation constant (KD) of anti-biotin antibody toward immobilized biotin, a value of (1.9+/-0.5) x10-7M is estimated, which is of the same order of magnitude of other published data.4 Furthermore, the specificity of the interaction is confirmed by using negative control antibodies and by performing competition with free, i.e., dissolved, biotin. In addition, the functional surface of the sensors could be regenerated for repeated measurements up to eight times by using 10 mM glycine/HCl pH 1.5.

  4. Label‐Free and Regenerative Electrochemical Microfluidic Biosensors for Continual Monitoring of Cell Secretomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Tugba; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Avci, Huseyin; Hu, Ning; Kim, Duckjin; Branco, Cristina; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Silvestri, Antonia; Kang, Jian; Desalvo, Anna; Hussaini, Mohammed Abdullah; Chae, Su‐Kyoung; Polini, Alessandro; Bhise, Nupura; Hussain, Mohammad Asif; Lee, HeaYeon

    2017-01-01

    Development of an efficient sensing platform capable of continual monitoring of biomarkers is needed to assess the functionality of the in vitro organoids and to evaluate their biological responses toward pharmaceutical compounds or chemical species over extended periods of time. Here, a novel label‐free microfluidic electrochemical (EC) biosensor with a unique built‐in on‐chip regeneration capability for continual measurement of cell‐secreted soluble biomarkers from an organoid culture in a fully automated manner without attenuating the sensor sensitivity is reported. The microfluidic EC biosensors are integrated with a human liver‐on‐a‐chip platform for continual monitoring of the metabolic activity of the organoids by measuring the levels of secreted biomarkers for up to 7 d, where the metabolic activity of the organoids is altered by a systemically applied drug. The variations in the biomarker levels are successfully measured by the microfluidic regenerative EC biosensors and agree well with cellular viability and enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay analyses, validating the accuracy of the unique sensing platform. It is believed that this versatile and robust microfluidic EC biosensor that is capable of automated and continual detection of soluble biomarkers will find widespread use for long‐term monitoring of human organoids during drug toxicity studies or efficacy assessments of in vitro platforms. PMID:28546915

  5. Label-Free and Regenerative Electrochemical Microfluidic Biosensors for Continual Monitoring of Cell Secretomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Su Ryon; Kilic, Tugba; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Avci, Huseyin; Hu, Ning; Kim, Duckjin; Branco, Cristina; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Silvestri, Antonia; Kang, Jian; Desalvo, Anna; Hussaini, Mohammed Abdullah; Chae, Su-Kyoung; Polini, Alessandro; Bhise, Nupura; Hussain, Mohammad Asif; Lee, HeaYeon; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Development of an efficient sensing platform capable of continual monitoring of biomarkers is needed to assess the functionality of the in vitro organoids and to evaluate their biological responses toward pharmaceutical compounds or chemical species over extended periods of time. Here, a novel label-free microfluidic electrochemical (EC) biosensor with a unique built-in on-chip regeneration capability for continual measurement of cell-secreted soluble biomarkers from an organoid culture in a fully automated manner without attenuating the sensor sensitivity is reported. The microfluidic EC biosensors are integrated with a human liver-on-a-chip platform for continual monitoring of the metabolic activity of the organoids by measuring the levels of secreted biomarkers for up to 7 d, where the metabolic activity of the organoids is altered by a systemically applied drug. The variations in the biomarker levels are successfully measured by the microfluidic regenerative EC biosensors and agree well with cellular viability and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses, validating the accuracy of the unique sensing platform. It is believed that this versatile and robust microfluidic EC biosensor that is capable of automated and continual detection of soluble biomarkers will find widespread use for long-term monitoring of human organoids during drug toxicity studies or efficacy assessments of in vitro platforms.

  6. An automated optofluidic biosensor platform combining interferometric sensors and injection moulded microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydzik, C; Gavela, A F; Herranz, S; Roccisano, J; Knoerzer, M; Thurgood, P; Khoshmanesh, K; Mitchell, A; Lechuga, L M

    2017-08-08

    A primary limitation preventing practical implementation of photonic biosensors within point-of-care platforms is their integration with fluidic automation subsystems. For most diagnostic applications, photonic biosensors require complex fluid handling protocols; this is especially prominent in the case of competitive immunoassays, commonly used for detection of low-concentration, low-molecular weight biomarkers. For this reason, complex automated microfluidic systems are needed to realise the full point-of-care potential of photonic biosensors. To fulfil this requirement, we propose an on-chip valve-based microfluidic automation module, capable of automating such complex fluid handling. This module is realised through application of a PDMS injection moulding fabrication technique, recently described in our previous work, which enables practical fabrication of normally closed pneumatically actuated elastomeric valves. In this work, these valves are configured to achieve multiplexed reagent addressing for an on-chip diaphragm pump, providing the sample and reagent processing capabilities required for automation of cyclic competitive immunoassays. Application of this technique simplifies fabrication and introduces the potential for mass production, bringing point-of-care integration of complex automated microfluidics into the realm of practicality. This module is integrated with a highly sensitive, label-free bimodal waveguide photonic biosensor, and is demonstrated in the context of a proof-of-concept biosensing assay, detecting the low-molecular weight antibiotic tetracycline.

  7. Artificial DNA and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Roberta; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The combined use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and modified or mimic oligonucleotides have expanded diagnostic capabilities of SPR-based biosensors and have allowed detailed studies of molecular recognition processes. This review summarizes the most significant advances made in this area over the past 15 years.   Functional and conformationally restricted DNA analogs (e.g., aptamers and PNAs) when used as components of SPR biosensors contribute to enhance the biosensor sensitivity and selectivity. At the same time, the SPR technology brings advantages that allows forbetter exploration of underlying properties of non-natural nucleic acid structures such us DNAzymes, LNA and HNA.

  8. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  9. Shadow masking for nanomaterial-based biosensors incorporated with a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiyong; Lee, Innam; Luo, Xiliang; Cui, Xinyan Tracy; Yun, Minhee

    2013-06-01

    Integrating PDMS channels and chips containing pre-functionalized biosensors into microfluidic devices with irreversible sealing has been challenging because the integration process requires use of an O2 plasma treatment that usually destroys the biosensors. In this study, we examined the usefulness of introducing a shadow mask into the process as a method of protecting the pre-functionalized biosensors. Single nanowire sensors were pre-functionalized with fluorescently labeled biomolecules and then subjected to O2 plasma with and without the shadow mask. Results from the two groups were then compared. Those sensors without a shadow mask were destroyed, giving the sensor an infinite resistance and reduced fluorescence intensity. In contrast, the sensors with the shadow mask were protected and exhibited little changes in the resistance and fluorescence intensity. Then two different nanowires, aptamers incorporated polypyrrole nanowire (entrapment) and antibodies immobilized polyaniline nanowire (surface covalent binding), were used to investigate their detection performance before and after the plasma treatment in the presence of shadow mask. The protected samples showed a good sensitivity to the targets with a slight reduction in response compared with the as-prepared samples. After the O2 plasma treatment, the microfluidic channels were integrated with single nanowire biosensors. This microfluidic biosensor showed a high sensitivity with about ~0.5 % change in conductance at the lowest IgE protein concentration of 10 pM.

  10. Cytometer on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (approximately 50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of one the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the

  11. The application of FRET biosensors to visualize Src activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2008-02-01

    Src kinase, the first tyrosine kinase discovered, has been shown to play critical roles in a variety of cellular processes, including cell motility/migration, mechanotranduction, and cancer development. Based on fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET), we have developed and characterized a genetically encoded single-molecule Src biosensor, which enables the imaging and quantification of temporal-spatial activation of Src in live cells. In this paper, we summarize the application of this biosensor to study a variety of cellular functions. First, we introduced a local mechanical stimulation by applying laser-tweezer-induced traction on fibronectin-coated beads adhered to the cells. Using a membrane-anchored Src biosensor, we observed a wave propagation of Src activation in a direction opposite to the applied force. This Src reporter was also applied to visualize the interplays between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions. The results indicate that integrin-ligation can induce Src activation around cell-cell junctions and cause the disruption of adherens junctions. Lastly, the flow-induced dynamic Src activation at subcellular levels was visualized by the FRET biosensor simultaneously with actin-fused mCherry, a red fluorescence protein. Our results indicate that shear stress induced a moderate up-regulation of Src activation in the whole cell, but a significant translocation of active Src from perinuclear regions toward cell periphery. In summary, our novel Src biosensor has made it possible to monitor key signaling transduction cascades involving Src in live cells with temporal-spatial characterization in mechanobiology.

  12. Slow light engineering for high Q high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Ray T

    2012-01-01

    Current trends in photonic crystal microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), that focus on small and smaller sensors have faced a bottleneck trying to balance two contradictory requirements of resonance quality factor and sensitivity. By simultaneous control of the radiation loss and optical mode volumes, we show that both requirements can be satisfied simultaneously. Microcavity sensors are designed in which resonances show highest Q ≈ 9300 in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as well as highest sensitivity among photonic crystal biosensors. We experimentally demonstrated mass sensitivity 8.8 atto-grams with sensitivity per unit area of 0.8 pg/mm(2). Highest sensitivity, irrespective of the dissociation constant K(d), is demonstrated among all existing label-free optical biosensors in silicon at the concentration of 0.1 μg/ml. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biosensors for the Detection of Food Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Mezzolla, Valeria; Primiceri, Elisabetta; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2014-09-02

    Food pathogens frequently cause foodborne diseases. There is a need to rapidly identify the source of the bacteria in order to contain their spread and epidemics. A pre-enrichment culture or a direct culture on agar plate are standard microbiological methods. In this review, we present an update on alternative molecular methods to nucleic acid-based detection for species identification. Biosensor-based methods rely on the recognition of antigen targets or receptors by antibodies, aptamers or high-affinity ligands. The captured antigens may be then directly or indirectly detected through an antibody or high-affinity and high-specificity recognition molecule. Various different detection methods are discussed, from label-free sensors and immunosensors to fluorescence-based ones. Each method shows advantages and disadvantages in terms of equipment, sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effectiveness. Finally, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices are introduced briefly, with the potential to be fast, sensitive and useful for on-site bacteria detection in food processing laboratories to check potential contamination by sample monitoring combined with a rapid pre-enrichment step.

  14. Biosensors for the Detection of Food Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiro Poltronieri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food pathogens frequently cause foodborne diseases. There is a need to rapidly identify the source of the bacteria in order to contain their spread and epidemics. A pre-enrichment culture or a direct culture on agar plate are standard microbiological methods. In this review, we present an update on alternative molecular methods to nucleic acid-based detection for species identification. Biosensor-based methods rely on the recognition of antigen targets or receptors by antibodies, aptamers or high-affinity ligands. The captured antigens may be then directly or indirectly detected through an antibody or high-affinity and high-specificity recognition molecule. Various different detection methods are discussed, from label-free sensors and immunosensors to fluorescence-based ones. Each method shows advantages and disadvantages in terms of equipment, sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effectiveness. Finally, lab-on-a-chip (LOC devices are introduced briefly, with the potential to be fast, sensitive and useful for on-site bacteria detection in food processing laboratories to check potential contamination by sample monitoring combined with a rapid pre-enrichment step.

  15. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immobilized proteins were removed using carbon dioxide aerosols. • We observed high removal efficiencies due to the aerosol treatment. • We confirmed the removal with FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization. • This technique is a fast and damage-free method to reuse a sensor surface. - Abstract: Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO{sub 2}), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1–20 μg mL{sup −1}) of E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8 s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC–Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors.

  16. CMOS capacitive sensors for lab-on-chip applications a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2010-01-01

    The main components of CMOS capacitive biosensors including sensing electrodes, bio-functionalized sensing layer, interface circuitries and microfluidic packaging are verbosely explained in chapters 2-6 after a brief introduction on CMOS based LoCs in Chapter 1. CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications is written in a simple pedagogical way. It emphasises practical aspects of fully integrated CMOS biosensors rather than mathematical calculations and theoretical details. By using CMOS Capacitive Sensors for Lab-on-Chip Applications, the reader will have circuit design methodologies,

  17. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  18. Biosensors based on graphene oxide and its biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieon; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Seongchan; Min, Dal-Hee

    2016-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is one of the most attributed materials for opening new possibilities in the development of next generation biosensors. Due to the coexistence of hydrophobic domain from pristine graphite structure and hydrophilic oxygen containing functional groups, GO exhibits good water dispersibility, biocompatibility, and high affinity for specific biomolecules as well as properties of graphene itself partly depending on preparation methods. These properties of GO provided a lot of opportunities for the development of novel biological sensing platforms, including biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and electrochemical detection. In this review, we classify GO-based biological sensors developed so far by their signal generation strategy and provide the comprehensive overview of them. In addition, we offer insights into how the GO attributed in each sensor system and how they improved the sensing performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanobioengineering and Characterization of a Novel Estrogen Receptor Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfrid Boireau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed an original supramolecular assembly on a surface of sensor composed of an innovative combination of an engineered cytochrome b5 and a modified nucleic acid bound to a synthetic lipid hemimembrane. The protein/DNA block, called (PDNA 2, was synthesized and purified before its immobilization onto a hybrid bilayer reconstituted on a gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and atomic force microscopy (AFM were engaged in parallel on the same substrates in order to better understand dynamic events that occur at the surface of the biosensor. Good correlations were obtained in terms of specificity and reversibility. These findings allow us to present a first application of such biosensor in the study of the interaction processes between nuclear receptor and DNA.

  20. Screening and Biosensor-Based Approaches for Lung Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of lung cancer helps to reduce the cancer death rate significantly. Over the years, investigators worldwide have extensively investigated many screening modalities for lung cancer detection, including computerized tomography, chest X-ray, positron emission tomography, sputum cytology, magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy. However, these techniques are not suitable for patients with other pathologies. Developing a rapid and sensitive technique for early diagnosis of lung cancer is urgently needed. Biosensor-based techniques have been recently recommended as a rapid and cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of lung tumor markers. This paper reviews the recent development in screening and biosensor-based techniques for early lung cancer detection.

  1. DNA Chip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. In the human ge- nome, the ratio between coding and non-coding DNA is very low (less than 3% of the human .... construction of a Tm-specific chip, i.e. all the oligos/cDNA on the chip will hybridize at the same temperature. The techniques available are still not able to create a chip ...

  2. A review on impedimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a sensitive technique for the analysis of the interfacial properties related to biorecognition events such as reactions catalyzed by enzymes, biomolecular recognition events of specific binding proteins, lectins, receptors, nucleic acids, whole cells, antibodies or antibody-related substances, occurring at the modified surface. Many studies on impedimetric biosensors are focused on immunosensors and aptasensors. In impedimetric immunosensors, antibodies and antigens are bound each other and thus immunocomplex is formed and the electrode is coated with a blocking layer. As a result of that electron transfer resistance increases. In impedimetric aptasensors, impedance changes following the binding of target sequences, conformational changes, or DNA damages. Impedimetric biosensors allow direct detection of biomolecular recognition events without using enzyme labels. In this paper, impedimetric biosensors are reviewed and the most interesting ones are discussed.

  3. Measurement and Simulation Techniques For Piezoresistive Microcantilever Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aan Febriansyah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Applications of microcantilevers as biosensors have been explored by many researchers for the applications in medicine, biological, chemistry, and environmental monitoring. This research discusses a design of measurement method and simuations for piezoresistive microcantilever as a biosensor, which consist of designing Wheatstone bridge circuit as object detector, simulation of resonance frequency shift based on Euler Bernoulli Beam equation, and microcantilever vibration simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5. The piezoresistive microcantilever used here is Seiko Instrument Technology (Japan product with length of 110 ?m, width of 50 ?m, and thickness of 1 ?m. Microcantilever mass is 12.815 ng, including the mass receptor. The sample object in this research is bacteria EColi. One bacteria mass is assumed to 0.3 pg. Simulation results show that the mass of one bacterium will cause the deflection of 0,03053 nm and resonance frequency value of 118,90 kHz. Moreover, four bacterium will cause the deflection of 0,03054 nm and resonance frequency value of 118,68 kHz. These datas indicate that the increasing of the bacteria mass increases the deflection value and reduces the value of resonance frequency.

  4. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Dudchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on the biosensor performance are given. The fructose biosensor is characterized by high signal reproducibility and selectivity to fructose. The developed conductometric biosensor can be successfully used for fructose monitoring in the procedures of food and clinical diagnostic.

  5. Micro-and nanoelectromechanical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nicu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Most books dedicated to the issues of bio-sensing are organized by the well-known scheme of a biosensor. In this book, the authors have deliberately decided to break away from the conventional way of treating biosensing research by uniquely addressing biomolecule immobilization methods on a solid surface, fluidics issues and biosensing-related transduction techniques, rather than focusing simply on the biosensor. The aim is to provide a contemporary snapshot of the biosensing landscape without neglecting the seminal references or products where needed, following the downscaling (from the micr

  6. Microbial biosensors for organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    Organophosphates, amongst the most toxic substance known, are used widely in agriculture around the world. Their extensive use, however, has resulted in their occurrence in the water and food supply threatening humans and animals. Therefore, there is a need for determination of these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, and rapidly in the field. The present work is a brief review on the recent advancements in amperometric, potentiometric, and optical biosensors using genetically engineered microorganisms expressing organophosphate hydrolyzing enzyme intracellularly or anchored on the cell surface for the detection of organophosphate pesticides. The benefits and limitations associated with such microbial biosensors are delineated.

  7. Advances in biosensor-based analysis for antimicrobial residues in foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Delahaut, P.; Fodey, T.; Haughey, S.A.; Elliott, C.; Weigel, S.

    2010-01-01

    Biosensors are used for a large number of applications within biotechnology, including the pharmaceutical industry and life sciences. Since the production of Biacore surface-plasmon resonance instruments in the early 1990s, there has been steadily growing use of this technology for the detection of

  8. Biosensors in clinical chemistry - 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Paul

    2011-09-18

    Research activity and applications of biosensors for measurement of analytes of clinical interest over the last eight years are reviewed. Nanotechnology has been applied to improve performance of biosensors using electrochemical, optical, mechanical and physical modes of transduction, and to allow arrays of biosensors to be constructed for parallel sensing. Biosensors have been proposed for measurement of cancer biomarkers, cardiac biomarkers as well as biomarkers for autoimmune disease, infectious disease and for DNA analysis. Novel applications of biosensors include measurements in alternate sample types, such as saliva. Biosensors based on immobilized whole cells have found new applications, for example to detect the presence of cancer and to monitor the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The number of research reports describing new biosensors for analytes of clinical interest continues to increase; however, movement of biosensors from the research laboratory to the clinical laboratory has been slow. The greatest impact of biosensors will be felt at point-of-care testing locations without laboratory support. Integration of biosensors into reliable, easy-to-use and rugged instrumentation will be required to assure success of biosensor-based systems at the point-of-care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  10. THE POTENTIOMETRIC UREA BIOSENSOR USING CHITOSAN MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Mulyasuryani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric urea biosensor development is based on urea hydrolysis by urease resulted CO2. The biosensor is used chitosan membrane and the H3O+ electrode as a transducer. The research was studied of effecting pH and membrane thickness to the biosensor performance. The best biosensor performance resulted at pH = 7.3 and 0.2 mm of membrane thickness. The biosensor has a Nerntian factor 28.47 mV/decade; the concentration range is 0.1 up to 6.00 ppm; and the limit of detection is 0.073 ppm. The response time of this biosensor is 280 seconds, efficiency 32 samples and accuracy 94% up to 99%.   Keywords: biosensor, potentiometry, urea, chitosan membrane

  11. Enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzyadevych S. V.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination. Methods. A conductometric transducer consisting of two gold pairs of electrodes was applied. Three-enzyme membrane (glucose oxidase, mutarotase, -glucosidase immobilized on the surface of the conductometric transducer was used as a bioselective element. Results. A linear range of maltose conductometric biosensor was from 0,002 mM to 1 mM for glucose and maltose detection. The time of maltose analysis in solution was 1–2 minutes. The dependence of biosensor responses to substrate on pH, ionic strength, and buffer capacity of work solution was studied. The data of biosensor selectivity are presented. The developed conductometric biosensor is characterized by high operational stability and signal reproducibility. Conclusion. The enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination has been developed. The analytical characteristics of the maltose biosensor were investigated. The proposed method could be used in food industry to control and optimize production.

  12. Magnetoelastic Biosensor Design: an Experimental Study of Sensor Response and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh GUNTUPALLI

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of an investigation into the development and characterization of polyclonal antibody immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB monolayer technique was employed for antibody (specific to Salmonella. sp immobilization on rectangular shaped strip magnetoelastic sensors. Biosensor performance was investigated by exposing to graded concentrations (5×101 through 5×108 cfu/ml of Salmonella typhimurium solutions in a flow through mode. Bacterial binding to the antibody on the sensor surfaces changed the resonance parameters, and these changes were quantified by the sensor’s resonance frequency shift. Biosensor response towards S. typhimurium was measured in different liquid samples (water, fat free milk and apple juice and as well as in the presence of extraneous microorganisms (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. Biosensor performance was characterized by evaluating mechanical merit factor (Q-value in different liquids, specificity towards various bacterial species and also the thermal stability of biosensor was investigated at different temperatures 25, 45 and 65 °C.

  13. QCM DNA biosensor for the diagnosis of a fish pathogenic virus VHSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Rok; Jeong, Hyun-Do; Hong, Suhee

    2010-08-15

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is one of the most serious viral diseases damaging both fresh and marine fish species. VHS caused by VHSV and diagnosis of VHSV has been dependent on the conventional methods, such as cell culture and RT-PCR, which takes a few days or several hours. This study demonstrates a rapid and sensitive QCM biosensor for diagnosis of VHSV infection in fish. The QCM biosensor was developed to detect a main viral RNA encoding G protein in VHSV using the specific DNA probe. To maximize the sensitivity of the biosensor, we prepared three different DNA probes which modified 3' end of DNA by thiol, amine, or biotin and compared three different immobilisation methods on quartz surface coated with gold: immobilisation of thiol labelled probe DNA on naked gold surface, immobilisation of amino labelled probe DNA on gold surface prepared as carboxyl chip using MPA followed by EDC/NHS activation, and immobilisation of biotin labelled probe DNA on gold surface after immobilising avidin on carboxyl chip prior to biotin. As a result, immobilisation method using avidin-biotin interaction was most efficient to immobilise probe DNA and to detect target DNA. The QCM biosensor system using biotinylated probe DNA was stable enough to withstand 32 times of repeated regenerations and the detection limit was 0.0016muM. Diagnosis using the QCM biosensor system was more sensitive and much faster than a conventional RT-PCR analysis in detecting the viral RNA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of an optical biosensor based on elastic light scattering from diamond-, glass-, and sapphire microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Murib, Mohammed Sharif; Tran, Anh Quang; De Ceuninck, Ward; Schöning, J.M.; Nesladek, Milos; SERPENGÜZEL, Ali; Wagner, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein recognition are now standard tools in biology. In addition, the special optical properties of microsphere resonators expressed by the high quality factor (Q-factor) of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) or morphology dependent resonances (MDRs) have attracted the attention of the biophotonic community. Microsphere-based biosensors are considered as powerful candidates to achieve label-free recognition of single molecules due to the high sensitivity of thei...

  15. Aptamer-functionalized nano-biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials have become one of the most interesting sensing materials because of their unique size- and shape-dependent optical properties, high surface energy and surface-to-volume ratio, and tunable surface properties. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind their target ligands with high affinity. The use of nanomaterials that are bioconjugated with aptamers for selective and sensitive detection of analytes such as small molecules, metal ions, proteins, and cells has been demonstrated. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional aptamers with different types of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Colorimetry, fluorescence, electrochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and magnetic resonance imaging are common detection modes for a broad range of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity when using aptamer bioconjugated nanomaterials (Apt-NMs). We highlight the important roles that the size and concentration of nanomaterials, the secondary structure and density of aptamers, and the multivalent interactions play in determining the specificity and sensitivity of the nanosensors towards analytes. Advantages and disadvantages of the Apt-NMs for bioapplications are focused.

  16. Aptamer-Functionalized Nano-Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chia Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have become one of the most interesting sensing materials because of their unique size- and shape-dependent optical properties, high surface energy and surface-to-volume ratio, and tunable surface properties. Aptamers are oligonucleotides that can bind their target ligands with high affinity. The use of nanomaterials that are bioconjugated with aptamers for selective and sensitive detection of analytes such as small molecules, metal ions, proteins, and cells has been demonstrated. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional aptamers with different types of nanomaterials, including quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, metallic NPs, and carbon nanotubes. Colorimetry, fluorescence, electrochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, and magnetic resonance imaging are common detection modes for a broad range of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity when using aptamer bioconjugated nanomaterials (Apt-NMs. We highlight the important roles that the size and concentration of nanomaterials, the secondary structure and density of aptamers, and the multivalent interactions play in determining the specificity and sensitivity of the nanosensors towards analytes. Advantages and disadvantages of the Apt-NMs for bioapplications are focused.

  17. Novel low-loss waveguide delay lines using Vernier ring resonators for on-chip multi-λ microwave photonic signal processors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Hoekman, M.; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, Rene; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, novel photonic delay lines (DLs) using Vernier/non-identical ring resonators (VRRs) are proposed and demonstrated, which are capable of simultaneous generation of multiple different delays at different wavelengths (frequencies). The simple device architectures and full

  18. Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; White, Victor; Dougherty, Dennis; Maurer, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop improved biosensors of a type based on ion channels in biomimetic membranes. These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. As described, these sensors offer a number of advantages over prior sensors of this type.

  19. Biosensors and multiple mycotoxin analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, B. van der; Spath, S.; Dietrich, H.; Stigter, E.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Osenbruggen, T. van; Koopal, K.

    2003-01-01

    An immunochemical biosensor assay for the detection of multiple mycotoxins in a sample is described.The inhibition assay is designed to measure four different mycotoxins in a single measurement, following extraction, sample clean-up and incubation with an appropriate cocktail of anti-mycotoxin

  20. Portable surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for the detection of fluoroquinolone antibiotic residues in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Fátima; Pinacho, Daniel G; Sánchez-Baeza, Francisco; Marco, M Pilar

    2011-05-11

    An inexpensive and portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor, SPReeta Evaluation Kit SPR3, has been used to develop a biosensor for the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) and to demonstrate its performance analyzing FQ residues in milk samples. The SPReeta three-channel gold chips were activated with a mixed self-assembled monolayer (m-SAM) and functionalized with a FQ haptenized protein. Binding of the antibody produced a concentration-dependent increase of the SPR signal as a result of the change in the refraction index. Similarly, the presence of the FQ produced a dose-dependent decrease of the response, which allowed a good limit of detection (LOD) to be obtained (1.0 ± 0.4 μg L(-1) for enrofloxacin in buffer). The response was reproducible in all three channels, on different injections and days, and also between chips. Milk samples could be analyzed after a simple sample treatment involving fat removal by centrifugation and dilution with water. Under these conditions calibration curves were obtained showing that FQ residues can be analyzed in milk samples with an IC(50) value of 26.4 ± 7.2 μg L(-1) and a LOD of 2.0 ± 0.2 μg L(-1) (for enrofloxacin), far below the European Union regulations for this antibiotic family in this matrix. Finally, the paper also demonstrates that the biosensor is able to selectively detect the presence of FQs in milk samples, even in the presence of other antibiotics. Enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and norfloxacin residues were detected in blind samples supplied by Nestlé Co.

  1. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dietler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  2. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  3. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-17

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

  4. Photonic Biosensor Chips for Label-Free Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    Optical fibers are ideal for transmission of light due to their low loss. This is less important for optical sensors where chemical compatibility, size and price are more important. These parameters can be optimized by using planar integrated optics and fabrication methods from the semiconductor...

  5. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  6. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrigno, Paul?Ko

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite...

  7. Plasmonic nanoparticles: Towards the fabrication of biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Au and Ag nanoparticles are mainly employed in the fabrication of biosensors owing to their unique optical properties compared to other noble metal nanoparticles. Many biosensors are fabricated for the rapid detection of different analytes such as organic and inorganic molecules, biomolecules like DNA, proteins, biotoxins and pathogens. In this mini review we mainly discuss on the usage of Au and Ag nanoparticles for the fabrication of colorimetric, SERS and two photon based photoluminescence biosensors.

  8. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bosch Ojeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  9. Disposable cartridge biosensor platform for portable diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaras, Yusuf S.; Cakmak, Onur; Gunduz, Ali B.; Saglam, Gokhan; Olcer, Selim; Mostafazadeh, Aref; Baris, Ibrahim; Civitci, Fehmi; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Urey, Hakan

    2017-03-01

    We developed two types of cantilever-based biosensors for portable diagnostics applications. One sensor is based on MEMS cantilever chip mounted in a microfluidic channel and the other sensor is based on a movable optical fiber placed across a microfluidic channel. Both types of sensors were aimed at direct mechanical measurement of coagulation time in a disposable cartridge using plasma or whole blood samples. There are several similarities and also some important differences between the MEMS based and the optical fiber based solutions. The aim of this paper is to provide a comparison between the two solutions and the results. For both types of sensors, actuation of the cantilever or the moving fiber is achieved using an electro coil and the readout is optical. Since both the actuation and sensing are remote, no electrical connections are required for the cartridge. Therefore it is possible to build low cost disposable cartridges. The reader unit for the cartridge contains light sources, photodetectors, the electro coil, a heater, analog electronics, and a microprocessor. The reader unit has different optical interfaces for the cartridges that have MEMS cantilevers and moving fibers. MEMS based platform has better sensitivity but optomechanical alignment is a challenge and measurements with whole blood were not possible due to high scattering of light by the red blood cells. Fiber sensor based platform has relaxed optomechanical tolerances, ease of manufacturing, and it allows measurements in whole blood. Both sensors were tested using control plasma samples for activated-Partial-Thromboplastin-Time (aPTT) measurements. Control plasma test results matched with the manufacturer's datasheet. Optical fiber based system was tested for aPTT tests with human whole blood samples and the proposed platform provided repeatable test results making the system method of choice for portable diagnostics.

  10. Microfluidic-integrated biosensors: prospects for point-of-care diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suveen; Kumar, Saurabh; Ali, Md Azahar; Anand, Pinki; Agrawal, Ved Varun; John, Renu; Maji, Sagar; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing demand to integrate biosensors with microfluidics to provide miniaturized platforms with many favorable properties, such as reduced sample volume, decreased processing time, low cost analysis and low reagent consumption. These microfluidics-integrated biosensors would also have numerous advantages such as laminar flow, minimal handling of hazardous materials, multiple sample detection in parallel, portability and versatility in design. Microfluidics involves the science and technology of manipulation of fluids at the micro- to nano-liter level. It is predicted that combining biosensors with microfluidic chips will yield enhanced analytical capability, and widen the possibilities for applications in clinical diagnostics. The recent developments in microfluidics have helped researchers working in industries and educational institutes to adopt some of these platforms for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. This review focuses on the latest advancements in the fields of microfluidic biosensing technologies, and on the challenges and possible solutions for translation of this technology for POC diagnostic applications. We also discuss the fabrication techniques required for developing microfluidic-integrated biosensors, recently reported biomarkers, and the prospects of POC diagnostics in the medical industry. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Detection of heart failure-related biomarker in whole blood with graphene field effect transistor biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong-Min; Xiao, Meng-Meng; Li, Yu-Tao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2017-05-15

    Since brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) has become internationally recognized biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure (HF), it is highly desirable to search for a novel sensing tool for detecting the patient's BNP level at the early stage. Here we report a platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) field effect transistor (FET) biosensor coupled with a microfilter system for label-free and highly sensitive detection of BNP in whole blood. The PtNPs-decorated rGO FET sensor was obtained by drop-casting rGO onto the pre-fabricated FET chip and subsequently assembling PtNPs on the graphene surface. After anti-BNP was bound to the PtNPs surface, BNP was successfully detected by the anti-BNP immobilized FET biosensor. It was found that the developed FET biosensor was able to achieve a low detection limitation of 100fM. Moreover, BNP was successfully detected in human whole blood sample treated by a custom-made microfilter, suggesting the sensor's capability of working in a complex sample matrix. The developed FET biosensor provides a new sensing platform for protein detection, showing its potential applications in clinic sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The utilization of BSA-modified chip on the investigation of ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    experimental channel and the without-active BSA surface was designed as the reference channel to improve the quality of the binding data and prevent a number of experimental artifacts to complicate the final biosensor analysis. Our results demonstrated that the BSA-modified chip was effective not only in binding the ...

  13. Single and Double Superconducting Coplanar Waveguide Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Liu, Jian-She; Li, Hao; Li, Tie-Fu; Chen, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Transmission characteristics of single and double coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators are simulated. The crosstalk of two CPW resonators located on the same chip is observed in simulation as well as in low temperature measurement results. The crosstalk behaves as exponential attenuation versus the distance between two resonators.

  14. Droplet-based Biosensing for Lab-on-a-Chip, Open Microfluidics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Dak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Low cost, portable sensors can transform health care by bringing easily available diagnostic devices to low and middle income population, particularly in developing countries. Sample preparation, analyte handling and labeling are primary cost concerns for traditional lab-based diagnostic systems. Lab-on-a-chip (LoC platforms based on droplet-based microfluidics promise to integrate and automate these complex and expensive laboratory procedures onto a single chip; the cost will be further reduced if label-free biosensors could be integrated onto the LoC platforms. Here, we review some recent developments of label-free, droplet-based biosensors, compatible with “open” digital microfluidic systems. These low-cost droplet-based biosensors overcome some of the fundamental limitations of the classical sensors, enabling timely diagnosis. We identify the key challenges that must be addressed to make these sensors commercially viable and summarize a number of promising research directions.

  15. Droplet-based Biosensing for Lab-on-a-Chip, Open Microfluidics Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dak, Piyush; Ebrahimi, Aida; Swaminathan, Vikhram; Duarte-Guevara, Carlos; Bashir, Rashid; Alam, Muhammad A

    2016-04-14

    Low cost, portable sensors can transform health care by bringing easily available diagnostic devices to low and middle income population, particularly in developing countries. Sample preparation, analyte handling and labeling are primary cost concerns for traditional lab-based diagnostic systems. Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) platforms based on droplet-based microfluidics promise to integrate and automate these complex and expensive laboratory procedures onto a single chip; the cost will be further reduced if label-free biosensors could be integrated onto the LoC platforms. Here, we review some recent developments of label-free, droplet-based biosensors, compatible with "open" digital microfluidic systems. These low-cost droplet-based biosensors overcome some of the fundamental limitations of the classical sensors, enabling timely diagnosis. We identify the key challenges that must be addressed to make these sensors commercially viable and summarize a number of promising research directions.

  16. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  17. Low-cost label-free biosensors using photonic crystals embedded between crossed polarizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Bog, Uwe; Sekula, Sylwia; Mappes, Timo; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2010-08-30

    There is a strong need for low-cost biosensors to enable rapid, on-site analysis of biological, biomedical, or chemical substances. We propose a platform for label-free optical biosensors based on applying the analyte onto a surface-functionalized photonic crystal slab and performing a transmission measurement with two crossed polarization filters. This dark-field approach allows for efficient background suppression as only the photonic crystal guided-mode resonances interacting with the functionalized surface experience significant polarization rotation. We present a compact biosensor demonstrator using a low-cost light emitting diode and a simple photodiode capable of detecting the binding kinetics of a 2.5 nM solution of the protein streptavidin on a biotin-functionalized photonic crystal surface.

  18. Rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by a new array format-based surface plasmon resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Chang, Chia-Chen; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wei, Chia-Fong; Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2012-03-01

    Tubercle bacillus [TB] is one of the most important chronic infectious diseases that cause millions of deaths annually. While conventional smear microscopy and culture methods are widely used for diagnosis of TB, the former is insensitive, and the latter takes up to 6 to 8 weeks to provide a result, limiting the value of these methods in aiding diagnosis and intermediate decisions on treatment. Therefore, a rapid detection method is essential for the diagnosis, prognosis assessment, and recurrence monitoring. A new surface plasmon resonance [SPR] biosensor based on an array format, which allowed immobilizing nine TB antigens onto the sensor chip, was constructed. Simultaneous determination of multiple TB antibodies in serum had been accomplished with this array-based SPR system. The results were compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a conventional immunological method. Array-based SPR showed more advantages in providing label-free and real-time detection. Additionally, the high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of TB infection showed its potential for future development of biosensor arrays for TB diagnosis.

  19. Detection of norovirus virus-like particles using a surface plasmon resonance-assisted fluoroimmunosensor optimized for quantum dot fluorescent labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiba, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Yuki; Wang, Xiaomin; Shirato, Haruko; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Taniguchi, Koki; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2017-07-15

    A highly sensitive biosensor to detect norovirus in environment is desired to prevent the spread of infection. In this study, we investigated a design of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-assisted fluoroimmunosensor to increase its sensitivity and performed detection of norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs). A quantum dot fluorescent dye was employed because of its large Stokes shift. The sensor design was optimized for the CdSe-ZnS-based quantum dots. The optimal design was applied to a simple SPR-assisted fluoroimmunosensor that uses a sensor chip equipped with a V-shaped trench. Excitation efficiency of the quantum dots, degree of electric field enhancement by SPR, and intensity of autofluorescence of a substrate of the sensor chip were theoretically and experimentally evaluated to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. As the result, an excitation wavelength of 390nm was selected to excite SPR on an Al film of the sensor chip. The sandwich assay of norovirus VLPs was performed using the designed sensor. Minimum detectable concentration of 0.01ng/mL, which corresponds to 100 virus-like particles included in the detection region of the V-trench, was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  1. Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Beni, Valerio; Nilsson, D.; Arven, P.; Norberg, P.; Gustafsson, G.; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the...

  2. Recent advances in surface functionalization techniques on polymethacrylate materials for optical biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Koole, Leo H

    2014-06-21

    Biosensor chips for immune-based assay systems have been investigated for their application in early diagnostics. The development of such systems strongly depends on the effective protein immobilization on polymer substrates. In order to achieve this complex heterogeneous interaction the polymer surface must be functionalized with chemical groups that are reactive towards proteins in a way that surface functional groups (such as carboxyl, -COOH; amine, -NH2; and hydroxyl, -OH) chemically or physically anchor the proteins to the polymer platform. Since the proteins are very sensitive towards their environment and can easily lose their activity when brought in close proximity to the solid surface, effective surface functionalization and high level of control over surface chemistry present the most important steps in the fabrication of biosensors. This paper reviews recent developments in surface functionalization and preparation of polymethacrylates for protein immobilization. Due to their versatility and cost effectiveness, this particular group of plastic polymers is widely used both in research and in industry.

  3. Nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Su, Xiaodi; Lu, Yi

    2015-05-07

    Biosensors incorporating nanomaterials have demonstrated superior performance compared to their conventional counterparts. Most reported sensors use nanomaterials as a single transducer of signals, while biosensor designs using dual transducing elements have emerged as new approaches to further improve overall sensing performance. This review focuses on recent developments in nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection. The review begins with a brief introduction of the commonly used nanomaterial transducers suitable for designing dual element sensors, including quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles, graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanodots. This is followed by the presentation of the four basic design principles, namely Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Amplified Fluorescence Polarization (AFP), Bio-barcode Assay (BCA) and Chemiluminescence (CL), involving either two kinds of nanomaterials, or one nanomaterial and an organic luminescent agent (e.g. organic dyes, luminescent polymers) as dual transducers. Biomolecular and chemical analytes or biological interactions are detected by their control of the assembly and disassembly of the two transducing elements that change the distance between them, the size of the fluorophore-containing composite, or the catalytic properties of the nanomaterial transducers, among other property changes. Comparative discussions on their respective design rules and overall performances are presented afterwards. Compared with the single transducer biosensor design, such a dual-transducer configuration exhibits much enhanced flexibility and design versatility, allowing biosensors to be more specifically devised for various purposes. The review ends by highlighting some of the further development opportunities in this field.

  4. Directed Evolution to Engineer Monobody for FRET Biosensor Assembly and Imaging at Live-Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Peng, Qin; Wu, Yiqian; Allen, Molly E; Liang, Jing; Remacle, Albert G; Lopez, Tyler; Ge, Xin; Kay, Brian K; Zhao, Huimin; Strongin, Alex Y; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2018-01-26

    Monitoring enzymatic activities at the cell surface is challenging due to the poor efficiency of transport and membrane integration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Therefore, we developed a hybrid biosensor with separate donor and acceptor that assemble in situ. The directed evolution and sequence-function analysis technologies were integrated to engineer a monobody variant (PEbody) that binds to R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) dye. PEbody was used for visualizing the dynamic formation/separation of intercellular junctions. We further fused PEbody with the enhanced CFP and an enzyme-specific peptide at the extracellular surface to create a hybrid FRET biosensor upon R-PE capture for monitoring membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) activities. This biosensor revealed asymmetric distribution of MT1-MMP activities, which were high and low at loose and stable cell-cell contacts, respectively. Therefore, directed evolution and rational design are promising tools to engineer molecular binders and hybrid FRET biosensors for monitoring molecular regulations at the surface of living cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved FRET Biosensor for the Measurement of BCR-ABL Activity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Mika; Fujioka, Mari; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Li, Xinxin; Horiuchi, Kosui; O Satoh, Aya; Nepal, Prabha; Nishide, Shinya; Nanbo, Asuka; Teshima, Takanori; Ohba, Yusuke

    2017-02-02

    Although the co-development of companion diagnostics with molecular targeted drugs is desirable, truly efficient diagnostics are limited to diseases in which chromosomal translocations or overt mutations are clearly correlated with drug efficacy. Moreover, even for such diseases, few methods are available to predict whether drug administration is effective for each individual patient whose disease is expected to respond to the drug(s). We have previously developed a biosensor based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the activity of the tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL and its response to drug treatment in patient-derived chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The biosensor harbors CrkL, one of the major substrates of BCR-ABL, and is therefore named Pickles after phosphorylation indicator of CrkL en substrate. The efficacy of this technique as a clinical test has been demonstrated, but the number of cells available for analysis is limited in a case-dependent manner, owing to the cleavage of the biosensor in patient-derived leukemia cells. Here, we describe an improved biosensor with an amino acid substitution and a nuclear export signal being introduced. Of the two predicted cleavage positions in CrkL, the mutations inhibited one cleavage completely and the other cleavage partially, thus collectively increasing the number of cells available for drug evaluation. This improved version of the biosensor holds promise in the future development of companion diagnostics to predict responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  6. Hyperspectral imaging for simultaneous measurements of two FRET biosensors in pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amicia D Elliott

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein (FP biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET are commonly used to study molecular processes in living cells. There are FP-FRET biosensors for many cellular molecules, but it remains difficult to perform simultaneous measurements of multiple biosensors. The overlapping emission spectra of the commonly used FPs, including CFP/YFP and GFP/RFP make dual FRET measurements challenging. In addition, a snapshot imaging modality is required for simultaneous imaging. The Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS is a snapshot hyperspectral imaging system that collects high resolution spectral data and can be used to overcome these challenges. We have previously demonstrated the IMS's capabilities for simultaneously imaging GFP and CFP/YFP-based biosensors in pancreatic β-cells. Here, we demonstrate a further capability of the IMS to image simultaneously two FRET biosensors with a single excitation band, one for cAMP and the other for Caspase-3. We use these measurements to measure simultaneously cAMP signaling and Caspase-3 activation in pancreatic β-cells during oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are essential components in the pathology of diabetes.

  7. Quantitative Imaging of FRET-Based Biosensors for Cell- and Organelle-Specific Analyses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Swayoma; Garcia, Luis Rene; Versaw, Wayne K

    2016-04-01

    Genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors have been used to report relative concentrations of ions and small molecules, as well as changes in protein conformation, posttranslational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. Changes in FRET are typically quantified through ratiometric analysis of fluorescence intensities. Here we describe methods to evaluate ratiometric imaging data acquired through confocal microscopy of a FRET-based inorganic phosphate biosensor in different cells and subcellular compartments of Arabidopsis thaliana. Linear regression was applied to donor, acceptor, and FRET-derived acceptor fluorescence intensities obtained from images of multiple plants to estimate FRET ratios and associated location-specific spectral correction factors with high precision. FRET/donor ratios provided a combination of high dynamic range and precision for this biosensor when applied to the cytosol of both root and leaf cells, but lower precision when this ratiometric method was applied to chloroplasts. We attribute this effect to quenching of donor fluorescence because high precision was achieved with FRET/acceptor ratios and thus is the preferred ratiometric method for this organelle. A ligand-insensitive biosensor was also used to distinguish nonspecific changes in FRET ratios. These studies provide a useful guide for conducting quantitative ratiometric studies in live plants that is applicable to any FRET-based biosensor.

  8. Nanofabricated Optomechanical Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strong interest in whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR) for use in chip-scale photonic devices is motivated by their high optical quality, mechanical simplicity...

  9. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šípová, Hana [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, Prague (Czech Republic); Homola, Jiří, E-mail: homola@ufe.cz [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-04-22

    Highlights: ► Advances of nucleic acid (NA) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors are presented. ► Bioanalytical applications of NA SPR biosensors are reviewed. ► Applications for study of molecular interactions involving NAs are also discussed. -- Abstract: Biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have become a central tool for the investigation and quantification of biomolecules and their interactions. Nucleic acids (NAs) play a vital role in numerous biological processes and therefore have been one of the major groups of biomolecules targeted by the SPR biosensors. This paper discusses the advances of NA SPR biosensor technology and reviews its applications both in the research of molecular interactions involving NAs (NA–NA, NA–protein, NA–small molecule), as well as for the field of bioanalytics in the areas of food safety, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  10. Generation of an anti-NAGase single chain antibody and its application in a biosensor-based assay for the detection of NAGase in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbeck, Katherine; Leonard, Paul; Gilmartin, Niamh; Byrne, Barry; Viguier, Caroline; Arora, Sushrut; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Bovine mastitis, an inflammation of the mammary gland in cows, is a major challenge for the dairy industry worldwide as it lowers milk yield, reduces milk quality and increases overall production costs. Early diagnosis is of the utmost importance. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) is an enzyme released into milk during inflammation and acts as an early indicator of mastitis. This paper describes the selection of anti-NAGase single chain fragment variable antibodies (scFv) from naïve human antibody libraries and their incorporation into an automated optical biosensor-based immunoassay to detect NAGase in milk. The scFv with the highest affinity for NAGase was first characterized by inhibition ELISA, followed by further evaluation using a surface plasmon resonance platform. Purified NAGase was immobilized on the surface of a CM5 chip and spiked NAGase milk samples were analyzed. The limit of detection for the assay for the assay was determined as 1μg/ml. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-03-14

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  12. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  13. Photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor for detection of diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Harshita; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Painam, Balveer

    2016-07-01

    A biosensor is a device that is used to detect the analytes or molecules of a sample by means of a binding mechanism. A two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor is designed with a diamond-shaped ring resonator and two waveguides: a bus waveguide and a drop waveguide. The sensing mechanism is based on change in refractive index of the analytes, leading to a shift in the peak resonant wavelength. This mechanism can be used in the field of biomedical treatment where different body fluids such as blood, tears, saliva, or urine can be used as the analyte in which different components of the fluid can be detected. It can also be used to differentiate between the cell lines of a normal and an unhealthy human being. Average value of quality factor for this device comes out to be 1082.2063. For different analytes used, the device exhibits enhanced sensitivity and, hence, it is useful for the detection of diseases.

  14. Applications of On-Chip Coplanar Waveguides to Design Local Oscillators for Wireless Communications System

    OpenAIRE

    Pokharel, Ramesh K; Kanaya, Haruichi; Yoshida, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    The applications of on-chip CPW resonator was demonstrated to design a VCO and DCO at 5 GHz band. First, we examined the characteristics of the on-chip resonator in meander structure theoretically and experimentally in 0.18 m CMOS technology. Then, a VCO employing on-chip CPW resonator instead of LC-tank resonator is proposed, designed and fabricated using the same technology and latter a 10 bit DCO. The advantages of employing CPW resonator is the wide frequency-tuning range, and it also sav...

  15. Hyperfine structure analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: from astrophysical measurements towards endogenous biosensors in human tissue; Hyperfeinstruktur-Analyse in der Magnetresonanzspektroskopie: von astrophysikalischen Messungen zu endogenen Biosensoren in menschlichem Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2007-07-01

    The hyperfine interaction of two spins is a well studied effect in atomic systems. Magnetic resonance experiments demonstrate that the detectable dipole transitions are determined by the magnetic moments of the constituents and the external magnetic field. Transferring the corresponding quantum mechanics to molecular bound nuclear spins allows for precise prediction of NMR spectra obtained from metabolites in human tissue. This molecular hyperfine structure has been neglected so far in in vivo NMR spectroscopy but contains useful information, especially when studying molecular dynamics. This contribution represents a review of the concept of applying the Breit-Rabi formalism to coupled nuclear spins and discusses the immobilization of different metabolites in anisotropic tissue revealed by 1H NMR spectra of carnosine, phosphocreatine and taurine. Comparison of atomic and molecular spin systems allows for statements on the biological constraints for direct spin-spin interactions. Moreover, the relevance of hyperfine effects on the line shapes of multiplets of indirectly-coupled spin systems with more than two constituents can be predicted by analyzing quantum mechanical parameters. As an example, the superposition of eigenstates of the AMX system of adenosine 5'-triphosphate and its application for better quantification of 31P-NMR spectra will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Lab-on-a-Chip Pathogen Sensors for Food Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumsang Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs. These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors.

  17. Lab-on-a-Chip Pathogen Sensors for Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Bumsang

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors. PMID:23112625

  18. Chips 2020

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The release of this second volume of CHIPS 2020 coincides with the 50th anniversary of Moore’s Law, a critical year marked by the end of the nanometer roadmap and by a significantly reduced annual rise in chip performance. At the same time, we are witnessing a data explosion in the Internet, which is consuming 40% more electrical power every year, leading to fears of a major blackout of the Internet by 2020. The messages of the first CHIPS 2020, published in 2012, concerned the realization of quantum steps for improving the energy efficiency of all chip functions. With this second volume, we review these messages and amplify upon the most promising directions: ultra-low-voltage electronics, nanoscale monolithic 3D integration, relevant-data, brain- and human-vision-inspired processing, and energy harvesting for chip autonomy. The team of authors, enlarged by more world leaders in low-power, monolithic 3D, video, and Silicon brains, presents new vistas in nanoelectronics, promising  Moore-like exponential g...

  19. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaikha Mazlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM (R2 = 0.979 and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  20. Background reduction in a young interferometer biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H. K P; Subramaniam, V.; Kanger, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical Young interferometer (IOYI) biosensors are among the most sensitive label-free biosensors. Detection limits are in the range of 20 fg/mm2. The applicability of these sensors is however strongly hampered by the large background that originates from both bulk refractive index

  1. Disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple procedure for the voltammetric detection of the DNA damage using a disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor is reported. The DNA biosensor is assembled by immobilizing the double stranded calf thymus DNA (dsDNA) on the surface of a disposable carbon screen-printed electrode. The interaction of ...

  2. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  3. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  4. Water-soluble fluorescent conjugated polymers and their interactions with biomacromolecules for sensitive biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuli; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu; Zhu, Daoben

    2010-07-01

    Over the past decades, water-soluble conjugated polymers (CPs) have gained increasing attention as optical platforms for sensitive detection of biomacromolecules (DNA, protein and cell) due to the amplification of fluorescent signals. To meet the requirement for high throughput assays, chip and microarray techniques based on CPs have also been developed. Very recently, fluorescence imaging in vivo and at the cellular level have also been successfully accomplished using these water-soluble CPs. In this tutorial review, we provide a brief review of the synthesis and optical properties of CPs, focusing especially on their applications in biosensors and cell imaging.

  5. Development of new hCaM-Alexa Fluor®biosensors for a wide range of ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-López, I; León-Cruz, E; Pardo, J P; Sosa-Peinado, A; González-Andrade, M

    2017-01-01

    Eight new fluorescent biosensors of human calmodulin (hCaM) using Alexa Fluor ® 350, 488, 532, and 555 dyes were constructed. These biosensors are thermodynamically stable, functional, and highly sensitive to ligands of the CaM. They resolve the problem of CaM ligands with similar spectroscopic properties to the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorophores of other biosensors previously reported. Additionally, they can be used in studies of protein-protein interaction through Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The variation in T m (range 78.07-81.47 °C; 79.05 to WT) is no larger than two degrees in all cases in regards to CaM WT. The K ds calculated with all biosensors for CPZ and BIMI (a new inhibitor of CaM) are in the range of 0.45-1.86 and 0.69-1.54 μm respectively. All biosensors retain their ability to activate Calcineurin about 70%. Structural models built "in silico" show their possible conformation taking the fluorophores in protein thus we can predict system stability. Finally, these new biosensors represent a biotechnological development applied to an analytical problem, which aims to determine accurately the affinity of inhibitors of CaM without possible interference, to be put forward as possible drugs related to CaM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric de Souza Gil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, focusing on enzymatic electrochemical sensors.Em virtude do aumento da demanda por técnicas analíticas simples e de baixo custo, os biossensores têm atraído a atenção para a análise de fármacos, medicamentos e outros analitos de interesse em controle de qualidade de medicamentos. Os biossensores permitem a quantificação não somente de princípio ativo em formulações farmacêuticas, mas também de produtos de degradação e metabólitos em fluídos biológicos, bem como análise de amostras de interesse clínico e industrial, além de possibilitar a determinação de enantiômeros. Desta forma, este artigo objetiva fazer uma breve revisão a respeito do emprego de biossensores em análise farmacêutica, com ênfase em sensores eletroquímicos enzimáticos.

  7. Nanoporous polymer ring resonators for biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Mancuso, Matthew; Goddard, Julie M.; Erickson, David

    2011-01-01

    Optically resonant devices are promising as label-free biomolecular sensors due to their ability to concentrate electromagnetic energy into small mode volumes and their capacity for multiplexed detection. A fundamental limitation of current optical biosensor technology is that the biomolecular interactions are limited to the surface of the resonant device, while the highest intensity of electromagnetic energy is trapped within the core. In this paper, we present nanoporous polymer optofluidic...

  8. Fabrication of protein chip by magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Jang, Gil-Soo; Hong, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Sup

    2009-12-01

    This research describes a new immobilizing method of many kinds of biomaterials (enzyme, antibody, and DNA) on a transducer array using magnetic force interaction as the short-range force. The method composes two immobilizing steps. In the first step, same biomaterials are immobilized on metal particles. In the second step, the particles are arranged by the fluidic self-assembly method at random on an array. An array immobilized many kinds of the particles become multichannel biosensor. The biosensor can apply to DNA chip, protein chip, multienzyme electrode, and so on. The metal particles and the array were fabricated by micromachining manufacture. The metal particles were multilayer structure (gold, titanium, and nickel). In the array case, sidewalls of patterning nickel dots on an array were covered by thick negative photoresist (SU-8), and the array was magnetized. The array and the particles were mixed in buffer solution, and were arranged by magnetic force interaction. A quarter of total nickel dots were covered by the particles. The binding direction of the particles was controllable, and condition of particles was almost with gold surface on top. The immobilization of the biomaterials to metal particles was able to materialize it by using 3-CPD. This confirmed an activity by the luminol radiation.

  9. Sensitive and molecular size-selective detection of proteins using a chip-based and heteroliganded gold nanoisland by localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Surin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A highly sensitive and molecular size-selective method for the detection of proteins using heteroliganded gold nanoislands and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is described. Two different heteroligands with different chain lengths (3-mercaptopionicacid and decanethiol were used in fabricating nanoholes for the size-dependent separation of a protein in comparison with its aggregate. Their ratios on gold nanoisland were optimized for the sensitive detection of superoxide dismutase (SOD1. This protein has been implicated in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Upon exposure of the optimized gold nanoisland to a solution of SOD1 and aggregates thereof, changes in the LSPR spectra were observed which are attributed to the size-selective and covalent chemical binding of SOD1 to the nanoholes. With a lower detection limit of 1.0 ng/ml, the method can be used to selectively detect SOD1 in the presence of aggregates at the molecular level.

  10. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  11. Sensitive detection of capsaicinoids using a surface plasmon resonance sensor with anti-homovanillic Acid polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-13

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  12. Subtractive Inhibition Assay for the Detection of E. coli O157:H7 Using Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyan Si

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor was developed for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 by means of a new subtractive inhibition assay. In the subtractive inhibition assay, E. coli O157:H7 cells and goat polyclonal antibodies for E. coli O157:H7 were incubated for a short of time, and then the E. coli O157:H7 cells which bound antibodies were removed by a stepwise centrifugation process. The remaining free unbound antibodies were detected through interaction with rabbit anti-goat IgG polyclonal antibodies immobilized on the sensor chip using a BIAcore 3000 biosensor. The results showed that the signal was inversely correlated with the concentration of E. coli O157:H7 cells in a range from 3.0 × 104 to 3.0 × 108 cfu/mL with a detection limit of 3.0 × 104 cfu/mL. Compared with direct SPR by immobilizing antibodies on the chip surface to capture the bacterial cells and ELISA for E. coli O157:H7 (detection limit: both 3.0 × 105 cfu/mL in this paper, the detection limit of subtractive inhibition assay method was reduced by one order of magnitude. The method simplifies bacterial cell detection to protein-protein interaction, which has the potential for providing a practical alternative for the monitoring of E. coli O157:H7 and other pathogens.

  13. Subtractive inhibition assay for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixian; Ye, Zunzhong; Si, Chengyan; Ying, Yibin

    2011-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor was developed for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 by means of a new subtractive inhibition assay. In the subtractive inhibition assay, E. coli O157:H7 cells and goat polyclonal antibodies for E. coli O157:H7 were incubated for a short of time, and then the E. coli O157:H7 cells which bound antibodies were removed by a stepwise centrifugation process. The remaining free unbound antibodies were detected through interaction with rabbit anti-goat IgG polyclonal antibodies immobilized on the sensor chip using a BIAcore 3000 biosensor. The results showed that the signal was inversely correlated with the concentration of E. coli O157:H7 cells in a range from 3.0 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(8) cfu/mL with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10(4) cfu/mL. Compared with direct SPR by immobilizing antibodies on the chip surface to capture the bacterial cells and ELISA for E. coli O157:H7 (detection limit: both 3.0 × 10(5) cfu/mL in this paper), the detection limit of subtractive inhibition assay method was reduced by one order of magnitude. The method simplifies bacterial cell detection to protein-protein interaction, which has the potential for providing a practical alternative for the monitoring of E. coli O157:H7 and other pathogens.

  14. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-01-01

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test. PMID:28287493

  15. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-03-12

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test.

  16. Biosensors: the new wave in cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bohunicky

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brian Bohunicky1, Shaker A Mousa1,21The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USA; 2College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: The earlier cancer can be detected, the better the chance of a cure. Currently, many cancers are diagnosed only after they have metastasized throughout the body. Effective, accurate methods of cancer detection and clinical diagnosis are urgently needed. Biosensors are devices that are designed to detect a specific biological analyte by essentially converting a biological entity (ie, protein, DNA, RNA into an electrical signal that can be detected and analyzed. The use of biosensors in cancer detection and monitoring holds vast potential. Biosensors can be designed to detect emerging cancer biomarkers and to determine drug effectiveness at various target sites. Biosensor technology has the potential to provide fast and accurate detection, reliable imaging of cancer cells, and monitoring of angiogenesis and cancer metastasis, and the ability to determine the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy agents. This review will briefly summarize the current obstacles to early detection of cancer and the expanding use of biosensors as a diagnostic tool, as well as some future applications of biosensor technology.Keywords: biosensor, oncogene, nanotechnology, biotechnology, cancer detection, diagnosis, point-of-care

  17. Denaturation strategies for detection of double stranded PCR products on GMR magnetic biosensor array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Guldberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    Microarrays and other surface-based nucleic acid detection schemes rely on the hybridization of the target to surface-bound detection probes. We present the first comparison of two strategies to detect DNA using a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor platform starting from an initially double......-time binding signals. The first strategy, using off-chip heat denaturation followed by sequential on-chip incubation of the nucleic acids and MNPs, produces a signal that stabilizes quickly but the signal magnitude is reduced due to competitive rehybridization of the target in solution. The second strategy......, using magnetic capture of the double-stranded product followed by denaturing, produces a higher signal but the signal increase is limited by diffusion of the MNPs. Our results show that both strategies give highly reproducible results but that the signal obtained using magnetic capture is higher...

  18. Simulation of Biosensor using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeparamatti, B. G.; Hebbal, M. S.; Sheeparamatti, R. B.; Math, V. B.; Kadadevaramath, J. S.

    2006-04-01

    Bio-Micro Electro Mechanical Systems/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems include a wide variety of sensors, actuators, and complex micro/nano devices for biomedical applications. Recent advances in biosensors have shown that sensors based on bending of microfabricated cantilevers have potential advantages over earlier used detection methods. Thus, a simple cantilever beam can be used as a sensor for biomedical, chemical and environmental applications. Here, microfabricated multilayered cantilever beam is exposed to sensing environment. Lower layer being pure structural silicon or polymer and upper layer is of polymer with antigen/antibody immobilized in it. Obviously, it has an affinity towards its counterpart i.e. antibody/antigen. In the sensing environment, if counter elements exists, they get captured by this sensing beam head, and the cantilever beam deflects. This deflection can be sensed and the presence of counter elements in the environment can be predicted. In this work, a finite element model of a biosensor for sensing antibody/antigen reaction is developed and simulated using ANSYS/Multiphysics. The optimal dimensions of the microcantilever beam are selected based on permissible deflection range with the aid of MATLAB. In the model analysis, both weight and surface stress effects on the cantilever are considered. Approximate weights are taken into account because of counter elements, considering their molecular weight and possible number of elements required for sensing. The results obtained in terms of lateral deflection are presented.

  19. Mining the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to develop FRET biosensors for sugars, dicarboxylates and cyclic polyols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bourdès

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensors are powerful tools to detect biologically important ligands in real time. Currently FRET bisosensors are available for twenty-two compounds distributed in eight classes of chemicals (two pentoses, two hexoses, two disaccharides, four amino acids, one nucleobase, two nucleotides, six ions and three phytoestrogens. To expand the number of available FRET biosensors we used the induction profile of the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to systematically screen for new FRET biosensors.Two new vectors were developed for cloning genes for solute-binding proteins (SBPs between those encoding FRET partner fluorescent proteins. In addition to a vector with the widely used cyan and yellow fluorescent protein FRET partners, we developed a vector using orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 FRET partners. From the sixty-nine SBPs tested, seven gave a detectable FRET signal change on binding substrate, resulting in biosensors for D-quinic acid, myo-inositol, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, β-diglucosides (cellobiose and gentiobiose, D-galactose and C4-dicarboxylates (malate, succinate, oxaloacetate and fumarate. To our knowledge, we describe the first two FRET biosensor constructs based on SBPs from Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP transport systems.FRET based on orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 partners allows the use of longer wavelength light, enabling deeper penetration of samples at lower energy and increased resolution with reduced back-ground auto-fluorescence. The FRET biosensors described in this paper for four new classes of compounds; (i cyclic polyols, (ii L-deoxy sugars, (iii β-linked disaccharides and (iv C4-dicarboxylates could be developed to study metabolism in vivo.

  20. On chip real time monitoring of B-cells hybridoma secretion of immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, Sarah; Cortes, Sandra; Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Marche, Patrice; Buhot, Arnaud; Livache, Thierry; Roupioz, Yoann

    2011-01-15

    The secretions of molecules by cells are of tremendous interest for both fundamental insights studies and medical purposes. In this study, we propose a new biochip-based approach for the instantaneous monitoring of protein secretions, using antibody production by B lymphocytes cultured in vitro. This was possible thanks to the Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) of a protein biochip where antigen proteins (Hen Egg Lysozyme, HEL) were micro-arrayed along with series of control proteins. B cell hybridomas were cultured on the chip and the secretion of immunoglobulins (antibody) specific to HEL was monitored in real-time and detected within only few minutes rather than after a 30-60 min incubation with standard ELISA experiments. This fast and sensitive detection was possible thanks to the sedimentation of the cells on the biochip sensitive surface, where local antibody concentrations are much higher before dilution in the bulk medium. An other interesting feature of this approach for the secretion monitoring was the independence of the SPR response--after normalization--regarding to the density of the surface-immobilized probes. Such biosensor might thus pave the way to new tools capable of both qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of proteins secreted by other immune cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanoplasmonic biosensing with on-chip electrical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Francesco; Wang, Guoliang; Hägglund, Carl; Höök, Fredrik; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2010-12-15

    A nanoplasmonic biosensor chip with integrated electrical detection is presented. The concept is based on the local refractive index sensitivity of nanoplasmonic gold nanodisks (110 nm in diameter and 20 nm in height) that are fabricated, through a parallel method, directly on an array of silicon solar cells or photoactive diodes. The nanoplasmonic properties of the sensor chip were investigated both optically and electrically, with excellent agreement between the two. We show that local changes in the refractive index of the surrounding environment gives changes in the nanoplasmonic properties of the gold nanodisks, which induce corresponding changes in the photocurrent at single wavelengths of the nanoplasmonic solar cells. With a simple light-emitting diode as light source, and together with a material-specific modification protocol, the photocurrent output of the nanoplasmonic sensor chip was successfully used to monitor a specific biorecognition reaction in real-time. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of electrochemical biosensors in clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monošík, Rastislav; Stred'anský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Analyses in the clinical area need quick and reliable analytical methods and devices. For this purpose, biosensors can be a suitable option, whereas they are constructed to be simple for use, specific for the target analyte, capable of continuous monitoring and giving quick results, potentially low-costing and portable. In this article, we describe electrochemical biosensors developed for clinical diagnosis, namely for glucose, lactate, cholesterol, urea, creatinine, DNA, antigens, antibodies, and cancer markers assays. Chosen biosensors showed desirable sensitivity, selectivity, and potential for application on real samples. They are often designed to avoid interference with undesired components present in the monitored systems. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Improved biosensor-based detection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Described is a new biosensor-based detection system for effector compounds, useful for in vivo applications in e.g. screening and selecting of cells which produce a small molecule effector compound or which take up a small molecule effector compound from its environment. The detection system...... comprises a protein or RNA-based biosensor for the effector compound which indirectly regulates the expression of a reporter gene via two hybrid proteins, providing for fewer false signals or less 'noise', tuning of sensitivity or other advantages over conventional systems where the biosensor directly...

  4. Design Strategies for Aptamer-Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Liang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Nandi

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers have been widely used as recognition elements for biosensor construction, especially in the detection of proteins or small molecule targets, and regarded as promising alternatives for antibodies in bioassay areas. In this review, we present an overview of reported design strategies for the fabrication of biosensors and classify them into four basic modes: target-induced structure switching mode, sandwich or sandwich-like mode, target-induced dissociation/displacement mode and competitive replacement mode. In view of the unprecedented advantages brought about by aptamers and smart design strategies, aptamer-based biosensors are expected to be one of the most promising devices in bioassay related applications. PMID:22399891

  5. Modeling amperometric biosensors based on allosteric enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liutauras Ričkus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of a biosensor with allosteric enzyme layer was investigated in this study. The operation of the biosensor is modeled using non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three regions: the allosteric enzyme layer where the allosteric enzyme reactions as well as then mass transport by diffusion take place, the diffusion region where the mass transport by diffusion and non-enzymatic reactions take place and the convective region in which the analyte concentration is maintained constant. The biosensor response on dependency substrate concentration, cooperativity coefficient and the diffusion layer thickness on the same parameters have been studied.

  6. Magneto-plasmonic biosensor with enhanced analytical response and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sorin; Polonschii, Cristina; Luculescu, Catalin; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Gheorghiu, Eugen

    2015-01-15

    We present novel solutions to surpass current analytic limitations of Magneto-Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance (MOSPR) assays, concerning both the chip structure and the method for data analysis. The structure of the chip is modified to contain a thin layer of Co-Au alloy instead of successive layers of homogeneous metals, as currently used. This alloy presents improved plasmonic and magnetic properties, yet a structural stability similar to Au-SPR chips, allowing for bioaffinity assays in saline solutions. Analyzing the whole reflectivity curve at multiple angles of incidence instead of the reflectivity value at a single incidence angle provides a high signal-to-noise ratio suitable for detection of minute analyte concentrations. Based on assessment of solutions with known refractive indices as well as of a model biomolecular interaction (i.e. IgG-AntiIgG) we demonstrate that the proposed structure of the MOSPR sensing chip and the procedure of data analysis allows for long-time assessment in liquid media with increased sensitivity over standard SPR analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of biomembrane structural changes and interactions by optical biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hirst, Daniel J; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular-membrane interactions play a critical role in the regulation of many important biological processes such as protein trafficking, cellular signalling and ion channel formation. Peptide/protein-membrane interactions can also destabilise and damage the membrane which can lead to cell death. Characterisation of the molecular details of these binding-mediated membrane destabilisation processes is therefore central to understanding cellular events such as antimicrobial action, membrane-mediated amyloid aggregation, and apoptotic protein induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation. Optical biosensors have provided a unique approach to characterising membrane interactions allowing quantitation of binding events and new insight into the kinetic mechanism of these interactions. One of the most commonly used optical biosensor technologies is surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and there have been an increasing number of studies reporting the use of this technique for investigating biophysical analysis of membrane-mediated events. More recently, a number of new optical biosensors based on waveguide techniques have been developed, allowing membrane structure changes to be measured simultaneously with mass binding measurements. These techniques include dual polarisation interferometry (DPI), plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR) and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS). These techniques have expanded the application of optical biosensors to allow the analysis of membrane structure changes during peptide and protein binding. This review provides a theoretical and practical overview of the application of biosensor technology with a specific focus on DPI, PWR and OWLS to study biomembrane-mediated events and the mechanism of biomembrane disruption. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Refractive index biosensor using sidewall gratings in dual-slot waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sourabh; Ali, Jalil; Singh, Ghanshyam

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents an optical biosensor using sidewall grating in dual slot waveguide, modeled on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. By optimizing the geometric parameters of the device, the spectral response is tailored to obtain a sharp resonant peak with high transmissivity that also enhances the limit-of-detection. The device detects the shift in resonant wavelength on a variation of the biomaterial refractive index. The simulation study has performed using the transfer matrix method. The obtained characteristics of the sensors include linear response to a change in refractive index of biomaterial, limit of detection of the order of 10-6 and ease of fabrication. The device performance has also compared with other SOI resonator structures like photonic crystal waveguide, sub-wavelength grating, ring resonator and grating resonator.

  9. Ultra-sensitive optical biosensor based on whispering gallery modes: The effect of buffer solutions refractive index on their sensitivity and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadgaran, Hamid; Pourmand, Raheleh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Whispering gallery modes (WGM) biosensors are ultrasensitive systems that can measure amount of adsorbed layer onto the micro-cavity surface. They have many applications including protein, peptide growth, DNA and bacteria detection, molecular properties measurements and specific interaction and drug table recognitions due to their high sensitivity, compact size and label free sensing mechanism.     Objective: In this paper we investigate the effect of buffer solution on detection of specific biomolecules in WGM biosensors through its refractive index change. Methods: The propagation of electromagnetic waves in a dielectric microsphere is analyzed by solving Maxwell’s equations through proper boundary condition to find a concise relation for micro-cavity resonance shift. Results: Analysis of the buffer solution’s refractive index effects on detection of BSA by WGM biosensors are presented and it was shown that even a very small change in the refractive index of buffer solution can affect the biosensor wavelength shift and the sensitivity of biosensors. Conclusion: This study opens up a discussion in biosensor sensitivity based on true and reliable performance of the buffer solution through its accurate determination of refractive index and behavior. To avoid expensive methods of enhancing sensitivity, one can improve the sensitivity of WGM biosensor to some extent, by means of using proper buffer solution. PMID:25505748

  10. Electrochemical Biosensors - Sensor Principles and Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Dorothee; MacKenzie, Robert; Vörös, Janos; Reimhult, Erik

    2008-03-07

    Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importance for medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biological information to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity of connecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensors provide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to the direct conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades several sensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most common traditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry, impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented along with selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-based biosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combination with electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versions of surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy. The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determined by the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sample at the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemical transduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor molecules all influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches, such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymes into vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities for signal amplification. In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the delicate

  11. Biosensors in immunology: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathak, S.S.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Optical biosensors are finding a range of applications in immunology. They enable biomolecular interactions to be characterized in real time without the need to label reactants, and, because individual binding steps can be visualized, are particularly suited to complex assays

  12. Biosensors: applications for dairy food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E R

    1993-10-01

    Biosensors are defined as indicators of biological compounds that can be as simple as temperature-sensitive paint or as complex as DNA-RNA probes. Food microbiologists are constantly seeking rapid and reliable automated systems for the detection of biological activity. Biosensors provide sensitive, miniaturized systems that can be used to detect unwanted microbial activity or the presence of a biologically active compound, such as glucose or a pesticide. Immunodiagnostics and enzyme biosensors are two of the leading technologies that have had the greatest impact on the food industry. The use of these two systems has reduced the time for detection of pathogens such as Salmonella to 24 h and has provided detection of biological compounds such as cholesterol or chymotrypsin. The continued development of biosensor technology will soon make available "on-line quality control" of food production, which will not only reduce cost of food production but will also provide greater safety and increased food quality.

  13. Point-of-care biosensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Arvind Sai Sarathi; Mahadeo, Dinesh Michael; Doraiswami, Ravi; Huang, Yunhan; Pecht, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care biosensor systems can potentially improve patient care through real-time and remote health monitoring. Over the past few decades, research has been conducted in the field of biosensors to detect patterns of biomarkers and provide information on their concentration in biological samples for robust diagnosis. In future point-of-care applications, requirements such as rapid label-free detection, miniaturized sensor size, and portability will limit the types of biosensors that can be used. This paper reviews label-free detection techniques using Biological MicroElectroMechanical Systems as a potential candidate for point-of-care biosensing applications. Furthermore, detailed surveys have been carried out on wireless networking schemes applicable for a point-of-care environment and on prognostic techniques that will enable decision-support services. This paper concludes by providing a list of challenges that must be resolved before realizing biosensor systems for next-generation point-of-care applications.

  14. Development of microbial biosensors for food analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukasiak, Justyna

    Microbial biosensors are analytical devices composed of a biological recognition element (microorganism) integrated to a signal transduction element (i.e. bioluminescence), converting a biochemical signal into quantifiable response. Due to their molecular properties they can be diversely designed......, optimize and characterize various reporter strains utilizing different signal transducers and targeting carbohydrate constituents of pectin and arabinoxylan. Addit onally, the objective was to assess the potential suitability of microbial biosensors for food ingredients analysis. Pectin is a plant...... and responded quantitatively in selected detection ranges. Verification of performance of arabinoxylan targeting reporter strains revealed 9-18% difference between the results obtained by biosensors and by High Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography. Results of this research suggest that microbial biosensors...

  15. Recent Advances in Nanotechnology Applied to Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxiang Cui

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been great progress the application of nanomaterials in biosensors. The importance of these to the fundamental development of biosensors has been recognized. In particular, nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots have been being actively investigated for their applications in biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. Here we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore the application prospects, and discuss the issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination.

  16. A novel silicon based mags-biosensor for nucleic acid detection by magnetoelectronic transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eloisa Castagna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a novel silicon biosensor based on magnetoelectronic transduction (MAGS for nucleic acid detection. The mags-biosensor is a planar device composed by a primary micro-coil, and two secondary coils which produce a differential voltage due to the induced magnetic field. The presence of magnetic material over one of the secondary coils causes variations of induced magnetic field density that in turn results in a total output voltage different from zero. The voltage variation, therefore, is a measure of the amount of magnetic material present in the active zone. A device sensitivity of 5.1 mV/ng and a resolution of 0.008 ng have been observed. The biosensor also presents a micro-heater and a thermal sensor respectively to set and read-out the chip temperature: this aspect enables the device to be used for several biochemical applications that need temperature control and activation such for example nucleic acid amplification (real-time PCR, antigen- antibody detection (immune-assay and SNP detection.

  17. Characterizing Rat PNS Electrophysiological Response to Electrical Stimulation Using in vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khani, Joshua [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Prescod, Lindsay [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Enright, Heather [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Felix, Sarah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osburn, Joanne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wheeler, Elizabeth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, Kris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Ex vivo systems and organ-on-a-chip technology offer an unprecedented approach to modeling the inner workings of the human body. The ultimate goal of LLNL’s in vitro Chip-based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP) is to integrate multiple organ tissue cultures using microfluidic channels, multi-electrode arrays (MEA), and other biosensors in order to effectively simulate and study the responses and interactions of the major organs to chemical and physical stimulation. In this study, we focused on the peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of the iCHIP system. Specifically we sought to expound on prior research investigating the electrophysiological response of rat dorsal root ganglion cells (rDRGs) to chemical exposures, such as capsaicin. Our aim was to establish a protocol for electrical stimulation using the iCHIP device that would reliably elicit a characteristic response in rDRGs. By varying the parameters for both the stimulation properties – amplitude, phase width, phase shape, and stimulation/ return configuration – and the culture conditions – day in vitro and neural cell types - we were able to make several key observations and uncover a potential convention with a minimal number of devices tested. Future work will seek to establish a standard protocol for human DRGs in the iCHIP which will afford a portable, rapid method for determining the effects of toxins and novel therapeutics on the PNS.

  18. Intelligent Communication Module for Wireless Biosensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, R.; Singh, J.; Le, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presented a new paradigm of biosensors which have processing capability with an intelligent and adaptive wireless communication module. The adaptive communication module efficiently reconfigures its hardware components according to the changes in operating environment in order to reduce system power consumption and optimally utilise resources. The chapter presented several significant applications of wireless biosensor networks which hold enormous potential to benefit the communi...

  19. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  20. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity a...

  1. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  2. Development and adaptation of a multiprobe biosensor for the use in a semi-automated device for the detection of toxic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Sonja; Metfies, Katja; Medlin, Linda K

    2008-05-15

    Worldwide monitoring programs have been launched for the observation of phytoplankton composition and especially for harmful and toxic microalgae. Several molecular methods are currently used for the identification of phytoplankton but usually require transportation of samples to specialised laboratories. For the purpose of the monitoring of toxic algae, a multiprobe chip and a semi-automated rRNA biosensor for the in-situ detection of toxic algae were developed. Different materials for the electrodes and the carrier material were tested using single-electrode sensors and sandwich hybridisation that is based on species-specific rRNA probes. Phytoplankton communities consist of different species and therefore a biosensor consisting of a multiprobe chip with an array of 16 gold electrodes for the simultaneous detection of up to 14 target species was developed. The detection of the toxic algae is based on a sandwich hybridisation and an electrochemical detection method.

  3. Continuously Operating Biosensor and Its Integration into a Hermetically Sealed Medical Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Birkholz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An integration concept for an implantable biosensor for the continuous monitoring of blood sugar levels is presented. The system architecture is based on technical modules used in cardiovascular implants in order to minimize legal certification efforts for its perspective usage in medical applications. The sensor chip operates via the principle of affinity viscometry, which is realized by a fully embedded biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS prepared in 0.25-µm complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS/BiCMOS technology. Communication with a base station is established in the 402–405 MHz band used for medical implant communication services (MICS. The implant shall operate within the interstitial tissue, and the hermetical sealing of the electronic system against interaction with the body fluid is established using titanium housing. Only the sensor chip and the antenna are encapsulated in an epoxy header closely connected to the metallic housing. The study demonstrates that biosensor implants for the sensing of low-molecular-weight metabolites in the interstitial may successfully rely on components already established in cardiovascular implantology.

  4. Biosensors for the detection of antibiotics in poultry industry-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungroo, Nawfal Adam; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2014-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Each of these techniques has its benefits as well as drawbacks. This review aims to evaluate different biosensing techniques and their working principles in order to accurately, quickly and practically detect antibiotics in chicken muscle and blood serum. The review is divided into three main sections, namely: a biosensors overview, a section on biosensor recognition and a section on biosensor transducing elements. The first segment provides a detailed overview on the different techniques available and their respective advantages and disadvantages. The second section consists of an evaluation of several analyte systems and their mechanisms. The last section of this review studies the working principles of biosensing transducing elements, focusing mainly on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology and its applications in industries.

  5. Multifunctional glucose biosensors from Fe3O4 nanoparticles modified chitosan/graphene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Xiaojian; Zou, Ruitao; Wu, Huizi; Shi, Haiyan; Yu, Shanshan; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Novel water-dispersible and biocompatible chitosan-functionalized graphene (CG) has been prepared by a one-step ball milling of carboxylic chitosan and graphite. Presence of nitrogen (from chitosan) at the surface of graphene enables the CG to be an outstanding catalyst for the electrochemical biosensors. The resulting CG shows lower ID/IG ratio in the Raman spectrum than other nitrogen-containing graphene prepared using different techniques. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNP) are further introduced into the as-synthesized CG for multifunctional applications beyond biosensors such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Carboxyl groups from CG is used to directly immobilize glucose oxidase (GOx) via covalent linkage while incorporation of MNP further facilitated enzyme loading and other unique properties. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good glucose detection response with a detection limit of 16 μM, a sensitivity of 5.658 mA/cm2/M, and a linear detection range up to 26 mM glucose. Formation of the multifunctional MNP/CG nanocomposites provides additional advantages for applications in more clinical areas such as in vivo biosensors and MRI agents. PMID:26052919

  6. Monitoring Biosensor Activity in Living Cells with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Day

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing “FRET standard” fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  7. Detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on Spinach Using Phage-Based Magnetoelastic Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengen Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Phage-based magnetoelastic (ME biosensors have been studied as an in-situ, real-time, wireless, direct detection method of foodborne pathogens in recent years. This paper investigates an ME biosensor method for the detection of Salmonella Typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. A procedure to obtain a concentrated suspension of Salmonella from contaminated spinach leaves is described that is based on methods outlined in the U.S. FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual for the detection of Salmonella on leafy green vegetables. The effects of an alternative pre-enrichment broth (LB broth vs. lactose broth, incubation time on the detection performance and negative control were investigated. In addition, different blocking agents (BSA, Casein, and Superblock were evaluated to minimize the effect of nonspecific binding. None of the blocking agents was found to be superior to the others, or even better than none. Unblocked ME biosensors were placed directly in a concentrated suspension and allowed to bind with Salmonella cells for 30 min before measuring the resonant frequency using a surface-scanning coil detector. It was found that 7 h incubation at 37 °C in LB broth was necessary to detect an initial spike of 100 cfu/25 g S. Typhimurium on spinach leaves with a confidence level of difference greater than 95% (p < 0.05. Thus, the ME biosensor method, on both partly and fully detection, was demonstrated to be a robust and competitive method for foodborne pathogens on fresh products.

  8. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Victoria; Otten, Julia; Engelmann, Susann; Radek, Andreas; Limberg, Michael; Koenig, Bernd W.; Noack, Stephan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Pohl, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP) flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), Citrine). Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) strain DM1933 in a BioLector® microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization. PMID:27690044

  9. Biosensors for the Detection of Antibiotics in Poultry Industry—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungroo, Nawfal Adam; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is emerging as a potential threat in the next decades. This is a global phenomenon whereby globalization is acting as a catalyst. Presently, the most common techniques used for the detection of antibiotics are biosensors, ELISA and liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Each of these techniques has its benefits as well as drawbacks. This review aims to evaluate different biosensing techniques and their working principles in order to accurately, quickly and practically detect antibiotics in chicken muscle and blood serum. The review is divided into three main sections, namely: a biosensors overview, a section on biosensor recognition and a section on biosensor transducing elements. The first segment provides a detailed overview on the different techniques available and their respective advantages and disadvantages. The second section consists of an evaluation of several analyte systems and their mechanisms. The last section of this review studies the working principles of biosensing transducing elements, focusing mainly on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology and its applications in industries. PMID:25587435

  10. Monitoring biosensor activity in living cells with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum, Julia M; Siegel, Amanda P; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Day, Richard N

    2012-11-07

    Live-cell microscopy is now routinely used to monitor the activities of the genetically encoded biosensor proteins that are designed to directly measure specific cell signaling events inside cells, tissues, or organisms. Most fluorescent biosensor proteins rely on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to report conformational changes in the protein that occur in response to signaling events, and this is commonly measured with intensity-based ratiometric imaging methods. An alternative method for monitoring the activities of the FRET-based biosensor proteins is fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). FLIM measurements are made in the time domain, and are not affected by factors that commonly limit intensity measurements. In this review, we describe the use of the digital frequency domain (FD) FLIM method for the analysis of FRET signals. We illustrate the methods necessary for the calibration of the FD FLIM system, and demonstrate the analysis of data obtained from cells expressing "FRET standard" fusion proteins. We then use the FLIM-FRET approach to monitor the changes in activities of two different biosensor proteins in specific regions of single living cells. Importantly, the factors required for the accurate determination and reproducibility of lifetime measurements are described in detail.

  11. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP, Citrine. Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum strain DM1933 in a BioLector® microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization.

  12. A Toolbox of Genetically Encoded FRET-Based Biosensors for Rapid l-Lysine Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Victoria; Otten, Julia; Engelmann, Susann; Radek, Andreas; Limberg, Michael; Koenig, Bernd W; Noack, Stephan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Pohl, Martina

    2016-09-28

    Background: The fast development of microbial production strains for basic and fine chemicals is increasingly carried out in small scale cultivation systems to allow for higher throughput. Such parallelized systems create a need for new rapid online detection systems to quantify the respective target compound. In this regard, biosensors, especially genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, offer tremendous opportunities. As a proof-of-concept, we have created a toolbox of FRET-based biosensors for the ratiometric determination of l-lysine in fermentation broth. Methods: The sensor toolbox was constructed based on a sensor that consists of an optimized central lysine-/arginine-/ornithine-binding protein (LAO-BP) flanked by two fluorescent proteins (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), Citrine). Further sensor variants with altered affinity and sensitivity were obtained by circular permutation of the binding protein as well as the introduction of flexible and rigid linkers between the fluorescent proteins and the LAO-BP, respectively. Results: The sensor prototype was applied to monitor the extracellular l-lysine concentration of the l-lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) strain DM1933 in a BioLector(®) microscale cultivation device. The results matched well with data obtained by HPLC analysis and the Ninhydrin assay, demonstrating the high potential of FRET-based biosensors for high-throughput microbial bioprocess optimization.

  13. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  14. Biosensors in clinical chemistry: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Babu Murugaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are small devices that employ biological/biochemical reactions for detecting target analytes. Basically, the device consists of a biocatalyst and a transducer. The biocatalyst may be a cell, tissue, enzyme or even an oligonucleotide. The transducers are mainly amperometric, potentiometric or optical. The classification of biosensors is based on (a the nature of the recognition event or (b the intimacy between the biocatalyst and the transducer. Bioaffinity and biocatalytic devices are examples for the former and the first, whereas second and third generation instruments are examples for the latter. Cell-based biosensors utilizing immobilized cells, tissues as also enzyme immunosensors and DNA biosensors find variegated uses in diagnostics. Enzyme nanoparticle-based biosensors make use of small particles in the nanometer scale and are currently making a mark in laboratory medicine. Nanotechnology can help in optimizing the diagnostic biochips, which would facilitate sensitive, rapid, accurate and precise bedside monitoring. Biosensors render themselves as capable diagnostic tools as they meet most of the above-mentioned criteria.

  15. Opportunities for bioprocess monitoring using FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Antony; Polizzi, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    Bioprocess monitoring is used to track the progress of a cell culture and ensure that the product quality is maintained. Current schemes for monitoring metabolism rely on offline measurements of samples of the extracellular medium. However, in the era of synthetic biology, it is now possible to design and implement biosensors that consist of biological macromolecules and are able to report on the intracellular environment of cells. The use of fluorescent reporter signals allows non-invasive, non-destructive and online monitoring of the culture, which reduces the delay between measurement and any necessary intervention. The present mini-review focuses on protein-based biosensors that utilize FRET as the signal transduction mechanism. The mechanism of FRET, which utilizes the ratio of emission intensity at two wavelengths, has an inherent advantage of being ratiometric, meaning that small differences in the experimental set-up or biosensor expression level can be normalized away. This allows for more reliable quantitative estimation of the concentration of the target molecule. Existing FRET biosensors that are of potential interest to bioprocess monitoring include those developed for primary metabolites, redox potential, pH and product formation. For target molecules where a biosensor has not yet been developed, some candidate binding domains can be identified from the existing biological databases. However, the remaining challenge is to make the process of developing a FRET biosensor faster and more efficient.

  16. Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...

  17. Biosensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plant Pathology Labora- tory, National Botanical. Research ... enzymes from thermo- philic fungi. (center) B Singh is Head and Scientist, Plant. Pathology Division,. National Botanical. Research Institute,. Lucknow. He specializes in the field of biocontrol of ... (a) (top): Construction and mode of operation of a bio- sensor.

  18. A Label-Free Microfluidic Biosensor for Activity Detection of Single Microalgae Cells Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of living microalgae cells is very important for ballast water treatment and analysis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is an indicator of photosynthetic activity and hence the living status of plant cells. In this paper, we developed a novel microfluidic biosensor system that can quickly and accurately detect the viability of single microalgae cells based on chlorophyll fluorescence. The system is composed of a laser diode as an excitation light source, a photodiode detector, a signal analysis circuit, and a microfluidic chip as a microalgae cell transportation platform. To demonstrate the utility of this system, six different living and dead algae samples (Karenia mikimotoi Hansen, Chlorella vulgaris, Nitzschia closterium, Platymonas subcordiformis, Pyramidomonas delicatula and Dunaliella salina were tested. The developed biosensor can distinguish clearly between the living microalgae cells and the dead microalgae cells. The smallest microalgae cells that can be detected by using this biosensor are 3 μm ones. Even smaller microalgae cells could be detected by increasing the excitation light power. The developed microfluidic biosensor has great potential for in situ ballast water analysis.

  19. Self-powered microneedle-based biosensors for pain-free high-accuracy measurement of glycaemia in interstitial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambini, L M; Longo, A; Scarano, S; Prescimone, T; Palchetti, I; Minunni, M; Giannessi, D; Barillaro, G

    2015-04-15

    In this work a novel self-powered microneedle-based transdermal biosensor for pain-free high-accuracy real-time measurement of glycaemia in interstitial fluid (ISF) is reported. The proposed transdermal biosensor makes use of an array of silicon-dioxide hollow microneedles that are about one order of magnitude both smaller (borehole down to 4µm) and more densely-packed (up to 1×10(6)needles/cm(2)) than state-of-the-art microneedles used for biosensing so far. This allows self-powered (i.e. pump-free) uptake of ISF to be carried out with high efficacy and reliability in a few seconds (uptake rate up to 1µl/s) by exploiting capillarity in the microneedles. By coupling the microneedles operating under capillary-action with an enzymatic glucose biosensor integrated on the back-side of the needle-chip, glucose measurements are performed with high accuracy (±20% of the actual glucose level for 96% of measures) and reproducibility (coefficient of variation 8.56%) in real-time (30s) over the range 0-630mg/dl, thus significantly improving microneedle-based biosensor performance with respect to the state-of-the-art. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NIR FRET Fluorophores for Use as an Implantable Glucose Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  1. On-chip bioorthogonal chemistry enables immobilization of in situ modified nanoparticles and small molecules for label-free monitoring of protein binding and reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassa, C; Liong, M; Hilderbrand, S; Sandler, J E; Reiner, T; Keliher, E J; Weissleder, R; Shaw, S Y

    2012-09-07

    Efficient methods to immobilize small molecules under continuous-flow microfluidic conditions would greatly improve label-free molecular interaction studies using biosensor technology. At present, small-molecule immobilization chemistries require special conditions and in many cases must be performed outside the detector and microfluidic system where real-time monitoring is not possible. Here, we have developed and optimized a method for on-chip bioorthogonal chemistry that enables rapid, reversible immobilization of small molecules with control over orientation and immobilization density, and apply this technique to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies. Immobilized small molecules reverse the orientation of canonical SPR interaction studies, and also enable a variety of new SPR applications including on-chip assembly and interaction studies of multicomponent structures, such as functionalized nanoparticles, and measurement of bioorthogonal reaction rates. We use this approach to demonstrate that on-chip assembled functionalized nanoparticles show a preserved ability to interact with their target protein, and to measure rapid bioorthogonal reaction rates with k(2) > 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). This method offers multiple benefits for microfluidic biological applications, including rapid screening of targeted nanoparticles with vastly decreased nanoparticle synthetic requirements, robust immobilization chemistry in the presence of serum, and a continuous flow technique that mimics biologic contexts better than current methods used to measure bioorthogonal reaction kinetics such as NMR or UV-vis spectroscopy (e.g., stopped flow kinetics). Taken together, this approach constitutes a flexible and powerful technique for evaluating a wide variety of reactions and intermolecular interactions for in vitro or in vivo applications.

  2. An efficient biosensor made of an electromagnetic trap and a magneto-resistive sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2014-09-01

    Magneto-resistive biosensors have been found to be useful because of their high sensitivity, low cost, small size, and direct electrical output. They use super-paramagnetic beads to label a biological target and detect it via sensing the stray field. In this paper, we report a new setup for magnetic biosensors, replacing the conventional "sandwich" concept with an electromagnetic trap. We demonstrate the capability of the biosensor in the detection of E. coli. The trap is formed by a current-carrying microwire that attracts the magnetic beads into a sensing space on top of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. The sensor signal depends on the number of beads in the sensing space, which depends on the size of the beads. This enables the detection of biological targets, because such targets increase the volume of the beads. Experiments were carried out with a 6. μm wide microwire, which attracted the magnetic beads from a distance of 60. μm, when a current of 30. mA was applied. A sensing space of 30. μm in length and 6. μm in width was defined by the magnetic sensor. The results showed that individual E. coli bacterium inside the sensing space could be detected using super-paramagnetic beads that are 2.8. μm in diameter. The electromagnetic trap setup greatly simplifies the device and reduces the detection process to two steps: (i) mixing the bacteria with magnetic beads and (ii) applying the sample solution to the sensor for measurement, which can be accomplished within about 30. min with a sample volume in the μl range. This setup also ensures that the biosensor can be cleaned easily and re-used immediately. The presented setup is readily integrated on chips via standard microfabrication techniques. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Signal amelioration of electrophoretically deposited whole-cell biosensors using external electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Amzel, Tal [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Belkin, Shimshon [Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Rubin, Adi [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2011-11-01

    short 10 ms external DC electric pulse improves the performance of bacterial biosensors by 15% relative to un-biased biosensors. The application of prolonged 1 h external alternating electric fields deteriorated the whole-cell performance in the presence of toxins. In this paper we present the electrode apparatus and methods, as well as the characterization results, e.g. signal vs. time and induction factor, of such chips and discussing the highlight and problems of this new concept.

  4. Microfluidic biosensor for β-Hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) determination of subclinical ketosis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xuan; Zhao, Wenting; Neethirajan, Suresh; Duffield, Todd

    2015-02-12

    Determination of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) is a gold standard for diagnosis of Subclinical Ketosis (SCK), a common disease in dairy cows that causes significant economic loss. Early detection of SCK can help reduce the risk of the disease progressing into clinical stage, thus minimizing economic losses on dairy cattle. Conventional laboratory methods are time consuming and labor-intensive, requiring expensive and bulky equipment. Development of portable and robust devices for rapid on-site SCK diagnosis is an effective way to prevent and control ketosis and can significantly aid in the management of dairy animal health. Microfluidic technology provides a rapid, cost-effective way to develop handheld devices for on-farm detection of sub-clinical ketosis. In this study, a highly sensitive microfluidics-based biosensor for on-site SCK diagnosis has been developed. A rapid, low-cost microfluidic biosensor with high sensitivity and specificity was developed for SCK diagnosis. Determination of βHBA was employed as the indicator in the diagnosis of SCK. On-chip detection using miniaturized and cost-effective optical sensor can be finished in 1 minute with a detection limit of 0.05 mM concentration. Developed microfluidic biosensor was successfully tested with the serum samples from dairy cows affected by SCK. The results of the developed biosensor agreed well with two other laboratory methods. The biosensor was characterized by high sensitivity and specificity towards βHBA with a detection limit of 0.05 mM. The developed microfluidic biosensor provides a promising prototype for a cost-effective handheld meter for on-site SCK diagnosis. By using microfluidic method, the detection time is significantly decreased compared to other laboratory methods. Here, we demonstrate a field-deployable device to precisely identify and measure subclinical ketosis by specific labeling and quantification of β-hydroxybutyate in cow blood samples. A real-time on-site detection system will

  5. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  6. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  7. Real-time determination of intracellular oxygen in bacteria using a genetically encoded FRET-based biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potzkei Janko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular oxygen (O2 is one of the key metabolites of all obligate and facultative aerobic pro- and eukaryotes. It plays a fundamental role in energy homeostasis whereas oxygen deprivation, in turn, broadly affects various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Therefore, real-time monitoring of cellular oxygen levels is basically a prerequisite for the analysis of hypoxia-induced processes in living cells and tissues. Results We developed a genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based biosensor allowing the observation of changing molecular oxygen concentrations inside living cells. This biosensor named FluBO (fluorescent protein-based biosensor for oxygen consists of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP that is sensitive towards oxygen depletion and the hypoxia-tolerant flavin-binding fluorescent protein (FbFP. Since O2 is essential for the formation of the YFP chromophore, efficient FRET from the FbFP donor domain to the YFP acceptor domain only occurs in the presence but not in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen biosensor was used for continuous real-time monitoring of temporal changes of O2 levels in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells during batch cultivation. Conclusions FluBO represents a unique FRET-based oxygen biosensor which allows the non-invasive ratiometric readout of cellular oxygen. Thus, FluBO can serve as a novel and powerful probe for investigating the occurrence of hypoxia and its effects on a variety of (pathophysiological processes in living cells.

  8. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  9. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  10. Nanostructured enzymatic biosensor based on fullerene and gold nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzellotto, C; Favero, G; Antonelli, M L; Tortolini, C; Cannistraro, S; Coppari, E; Mazzei, F

    2014-05-15

    In this work a novel electrochemical biosensing platform based on the coupling of two different nanostructured materials (gold nanoparticles and fullerenols) displaying interesting electrochemical features, has been developed and characterized. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) exhibit attractive electrocatalytic behavior stimulating in the last years, several sensing applications; on the other hand, fullerene and its derivatives are a very promising family of electroactive compounds although they have not yet been fully employed in biosensing. The methodology proposed in this work was finalized to the setup of a laccase biosensor based on a multilayer material consisting in AuNPs, fullerenols and Trametes versicolor Laccase (TvL) assembled layer by layer onto a gold (Au) electrode surface. The influence of different modification step procedures on the electroanalytical performance of biosensors has been evaluated. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) were used to characterize the modification of surface and to investigate the bioelectrocatalytic biosensor response. This biosensor showed fast amperometric response to gallic acid, which is usually considered a standard for polyphenols analysis of wines, with a linear range 0.03-0.30 mmol L(-1) (r(2)=0.9998), with a LOD of 0.006 mmol L(-1) or expressed as polyphenol index 5.0-50 mg L(-1) and LOD 1.1 mg L(-1). A tentative application of the developed nanostructured enzyme-based biosensor was performed evaluating the detection of polyphenols either in buffer solution or in real wine samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential diagnostic applications of biosensors: current and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Shiping; Xu, Hui; Fan, Chunhai

    2006-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in biosensors of potential clinical applications. Biosensors are becoming increasingly important and practical tools in pathogen detection, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food safety control as well as in homeland defense. Electrochemical biosensors are particularly promising toward these goals arising due to several combined advantages including low-cost, operation convenience, and miniaturized devices. We review the clinical applicatio...

  12. Recent Progress in Lectin-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress in the development of lectin-based biosensors used for the determination of glucose, pathogenic bacteria and toxins, cancer cells, and lectins. Lectin proteins have been widely used for the construction of optical and electrochemical biosensors by exploiting the specific binding affinity to carbohydrates. Among lectin proteins, concanavalin A (Con A is most frequently used for this purpose as glucose- and mannose-selective lectin. Con A is useful for immobilizing enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP on the surface of a solid support to construct glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors, because these enzymes are covered with intrinsic hydrocarbon chains. Con A-modified electrodes can be used as biosensors sensitive to glucose, cancer cells, and pathogenic bacteria covered with hydrocarbon chains. The target substrates are selectively adsorbed to the surface of Con A-modified electrodes through strong affinity of Con A to hydrocarbon chains. A recent topic in the development of lectin-based biosensors is a successful use of nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, for amplifying output signals of the sensors. In addition, lectin-based biosensors are useful for studying glycan expression on living cells.

  13. Functional design of electrolytic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage Preethichandra, D. M.; Mala Ekanayake, E. M. I.; Onoda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensbased on conjugated polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on a Pt modified ITO (indium tin oxide) conductive glass substrate and their performances are described. We have presented a method of developing a highly sensitive and low-cost nano-biosensor for blood glucose measurements. The fabrication method proposed decreases the cost of production significantly as the amount of noble metals used is minimized. A nano-corrugated PPy substrate was developed through pulsed electrochemical deposition. The sensitivity achieved was 325 mA/(Mcm2) and the linear range of the developed sensor was 50-60 mmol/l. Then the application of the electrophoresis helps the glucose oxidase (GOx) on the PPy substrate. The main reason behind this high enzyme loading is the high electric field applied across the sensor surface (working electrode) and the counter electrode where that pushes the nano-scale enzyme particles floating in the phosphate buffer solution towards the substrate. The novel technique used has provided an extremely high sensitivities and very high linear ranges for enzyme (GOx) and therefore can be concluded that this is a very good technique to load enzyme onto the conducting polymer substrates.

  14. Magnetic impedance biosensor: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Yong; Lei, Chong; Luo, Jun; Xie, Shaorong; Pu, Huayan

    2017-04-15

    Though the magnetoimpedance effect was discovered two decades ago, the biomedical applications of the magnetoimpedance sensor are still in their infancy. In this review, the authors summarized the magnetoimpedance effect in soft ferromagnetic wires, ribbons and thin films for biosensing applications. Recent progress and achievements of the magnetoimpedance-based biosensing applications including the detection of magnetic Ferrofluid, magnetic beads, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetically labeled bioanalytes and biomagnetic fields of living systems were reviewed. The modification effect of the biochemical liquids, agglomeration effect of the magnetic particles, and the effect of the stray magnetic field on magnetoimpedance were investigated in this review. Some constructive strategies were proposed for design of the high-performance magnetoimpedance biosensor, for quantitative and ultrasensitive detection of magnetically labeled biomolecules. The theoretical and experimental results suggest that the magnetoimpedance sensors are particularly suitable for highly sensitive detection of low-concentration biomolecules, and might be used for early diagnosis and screening of cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Adsorption in Surface-based Biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus

    The present Ph.D. dissertation concerns the application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which is a surface-based biosensor technology, for studies of adsorption dynamics. The thesis contains both experimental and theoretical work. In the theoretical part we develop the theory...... for convection, diffusion, and adsorption in surface-based biosensors in general. In particular, we study the transport dynamics in a model geometry of a Biacore SPR sensor. An approximate quasi-steady theory, which has been widely adopted in the SPR literature to capture convective and diffusive mass transport......, is reviewed, and an analytical solution is provided. The important nondimensional Damk¨ohler number, inherent in the quasi-steady theory, is derived in terms of the nondimensional adsorption coefficient (Biot number), the nondimensional flow rate (P´eclet number), and the model geometry. Also, a two...

  16. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors.

  17. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip for biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jönsson, Alexander; Senkbeil, Silja

    2016-01-01

    The marriage of highly sensitive biosensor designs with the versatility in sample handling and fluidic manipulation offered by lab-on-a-chip systems promises to yield powerful tools for analytical and, in particular, diagnostic applications. The field where these two technologies meet is rapidly...... and almost violently developing. Yet, solutions where the full potentials are being exploited are still surprisingly rare. In the context of this review, sensor designs are often fairly advanced, whereas the lab-on-a-chip aspect is still rather simplistic in many cases, albeit already offering significant...

  18. Integrated Ultra-High-Q Optical Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ki Youl; Oh, Dong Yoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Yang, Qi-Fan; Yi, Xu; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    Optical microcavities are compact, often chip-based devices, that are essential in technologies spanning frequency metrology to biosensing. They have also enabled new science in quantum information and cavity optomechanics. Performance requirements in subjects like cavity-QED and sensing have long placed emphasis on low-optical-loss (high-Q-factor) micrometer-scale resonators. However, an array of system-on-a-chip applications have emerged that also require millimeter-scale devices. To avoid ...

  19. Critical stages of a biodetection platform development from sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry and assay development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Yildiz

    2014-06-01

    Once viewed solely as a tool to analyse biomolecular interactions, biosensors are gaining widespread interest for diagnostics, biological defense, environmental and quality assurance in agriculture/food industries. Advanced micro fabrication techniques have facilitated integration of microfluidics with sensing functionalities on the same chip making system automation more convenient1. Biosensor devices relying on lab-on-a-chip technologies and nanotechnology has attracted much of attention in recent years for biological defense research and development. However, compared with the numerous publications and patents available, the commercialization of biosensors technology has significantly lagged behind the research output. This paper reviews the reasons behind the slow commercialisation of biosensors with an insight to the critical stages of a biosensor development from the sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry applications and nanotechnology applications in sensing with case studies. In addition, the paper includes the description of a new biodetection platform based on Real-time Electrochemical ProfilingTM (REPTM) that comprises novel electrode arrays and nanoparticle based sensing. The performance of the REPTM platform has been tested for the detection of Planktothrix agardhii, one of the toxic bloom-forming cyanobacteria, usually found in shallow fresh water sources that can be used for human consumption. The optimised REPTM assay allowed the detection of P. agardhii DNA down to 6 pM. This study, showed the potential of REPTM as a new biodetection platform for toxic bacteria and hence further studies will involve the development of a portable multi-analyte biosensor based on REPTM technology for on-site testing.

  20. Polymer Based Biosensors for Medical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherré, Solène; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to give an overview about the newest developments in biosensors made of polymers for medical applications. Biosensors are devices that can recognize and detect a target with high selectivity. They are widely used in many fields such as medical diagnostic...... and be available for use by everybody. To fulfil these purposes, polymers represent very appropriate materials. Many nano- and microfabrication methods for polymers are available, allowing a fast and cheap production of devices. This chapter will present the general concept of a biosensor in a first part....... The second part will focus on conducting polymers, used as electrode material in devices based on electrochemical detection. A third part will describe the molecularly imprinted technology, where the target is replicated in 3D negative form into the polymer....

  1. Antibody orientation on biosensor surfaces: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Beekwilder, Jules; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-03-21

    Detection elements play a key role in analyte recognition in biosensors. Therefore, detection elements with high analyte specificity and binding strength are required. While antibodies (Abs) have been increasingly used as detection elements in biosensors, a key challenge remains - the immobilization on the biosensor surface. This minireview highlights recent approaches to immobilize and study Abs on surfaces. We first introduce Ab species used as detection elements, and discuss techniques recently used to elucidate Ab orientation by determination of layer thickness or surface topology. Then, several immobilization methods will be presented: non-covalent and covalent surface attachment, yielding oriented or random coupled Abs. Finally, protein modification methods applicable for oriented Ab immobilization are reviewed with an eye to future application.

  2. Effect of surface roughness on performance of magnetoelastic biosensors for the detection of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Possan, A.L. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Menti, C. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Beltrami, M. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Santos, A.D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Roesch-Ely, M. [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Missell, F.P., E-mail: fmissell@yahoo.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli are bacteria that must be controlled in the food industry and the hospital sector. Magnetoelastic biosensors offer the promise of rapid identification of these and other harmful antigens. In this work, strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3 were cut to size (5 mm × 1 mm) with a microdicing saw and were then coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Several sensor surfaces were studied: 1) as-cast strip, wheel side; 2) as-cast strip, free surface; and 3) thinned and polished surface. A layer of cystamine was applied to the Au-covered magnetoelastic substrate, forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM), followed by antibodies, using a modified Hermanson protocol. The cystamine layer growth was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biosensors were exposed to solutions of bacteria and the resonant frequency of the sensors was measured with an impedance analyzer for times up to 100 min. Reductions in the resonant frequency, corresponding to bacteria capture, were measured after optimizing the signal amplitude. For times up to 40 min, high capture rates were observed and thereafter saturation occurred. Saturation values of the frequency shifts were compared with the number of bacteria observed on the sensor using fluorescence microscopy. Parameters associated with capture kinetics were studied for different sensor surfaces. The rough surfaces were found to show a faster response, while the thinned and polished sensors showed the largest frequency shift. - Highlights: • Magnetoelastic biosensors to capture Escherichia coli were produced. • Surface roughness of biosensors was varied in the range R{sub a} = 0.3–0.52 μm. • Rough surfaces show faster response, polished surfaces have larger frequency shift.

  3. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-07

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future.

  4. Development of a biosensor for caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, V R Sarath; Patra, S; Karanth, N G; Kumar, M A; Thakur, M S

    2007-01-23

    We have utilized a microbe, which can degrade caffeine to develop an Amperometric biosensor for determination of caffeine in solutions. Whole cells of Pseudomonas alcaligenes MTCC 5264 having the capability to degrade caffeine were immobilized on a cellophane membrane with a molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 3000-6000 by covalent crosslinking method using glutaraledhyde as the bifunctional crosslinking agent and gelatin as the protein based stabilizing agent (PBSA). The biosensor system was able to detect caffeine in solution over a concentration range of 0.1 to 1 mg mL(-1). With read-times as short as 3 min, this caffeine biosensor acts as a rapid analysis system for caffeine in solutions. Interestingly, successful isolation and immobilization of caffeine degrading bacteria for the analysis of caffeine described here was enabled by a novel selection strategy that incorporated isolation of caffeine degrading bacteria capable of utilizing caffeine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen from soils and induction of caffeine degrading capacity in bacteria for the development of the biosensor. This biosensor is highly specific for caffeine and response to interfering compounds such as theophylline, theobromine, paraxanthine, other methyl xanthines and sugars was found to be negligible. Although a few biosensing methods for caffeine are reported, they have limitations in application for commercial samples. The development and application of new caffeine detection methods remains an active area of investigation, particularly in food and clinical chemistry. The optimum pH and temperature of measurement were 6.8 and 30+/-2 degrees C, respectively. Interference in analysis of caffeine due to different substrates was observed but was not considerable. Caffeine content of commercial samples of instant tea and coffee was analyzed by the biosensor and the results compared well with HPLC analysis.

  5. Performance of Eudragit Coated Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator-Based Immunosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cosi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMR are an efficient tool for the realization of optical biosensors. A high Q factor preservation is a crucial requirement for good biosensor performances. In this work we present an Eudragit®L100 coated microspherical WGMR as an efficient immunosensor. The developed resonator was morphologically characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The functionalization process was tuned to preserve the high Q factor of the resonator. The protein binding assay was optically characterized in terms of specificity in buffer solution.

  6. Applications of redox polymers in biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguslavsky, L. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Hale, P.D. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Geng Lin (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Skotheim, T.A. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Lee Hongsui (Dept. of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Polymers containing covalently attached redox molecules can be highly effective electron transfer mediators for flavin adenine dinucleotide redox centers of many oxidases. Highly flexible siloxane and ethylene oxide polymers containing covalently attached ferrocene molecules are shown to be capable of mediating electron transfer between enzymes and an electrode. The construction and response of bienzyme cholesterol biosensor, acetylcholine and glucose biosensor are described and discussed. Our data showed that the flexibility, hydrophilicity of the polymer, the density of redox centers in the polymer matrices and the self-exchange reaction rate of the redox molecules control the efficiency of the electron transfer mediation. (orig.)

  7. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  8. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted.

  9. Novel On Chip Passive Circuits for RF, Microwave, Millimeter wave and Sub THz Applicatons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    linearity and high-Q are achieved, simultaneously. V. HYBRID SUB-THz CPW /DGS REsONATOR On-chip sub-THz application is a hot-research topic in... resonator with dual- resonances remains a great challenge. In Fig. 9, a hybrid CPW /DGS resonator [12) is proposed, which is with one-side directly...paper. Several types passive including SSI inductor, SSI transformer, 30 self-shielded capacitor, and hybrid sub-THz CPW /DGS resonator are

  10. Fluidic MEMS based Biosensor for the Detection of Nucleic acids by using Schizophyllan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Takaaki; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Noguchi, Kazuhiro; Takamatsu, Kana; Itho, Fuyumi; Kimura, Taro; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    Recently, a fluid micro electro mechanical system (fluid MEMS), which is composed of a micro pump, mixer, valve, reactor, sensor, an electric circuit, on a chip, is being applied to a biotechnology or a medical analysis. Authors developed a micro sensor mounted on a chip to measure a concentration of one drop of solution (1nL-10μL) which contained nuclear acids. The form of the micro sensor mounted on the chip was a pair of Cu electrode which was a diameter of 2mm and was a thickness of 10μm. The sensing function was evaluated by the changes in a concentration of poly(x) (x=adenine, guanine, uracil, and cytosine) solution which was dropped on a micro sensor. To increase a recognization against nucleic acid, various adsorbent was added in a droplet. Especially, high recognition against the nucleic acid was observed with the adsorbent which modified the surface of polystyrene micro beads(10μm) using schizophyllan: a kind of polysaccharide. This biosensor recognized a small quantity of total-RNA and m-RNA extracted from the yeast.

  11. Biosensor Systems for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2004-05-30

    The detection of biological agents is important to minimize the effects of pathogens that can harm people, livestock, or plants. In addition to pathogens distributed by man, there is a need to detect natural outbreaks. Recent outbreaks of SARS, mad cow disease, pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella, as well as the discovery of letters filled with anthrax spores have highlighted the need for biosensor systems to aid in prevention, early warning, response, and recovery. Rapid detection can be used to prevent exposure; and detection on a longer timescale can be used to minimize exposure, define treatment, and determine whether contaminated areas are clean enough for reuse. The common types of biological agents of concern include bacteria, spores, and viruses (Figure 1). From a chemist’s point of view, pathogens are essentially complex packages of chemicals that are assembled into organized packages with somewhat predictable physical characteristics such as size and shape. Pathogen detection methods can be divided into three general approaches: selective detection methods for specific identification such as nucleic acid analysis and structural recognition, semi-selective methods for broad-spectrum detection (e.g. physical properties, metabolites, lipids), and function-based methods (e.g. effect of the pathogen on organisms, tissues, or cells). The requirements for biodetection systems depend upon the application. While detect to warn sensors may require rapid detection on the order one minute, detection times of many minutes or hours may be suitable for determining appropriate treatments or for forensic analysis. Of course ideal sensor systems will meet the needs of many applications, and will be sensitive, selective, rapid, and simultaneously detect all agents of concern. They will also be reliable with essentially no false negatives or false positives, small, easy to use, and low cost with minimal consumables.

  12. Mathematical Model of the Biosensors Acting in a Trigger Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feliksas Ivanauskas

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A mathematical model of biosensors acting in a trigger mode has been developed. One type of the biosensors utilized a trigger enzymatic reaction followed by the cyclic enzymatic and electrochemical conversion of the product (CCE scheme. Other biosensors used the enzymatic trigger reaction followed by the electrochemical and enzymatic product cyclic conversion (CEC scheme. The models were based on diffusion equations containing a non-linear term related to Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the enzymatic reactions. The digital simulation was carried out using the finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration, the maximal enzymatic rate as well as the membrane thickness on the biosensor response was investigated. The numerical experiments demonstrated a significant gain (up to dozens of times in biosensor sensitivity when the biosensor response was under diffusion control. In the case of significant signal amplification, the response time with triggering was up to several times longer than that of the biosensor without triggering.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of nucleic acids: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šípová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    -, č. 773 (2013), s. 9-23 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Nucleic acid * Biosensor Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 4.517, year: 2013

  14. The Torus Routing Chip

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dally, William J; Seitz, Charles L

    1986-01-01

    The torus routing chip (TRC) is a self-timed chip that performs deadlock-free cut-through routing in k-ary n-cube multiprocessor interconnection networks using a new method of deadlock avoidance called virtual channels...

  15. Sensitive detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein, with a sandwich assay on a plasmonic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Keiko; Kondo, Fusanori; Sasakawa, Chisato; Nagae, Kousuke; Nakamura, Yukito; Nozaki, Akitoshi; Kaya, Takatoshi

    2015-04-07

    Two types of plasmonic silver- and gold-coated grating biosensor chips (plasmonic chip) were applied in the detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP) with a sandwich imunoassay and surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence. On the plasmonic chip, unlabeled marker in the sandwich immunoassay was first quantitatively detected over a wide range between 10(-12) and 10(-8) g/mL. The affinity constants between AFP and anti-AFP antibody, which were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the Langmuir isotherm adsorption curve, were 1 × 10(8) g(-1) mL regardless of the kind of metal in the plasmonic chips. Although the fluorescence intensity on the silver plasmonic chip was 5 times larger than that on the gold plasmonic chip, the limit of detection (LOD) was on the order of 10(-11) g/mL and not improved with a silver plasmonic chip. Herein, we used a new setup that generated less dispersions of both the fluorescence intensity for nonspecific adsorption and the background (optical blank) signal and improved the LOD of AFP to 4 pg/mL (55 fM) with the silver plasmonic chip. With the highly sensitive detection in the sandwich immunoassay, the development of a plasmonic chip for clinical diagnosis by a blood test is promising.

  16. Single-particle imaging for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Isil, Cagatay; Seymour, Elif; Yurdakul, Celalettin; Solmaz, Berkan; Koc, Aykut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art technology for in-vitro diagnostics employ laboratory tests such as ELISA that consists of a multi-step test procedure and give results in analog format. Results of these tests are interpreted by the color change in a set of diluted samples in a multi-well plate. However, detection of the minute changes in the color poses challenges and can lead to false interpretations. Instead, a technique that allows individual counting of specific binding events would be useful to overcome such challenges. Digital imaging has been applied recently for diagnostics applications. SPR is one of the techniques allowing quantitative measurements. However, the limit of detection in this technique is on the order of nM. The current required detection limit, which is already achieved with the analog techniques, is around pM. Optical techniques that are simple to implement and can offer better sensitivities have great potential to be used in medical diagnostics. Interference Microscopy is one of the tools that have been investigated over years in optics field. More of the studies have been performed in confocal geometry and each individual nanoparticle was observed separately. Here, we achieve wide-field imaging of individual nanoparticles in a large field-of-view ( 166 μm × 250 μm) on a micro-array based sensor chip in fraction of a second. We tested the sensitivity of our technique on dielectric nanoparticles because they exhibit optical properties similar to viruses and cells. We can detect non-resonant dielectric polystyrene nanoparticles of 100 nm. Moreover, we perform post-processing applications to further enhance visibility.

  17. Development of smart functional surfaces for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalinga Balasubramanian, Shankar Ganesh

    Biosensing platforms and antimicrobial coatings were developed to combat problems associated with infectious diseases. Particularly, a lytic bacteriophage based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was developed to detect food borne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) in real-time with high specificity. Lytic bacteriophages are naturally developed molecular probes that infect bacteria. They are environmentally stable and inexpensive to produce compared to commercially available antibodies. The sensitivity of SPR biosensors were further improved specifically by poly-L-lysine grafted polyethylene glycol (PLL-g-PEG) polymer. This polymer reduces non-specific adsorption of S.aureus on SPR gold surface by ˜97%. When used as a blocking buffer in affinity sensing of model antigen, beta-galactosidase by filamentous bacteriophage, this polymer improved the detection sensitivity by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. A facile approach was developed for sensor surface regeneration by controlling the immobilization and removal of antibodies from SPR gold surface. This was facilitated by the electro-reductive nature of alkanethiols. By combining SPR with electrochemical methods, the molecular assembly/disassembly processes were monitored in real-time with great control. Finally, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) biocomposites were prepared using DNA and lysozyme (LSZ) to develop mechanically strong antimicrobial coatings. Coulombic interactions between DNA and LSZ were exploited to fabricate multilayer antimicrobial coatings using a technique called layer-by-layer assembly. This produced large scale biomimetic coatings with significant antimicrobial activity, high Young's modulus and controlled morphology which combines the individual attributes of SWNTs and natural materials.

  18. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  19. High-throughput and high-sensitivity quantitative analysis of serum unsaturated fatty acids by chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: early stage diagnostic biomarkers of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Yanmin; Qin, Xuzhen; Li, Zhili

    2014-04-07

    In this study, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) coupled with chip-based direct-infusion nanoelectrospray ionization source (CBDInanoESI) in a negative ion mode is first employed to evaluate the effect of serum and its corresponding supernatant matrixes on the recoveries of serum free fatty acids (FFAs) based on spike-and-recovery experimental strategy by adding analytes along with analog internal standard (IS). The recoveries between serum (69.8-115.6%) and the supernatant (73.6-99.0%) matrixes are almost identical. Multiple point internal standard calibration curves between the concentration ratios of individual fatty acids to ISs, (C(17:1) as IS of C(16:1), C(18:3), C(18:2), or C(18:1) or C(21:0) as IS of C(20:4) or C(22:6)) versus their corresponding intensity ratios were constructed for C(16:1), C(18:3), C(18:2), C(18:1), C(20:4) and C(22:6), respectively, with correlation coefficients of greater than 0.99, lower limits of detection between 0.3 and 1.8 nM, and intra- and inter-day precision (relative standard deviations <18%), along with the linear dynamic range of three orders of magnitude. Sequentially, this advanced analytical platform was applied to perform simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of multiple targets, e.g., serum supernatant unsaturated FFAs from 361 participants including 95 patients with pancreatic cancer (PC), 61 patients with pancreatitis and 205 healthy controls. Experimental results indicate that the levels of C(18:1), C(18:2), C(18:3), C(20:4) and C(22:6), as well as the level ratios of C(18:2)/C(18:1) and C(18:3)/C(18:1) of the PC patients were significantly decreased compared with those of healthy controls and the patients with pancreatitis (p < 0.01). It is worth noting that the ratio of C(18:2)/C(18:1), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (C(18:2), C(18:3), C(20:4), and C(22:6)), panel a (C(16:1), C(18:3), C(18:2), C(20:4) and C(22:6)) and panel b (C(18:2)/C(18:1) and C(18:3)/C(18

  20. Detection of solder bump defects on a flip chip using vibration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junchao; Shi, Tielin; Xia, Qi; Liao, Guanglan

    2012-03-01

    Flip chips are widely used in microelectronics packaging owing to the high demand of integration in IC fabrication. Solder bump defects on flip chips are difficult to detect, because the solder bumps are obscured by the chip and substrate. In this paper a nondestructive detection method combining ultrasonic excitation with vibration analysis is presented for detecting missing solder bumps, which is a typical defect in flip chip packaging. The flip chip analytical model is revised by considering the influence of spring mass on mechanical energy of the system. This revised model is then applied to estimate the flip chip resonance frequencies. We use an integrated signal generator and power amplifier together with an air-coupled ultrasonic transducer to excite the flip chips. The vibrations are measured by a laser scanning vibrometer to detect the resonance frequencies. A sensitivity coefficient is proposed to select the sensitive resonance frequency order for defect detection. Finite element simulation is also implemented for further investigation. The results of analytical computation, experiment, and simulation prove the efficacy of the revised flip chip analytical model and verify the effectiveness of this detection method. Therefore, it may provide a guide for the improvement and innovation of the flip chip on-line inspection systems.