WorldWideScience

Sample records for resonance assisted hydrogen

  1. The Origin of the Non-Additivity in Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bond Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuhui; Zhang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2017-11-09

    The concept of resonance-assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB) has been widely accepted, and its impact on structures and energetics can be best studied computationally using the block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and able to derive strictly electron-localized structures self-consistently. In this work, we use the BLW method to examine a few molecules that result from the merging of two malonaldehyde molecules. As each of these molecules contains two hydrogen bonds, these intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be cooperative or anticooperative, depended on their relative orientations, and compared with the hydrogen bond in malonaldehyde. Apart from quantitatively confirming the concept of RAHB, the comparison of the computations with and without π resonance shows that both σ-framework and π-resonance contribute to the nonadditivity in these RAHB systems with multiple hydrogen bonds.

  2. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  3. Polarized IR spectra of resonance assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB) in 2-hydroxyazobenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rospenk, Maria; Majewska, Paulina; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Boguslawa; Sobczyk, Lucjan

    2006-01-01

    The polarized IR spectra in the region 4000-400 cm -1 over the temperature range 298-370 K of liquid crystalline (LC) 4-chloro-2'-hydroxy-4'-pentyloxyazobenzene (CHPAB) containing strong O-H...N RAHBs were studied. It has been established that molecules of this compound undergoes a spontaneous ordering in thin layers (10-20 μm) between the KRS-5 plates. The order degree expressed by the S parameter exceeds 0.6 for the Smectic A and crystalline phases. The best indicator of orientation is the mode at 1084 cm -1 as its transition dipole moment is oriented parallel to the long axis of the molecule. A good marker is also the γ(OH) band with the transition dipole moment nearly perpendicular to the long axis. The intramolecular O-H...N hydrogen bonding shows features characteristic of RAHB. The transition dipole moment of the ν(OH) vibrations forms with the long axis of the molecule the angle equal to 43 ± 3 deg. (the OH bond is oriented to this axis at the angle of 9 deg.) that convincingly speaks in favour of a coupling between the proton and π-electron motions. Similar behaviour is manifested by a broad absorption in the finger print region that can be interpreted in terms of the modification of the potential energy shape due to the plane-to-plane intermolecular interaction and appearance of the second minimum. A marked ordering of molecules in the isotropic phase is also observed evidencing some alignment of molecules extended far beyond the monomolecular layers on the surfaces of the KRS-5 windows

  4. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, K; Winter, R

    2005-08-01

    COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80 degrees C) and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13 degrees C). Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea) on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM) led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  5. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vogtt

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80ºC and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13ºC. Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  6. A Failure Locus for Hydrogen Assisted Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Harris, Zach D.; Burns, James T.

    2017-01-01

    of a hydrogen-dependent traction separation law. A special control algorithm is employed to overcome numerical instabilities intrinsically associated with cohesive zone formulations. The fracture energy is degraded by means of an experimentally-motivated hydrogen degradation relation. Numerical results provide...... important insight into the failure process, enabling to identify critical values of hydrogen concentration and remote stresses that trigger cracking. The work builds upon previous works by the authors and brings important insight into the technologically important problem of hydrogen assisted cracking....

  7. Characterization of electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outten, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas yield low energy and high ion density plasmas. The characteristics downstream of an ECR hydrogen plasma were investigated as a function of microwave power and magnetic field. A fast-injection Langmuir probe and a carbon resistance probe were used to determine plasma potential (V p ), electron density (N e ), electron temperature (T e ), ion energy (T i ), and ion fluence. Langmuir probe results showed that at 17 cm downstream from the ECR chamber the plasma characteristics are approximately constant across the center 7 cm of the plasma for 50 Watts of absorbed power. These results gave V p = 30 ± 5 eV, N e = 1 x 10 8 cm -3 , and T e = 10--13 eV. In good agreement with the Langmuir probe results, carbon resistance probes have shown that T i ≤ 50 eV. Also, based on hydrogen chemical sputtering of carbon, the hydrogen (ion and energetic neutrals) fluence rate was determined to be 1 x 10 16 /cm 2 -sec. at a pressure of 1 x 10 -4 Torr and for 50 Watts of absorbed power. 19 refs

  8. Effect of composition on diffusible hydrogen content and hydrogen assisted cracking of steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.K.; Ramasubbu, V.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Parvathavarthini, N.

    2008-01-01

    Study of hydrogen assisted cracking and measurement of diffusible hydrogen content in different Cr-Mo steel welds showed that for identical conditions, susceptibility to cracking increased and diffusible hydrogen content decreased with increase in alloy content. Hydrogen permeation studies showed that hydrogen diffusivity decreases and solubility increases with increase in alloy content. Thus decrease in diffusible hydrogen content with increase in alloying is attributed to increase in apparent solubility and decrease in apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with increase in alloy content. Analysis of the results indicates that variation of diffusible hydrogen content and apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with alloy content can be represented as a function of alloy composition. (author)

  9. Dry cleaning of fluorocarbon residues by low-power electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, S H; Yuh, H K; Yoon Eui Joon; Lee, S I

    1988-01-01

    A low-power ( 50 W) electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen plasma cleaning process was demonstrated for the removal of fluorocarbon residue layers formed by reactive ion etching of silicon dioxide. The absence of residue layers was confirmed by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The ECR hydrogen plasma cleaning was applied to contact cleaning of a contact string structure, resulting in comparable contact resistance arising during by a conventional contact cleaning procedure. Ion-assisted chemical reaction involving reactive atomic hydrogen species generated in the plasma is attributed for the removal of fluorocarbon residue layers.

  10. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    2017-01-01

    due to coking of the catalyst is an inhibitive problem for this technology. The objective of the present work is to produce oxygen free gasoline and diesel from biomass by hydrogen assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been performed in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere...

  11. Hydrogen-Assisted IC Engine Combustion as a Route to Hydrogen Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre Boehman; Daniel Haworth

    2008-09-30

    The 'Freedom Car' Initiative announced by the Bush Administration has placed a significant emphasis on development of a hydrogen economy in the United States. While the hydrogen-fueled fuel-cell vehicle that is the focus of the 'Freedom Car' program would rely on electrochemical energy conversion, and despite the large amount of resources being devoted to its objectives, near-term implementation of hydrogen in the transportation sector is not likely to arise from fuel cell cars. Instead, fuel blending and ''hydrogen-assisted'' combustion are more realizable pathways for wide-scale hydrogen utilization within the next ten years. Thus, a large potential avenue for utilization of hydrogen in transportation applications is through blending with natural gas, since there is an existing market for natural-gas vehicles of various classes, and since hydrogen can provide a means of achieving even stricter emissions standards. Another potential avenue is through use of hydrogen to 'assist' diesel combustion to permit alternate combustion strategies that can achieve lower emissions and higher efficiency. This project focused on developing the underlying fundamental information to support technologies that will facilitate the introduction of coal-derived hydrogen into the market. Two paths were envisioned for hydrogen utilization in transportation applications. One is for hydrogen to be mixed with other fuels, specifically natural gas, to enhance performance in existing natural gas-fueled vehicles (e.g., transit buses) and provide a practical and marketable avenue to begin using hydrogen in the field. A second is to use hydrogen to enable alternative combustion modes in existing diesel engines, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, to permit enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Thus, this project on hydrogen-assisted combustion encompassed two major objectives: (1) Optimization of hydrogen-natural gas mixture

  12. New Transition metal assisted complex borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesha Srinivasan; Elias Lee Stefanakos; Yogi Goswami

    2006-01-01

    High capacity hydrogen storage systems are indeed essential for the on-board vehicular application that leads to the pollution free environment. Apart from the various hydrogen storage systems explored in the past, complex hydrides involving light weight alkali/alkaline metals exhibits promising hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation characteristics. New transition metal assisted complex borohydrides [Zn(BH 4 ) 2 ] have been successfully synthesized by an inexpensive mechano-chemical process. These complex hydrides possesses gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity of ∼8.4 wt.% at around 120 C. We have determined the volumetric hydrogen absorption and desorption of these materials for a number of cycles. Another complex borohydride mixture LiBH 4 /MgH 2 catalyzed with ZnCl 2 has been synthesized and characterized using various analytical techniques. (authors)

  13. Resonance-assisted decay of nondispersive wave packets

    OpenAIRE

    Wimberger, S.; Schlagheck, P.; Eltschka, C.; Buchleitner, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantitative semiclassical theory for the decay of nondispersive electronic wave packets in driven, ionizing Rydberg systems. Statistically robust quantities are extracted combining resonance assisted tunneling with subsequent transport across chaotic phase space and a final ionization step.

  14. Spin asymmetry in resonant electron-hydrogen elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Shang, Bo.

    1993-02-01

    Differential cross sections and asymmetries at 90 deg. and 30 deg are calculated for electron-hydrogen elastic scattering over the energies of the lowest 1 S and 3 P resonances using a nine-state coupled-channels calculation with and without continuum effects, which are represented by an equivalent-local polarization potential. The polarization potential improves agreement with experiment in general for the spin-averaged cross sections. It is suggested that continuum effects would be critically tested by asymmetry measurement at 30 deg over the 1 S resonance. 7 refs., 4 figs

  15. Density of Resonance Neutrons in Hydrogenous Media Near the Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1944-07-01

    This report was written by D.V. Booker, E. Broda and L. Kowarski at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) in January 1944 and is about the density of resonance neutrons in hydrogenous media near the source. Neutron-absorbing properties of a medium sometimes cannot be studied by the usual density integration technique because the amount of medium, or the intensity far from the source is insufficient. In such cases many useful deductions can be made from single-point activation measurements in a medium of known behaviour provided the differences between the scattering properties of the two media are negligible, insofar as they influence the observed activations, or can be allowed for. The relevant properties of a hydrogenous medium are discussed in this report and the activation of resonance detectors in H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} is compared to the activation in C{sub 10}H{sub 8}, used as a reference medium. (nowak)

  16. Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen gas at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, W.N.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.W.; Kubik, P.R.; Marsolais, R.M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H 2 and 4 He, we have been able to store a low density (approximately 10 12 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T=1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4 He→H 2 + 4 He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4 He gas and the pressure shift of the hyperfine frequency due to the 4 He buffer gas. Here we discuss the application of hyperfine frequency shifts as a probe of the H-He potential, and as a means for determining the binding energy of H on liquid helium

  18. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Work on observing strange particle resonances, already predicted by theory, was done at Berkeley by the author Luis Alvarez starting in 1953, thanks to the development of a bubble chamber filled with liquid hydrogen, which made the discovery on new particles and their mode of production easier. The first experiment, stopping K - mesons in hydrogen lead to copious production of the strangeness equal to minus one hyperons, the lambda, and sigma minus, plus and neutral, as well as enabling the first observation of muon-catalyzed fusion reactions. In 1955, funding was obtained for a seventy-two-inch bubble chamber, by far the largest ever constructed. Later computer analysis permitted calculation of track co-ordinates in real space. A neutral cascade particle, the xi, predicted by theory, had its mass measured first on the fifteen-inch chamber. The author closes with a description of the explosion in discoveries of resonance particles in the late fifties and speculates about future discoveries. (UK)

  19. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaturonrusmee, Wasna; Arthonvorakul, Areerat; Assateranuwat, Adisorn

    2005-10-01

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  20. Controlling chaos-assisted directed transport via quantum resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jintao; Zou, Mingliang; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-06-01

    We report on the first demonstration of chaos-assisted directed transport of a quantum particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice, through a resonance-induced double-mean displacement relating to the true classically chaotic orbits. The transport velocity is controlled by the driving amplitude and the sign of tilt, and also depends on the phase of the initial state. The chaos-assisted transport feature can be verified experimentally by using a source of single atoms to detect the double-mean displacement one by one, and can be extended to different scientific fields.

  1. Controlling chaos-assisted directed transport via quantum resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jintao; Zou, Mingliang; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua, E-mail: whhai2005@aliyun.com [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Low-dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081, China and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-06-15

    We report on the first demonstration of chaos-assisted directed transport of a quantum particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice, through a resonance-induced double-mean displacement relating to the true classically chaotic orbits. The transport velocity is controlled by the driving amplitude and the sign of tilt, and also depends on the phase of the initial state. The chaos-assisted transport feature can be verified experimentally by using a source of single atoms to detect the double-mean displacement one by one, and can be extended to different scientific fields.

  2. Uncertainty in the inelastic resonant scattering assisted by phonons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.; Garcia-Sanz, J.; Solana, J.

    1977-01-01

    We have analyzed the inelastic minima observed in new results of He atoms scattered from LiF(001) surfaces. This is done considering bound state resonance processes assisted by phonons. The analysis presents large uncertainties. In the range of uncertainty, we find two ''possible'' bands associated with the vibrations of F - and Li + , respectively. Many more experimental data are necessary to confirm the existence of these processes

  3. Influence of alloying on hydrogen-assisted cracking and diffusible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    moisture in the welding consumables which dissociate in the welding arc to form hydrogen and oxygen. The susceptibility of the weldment to HAC is assessed from the hydrogen diffused out from the weld after the welding is over. Hydrogen thus diffused out is referred to as diffusible hydrogen (HD) and is estimated from the ...

  4. Development of a Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Double Saw Resonator System at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Yunusa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A double SAW resonator system was developed as a novel method for gas sensing applications. The proposed system was investigated for hydrogen sensing. Commercial Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators with resonance frequencies of 433.92 MHz and 433.42 MHz were employed in the double SAW resonator system configuration. The advantages of using this configuration include its ability for remote measurements, and insensitivity to vibrations and other external disturbances. The sensitive layer is composed of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline nanofibers which were deposited on pre-patterned platinum metal electrodes fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. This was mounted into the DSAWR circuit and connected in parallel. The sensor response was measured as the difference between the resonance frequencies of the SAW resonators, which is a measure of the gas concentration. The sensor showed good response towards hydrogen with a minimum detection limit of 1%.

  5. Photocatalytic methanol assisted production of hydrogen with simultaneous degradation of methyl orange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral Romao, J.I.; Salata, Rafal; Park, Sun-Young; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Platinized TiO2 prepared by photodeposition was evaluated for activity in the simultaneous conversion of methyl orange (MO), and methanol assisted formation of hydrogen. Low concentrations of MO were found ineffective for generation of hydrogen in measurable quantities upon illumination of Pt/TiO2

  6. Travelling wave resonators fabricated with low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Timo; Amthor, Julia; Trieu, Hoc Khiem; Müller, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    Low-loss hydrogenated amorphous silicon is employed for the fabrication of various planar integrated travelling wave resonators. Microring, racetrack, and disk resonators of different dimensions were fabricated with CMOS-compatible processes and systematically investigated. The key properties of notch filter ring resonators as extinction ratio, Q-factor, free spectral range, and the group refractive index were determined for resonators of varying radius, thereby achieving critically coupled photonic systems with high extinction ratios of about 20 dB for both polarizations. Racetrack resonators that are arranged in add/drop configuration and high quality factor microdisk resonators were optically characterized, with the microdisks exhibiting Q-factors of greater than 100000. Four-channel add/drop wavelength-division multiplexing filters that are based on cascaded racetrack resonators are studied. The design, the fabrication, and the optical characterization are presented.

  7. Microstructural characterization of hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel by EBSD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureys, A., E-mail: Aurelie.Laureys@UGent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Depover, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Petrov, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Verbeken, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking by performing an elaborate EBSD (Electron BackScatter Diffraction) study in a steel with transformation induced plasticity (TRIP-assisted steel). This type of steel exhibits a multiphase microstructure which undergoes a deformation induced phase transformation. Additionally, each microstructural constituent displays a different behavior in the presence of hydrogen. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding on the mechanisms governing hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation in the hydrogen saturated multiphase structure. Tensile tests on notched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. The tests were interrupted at stresses just after reaching the tensile strength, i.e. before macroscopic failure of the material. This allowed to study hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EBSD. A correlation was found between the presence of martensite, which is known to be very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and the initiation of hydrogen induced cracks. Initiation seems to occur mostly by martensite decohesion. High strain regions surrounding the hydrogen induced crack tips indicate that further crack propagation may have occurred by the HELP (hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity) mechanism. Small hydrogen induced cracks located nearby the notch are typically S-shaped and crack propagation was dominantly transgranularly. The second stage of crack propagation consists of stepwise cracking by coalescence of small hydrogen induced cracks. - Highlights: • Hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel is evaluated by EBSD. • Tensile tests were conducted on notched hydrogen saturated samples. • Crack initiation occurs by a H-Enhanced Interface DEcohesion (HEIDE) mechanism. • Crack propagation involves growth and coalescence of small cracks. • Propagation is governed by the characteristics of

  8. Microstructural characterization of hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel by EBSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureys, A.; Depover, T.; Petrov, R.; Verbeken, K.

    2016-01-01

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking by performing an elaborate EBSD (Electron BackScatter Diffraction) study in a steel with transformation induced plasticity (TRIP-assisted steel). This type of steel exhibits a multiphase microstructure which undergoes a deformation induced phase transformation. Additionally, each microstructural constituent displays a different behavior in the presence of hydrogen. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding on the mechanisms governing hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation in the hydrogen saturated multiphase structure. Tensile tests on notched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. The tests were interrupted at stresses just after reaching the tensile strength, i.e. before macroscopic failure of the material. This allowed to study hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EBSD. A correlation was found between the presence of martensite, which is known to be very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and the initiation of hydrogen induced cracks. Initiation seems to occur mostly by martensite decohesion. High strain regions surrounding the hydrogen induced crack tips indicate that further crack propagation may have occurred by the HELP (hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity) mechanism. Small hydrogen induced cracks located nearby the notch are typically S-shaped and crack propagation was dominantly transgranularly. The second stage of crack propagation consists of stepwise cracking by coalescence of small hydrogen induced cracks. - Highlights: • Hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel is evaluated by EBSD. • Tensile tests were conducted on notched hydrogen saturated samples. • Crack initiation occurs by a H-Enhanced Interface DEcohesion (HEIDE) mechanism. • Crack propagation involves growth and coalescence of small cracks. • Propagation is governed by the characteristics of

  9. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    differs in general from the previous models in that hydrogen is assumed , to enhance local plasticity rather than truly embrittle the lattice. 5) Formation...measured. - The salient caracteristics of the IIW test include: - A 10mm X 15mm X 30mm specimen machined from mild steel with a sur- . .. face ground...hydrogen so %4. -. ,*. that a crack can grow under a lower applied stress. This theory has been criticized on the basis that the small but finite plastic

  10. Resonance charge exchange between excited states in slow proton-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Kato, Daiji

    2010-01-01

    The theory of resonance charge exchange in slow collisions of a proton with a hydrogen atom in the excited state is developed. It extends the Firsov-Demkov theory of resonance charge exchange to the case of degenerate initial and final states. The theory is illustrated by semiclassical and quantum calculations of charge exchange cross sections between states with n=2 in parabolic and spherical coordinates. The results are compared with existing close-coupling calculations.

  11. Resonances above the ionization threshold in positron-hydrogen scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernoghan, A.A.; Walters, H.R.J.; McAlinden, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Resonances appearing above the ionization threshold in coupled-state calculations of positron-atom scattering are discussed. Calculations in the six state approximation Ps(1s, 2s, 2p) + H(1s, 2s, 2p), which show such resonance structure, are compared with a more extensive 18-state approximation Ps(1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 2p, 3p, 4p, 3d, 4d) + H(1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 2p, 3p, 4p, 3d, 4d) in which channels other than 1s, 2s and 2p are represented by pseudostates. The results strongly indicate that the above ionization threshold resonances observed in the six-state approximation, and in other small basis set calculations, are not real. It is suggested that they are a consequence of the neglect, or inadequate representation in other approximations, of ionization channels. In the six-state approximation the positronium component of the system wavefunction attempts to represent the missing ionization channels but in so doing produces unreal resonances above the ionization threshold. More generally it is suggested that, in coupled-state calculations of positron-atom scattering, the atom part of the system wavefunction will try to compensate for defects in the positronium component and vice versa. When the defects are serious, for example, the omission of important ionization channels, unusual spurious behaviour is to be expected. (Author)

  12. Enhanced photoluminescence from ring resonators in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ryan J; Wood, Michael G; Reano, Ronald M

    2017-11-01

    We report enhanced photoluminescence in the telecommunications wavelength range in ring resonators patterned in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films deposited via low-temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The thin films exhibit broadband photoluminescence that is enhanced by up to 5 dB by the resonant modes of the ring resonators due to the Purcell effect. Ellipsometry measurements of the thin films show a refractive index comparable to crystalline silicon and an extinction coefficient on the order of 0.001 from 1300 nm to 1600 nm wavelengths. The results are promising for chip-scale integrated optical light sources.

  13. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-assisted crack initiation in austenitic-ferritic duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mente, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels have been used for a long time in the offshore industry, since they have higher strength than conventional austenitic stainless steels and they exhibit a better ductility as well as an improved corrosion resistance in harsh environments compared to ferritic stainless steels. However, despite these good properties the literature shows some failure cases of duplex stainless steels in which hydrogen plays a crucial role for the cause of the damage. Numerical simulations can give a significant contribution in clarifying the damage mechanisms. Because they help to interpret experimental results as well as help to transfer results from laboratory tests to component tests and vice versa. So far, most numerical simulations of hydrogen-assisted material damage in duplex stainless steels were performed at the macroscopic scale. However, duplex stainless steels consist of approximately equal portions of austenite and δ-ferrite. Both phases have different mechanical properties as well as hydrogen transport properties. Thus, the sensitivity for hydrogen-assisted damage is different in both phases, too. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop a numerical model of a duplex stainless steel microstructure enabling simulation of hydrogen transport, mechanical stresses and strains as well as crack initiation and propagation in both phases. Additionally, modern X-ray diffraction experiments were used in order to evaluate the influence of hydrogen on the phase specific mechanical properties. For the numerical simulation of the hydrogen transport it was shown, that hydrogen diffusion strongly depends on the alignment of austenite and δ-ferrite in the duplex stainless steel microstructure. Also, it was proven that the hydrogen transport is mainly realized by the ferritic phase and hydrogen is trapped in the austenitic phase. The numerical analysis of phase specific mechanical stresses and strains revealed that if the duplex stainless steel is

  14. Study on hydrogen assisted cracking susceptibility of HSLA steel by implant test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopa Chakraborty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DMR-249A is an indigenously developed high strength low alloy steel for Indian ship building industry for making ship-hull and is extensively used in the construction of war ships and submarines. Welding electrodes conforming to SFA 5.5 AWS E8018 C1 has been indigenously developed for welding of this steel using shielded metal arc welding process. In the present study, susceptibility to hydrogen assisted cracking of DMR-249A steel welds made using this electrode has been assessed using implant test. Implant tests were conducted using this electrode at two different levels of diffusible hydrogen, measured using gas chromatography technique. It is observed that both the steel and the welding consumable are not susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking even with a high diffusible hydrogen level of 9 mL/100g of weld metal. In implant tests, specimen did not fracture even after loading to stress levels higher than the yield strength of the base metal. The good resistance of this steel and the welding consumable, even with high levels of diffusible hydrogen, is attributed to absence of a susceptible microstructure in both the weld metal and heat affected zone. Hence, this study shows that, in the absence of a susceptible microstructure, hydrogen assisted cracking is unlikely to occur even if hydrogen level is high. It also confirms that in welding of DMR-249A with indigenously developed E8018 C1 electrode, hydrogen assisted cracking is not a concern and no preheating is required to avoid it during welding.

  15. STM-Induced Hydrogen Desorption via a Hole Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report STM-induced desorption of H from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) at negative sample bias. The desorption rate exhibits a power-law dependence on current and a maximum desorption rate at -7 V. The desorption is explained by vibrational heating of H due to inelastic scattering of tunneling holes...... with the Si-H 5 sigma hole resonance. The dependence of desorption rate on current and bias is analyzed using a novel approach for calculating inelastic scattering, which includes the effect of the electric field between tip and sample. We show that the maximum desorption rate at -7 V is due to a maximum...

  16. Enzyme catalytic resonance scattering spectral detection of trace hydrogen peroxide using guaiacol as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwen Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidized guaiacol to form tetramer particles that exhibited a strong resonance scattering (RS peak at 530 nm in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP in citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution of pH 4.4. The RS peak increased when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased. The increased RS intensity (ΔI530 nm was linear to the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the range of 0.55-27.6 μM, with a linear regression equation of ΔI530 nm = 17.1C + 1.6, a relative coefficient of 0.9996 and a detection limit of 0.03 μM H2O2. This proposed method was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide in rain water, with sensitivity, selectivity, rapidity, and recovery of 98.0-104 %.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance heating assisted plasma startup in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucalossi, J.; Hertout, P.; Lennholm, M.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-04-01

    ECRH assisted plasma startup at fundamental resonance is investigated in Tore Supra in view of ITER operation. ECRH pre-ionisation is found to be very efficient allowing plasma initiation in a wide range of pre-fill pressure compared to ohmic startup. Reliable assisted startup has been achieved at the ITER reference toroidal electric field (0.3 V/m) with 160 kW of ECRH. Resonance location scan indicates that the plasma is initiated at the resonance location and that the plasma current channel position had to be real-time controlled since the very beginning of the discharge to obtain robust plasma startup. (authors)

  18. Use of nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen in the characterization of saturated hydrocarbonic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Neto, A.; Soares, V.L.P.; Costa Neto, C.

    1979-01-01

    Alkanes and cycloalkanes are characterized by a methyl-methylene-methine groups proportion, the percentual absorption in prefixed regions and the pattern of the spectrum of nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen. The GPI is calculated from the contribution of the areas corresponding to prefixed regions of the hydrogen magnetic resonance spectra (60 Mc). These regions are (for the saturated hydrocarbons): 0,5-1,05ppm (X), 1,05ppm (Y) and 1,50-2,00ppm (Z). The validity of the index was verified for the homologous series of linear hydrocarbons and methyl-, dimethyl-, ethyl-, cyclopentyl- and cyclohexyl-branched hydrocarbons. Its application to shale oil chemistry (xistoquimica) is discussed. (author) [pt

  19. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis. Effect of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, M.Z.; Høj, M.; Schandel, C. B.

    2018-01-01

    fraction of 17 and 22% daf, corresponding to an energy recovery of between 40 and 53% in the organic product. The yield of the non-condensable gases varied between a mass fraction of 24 and 32% daf and the char yield varied between 9.6 and 18% daf. The condensed organics contained a mass fraction of 42....... The effect of varying the temperature (365–511 °C) and hydrogen pressure (1.6–3.6 MPa) on the product yield and organic composition was studied. The mass balance closed by a mass fraction between 90 and 101% dry ash free basis (daf). The yield of the combined condensed organics and C4+ varied between a mass......–75% aromatics, based on GC × GC-FID chromatographic peak area, and the remainder was primarily naphthenes with minor amounts of paraffins. The condensed organics were essentially oxygen free (mass fraction below 0.001%) when both reactors were used. Bypassing the HDO reactor increased the oxygen concentration...

  20. Shape of the Hα emission line in non resonant charge exchange in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susino Bueno, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Hα line shape emitted from a maxwellian hydrogen plasma and produced by non resonant change exchange has been calculated. Its explicit shape depends on the ion temperature, on background neutral energy and on the relative shape of the collision cross section. A comparison between theoretical and experimental shapes of the Hα line is carried out to check the model and to deduce the ion plasma temperature. (author) [es

  1. Study the feasibility of hydrogen assisted renewable power for off-grid communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.H.; Fleetwood, M.; Roberston, R.; Nielsen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Most Renewable energy sources lack the controllability and availability of conventional fossil fuel-based energy sources and therefore cannot meet load requirements of a community without a backup or storage system. The advances of hydrogen technologies enable these renewable energy options to supply power to remote communities relying on independent sources of electrical and other energy. The hydrogen assisted renewable power (HARP) concept promises to make renewable energy more practical and mainstream through the use of hydrogen based electrical generation systems. The study herein is the first of a multiphase project to investigate the benefits of HARP as an environmentally friendly replacement for diesel in the supply of electricity to off-grid communities and analyse its feasibility and suitability as a back-up power supply. A small-scale pilot project was selected and this study assesses the major elements of a plant required to integrate electrical generation system, hydrogen storage and hydrogen generation into a renewable energy generation system. Based on the available renewable energy profiles, a simulation model was developed to assist in selecting, integrating, and evaluating various configurations and operational scenarios. This paper describes the components of the proposed HARP system as well as its cost, benefits and opportunities for other applications. (author)

  2. Uncertainty propagation in modeling of plasma-assisted hydrogen production from biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaherisarabi, Shadi; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2016-10-01

    With the growing concern of global warming and the resulting emphasis on decreasing greenhouse gas emissions, there is an ever-increasing need to utilize energy-production strategies that can decrease the burning of fossil fuels. In this context, hydrogen remains an attractive clean-energy fuel that can be oxidized to produce water as a by-product. In spite of being an abundant species, hydrogen is seldom found in a form that is directly usable for energy-production. While steam reforming of methane is one popular technique for hydrogen production, plasma-assisted conversion of biogas (carbon dioxide + methane) to hydrogen is an attractive alternative. Apart from producing hydrogen, the other advantage of using biogas as raw material is the fact that two potent greenhouse gases are consumed. In this regard, modeling is an important tool to understand and optimize plasma-assisted conversion of biogas. The primary goal of this work is to perform a comprehensive statistical study that quantifies the influence of uncertain rate constants thereby determining the key reaction pathways. A 0-D chemical kinetics solver in the OpenFOAM suite is used to perform a series of simulations to propagate the uncertainty in rate constants and the resulting mean and standard deviation of outcomes.

  3. Computer assisted tomography for the non-destructive evaluation of hydrogen-induced cracking in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Sawicka, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) was used to assess hydrogen-induced cracking in steel exposed to an H 2 S-saturated ('sour') environment. In this case the environment was the NACE TM-02-84 test for susceptibility to hydrogen-induced cracking. The feasibility of using CAT in this application was shown in a previous paper. This study extends the application of CAT to a quantitative assessment of the cracking. Optimal parameters for CAT imaging in such an application are determined and the advantages of using CAT in comparison to traditional inspection methods are discussed

  4. Modelling of hydrogen assisted cracking of nickel-base Alloy X-750 in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, T.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-form, semi-empirical, electrochemical model has been developed to rationalize the intergranular corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy X-750 in aqueous electrolytes. The model is based on the assumption that, in the electrolytes investigated and for the microstructures studied, that hydrogen assisted crack growth is the dominant mechanism. Further, it is assumed that the rate of hydrogen reduction is a controlling factor in the magnitude of the environmental component of crack growth. Electrolyte conductivity, dissolution and passivation kinetics of precipitates, grain boundary coverage of precipitates are identified as important environmental and microstructural variables governing the hydrogen reduction rate at the crack tip. The model is compared with experimental data for fatigue crack growth where hydrogen is supplied by external charging and with data where galvanically-generated local hydrogen is responsible for enhanced crack growth. It is shown that predicted results characterize the observed effects of frequency, microstructure, electrolyte conductivity, and stress intensity factor. The agreement between the hydrogen reduction model and measured crack growth rate is believed to support the proposed galvanic corrosion mechanism for the intergranular cracking of alloy X-750 in low temperature water

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  6. Investigation of hydrogen assisted cracking in acicular ferrite using site-specific micro-fracture tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costin, Walter L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Lavigne, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.lavigne@adelaide.edu.au [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kotousov, Andrei; Ghomashchi, Reza [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Linton, Valerie [Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-10

    Hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) is a common type of failure mechanism that can affect a wide range of metals and alloys. Experimental studies of HAC are cumbersome due to various intrinsic and extrinsic parameters and factors (associated with stress, hydrogen and the materials microstructure) contributing to the hydrogen crack kinetics. The microstructure of many materials consists of diverse constituents with characteristic features and mechanical properties which only occur in very small material volumes. The only way to differentiate the effect of these individual constituents on the hydrogen crack kinetics is to miniaturise the testing procedures. In this paper we present a new experimental approach to investigate hydrogen assisted crack growth in a microstructural constituent, i.e. acicular ferrite. For this purpose, sharply notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated with a Focus Ion Beam within this selected microscopic region. Acicular ferrite can be found in many ferrous alloys including ferritic weld metal and has specific features that control its intrinsic susceptibility to HAC. These features were characterised via Electron Backscatter Diffraction and the specimens were subsequently loaded under uncharged and hydrogen charged conditions with a nano-indenter. The outcomes of the testing, demonstrated that the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub th}, to initiate crack propagation in acicular ferrite ranges between 1.56 MPa m{sup 1/2} and 4.36 MPa m{sup 1/2}. This range is significantly below the values of K{sub th} reported for various ferrous alloys in standard macro-tests. This finding indicates that the mechanisms and resistance to HAC at micro-scale could be very different than at the macro-scale as not all fracture toughening mechanisms may be activated at this scale level.

  7. Ultra-low power hydrogen sensing based on a palladium-coated nanomechanical beam resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Jonas; Villanueva Torrijo, Luis Guillermo; Brugger, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sensing is essential to ensure safety in near-future zero-emission fuel cell powered vehicles. Here, we present a novel hydrogen sensor based on the resonant frequency change of a nanoelectromechanical clamped-clamped beam. The beam is coated with a Pd layer, which expands in the presence...... of H 2, therefore generating a stress build-up that causes the frequency of the device to drop. The devices are able to detect H2 concentrations below 0.5% within 1 s of the onset of the exposure using only a few hundreds of pW of power, matching the industry requirements for H 2 safety sensors......, whereby the responsivity of the sensors is fully restored and the chemo-mechanical process is accelerated, significantly decreasing response times. The sensors are fabricated using standard processes, facilitating their eventual mass-production. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  8. Resonance scattering formalism for the hydrogen lines in the presence of magnetic and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We derive a formalism for the computation of resonance-scattering polarization of hydrogen lines in the presence of simultaneous magnetic and electric fields, within a framework of the quantum theory of polarized line formation in the limit of complete frequency redistribution and of collisionless regime. Quantum interferences between fine-structure levels are included in this formalism. In the presence of a magnetic field, these interferences affect, together with the magnetic Hanle effect, the polarization of the atomic levels. In the presence of an electric field, interferences between distinct orbital configurations are also induced, further affecting the polarization of the hydrogen levels. In turn, the electric field is expected to affect the polarization of the atomic levels (electric Hanle effect), in a way analogous to the magnetic Hanle effect. We find that the simultaneous action of electric and magnetic fields give rise to complicated patterns of polarization and depolarization regimes, for varying geometries and field strengths

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance of atomic hydrogen (H0) centers in pink tourmaline from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A model for explaining the atom of hydrogen (H 0 ) in pink tourmaline irradiated with gamma rays is presented. The concentration of H 0 was evaluated and the H 0 lines using the electron paramagnetic resonance were analysed. The g factor and the hyperfine interaction constant were measured with accuracy and determined by matrix diagonalization of spin hamiltonian in vetor space of four dimensions, followed by an iterative calculation with quick convergence the local electric field produced by charges in the lattice was calculated and compared with the value obtained experimentally. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of ions with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions of H 2 + , HeH + , and CO 2 + ions with hydrogen atoms, and the reactions of D 2 + , CO 2 + , CO + , N 2 + and HCN + with deuterium atoms, were studied using ion cyclotron resonance techniques. These reactions proceed predominantly via a charge transfer mechanism. The rate constants measured are: 6.4, 9.1, 1.1, 5.0, 0.84, 0.90, 1.2, and 0.37 x 10 -10 cm 3 /sec, respectively. Hydrocarbon ions of the types CH/sub n/ + and C 2 H/sub n/ + , where n=2--4, do not react with H or D atoms

  11. On the effect of image states on resonant neutralization of hydrogen anions near metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    We directly assess the role of image state electronic structures on the ion-survival by comparing the resonant charge transfer dynamics of hydrogen anions near Pd(1 1 1), Pd(1 0 0), and Ag(1 1 1) surfaces. Our simulations show that image states that are degenerate with the metal conduction band favor the recapture of electrons by outgoing ions. In sharp contrast, localized image states that occur inside the band gap hinder the recapture process and thus enhance the ion-neutralization probability

  12. Measure of hydrogen concentration profile in materials by resonant nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, R.P.; Zawislak, F.C.; Acquadro, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for determining the profile of hydrogen concentration in proximities of the surface of materials, is presented. The preliminary measurements were done, using the Pelletron accelerator at Sao Paulo University (USP), in Brazil, for the resonant-nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F, α γ) 16 O. By using this reaction the technique is sensitive for concentrations above 500 ppm, which could be reduced to 100 ppm through special shieldings and other techniques to reduce the background radiation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. A Direct Proof of the Resonance-Impaired Hydrogen Bond (RIHB) Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuhui; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2018-01-24

    The concept of resonance-enhanced hydrogen bond (RAHB) has been widely accepted and applied as it highlights the positive impact of π-conjugation on intramolecular H-bonds. However, electron delocalization is directional and there is a possibility that π-resonance goes from the H-bond acceptor to the H-bond donor, leading to a negative impact on H-bonds. Here we used the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method which is a variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and able to derive strictly electron-localized structures self-consistently, to quantify the interplay between H-bond and π-resonance in the terms of geometry, energetics and spectral properties. The comparison of geometrical optimizations with and without π-resonance shows that conjugation can indeed either enhance or weaken intramolecular H-bonds. We further experimented with various substituents attached to either the H-bond acceptor and/or H-bond donor side(s) to tune the H-bonding strength in both directions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Surface plasmon resonance assisted rapid laser joining of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotovskaya, Svetlana A.; Tang, Guang; Abdolvand, Amin, E-mail: a.abdolvand@dundee.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, Zengbo [School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 1UT (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-25

    Rapid and strong joining of clear glass to glass containing randomly distributed embedded spherical silver nanoparticles upon nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation (∼40 ns and repetition rate of 100 kHz) at 532 nm is demonstrated. The embedded silver nanoparticles were ∼30–40 nm in diameter, contained in a thin surface layer of ∼10 μm. A joint strength of 12.5 MPa was achieved for a laser fluence of only ∼0.13 J/cm{sup 2} and scanning speed of 10 mm/s. The bonding mechanism is discussed in terms of absorption of the laser energy by nanoparticles and the transfer of the accumulated localised heat to the surrounding glass leading to the local melting and formation of a strong bond. The presented technique is scalable and overcomes a number of serious challenges for a widespread adoption of laser-assisted rapid joining of glass substrates, enabling applications in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, sensors, micro-fluidic, and medical devices.

  15. Significance of the Resonance Condition for Controlling the Seam Position in Laser-assisted TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, B.; Huse, M.; Hermsdorf, J.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    As an energy-preserving variant of laser hybrid welding, laser-assisted arc welding uses laser powers of less than 1 kW. Recent studies have shown that the electrical conductivity of a TIG welding arc changes within the arc in case of a resonant interaction between laser radiation and argon atoms. This paper presents investigations on how to control the position of the arc root on the workpiece by means of the resonant interaction. Furthermore, the influence on the welding result is demonstrated. The welding tests were carried out on a cooled copper plate and steel samples with resonant and non-resonant laser radiation. Moreover, an analysis of the weld seam is presented.

  16. 3D imaging of hydrogen assisted cracking in metals using refraction enhanced synchrotron CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laquai, Rene; Mueller, Bernd R.; Bruno, Giovanni [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. 8.5 Micro-NDT; Schaupp, Thomas; Griesche, Axel; Kannengiesser, Thomas [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. 9.4 Weld Mechanics

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen in metals can cause a degradation of the mechanical properties with possible subsequent hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC). Though, the mechanism of HAC is not completely understood yet and thus suitable methods for in situ investigations to characterise the crack formation are needed. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known tool for analysing these properties. However, the effective resolution of the detector system limits the detection of small defects by CT. Analyser based imaging (ABI) takes advantage of X-ray refraction at interfaces between volumes of different density, i.e. of cracks, pores, inclusions, etc., within the sample to detect defects smaller than the resolution of the detector system. In this study, measurements on an aluminium alloy weld showed that ABI allows us to resolve the 3D structure of cracks undetected by absorption based CT. Prospective investigations will analyse HAC in steels.

  17. Strain gradient plasticity-based modeling of hydrogen environment assisted cracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; P. Gangloff, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Finite element analysis of stress about a blunt crack tip, emphasizing finite strain and phenomenologicaland mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity (SGP) formulations, is integrated with electrochemical assessment of occluded-crack tip hydrogen (H) solubility and two H-decohesion models...... to predict hydrogen environment assisted crack growth properties. SGP elevates crack tip geometrically necessary dislocation density and flow stress, with enhancement declining with increasing alloy strength. Elevated hydrostatic stress promotes high-trapped H concentration for crack tip damage......; it is imperative to account for SGP in H cracking models. Predictions of the threshold stress intensity factor and H-diffusion limited Stage II crack growth rate agree with experimental data for a high strength austenitic Ni-Cusuperalloy (Monel®K-500) and two modern ultra-high strength martensitic steels (Aer...

  18. 3D imaging of hydrogen assisted cracking in metals using refraction enhanced synchrotron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laquai, Rene; Mueller, Bernd R.; Bruno, Giovanni; Schaupp, Thomas; Griesche, Axel; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in metals can cause a degradation of the mechanical properties with possible subsequent hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC). Though, the mechanism of HAC is not completely understood yet and thus suitable methods for in situ investigations to characterise the crack formation are needed. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known tool for analysing these properties. However, the effective resolution of the detector system limits the detection of small defects by CT. Analyser based imaging (ABI) takes advantage of X-ray refraction at interfaces between volumes of different density, i.e. of cracks, pores, inclusions, etc., within the sample to detect defects smaller than the resolution of the detector system. In this study, measurements on an aluminium alloy weld showed that ABI allows us to resolve the 3D structure of cracks undetected by absorption based CT. Prospective investigations will analyse HAC in steels.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance discharge as a source for hydrogen and deuterium ions production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon Velasco, A.J. [Universidad de Pamplona, Pamplona (Colombia); Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2004-07-01

    In this report, we describe characteristics of a ring-structure hydrogen plasma heated in electron cyclotron resonance conditions and confined in a mirror magnetic trap and discuss the relative efficiency of secondary electrons and thermo-electrons in negative hydrogen and deuterium ion production. The obtained data and calculations of the balance equations for possible reactions demonstrate that the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with the plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg or vibrational levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to the negative ion production through the process of dissociative attachment of low energy electrons. The low energy electrons are originated due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode by ions of one of the driven rings and thermo-emission from heated tungsten filaments. Experiments seem to indicate that the negative ion generation occurs predominantly in the limited volume filled with thermo-electrons. Estimation of the negative ion generation rate shows that the main channel of H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion production involves the process of high Rydberg state excitation. (authors)

  20. Production of hydrogen and deuterium negative ions in an electron cyclotron resonance driven plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Industrial Univ. of Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2001-04-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance source with driven plasma rings for hydrogen isotope ion production is studied. Extracted currents of positive and negative ions depending on gas pressure, microwave power value and extraction voltage are obtained. The study shows that the negative ion yield is an order of magnitude higher than the yield of positive particles when a driven ring is in contact with the surface of the plasma electrode. The production of negative ions of deuterium, D{sup -}, is close to the production of negative ions of light hydrogen isotope, H{sup -}. The comparison of the experimental data with the calculated ones shows that the most probable process of the H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion formation in the electron cyclotron driven plasma is dissociative attachment of electrons to molecules in high Rydberg states. For hydrogen ions and ions of deuterium, the negative current at a microwave power of 200 W through a 3-mm aperture and 8 kV extraction voltage are 4.7 mA and 3.1 mA respectively. (orig.)

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance discharge as a source for hydrogen and deuterium ions production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon Velasco, A.J.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we describe characteristics of a ring-structure hydrogen plasma heated in electron cyclotron resonance conditions and confined in a mirror magnetic trap and discuss the relative efficiency of secondary electrons and thermo-electrons in negative hydrogen and deuterium ion production. The obtained data and calculations of the balance equations for possible reactions demonstrate that the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with the plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg or vibrational levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to the negative ion production through the process of dissociative attachment of low energy electrons. The low energy electrons are originated due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode by ions of one of the driven rings and thermo-emission from heated tungsten filaments. Experiments seem to indicate that the negative ion generation occurs predominantly in the limited volume filled with thermo-electrons. Estimation of the negative ion generation rate shows that the main channel of H - and D - ion production involves the process of high Rydberg state excitation. (authors)

  2. Production of hydrogen and deuterium negative ions in an electron cyclotron resonance driven plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance source with driven plasma rings for hydrogen isotope ion production is studied. Extracted currents of positive and negative ions depending on gas pressure, microwave power value and extraction voltage are obtained. The study shows that the negative ion yield is an order of magnitude higher than the yield of positive particles when a driven ring is in contact with the surface of the plasma electrode. The production of negative ions of deuterium, D - , is close to the production of negative ions of light hydrogen isotope, H - . The comparison of the experimental data with the calculated ones shows that the most probable process of the H - and D - ion formation in the electron cyclotron driven plasma is dissociative attachment of electrons to molecules in high Rydberg states. For hydrogen ions and ions of deuterium, the negative current at a microwave power of 200 W through a 3-mm aperture and 8 kV extraction voltage are 4.7 mA and 3.1 mA respectively. (orig.)

  3. Competitive Adsorption-Assisted Formation of One-Dimensional Cobalt Nanochains with High CO Hydrogenation Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xin [State; Ren, Zhibo [State; Institute; Zhu, Xiaolin [State; Zhang, Qinwei [State; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Chen, Biaohua [State

    2017-10-31

    In the present work, cobalt nanochains have been successfully synthesized by a novel co assisted self-assembling formation strategy. A dramatic morphology transformation from cobalt nanoparticles to nanochains are observed when co molecules were introduced into the synthetic system. DFT calculations further confirm that competitive co-adsorbed co and oleylamine over the cobalt nanoparticles facilitates the formation of cobalt nanochains, which show higher co hydrogenation performance. The present work provides a new strategic and promising method for controllable synthesis of catalyst nanomaterials with the preferred surface structure and morphology.

  4. Numerical analysis of hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue of wind turbine bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Offshore wind parks at locations further from the shore often involve serious difficulties, e.g. the maintenance. The bearings of offshore wind turbines are prone to suffer hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue (HA-RCF. Three important aspects linked with bearing failures are being extensively researched: (i rolling contact fatigue (RCF, (ii influence of carbide particles on fatigue life, and (iii local microplastic strain accumulation via ratcheting. However, there is no reference related to bearing failure in harsh environment. This way, this paper helps to gain a better understanding of the influence of hydrogen on the service life of offshore wind turbine bearings through a numerical study. So, the widely used RCF ball-on-rod test was simulated by finite element method in order to obtain the stress-strain state inside the bearings during life in service and, from this, to elucidate the potential places where the hydrogen could be more harmful and, therefore, where the bearing material should be improved.

  5. Computer Simulations of Resonant Coherent Excitation of Heavy Hydrogen-Like Ions Under Planar Channeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A. A.; Pivovarov, Yu L.

    2010-04-01

    Resonant coherent excitation (RCE) of relativistic hydrogen-like ions is investigated by computer simulations methods. The suggested theoretical model is applied to the simulations of recent experiments on RCE of 390 MeV/u Ar17+ ions under (220) planar channeling in a Si crystal performed by T.Azuma et al at HIMAC (Tokyo). Theoretical results are in a good agreement with these experimental data and clearly show the appearance of the doublet structure of RCE peaks. The simulations are also extended to greater ion energies in order to predict the new RCE features at the future accelerator facility FAIR OSI and as an example, RCE of II GeV/u U91+ ions is considered in detail.

  6. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  7. Muonic-hydrogen molecular bound states, quasibound states, and resonances in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used as an exploratory tool to study bound states, quasibound states, and scattering resonances in muon (μ)--hydrogen (x)--hydrogen (y) molecular ions. Our purpose is to comment on the existence and nature of the narrow states reported in three-body calculations, for L=0 and 1, at approximately 55 eV above threshold and the family of states in the same partial waves reported about 1.9 keV above threshold. We first discuss the motivation for study of excited states beyond the well-known and well-studied bound states. Then we reproduce the energies and other properties of these well-known states to show that, despite the relatively large muon mass, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation gives a good, semiquantitative description containing all the essential physics. Born-Oppenheimer calculations of the s- and p-wave scattering of d-(dμ), d-(tμ), and t-(tμ) are compared with the accurate three-body results, again with general success. The places of disagreement are understood in terms of the differences in location of slightly bound (or unbound) states in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation compared to the accurate three-body calculations

  8. Electron cyclotron resonance hydrogen/helium plasma characterization and simulation of pumping in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outten, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasmas have been employed to simulate the plasma conditions at the edge of a tokamak in order to investigate hydrogen/helium uptake in thin metal films. The process of microwave power absorption, important to characterizing the ECR plasma source, was investigated by measuring the electron density and temperature with a Langmuir probe and optical spectroscopy as a function of the magnetic field gradient and incident microwave power. A novel diagnostic, carbon resistance probe, provided a direct measure of the ion energy and fluence while measurements from a Langmuir probe were used for comparison. The Langmuir probe gave a plasma potential minus floating potential of 30 ± 5 eV, in good agreement with the carbon resistance probe result of ion energy ≤ 40 eV. The measured ion energy was consistent with the ion energy predicted from a model based upon divergent magnetic field extraction. Also, based upon physical sputtering of the carbon, the hydrogen fluence rate was determined to be 1 x 10 16 /cm 2 -sec for 50 Watts of incident microwave power. ECR hydrogen/helium plasmas were used to study preferential pumping of helium in candidate materials for tokamak pump-limiters: nickel, vanadium, aluminum, and nickel/aluminum multi-layers. Nickel and vanadium exhibited similar pumping capacities whereas aluminum showed a reduced capacity due to increased sputtering. A helium retention model based upon ion implantation ranges and sputtering rates agreed with the experimental data. A new multilayer/bilayer pumping concept showed improved pumping above that for single element films

  9. Evidence for hydrogen-assisted recovery of cold-worked palladium: hydrogen solubility and mechanical properties studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ferrer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hydrogen as an agent to accelerate the thermal recovery of cold-worked palladium has been investigated. The techniques used to characterize the effects of hydrogen on the thermal recovery of palladium were hydrogen solubility and mechanical property measurements. Results show that the presence of modest amounts of hydrogen during annealing of cold-worked palladium does enhance the degree of thermal recovery, with a direct correlation between the amount of hydrogen during annealing and the degree of recovery. The results indicate that the damage resulting from cold-working palladium can be more effectively and efficiently reversed by suitable heat treatments in the presence of appropriate amounts of hydrogen, as compared to heat treatment in vacuum. The somewhat novel technique of using changes in the hydrogen solubility of palladium as an indicator of thermal recovery has been validated and complements the more traditional technique of mechanical property measurements.

  10. Role of multiaxial stress state in the hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue in bearings for wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Offshore wind turbines often involve important engineering challenges such as the improvement of hydrogen embrittlement resistance of the turbine bearings. These elements frequently suffer the so-called phenomenon of hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact fatigue (HA-RCF as a consequence of the synergic action of the surrounding harsh environment (the lubricant supplying hydrogen to the material and the cyclic multiaxial stress state caused by in-service mechanical loading. Thus the complex phenomenon could be classified as hydrogen-assisted rolling-contact multiaxial fatigue (HA-RC-MF. This paper analyses, from the mechanical and the chemical points of view, the so-called ball-on-rod test, widely used to evaluate the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of turbine bearings. Both the stress-strain states and the steady-state hydrogen concentration distribution are studied, so that a better elucidation can be obtained of the potential fracture places where the hydrogen could be more harmful and, consequently, where the turbine bearings could fail during their life in service.

  11. Detection of hydrogen dissolved in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shin; Fujiwara, Hirotada

    2012-01-01

    Rubber materials, which are used for hydrogen gas seal, can dissolve hydrogen during exposure in high-pressure hydrogen gas. Dissolved hydrogen molecules were detected by solid state 1H NMR of the unfilled vulcanized acrylonitrile butadiene rubber. Two signals were observed at 4.5 ppm and 4.8 ppm, which were assignable to dissolved hydrogen, in the 1H NMR spectrum of NBR after being exposed 100 MPa hydrogen gas for 24 h at room temperature. These signals were shifted from that of gaseous hydrogen molecules. Assignment of the signals was confirmed by quantitative estimation of dissolved hydrogen and peak area of the signals.

  12. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of the coplanar binary geometry where it is justified to use plane wave solutions for the study of the (e,2e) reaction and in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field, we introduce as a first step the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 1 where we take into account only the relativistic dressing of the incident and scattered electrons. Then, we introduce the Dirac-Volkov plane wave Born approximation 2 where we take totally into account the relativistic dressing of the incident, scattered, and ejected electrons. We then compare the corresponding triple differential cross sections for laser-assisted ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact both for the nonrelativistic and the relativistic regime

  13. CTAB assisted microwave synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon supported Pt nanoparticles for hydrogen electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; He, Jian-Ping; Ji, Ya-Jun; Dang, Wang-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Gui-Wang; Zhang, Chuan-Xiang; Zhao, Ji-Shuang; Fu, Qing-Bin; Hu, Huo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon with ordered hexagonal structure derived from the co-assembly of triblock copolymer F127 and resol was employed as the carbon support of Pt catalysts for hydrogen electro-oxidation. Structural characterizations revealed that the mesoporous carbon exhibited large surface area and uniform mesopores. The Pt nanoparticles supported on the novel mesoporous carbon were fabricated by a facile CTAB assisted microwave synthesis process, wherein CTAB was expected to improve the wettability of carbon support as well as the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the Pt catalysts. It was found that the Pt nanoparticles were uniform in size and highly dispersed on the mesoporous carbon supports. The cyclic voltammograms in sulfuric acid demonstrated that the electrochemical active surface area of Pt catalysts prepared with CTAB was two times than that without CTAB

  14. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO (1−x) Pd x , 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO (1−x) Pd x )  are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO (1−x) Pd x , altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H 2 and 4% H 2 in N 2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO (1−x) Pd x on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO (1−x) Pd x to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas. (paper)

  15. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  16. Hydrogen depth resolution in multilayer metal structures, comparison of elastic recoil detection and resonant nuclear reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S. E-mail: leszekw@optushome.com.au; Grambole, D.; Kreissig, U.; Groetzschel, R.; Harding, G.; Szilagyi, E

    2002-05-01

    Four different metals: Al, Cu, Ag and Au have been used to produce four special multilayer samples to study the depth resolution of hydrogen. The layer structure of each sample was analysed using 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, 4.5 MeV He elastic recoil detection (ERD) and 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD. Moreover the hydrogen distribution was analysed in all samples using H({sup 15}N, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with resonance at 6.385 MeV. The results show that the best depth resolution and sensitivity for hydrogen detection are offered by resonance NRA. The He ERD shows good depth resolution only for the near surface hydrogen. In this technique the depth resolution is rapidly reduced with depth due to multiple scattering effects. The 30 MeV F{sup 6+} HIERD demonstrated similar hydrogen depth resolution to He ERD for low mass metals and HIERD resolution is substantially better for heavy metals and deep layers.

  17. Anion-assisted trans-cis isomerization of palladium(II) phosphine complexes containing acetanilide functionalities through hydrogen bonding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Hau-San; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Wong, Jenny Ka-Yan; Zhu, Nianyong; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2005-03-28

    The anion-assisted shift of trans-cis isomerization equilibrium of a palladium(II) complex containing acetanilide functionalities brought about by allosteric hydrogen bonding interactions has been established by UV/Vis, 1H NMR, 31P NMR and ESI-MS studies.

  18. Ecofriendly laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleaching of linen fabrics and its influence on dyeing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Okeil, A; El-Shafie, A; El Zawahry, M M

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the bleaching efficiency of enzymatically scoured linen fabrics using a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process with and without ultrasonic energy, with the goal of obtaining fabrics with high whiteness levels, well preserved tensile strength and higher dye uptake. The effect of the laccase enzyme and the combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process with and without ultrasound has been investigated with regard to whiteness value, tensile strength, dyeing efficiency and dyeing kinetics using both reactive and cationic dyes. The bleached linen fabrics were characterized using X-ray diffraction and by measuring tensile strength and lightness. The dyeing efficiency and kinetics were characterized by measuring dye uptake and colour fastness. The results indicated that ultrasound was an effective technique in the combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process of linen fabrics. The whiteness values expressed as lightness of linen fabrics is enhanced by using ultrasonic energy. The measured colour strength values were found to be slightly better for combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleached fabrics than for combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide for both reactive and cationic dyes. The fastness properties of the fabrics dyed with reactive dye were better than those obtained when using cationic dye. The time/dye uptake isotherms were also enhanced when using combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleached fabric, which confirms the efficiency of ultrasound in the combined oxidative bleaching process. The dyeing rate constant, half-time of dyeing and dyeing efficiency have been calculated and discussed.

  19. [Microsurgery assisted by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-jun; Chen, Xiao-lei; Xu, Bai-nan; Sun, Zheng-hui; Sun, Guo-chen; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yu-bo; Zhou, Ding-biao

    2012-01-03

    To explore the practicability of resecting small lesions in deep brain by intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery and its clinical efficacies. A total of 42 cases with small lesions in deep brain underwent intraoperative MRI and neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery. The drifting of neuronavigation was corrected by images acquired from intraoperative MR rescanning. All lesions were successfully identified and 40 cases totally removed without mortality. Only 3 cases developed new neurological deficits post-operatively while 2 of them returned to normal neurological functions after a follow-up duration of 3 months to 2 years. The application of intraoperative MRI can effectively correct the drifting of neuronavigation and enhance the accuracy of microsurgical neuronavigation for small lesions in deep brain.

  20. Effects of classical resonances on the chaotic microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R V

    1987-05-01

    Experimental measurements of the microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from n = 32 to 90 are well described by a classical treatment of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In particular, the measurements of the threshold field for the onset of significant ionization exhibits a curious dependence on the microwave frequency with distinct peaks at rational values of the scaled frequency, n/sup 3/..cap omega.. = 1, 2/3, 1/2, 2/5, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, which is in excellent agreement with the predictions for the onset of classical chaos in a one-dimensional model of the experiment. In the classical theory this frequency dependence of the threshold fields is due to the stabilizing effect of nonlinear resonances (''islands'') in the classical phase space which is greatly enhanced when the microwave perturbation is turned on slowly (adiabatically) as in the experiments. Quantum calculations for this one-dimensional model also exhibit this stabilizing effect due to the preferential excitation of localized quasi-energy states.

  1. Fermi resonance effects on the vibration modes of hydrogen-passivated boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, G.D.; Fowler, W.B.; Deleo, G.G.; Stavola, M.; Kozuch, D.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Lopata, J.

    1990-01-01

    10 B - 11 B isotope shifts have been reported recently for the vibrational frequencies of hydrogen (H) and its isotope deuterium (D) in the H-B complex in silicon. The D- 10 B-D 11 B shift was found to be anomalously large. The authors show that this effect finds a natural explanation in a phenomenon called Fermi resonance, arising from a weak anharmonic coupling between the second harmonic of the transverse B vibration and the longitudinal D vibration. The authors present a simple classical explanation of the effect in terms of a parametric oscillator, or a child pumping a swing. They outline a simple quantum mechanical treatment that provides a satisfactory quantitative explanation of the results. The author's calculations also predict infrared absorption at the boron second harmonic frequencies. These are observed for both 10 B and 11 B with intensities and polarization as predicted, providing direct confirmation of the interpretation. The Pankove Si-H-B model, therefore, remains intact

  2. Mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in proteins from nuclear magnetic resonance studies of individual tryptophan indole NH hydrogens in lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedin, R.E.; Delepierre, M.; Dobson, C.M.; Poulsen, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The individual rates of solvent exchange of the six tryptophan indole NH hydrogens of lysozyme in 2 H 2 O have been measured over a wide range of temperatures by using 1 H NMR. Two distinct mechanisms for exchange have been identified, one characterized by a high activation energy and the other by a much lower activation energy. The high-energy process has been shown to be associated directly with the cooperative thermal unfolding of the protein and is the dominant mechanism for exchange of the most slowly exchanging hydrogen even 15 0 C below the denaturation temperature. Rate constants and activation energies for the folding and unfolding reactions were obtained from the experimental exchange rates. At low temperatures, a lower activation energy mechanism is dominant for all hydrogens, and this can be associated with local fluctuations in the protein structure which allow access of solvent. The relative exchange rates and activation energies can only qualitatively be related to the different environments of the residues in the crystal structure. There is provisional evidence that a mechanism intermediate between these two extremes may be significant for some hydrogens under restricted conditions

  3. Ion-assisted functional monolayer coating of nanorod arrays in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    Uniformity of postprocessing of large-area, dense nanostructure arrays is currently one of the greatest challenges in nanoscience and nanofabrication. One of the major issues is to achieve a high level of control in specie fluxes to specific surface areas of the nanostructures. As suggested by the numerical experiments in this work, this goal can be achieved by manipulating microscopic ion fluxes by varying the plasma sheath and nanorod array parameters. The dynamics of ion-assisted deposition of functional monolayer coatings onto two-dimensional carbon nanorod arrays in a hydrogen plasma is simulated by using a multiscale hybrid numerical simulation. The numerical results show evidence of a strong correlation between the aspect ratios and nanopattern positioning of the nanorods, plasma sheath width, and densities and distributions of microscopic ion fluxes. When the spacing between the nanorods and/or their aspect ratios are larger, and/or the plasma sheath is wider, the density of microscopic ion current flowing to each of the individual nanorods increases, thus reducing the time required to apply a functional monolayer coating down to 11 s for a 7-μm-wide sheath, and to 5 s for a 50-μm-wide sheath. The computed monolayer coating development time is consistent with previous experimental reports on plasma-assisted functionalization of related carbon nanostructures [B. N. Khare et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 5237 (2002)]. The results are generic in that they can be applied to a broader range of plasma-based processes and nanostructures, and contribute to the development of deterministic strategies of postprocessing and functionalization of various nanoarrays for nanoelectronic, biomedical, and other emerging applications

  4. Hydrogen-assisted post-growth substitution of tellurium into molybdenum disulfide monolayers with tunable compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoli; Zhu, Dancheng; Lv, Danhui; Hashemi, Arsalan; Fei, Zhen; Lin, Fang; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Zhang, Ze; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Jin, Chuanhong

    2018-04-01

    Herein we report the successful doping of tellurium (Te) into molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to form MoS2x Te2(1-x) alloy with variable compositions via a hydrogen-assisted post-growth chemical vapor deposition process. It is confirmed that H2 plays an indispensable role in the Te substitution into as-grown MoS2 monolayers. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy allows us to determine the lattice sites and the concentration of introduced Te atoms. At a relatively low concentration, tellurium is only substituted in the sulfur sublattice to form monolayer MoS2(1-x)Te2x alloy, while with increasing Te concentration (up to ˜27.6% achieved in this study), local regions with enriched tellurium, large structural distortions, and obvious sulfur deficiency are observed. Statistical analysis of the Te distribution indicates the random substitution. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the stability of the alloy structures and their electronic properties. Comparison with experimental results indicate that the samples are unstrained and the Te atoms are predominantly substituted in the top S sublattice. Importantly, such ultimately thin Janus structure of MoS2(1-x)Te2x exhibits properties that are distinct from their constituents. We believe our results will inspire further exploration of the versatile properties of asymmetric 2D TMD alloys.

  5. Electron streaking and dissociation in laser-assisted photoionization of molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations on laser-assisted photoionization of the hydrogen molecule in the energy region where autoionization from doubly excited states is expected to occur. We use a UV-pump/IR-probe scheme in which an isolated attosecond UV pulse and a 750 nm IR pulse are combined. The IR pulse has a relatively low intensity (10 12 W cm −2 ), which allows us to perform a perturbative analysis of the calculated ionization probabilities differential in either electron or nuclear energy or both. We show that, for dissociative ionization, the electron energy distributions as a function of time delay exhibit unusual streaking patterns that are due to the presence of autoionizing states. These patterns significantly differ from the standard ones observed in direct single ionization of atoms and molecules. We also show that, by using such a pump–probe scheme, one can suppress autoionization from doubly excited states for time delays between 0 and 4 fs. (paper)

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  7. Ultrafast all-optical arithmetic logic based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostimirovic, Dusan; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    For decades, the semiconductor industry has been steadily shrinking transistor sizes to fit more performance into a single silicon-based integrated chip. This technology has become the driving force for advances in education, transportation, and health, among others. However, transistor sizes are quickly approaching their physical limits (channel lengths are now only a few silicon atoms in length), and Moore's law will likely soon be brought to a stand-still despite many unique attempts to keep it going (FinFETs, high-k dielectrics, etc.). This technology must then be pushed further by exploring (almost) entirely new methodologies. Given the explosive growth of optical-based long-haul telecommunications, we look to apply the use of high-speed optics as a substitute to the digital model; where slow, lossy, and noisy metal interconnections act as a major bottleneck to performance. We combine the (nonlinear) optical Kerr effect with a single add-drop microring resonator to perform the fundamental AND-XOR logical operations of a half adder, by all-optical means. This process is also applied to subtraction, higher-order addition, and the realization of an all-optical arithmetic logic unit (ALU). The rings use hydrogenated amorphous silicon as a material with superior nonlinear properties to crystalline silicon, while still maintaining CMOS-compatibility and the many benefits that come with it (low cost, ease of fabrication, etc.). Our method allows for multi-gigabit-per-second data rates while maintaining simplicity and spatial minimalism in design for high-capacity manufacturing potential.

  8. Highly sensitive hydrogen detection of catalyst-free ZnO nanorod networks suspended by lithography-assisted growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Junghwan; Kim, Gyu Tae; Park, Jonghyurk; Park, Jeong Young

    2011-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated a ZnO nanorod-based 3D nanostructure to show a high sensitivity and very fast response/recovery to hydrogen gas. ZnO nanorods have been synthesized selectively over the pre-defined area at relatively low temperature using a simple self-catalytic solution process assisted by a lithographic method. The conductance of the ZnO nanorod device varies significantly as the concentration of the hydrogen is changed without any additive metal catalyst, revealing a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas. Its superior performance can be explained by the porous structure of its three-dimensional network and the enhanced surface reaction of the hydrogen molecules with the oxygen defects resulting from a high surface-to-volume ratio. It was found that the change of conductance follows a power law depending on the hydrogen concentration. A Langmuir isotherm following an ideal power law and a cross-over behavior of the activation energy with respect to hydrogen concentration were observed. This is a very novel and intriguing phenomenon on nanostructured materials, which suggests competitive surface reactions in ZnO nanorod gas sensors.

  9. Highly sensitive hydrogen detection of catalyst-free ZnO nanorod networks suspended by lithography-assisted growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Junghwan; Park, Jonghyurk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Park, Jeong Young

    2011-02-25

    We have successfully demonstrated a ZnO nanorod-based 3D nanostructure to show a high sensitivity and very fast response/recovery to hydrogen gas. ZnO nanorods have been synthesized selectively over the pre-defined area at relatively low temperature using a simple self-catalytic solution process assisted by a lithographic method. The conductance of the ZnO nanorod device varies significantly as the concentration of the hydrogen is changed without any additive metal catalyst, revealing a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas. Its superior performance can be explained by the porous structure of its three-dimensional network and the enhanced surface reaction of the hydrogen molecules with the oxygen defects resulting from a high surface-to-volume ratio. It was found that the change of conductance follows a power law depending on the hydrogen concentration. A Langmuir isotherm following an ideal power law and a cross-over behavior of the activation energy with respect to hydrogen concentration were observed. This is a very novel and intriguing phenomenon on nanostructured materials, which suggests competitive surface reactions in ZnO nanorod gas sensors.

  10. Hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Tuocheng; Jia, Zhenzhao; Yan, Baoming; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong, E-mail: xswu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We demonstrate hydrogen assisted growth of high quality epitaxial graphene on the C-face of 4H-SiC. Compared with the conventional thermal decomposition technique, the size of the growth domain by this method is substantially increased and the thickness variation is reduced. Based on the morphology of epitaxial graphene, the role of hydrogen is revealed. It is found that hydrogen acts as a carbon etchant. It suppresses the defect formation and nucleation of graphene. It also improves the kinetics of carbon atoms via hydrocarbon species. These effects lead to increase of the domain size and the structure quality. The consequent capping effect results in smooth surface morphology and suppression of multilayer growth. Our method provides a viable route to fine tune the growth kinetics of epitaxial graphene on SiC.

  11. Development of a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance fluorescence biosensor for detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Chiaki; Iizuka, Ryota; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    To detect biological substances such as bacteria speedily and accurately, a dielectrophoresis-assisted surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fluorescence biosensor is being developed. Using Escherichia coli as a target organism, an appropriate voltage frequency to collect E. coli cells on indium tin oxide quadrupole electrodes by dielectrophoresis is analyzed. Then, E. coli is stained with 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). To clearly detect fluorescence signals from DAPI-stained E. coli cells, the sensor is optimized so that we can excite SPR on Al electrodes by illuminating 405 nm photons. As a result, the number of fluorescence signals is increased on the electrodes by the application of a low-frequency voltage. This indicates that E. coli cells with a lower permittivity than the surrounding water are collected by negative dielectrophoresis onto the electrodes where the electric field strength is lowest.

  12. Low-temperature-compatible tunneling-current-assisted scanning microwave microscope utilizing a rigid coaxial resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    2016-06-01

    We present a design for a tunneling-current-assisted scanning near-field microwave microscope. For stable operation at cryogenic temperatures, making a small and rigid microwave probe is important. Our coaxial resonator probe has a length of approximately 30 mm and can fit inside the 2-in. bore of a superconducting magnet. The probe design includes an insulating joint, which separates DC and microwave signals without degrading the quality factor. By applying the SMM to the imaging of an electrically inhomogeneous superconductor, we obtain the spatial distribution of the microwave response with a spatial resolution of approximately 200 nm. Furthermore, we present an analysis of our SMM probe based on a simple lumped-element circuit model along with the near-field microwave measurements of silicon wafers having different conductivities.

  13. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Heat pump cycle by hydrogen-absorbing alloys to assist high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in producing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoshi, Fukada; Nobutaka, Hayashi

    2010-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system using two hydrogen-absorbing alloys is proposed to utilise heat exhausted from a high-temperature source such as a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), more efficiently. The heat pump system is designed to produce H 2 based on the S-I cycle more efficiently. The overall system proposed here consists of HTGR, He gas turbines, chemical heat pumps and reaction vessels corresponding to the three-step decomposition reactions comprised in the S-I process. A fundamental research is experimentally performed on heat generation in a single bed packed with a hydrogen-absorbing alloy that may work at the H 2 production temperature. The hydrogen-absorbing alloy of Zr(V 1-x Fe x ) 2 is selected as a material that has a proper plateau pressure for the heat pump system operated between the input and output temperatures of HTGR and reaction vessels of the S-I cycle. Temperature jump due to heat generated when the alloy absorbs H 2 proves that the alloy-H 2 system can heat up the exhaust gas even at 600 deg. C without any external mechanical force. (authors)

  15. Deposition of Methylammonium Lead Triiodide by Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, E. Tomas; Dunlap-Shohl, Wiley A.; Mitzi, David B.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2018-02-01

    Resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) was used to deposit the metal-halide perovskite (MHP) CH3NH3PbI3 (methylammonium lead triiodide, or MAPbI), creating phase-pure films. Given the moisture sensitivity of these crystalline, multi-component organic-inorganic hybrid materials, deposition of MAPbI by RIR-MAPLE required a departure from the use of water-based emulsions as deposition targets. Different chemistries were explored to create targets that properly dissolved MAPbI components, were stable under vacuum conditions, and enabled resonant laser energy absorption. Secondary phases and solvent contamination in the resulting films were studied through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorbance and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, suggesting that lingering excess methylammonium iodide (MAI) and low-vapor pressure solvents can distort the microstructure, creating crystalline and amorphous non-perovskite phases. Thermal annealing of films deposited by RIR-MAPLE allowed for excess solvent to be evaporated from films without degrading the MAPbI structure. Further, it was demonstrated that RIR-MAPLE does not require excess MAI to create stoichiometric films with optoelectronic properties, crystal structure, and film morphology comparable to films created using more established spin-coating methods for processing MHPs. This work marks the first time a MAPLE-related technique was used to deposit MHPs.

  16. Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking of Modern Ultra-High Strength Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioszak, Greger L.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2017-09-01

    Martensitic steels (Aermet®100, Ferrium®M54™, Ferrium®S53®, and experimental CrNiMoWV at ultra-high yield strength of 1550 to 1725 MPa) similarly resist hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) in aqueous NaCl. Cracking is transgranular, ascribed to increased steel purity and rare earth addition compared to intergranular HEAC in highly susceptible 300M. Nano-scale precipitates ((Mo,Cr)2C and (W,V)C) reduce H diffusivity and the K-independent Stage II growth rate by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to 300M. However, threshold K TH is similarly low (8 to 15 MPa√m) for each steel at highly cathodic and open circuit potentials. Transgranular HEAC likely occurs along martensite packet and {110}α'-block interfaces, speculatively governed by localized plasticity and H decohesion. Martensitic transformation produces coincident site lattice interfaces; however, a connected random boundary network persists in 3D to negate interface engineering. The modern steels are near-immune to HEAC when mildly cathodically polarized, attributed to minimal crack tip H production and uptake. Neither reduced Co and Ni in M54 and CrNiMoWV nor increased Cr in S53 broadly degrade HEAC resistance compared to baseline AM100. The latter suggests that crack passivity dominates acidification to widen the polarization window for HEAC resistance. Decohesion models predict the applied potential dependencies of K TH and d a/d t II with a single-adjustable parameter, affirming the importance of steel purity and trap sensitive H diffusivity.

  17. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines assisted by a thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingyang; Wen, Jialin; Tan, Renchang; Huang, Kexuan; Metola, Pedro; Wang, Rui; Anslyn, Eric V; Zhang, Xumu

    2014-08-04

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines catalyzed by rhodium/bis(phosphine)-thiourea provided chiral amines with up to 97% yield and 95% ee. (1)H NMR studies, coupled with control experiments, implied that catalytic chloride-bound intermediates were involved in the mechanism through a dual hydrogen-bonding interaction. Deuteration experiments proved that the hydrogenation proceeded through a pathway consistent with an imine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. Electricity-Assisted Biological Hydrogen Production from Acetate by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is a well-known current-producing microorganism in microbial fuel cells, and is able to use acetate and hydrogen as electron donor. We studied the functionality of G. sulfurreducens as biocatalyst for hydrogen formation at the cathode of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).

  20. Modelling of fatigue crack propagation assisted by gaseous hydrogen in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in a hydrogenous environment indicate that hydrogen created by surface reactions, then drained into the plastic zone, leads to a modification of deformation and damage mechanisms at the fatigue crack tip in metals, resulting in a significant decrease of crack propagation resistance. This study aims at building a model of these complex phenomena in the framework of damage mechanics, and to confront it with the results of fatigue crack propagation tests in high pressure hydrogen on a 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel. To do so, a cohesive zone model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A specific traction-separation law was developed, which is suitable for cyclic loadings, and whose parameters depend on local hydrogen concentration. Furthermore, hydrogen diffusion in the bulk material takes into account the influence of hydrostatic stress and trapping. The mechanical behaviour of the bulk material is elastic-plastic. It is shown that the model can qualitatively predict crack propagation in hydrogen under monotonous loadings; then, the model with the developed traction-separation law is tested under fatigue loading. In particular, the simulated crack propagation curves without hydrogen are compared to the experimental crack propagation curves for the 15-5PH steel in air. Finally, simulated fatigue crack propagation rates in hydrogen are compared to experimental measurements. The model's ability to assess the respective contributions of the different damage mechanisms (HELP, HEDE) in the degradation of the crack resistance of the 15-5PH steel is discussed. (author)

  1. Freeze drying-assisted synthesis of Pt@reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites as excellent hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaojing; Song, Xinjie; Gu, Cuiping; Ren, Haibo; Sun, Yufeng; Huang, Jiarui

    2018-05-01

    Quick and efficient detection of low concentrations of hydrogen remains a challenge because of the stability of hydrogen. A sensor based on reduced oxide graphene functionalized with Pt nanoparticles is successfully fabricated using a freeze-drying method followed by heat treatment. The structure and morphology of the Pt@rGO nanocomposites are well analyzed by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared Pt@rGO nanocomposites show excellent hydrogen gas sensing properties at a low working temperature of 50 °C. The sensitivity toward 0.5% hydrogen is 8%. The response and recovery times of the sensor exposed to 0.5% hydrogen are 63 and 104 s, respectively. The gas-sensing mechanism of Pt@rGO sensor is also discussed.

  2. Nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances in the electron scattering from hydrogen halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, G.; Gote, M.; Radle, M.; Jung, K.; Ehrhardt, H.

    1989-01-01

    The energy dependences of the differential cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the higher vibrational levels (v=2 and v=3) of HF and HCl have been measured. Besides the threshold peak a resonance structure has been observed in the v=3 excitation functions of HF below the cusp structure at the opening of the v=4 channel. This resonance structure is the first experimental proof for the existence of the nuclear-excited Feshbach resonances which are interpreted to be the origin of the threshold peaks in the vibrational excitation channels

  3. IR-UV double resonance spectroscopic investigation of phenylacetylene-alcohol complexes. Alkyl group induced hydrogen bond switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Patwari, G Naresh

    2008-06-12

    The electronic transitions of phenylacetylene complexes with water and trifluoroethanol are shifted to the blue, while the corresponding transitions for methanol and ethanol complexes are shifted to the red relative to the phenylacetylene monomer. Fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) spectra in the O-H stretching region indicate that, in all the cases, phenylacetylene is acting as a hydrogen bond acceptor to the alcohols. The FDIR spectrum in the acetylenic C-H stretching region shows Fermi resonance bands for the bare phenylacetylene, which act as a sensitive tool to probe the intermolecular structures. The FDIR spectra reveal that water and trifluoroethanol interact with the pi electron density of the acetylene C-C triple bond, while methanol and ethanol interact with the pi electron density of the benzene ring. It can be inferred that the hydrogen bonding acceptor site on phenylacetylene switches from the acetylene pi to the benzene pi with lowering in the partial charge on the hydrogen atom of the OH group. The most significant finding is that the intermolecular structures of water and methanol complexes are notably distinct, which, to the best of our knowledge, this is first such observation in the case of complexes of substituted benzenes.

  4. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Elizabeth A; Atkins, Tonya M; Gilbert, Dustin A; Kauzlarich, Susan M; Liu, Kai; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-06-01

    Currently, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are the only nanosized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents approved for clinical use, yet commercial manufacturing of these agents has been limited or discontinued. Though there is still widespread demand for these particles both for clinical use and research, they are difficult to obtain commercially, and complicated syntheses make in-house preparation unfeasible for most biological research labs or clinics. To make commercial production viable and increase accessibility of these products, it is crucial to develop simple, rapid and reproducible preparations of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we report a rapid, straightforward microwave-assisted synthesis of superparamagnetic dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were produced in two hydrodynamic sizes with differing core morphologies by varying the synthetic method as either a two-step or single-step process. A striking benefit of these methods is the ability to obtain swift and consistent results without the necessity for air-, pH- or temperature-sensitive techniques; therefore, reaction times and complex manufacturing processes are greatly reduced as compared to conventional synthetic methods. This is a great benefit for cost-effective translation to commercial production. The nanoparticles are found to be superparamagnetic and exhibit properties consistent for use in MRI. In addition, the dextran coating imparts the water solubility and biocompatibility necessary for in vivo utilization.

  5. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, Elizabeth A; Atkins, Tonya M; Kauzlarich, Susan M; Gilbert, Dustin A; Liu Kai; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-01-01

    Currently, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are the only nanosized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents approved for clinical use, yet commercial manufacturing of these agents has been limited or discontinued. Though there is still widespread demand for these particles both for clinical use and research, they are difficult to obtain commercially, and complicated syntheses make in-house preparation unfeasible for most biological research labs or clinics. To make commercial production viable and increase accessibility of these products, it is crucial to develop simple, rapid and reproducible preparations of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we report a rapid, straightforward microwave-assisted synthesis of superparamagnetic dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were produced in two hydrodynamic sizes with differing core morphologies by varying the synthetic method as either a two-step or single-step process. A striking benefit of these methods is the ability to obtain swift and consistent results without the necessity for air-, pH- or temperature-sensitive techniques; therefore, reaction times and complex manufacturing processes are greatly reduced as compared to conventional synthetic methods. This is a great benefit for cost-effective translation to commercial production. The nanoparticles are found to be superparamagnetic and exhibit properties consistent for use in MRI. In addition, the dextran coating imparts the water solubility and biocompatibility necessary for in vivo utilization. (paper)

  6. Computer-assisted imaging of the fetus with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, P M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the fetus and to propose future techniques and applications. Institutional review board approved MR images of the fetus were acquired in 66 patients with sonographically suspected fetal abnormalities. Axial, coronal, and sagittal short TR, short TE images were obtained. In addition, 12 studies were performed with rapid scans requiring 700-1200 ms using either GRASS or Spoiled GRASS techniques. Sequential studies demonstrating fetal motion were also performed. Three studies with 3D IR prepped GRASS were performed. These allowed for orthogonal and non-orthogonal reformatted views and 3D display. Normal fetal structures were shown with MRI, including brain, heart, liver, stomach, intestines, and bladder. Gross fetal anomalies could generally be demonstrated with MRI. MRI may give additional information to that of sonography in fetal anomalies, particularly those involving the central nervous system, and in the detection of fat, blood, and meconium. MRI of the fetus can demonstrate normal and abnormal structures. Newer techniques with faster imaging will allow for greater possibility of computer assisted manipulation of data.

  7. Dynamical resonances in the fluorine atom reaction with the hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Dong H

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. The concept of transition state has played a crucial role in the field of chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics. Resonances in the transition state region are important in many chemical reactions at reaction energies near the thresholds. Detecting and characterizing isolated reaction resonances, however, have been a major challenge in both experiment and theory. In this Account, we review the most recent developments in the study of reaction resonances in the benchmark F + H 2 --> HF + H reaction. Crossed molecular beam scattering experiments on the F + H 2 reaction have been carried out recently using the high-resolution, highly sensitive H-atom Rydberg tagging technique with HF rovibrational states almost fully resolved. Pronounced forward scattering for the HF (nu' = 2) product has been observed at the collision energy of 0.52 kcal/mol in the F + H 2 (j = 0) reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on two new potential energy surfaces, the Xu-Xie-Zhang (XXZ) surface and the Fu-Xu-Zhang (FXZ) surface, show that the observed forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) in the F + H 2 reaction is caused by two Feshbach resonances (the ground resonance and first excited resonance). More interestingly, the pronounced forward scattering of HF (nu' = 2) at 0.52 kcal/mol is enhanced considerably by the constructive interference between the two resonances. In order to probe the resonance potential more accurately, the isotope substituted F + HD --> HF + D reaction has been studied using the D-atom Rydberg tagging technique. A remarkable and fast changing dynamical picture has been mapped out in the collision energy range of 0.3-1.2 kcal/mol for this reaction. Quantum dynamical calculations based on the XXZ surface suggest that the ground resonance on this potential is too high in comparison with the experimental results of the F + HD reaction. However, quantum scattering calculations on the FXZ surface can reproduce nearly quantitatively the resonance

  8. The hydrogen dynamics of CsH5(PO4)2 studied by means of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradisek, A; Dimnik, B; Vrtnik, S; Dolinsek, J; Wencka, M; Zdanowska Fraczek, M; Lavrova, G V

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the hydrogen dynamics of cesium pentahydrogen diphosphate, CsH 5 (PO 4 ) 2 , by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in order to address the question of why there is no superprotonic phase transition in this compound, in contrast to other structurally similar hydrogen-bonded ionic salts, where a superprotonic transition is frequently found to be present. The analysis of the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation rate revealed that the temperature-dependent hydrogen dynamics of CsH 5 (PO 4 ) 2 involves motional processes (the intra-H-bond jumps and the inter-H-bond jumps at elevated temperatures, as a mechanism of the ionic conductivity) identical to those for the other H-bonded superprotonic salts. The considerably stronger H-bond network in CsH 5 (PO 4 ) 2 prompts the search for a higher superprotonic transition temperature. However, due to the relatively weak bonding between the {[H 2 PO 4 ]} ∞ planes in the [100] direction of the CsH 5 (PO 4 ) 2 structure by means of the ionic bonding via the cesium atoms and the small number of H bonds in that direction (where out of five H bonds in the unit cell, four are directed within the {[H 2 PO 4 ]} ∞ planes and only one is between the planes), the bonds between the planes become thermally broken and the crystal melts before the H-bond network rearranges via water release into an open structure typical of the superprotonic phase. Were the coupling between the {[H 2 PO 4 ]} ∞ planes in the CsH 5 (PO 4 ) 2 somewhat stronger, the superprotonic transition would occur in the same manner as it does in other structurally related hydrogen-bonded ionic salts.

  9. Application of water-assisted ultraviolet light in combination of chlorine and hydrogen peroxide to inactivate Salmonella on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuanghuan; Huang, Runze; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-09-18

    With the demand for fresh produce increases in recent decades, concerns for microbiological safety of fresh produce are also raised. To identify effective ultraviolet (UV) light treatment for fresh produce decontamination, we first determined the effect of three forms of UV treatment, dry UV (samples were treated by UV directly), wet UV (samples were dipped in water briefly and then exposed to UV), and water-assisted UV (samples were treated by UV while being immersed in agitated water) on inactivation of Salmonella inoculated on tomatoes and fresh-cut lettuce. In general, the water-assisted UV treatment was found to be the most effective for both produce items. Chlorine and hydrogen peroxide were then tested to determine whether they could be used to enhance the decontamination efficacy of water-assisted UV treatment and prevent transfer of Salmonella via wash water by completely eliminating it. Neither of them significantly enhanced water-assisted UV inactivation of Salmonella on tomatoes. Chlorine significantly improved the decontamination effectiveness of the water-assisted UV treatment for baby-cut carrots and lettuce, but not for spinach. In general, the single water-assisted UV treatment and the combined treatment of water-assisted UV and chlorine were similar or more effective than the chlorine washing treatment. In most of the cases, no Salmonella was detected in the wash water when the single water-assisted UV treatment was used to decontaminate tomatoes. In a few cases when Salmonella was detected in the wash water, the populations were very low,≤2CFU/mL, and the wash water contained an extremely high level of organic load and soil level. Therefore, the single water-assisted UV treatment could potentially be used as an environmentally friendly and non-chemical alternative to chlorine washing for tomatoes after validation in industrial scale. For lettuce, spinach and baby-cut carrots, the combined treatment of water-assisted UV treatment and chlorine

  10. What Is a Hydrogen Bond? Resonance Covalency in the Supramolecular Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Frank; Klein, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    We address the broader conceptual and pedagogical implications of recent recommendations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) concerning the re-definition of hydrogen bonding, drawing upon the recommended IUPAC statistical methodology of mutually correlated experimental and theoretical descriptors to operationally…

  11. Parent state swapping of resonances in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stibbe, D.T.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio R-matrix scattering calculations are presented for electron-H 2 as a function of H 2 bond length. It is found that 2 Σ u + and 2Π u resonances in the 10 eV region appear to be associated with multiple 'parent' target states and that the resonances can swap parents as a function of internuclear separation. It is shown how these phenomena provide an explanation for the inconsistencies in previous assignments of resonances in this region and other anomalies such as pronounced isotopic effects. It is suggested that this parent swapping behaviour is likely to be a common feature of electron-impact excitation of other molecules and is particularly important for any models that include nuclear motion. (author)

  12. The microwave-assisted ionic liquid nanocomposite synthesis: platinum nanoparticles on graphene and the application on hydrogenation of styrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The microwave-assisted nanocomposite synthesis of metal nanoparticles on graphene or graphite oxide was introduced in this research. With microwave assistance, the Pt nanoparticles on graphene/graphite oxide were successfully produced in the ionic liquid of 2-hydroxyethanaminium formate [HOCH2CH2NH3][HCO2]. On graphene/graphite oxide, the sizes of Pt nanoparticles were about 5 to 30 nm from transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) results. The crystalline Pt structures were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Since hydrogenation of styrene is one of the important well-known chemical reactions, herein, we demonstrated then the catalytic hydrogenation capability of the Pt nanoparticles on graphene/graphite oxide for the nanocomposite to compare with that of the commercial catalysts (Pt/C and Pd/C, 10 wt.% metal catalysts on activated carbon from Strem chemicals, Inc.). The conversions with the Pt nanoparticles on graphene are >99% from styrene to ethyl benzene at 100°C and under 140 psi H2 atmosphere. However, ethyl cyclohexane could be found as a side product at 100°C and under 1,520 psi H2 atmosphere utilizing the same nanocomposite catalyst. PMID:24103100

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging - guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: an initial experience in a community hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, P.; Enis, S.; Pinyard, J.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness in diagnosing mammographically and sonographically occult breast lesions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in patients who presented to a community-based hospital with a newly established breast MRI program. The records of 142 consecutive patients, median age of 55 years, who had undergone MRI-guided biopsy at our institution between July 2006 and July 2007 were reviewed. From these patients, 197 mammographically and sonographically occult lesions were biopsied at the time of discovery. The pathology was then reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. Cancer was present and subsequently discovered in 8% of the previously occult lesions (16/197) or 11% of the women studied (16/142). Of the cancerous lesions, 56% were invasive carcinomas (9/16) and 44% were ductal carcinomas in situ (7/16). Fourteen percent of the discovered lesions (28/197) were defined as high risk and included atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and radial scar. In total, occult cancerous and high-risk lesions were discovered in 22% of the found lesions (44/197) or 31% of the women who underwent MRI-guided biopsy (44/142). This study demonstrated that detection of cancerous and high-risk lesions can be significantly increased when an MRI-guided biopsy program is introduced at a community-based hospital. We believe that as radiologists gain confidence in imaging and histologic correlation, community-based hospitals can achieve similar rates of occult lesion diagnosis as those found in data emerging from academic institutions. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging - guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: an initial experience in a community hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, P.; Enis, S.; Pinyard, J., E-mail: jpinyard@gmail.com [Morristown Memorial Hospital, The Carol W. and Julius A. Rippel Breast Center, The Carol G. Simon Cancer Centre, Morristown, New Jersey (United States)

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness in diagnosing mammographically and sonographically occult breast lesions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in patients who presented to a community-based hospital with a newly established breast MRI program. The records of 142 consecutive patients, median age of 55 years, who had undergone MRI-guided biopsy at our institution between July 2006 and July 2007 were reviewed. From these patients, 197 mammographically and sonographically occult lesions were biopsied at the time of discovery. The pathology was then reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. Cancer was present and subsequently discovered in 8% of the previously occult lesions (16/197) or 11% of the women studied (16/142). Of the cancerous lesions, 56% were invasive carcinomas (9/16) and 44% were ductal carcinomas in situ (7/16). Fourteen percent of the discovered lesions (28/197) were defined as high risk and included atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and radial scar. In total, occult cancerous and high-risk lesions were discovered in 22% of the found lesions (44/197) or 31% of the women who underwent MRI-guided biopsy (44/142). This study demonstrated that detection of cancerous and high-risk lesions can be significantly increased when an MRI-guided biopsy program is introduced at a community-based hospital. We believe that as radiologists gain confidence in imaging and histologic correlation, community-based hospitals can achieve similar rates of occult lesion diagnosis as those found in data emerging from academic institutions. (author)

  15. Diagnostics of microwave assisted electron cyclotron resonance plasma source for surface modification of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Supriya E.; Das, Partha Sarathi; Bansode, Avinash; Dhamale, Gayatri; Ghorui, S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Mathe, Vikas L.

    2018-01-01

    Looking at the increasing scope of plasma processing of materials surface, here we present the development and diagnostics of a microwave assisted Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma system suitable for surface modification of polymers. Prior to the surface-treatment, a detailed diagnostic mapping of the plasma parameters throughout the reactor chamber was carried out by using single and double Langmuir probe measurements in Ar plasma. Conventional analysis of I-V curves as well as the elucidation form of the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) has become the source of calibration of plasma parameters in the reaction chamber. The high energy tail in the EEDF of electron temperature is seen to extend beyond 60 eV, at much larger distances from the ECR zone. This proves the suitability of the rector for plasma processing, since the electron energy is much beyond the threshold energy of bond breaking in most of the polymers. Nylon 6 is used as a representative candidate for surface processing in the presence of Ar, H2 + N2, and O2 plasma, treated at different locations inside the plasma chamber. In a typical case, the work of adhesion is seen to almost get doubled when treated with oxygen plasma. Morphology of the plasma treated surface and its hydrophilicity are discussed in view of the variation in electron density and electron temperature at these locations. Nano-protrusions arising from plasma treatment are set to be responsible for the hydrophobicity. Chemical sputtering and physical sputtering are seen to influence the surface morphology on account of sufficient electron energies and increased plasma potential.

  16. Dynamic high pressure induced strong and weak hydrogen bonds enhanced by pre-resonance stimulated Raman scattering in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Fabing; Gong, Nan; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2017-12-11

    355 nm pulsed laser is employed to excite pre-resonance forward stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) of liquid water at ambient temperature. Due to the shockwave induced dynamic high pressure, the obtained Raman spectra begin to exhibit double peaks distribution at 3318 and 3373 cm -1 with the input energy of 17 mJ,which correspond with OH stretching vibration with strong and weak hydrogen (H) bonds. With laser energy rising from 17 to 27 mJ, the Stokes line at 3318 cm -1 shifts to 3255 and 3230 cm -1 because of the high pressure being enlarged. When the energy is up to 32 mJ, only 3373 cm -1 peak exists. The strong and weak H bond exhibit quite different energy dependent behaviors.

  17. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    -oil by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is challenged by severe polymerization and coking upon heating the oil. Alternatively, performing fast pyrolysis in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere in a fluid bed reactor with a HDO catalyst as bed medium could immediately stabilize reactive pyrolysis vapors [2...

  18. Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Haberman, D.P.; Hishmeh, G.A.; Ciszek, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal

  19. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  20. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-assisted crack initiation in austenitic-ferritic duplex steels; Numerische Simulation der wasserstoffunterstuetzten Rissbildung in austentisch-ferritischen Duplexstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mente, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have been used for a long time in the offshore industry, since they have higher strength than conventional austenitic stainless steels and they exhibit a better ductility as well as an improved corrosion resistance in harsh environments compared to ferritic stainless steels. However, despite these good properties the literature shows some failure cases of duplex stainless steels in which hydrogen plays a crucial role for the cause of the damage. Numerical simulations can give a significant contribution in clarifying the damage mechanisms. Because they help to interpret experimental results as well as help to transfer results from laboratory tests to component tests and vice versa. So far, most numerical simulations of hydrogen-assisted material damage in duplex stainless steels were performed at the macroscopic scale. However, duplex stainless steels consist of approximately equal portions of austenite and δ-ferrite. Both phases have different mechanical properties as well as hydrogen transport properties. Thus, the sensitivity for hydrogen-assisted damage is different in both phases, too. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop a numerical model of a duplex stainless steel microstructure enabling simulation of hydrogen transport, mechanical stresses and strains as well as crack initiation and propagation in both phases. Additionally, modern X-ray diffraction experiments were used in order to evaluate the influence of hydrogen on the phase specific mechanical properties. For the numerical simulation of the hydrogen transport it was shown, that hydrogen diffusion strongly depends on the alignment of austenite and δ-ferrite in the duplex stainless steel microstructure. Also, it was proven that the hydrogen transport is mainly realized by the ferritic phase and hydrogen is trapped in the austenitic phase. The numerical analysis of phase specific mechanical stresses and strains revealed that if the duplex stainless steel is

  1. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutch, Michael J. [Intercollege Program of Materials, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lenahan, Patrick M. [Intercollege Program of Materials, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); King, Sean W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  2. Proton emission from resonant laser absorption and self-focusing effects from hydrogenated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, Daniele; Picciotto, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), s. 50-54 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant - others:OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : resonant absorption * self-focusing * Thomson parabola * spectrometer Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  3. Resonant electron attachment to mixed hydrogen/oxygen and deuterium/oxygen clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzler, Michael; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Barwa, Erik; Grubwieser, Lukas; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2017-11-01

    Low energy electron attachment to mixed (H2)x/(O2)y clusters and their deuterated analogs has been investigated for the first time. These experiments were carried out using liquid helium nanodroplets to form the clusters, and the effect of the added electron was then monitored via mass spectrometry. There are some important differences between electron attachment to the pure clusters and to the mixed clusters. A particularly notable feature is the formation of HO2- and H2O- ions from an electron-induced chemical reaction between the two dopants. The chemistry leading to these anions appears to be driven by electron resonances associated with H2 rather than O2. The electron resonances for H2 can lead to dissociative electron attachment (DEA), just as for the free H2 molecule. However, there is evidence that the resonance in H2 can also lead to rapid electron transfer to O2, which then induces DEA of the O2. This kind of excitation transfer has not, as far as we are aware, been reported previously.

  4. Deterministic transfer of an unknown qutrit state assisted by the low-Q microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-Shui, E-mail: quaninformation@sina.com; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2017-05-25

    Highlights: • We propose a scheme to achieve an unknown quantum state transfer between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. • Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. - Abstract: Qutrits (i.e., three-level quantum systems) can be used to achieve many quantum information and communication tasks due to their large Hilbert spaces. In this work, we propose a scheme to transfer an unknown quantum state between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, our approach can be adapted to other solid-state qutrits coupled to circuit resonators. Numerical simulations show that the high-fidelity transfer of quantum state between the two qutrits is feasible with current circuit QED technology.

  5. Deterministic transfer of an unknown qutrit state assisted by the low-Q microwave resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a scheme to achieve an unknown quantum state transfer between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. • The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. • Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. - Abstract: Qutrits (i.e., three-level quantum systems) can be used to achieve many quantum information and communication tasks due to their large Hilbert spaces. In this work, we propose a scheme to transfer an unknown quantum state between two flux qutrits coupled to two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. The quantum state transfer can be deterministically achieved without measurements. Because resonator photons are virtually excited during the operation time, the decoherences caused by the resonator decay and the unwanted inter-resonator crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, our approach can be adapted to other solid-state qutrits coupled to circuit resonators. Numerical simulations show that the high-fidelity transfer of quantum state between the two qutrits is feasible with current circuit QED technology.

  6. Hydrogen bonding-assisted thermal conduction in β-sheet crystals of spider silk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Teli; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2014-06-01

    Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that β-sheet, an essential component of spider silk protein, has a thermal conductivity 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of some other protein structures reported in the literature. In contrast to several other nanostructured materials of similar bundled/layered structures (e.g. few-layer graphene and bundled carbon nanotubes), the β-sheet is found to uniquely feature enhanced thermal conductivity with an increased number of constituting units, i.e. β-strands. Phonon analysis identifies inter-β-strand hydrogen bonding as the main contributor to the intriguing phenomenon, which prominently influences the state of phonons in both low- and high-frequency regimes. A thermal resistance model further verifies the critical role of hydrogen bonding in thermal conduction through β-sheet structures.Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that β-sheet, an essential component of spider silk protein, has a thermal conductivity 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of some other protein structures reported in the literature. In contrast to several other nanostructured materials of similar bundled/layered structures (e.g. few-layer graphene and bundled carbon nanotubes), the β-sheet is found to uniquely feature enhanced thermal conductivity with an increased number of constituting units, i.e. β-strands. Phonon analysis identifies inter-β-strand hydrogen bonding as the main contributor to the intriguing phenomenon, which prominently influences the state of phonons in both low- and high-frequency regimes. A thermal resistance model further verifies the critical role of hydrogen bonding in thermal conduction through β-sheet structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Structure of the β-sheets, computational model, determination of area and temperature gradient, and additional phonon DOS results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01195c

  7. Experimental and numerical investigations of a hydrogen-assisted laser-induced materials transfer procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toet, D.; Smith, P. M.; Sigmon, T. W.; Thompson, M. O.

    2000-01-01

    We present investigations of the mechanisms of a laser-induced transfer technique, which can be used for the spatially selective deposition of materials such as Si. This transfer is effected by irradiating the backside of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, deposited on a transparent substrate with an excimer laser pulse. The resulting release and accumulation of hydrogen at the film/substrate interface propels the silicon onto an adjacent receptor wafer. Time-resolved infrared transmission measurements indicate that the amorphous film is melted by the laser pulse and breaks into droplets during ejection. These droplets travel towards the receptor substrate and coalesce upon arrival. The transfer velocity increases as a function of fluence, the rate of increase dropping noticeably around the full melt threshold of the film. At this fluence, the transfer velocity reaches values of around 1000 m/s for typical films. Atomic force microscopy reveals that films transferred below the full melt threshold only partially cover the receptor substrate, while uniform, well-adhering films, which can be smoothed by subsequent laser irradiation, are obtained above it. Transfer of hydrogen-free Si films, on the other hand, does not occur until much higher fluences. The dynamics of the process have been simulated using a semiquantitative numerical model. In this model, hydrogen released from the melt front is instantaneously accumulated at the interface with an initial kinetic energy given by the melting temperature of Si and the enthalpy of solution. The resulting pressure accelerates the Si film, the dynamics of which are modeled using Newtonian mechanics, and the gas cools adiabatically as its kinetic energy is converted to the film's momentum. The results of the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Control of wettability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films by laser-assisted micro- and nanostructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm; Kohler, Robert; Torge, Maika; Trouillet, Vanessa; Danneil, Friederike; Stueber, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A flexible and rapid surface functionalization of amorphous carbon films shows a great potential for various application fields such as biological surfaces and tribological systems. For this purpose, the combination of thin film deposition and subsequent laser material processing was investigated. Amorphous carbon layers doped with hydrogen were deposited on silicon wafers by reactive direct-current magnetron sputtering. Films with three different hydrogen contents were synthesized. Subsequent to the thin film deposition process, UV laser material processing at wavelengths of 193 nm or 248 nm was performed with respect to chemical surface modification and surface structuring on micro- and nanometer scale. Depending on structure size and laser-induced chemical surface modification the adjustment of the surface energy and wetting behaviour in a broad range from hydrophobic to hydrophilic was possible. The chemical modification and the ablation mechanisms near the ablation threshold were strongly influenced by the hydrogen content in amorphous carbon thin films. Structural and chemical information of the as-deposited and modified films was obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements.

  9. Hydrogen assisted stress-cracking behaviour of electron beam welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Sharkawy, S.W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are gaining popularity as an alternate material to duplex and super duplex stainless steels for applications in oil and gas industries. The weldability of these steels, though reported to be better when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steels, so far has been addressed with duplex stainless steel electrodes/fillers. This work addresses the stress-cracking behaviour of weldments of a high-grade supermartensitic stainless steel (11% Cr, 6.5% Ni and 2% Mo) in the presence of hydrogen. Welds were produced with matching consumables, using electron beam welding (EBW) process. Weldments were subjected to slow strain rate tests in 0.1 M NaOH solution, with introduction of hydrogen into the specimens by means of potentiostatic cathodic polarisation at a potential of -1200 mV versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Reference tests were performed in air for comparison, and the results suggest that both the SMSS base material and the EB weld metal are susceptible to embrittlement under the conditions of hydrogen charging

  10. Analysis of low energy neutral hydrogen fluxes using an electron cyclotron resonance heated discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation describes the design, construction, and proof-of-principle verification of a neutral hydrogen flux detection system, based on an ECRH discharge as the neutral flux ionizer. The significant features of the ionizer are its small size and simultaneous excitation of the ECRH mode using a 30 MHz RF driver and relatively small static magnetic fields. Demonstrated is the ability of the ECRH ionizer to ionize ∼ 900 eV neutral hydrogen fluxes with subsequent detection in a high resolution energy analyzer. A versatile calibration technique is applied to determine the ionizer efficiency, which additionally gives a variety of elastic scattering and charge exchange cross section results. Also described are the details of a new low energy beam-target interaction research facility, along with the basic techniques required to calibrate many of the system components. The facility has potential applications in areas such as fundamental cross section measurement, plasma diagnostics, beam-plasma interactions, and further beam-target research. 111 refs., 82 figs

  11. Large-field behavior of the LoSurdo-Stark resonances in atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, G. (Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)); Silverstone, H.J. (Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States))

    1994-12-01

    The Schroedinger equation for atomic hydrogen in a large electric field [ital F] is solved by separation in parabolic coordinates. As [ital F][r arrow][infinity], the scaled field [ital f] that enters the separated equations tends to 0. Thus the large-[ital F] asymptotics depend on the small-[ital f] behavior of the separated equations, each of which in turn is equivalent to a quarticly perturbed two-dimensional anharmonic oscillator. The Bender-Wu branch cuts of the oscillator play a major role in the hydrogen asymptotics. A simple iterative algorithm permits the calculation of the branch points at which two eigenvalues coincide. We have found numerically that, as [ital F][r arrow][infinity], the separation constant [beta][sub 1] returns to the smaller of the unperturbed values [beta][sub 1][sup (0)] or [beta][sub 2][sup (0)]. At the same time, [beta][sub 2] tends to the negative of the smaller value. As the real electric field [ital F] increases from 0 to [infinity], in each case that [beta][sub 1][sup (0)] and [beta][sub 2][sup (0)] are not equal, the trajectory of either [ital f] or [ital e][sup [minus][ital i][pi

  12. Para-hydrogen raser delivers sub-millihertz resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suefke, Martin; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Liebisch, Alexander; Blümich, Bernhard; Appelt, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    The precision of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio, the measurement time Tm and the linewidth Δν = 1/(πT2). Overcoming the T 2 limit is possible if the nuclear spins of a molecule emit continuous radio waves. Lasers and masers are self-organized systems which emit coherent radiation in the optical and micro-wave regime. Both are based on creating a population inversion of specific energy states. Here we show continuous oscillations of proton spins of organic molecules in the radiofrequency regime (raser). We achieve this by coupling a population inversion created through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) to a high-quality-factor resonator. For the case of 15N labelled molecules, we observe multi-mode raser activity, which reports different spin quantum states. The corresponding 1H-15N J-coupled NMR spectra exhibit unprecedented sub-millihertz resolution and can be explained assuming two-spin ordered quantum states. Our findings demonstrate a substantial improvement in the frequency resolution of NMR.

  13. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Sulfonyldiamine Ligand for Microwave-Assisted Transfer Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen M. Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Sulfonyl-1,2-diamine ligands, derived from 1,2-diaminocyclohexane and 1,2-diaminopropane, were immobilized onto mesoporous SBA-15 silica. The SBA-15-supported sulfonyldiamine-Ru complex was prepared in situ under microwave heating at 60 W for 3 min. The prepared sulfonyldiamine-Ru complex was used as an efficient catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols. The heterogeneous complex showed extremely high catalytic activity with 99% conversion rate under microwave heating condition. The complexes were regenerated by simple filtration and reused two times without significant loss of activity.

  14. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.; Rose, F.; Marchon, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Fe-containing nanoparticles used as effective catalysts of lignin reforming to syngas and hydrogen assisted by microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsodikov, M. V.; Ellert, O. G.; Nikolaev, S. A.; Arapova, O. V.; Bukhtenko, O. V.; Maksimov, Yu. V.; Kirdyankin, D. I.; Vasil'kov, A. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Active iron-containing nanosized components have been formed on the lignin surface. The metal was deposited on the lignin from an ethanol solution of Fe(acac)3 and from a colloid solution of iron metal particles obtained beforehand by metal vapor synthesis. These active components are able to absorb microwave radiation and are suitable for microwave-assisted high-rate dehydrogenation and dry reforming of lignin without addition of a carbon adsorbent, as a supplementary radiation absorbing material, to the feedstock. The dependence of the solid lignin heating dynamics on the concentration of supported iron particles was investigated. The threshold Fe concentration equal to 0.5 wt.%, providing the highest rate of sample heating up to the reforming and plasma generation temperature was identified. The microstructure and magnetic properties of iron-containing nanoparticles supported on lignin were studied before and after the reforming. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles and also core-shell Fe3O4@γ-Fe-C nanostructures are formed during the reforming of lignin samples. The catalytic performance of iron-based nanoparticles toward the lignin conversion is manifested as increasing selectivity to hydrogen and syngas, which reaches 94% at the Fe concentration of 2 wt.%. It was found that with microwave irradiation under argon, hydrogen predominates in the gas. In the CO2 atmosphere, dry reforming takes place to give syngas with the CO/H2 ratio of 0.9. In both cases, the degree of hydrogen recovery from lignin reaches 90-94%. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Pulse-reverse electrodeposition for mesoporous metal films: combination of hydrogen evolution assisted deposition and electrochemical dealloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherevko, Serhiy; Kulyk, Nadiia; Chung, Chan-Hwa

    2012-01-21

    Hydrogen evolution assisted electrodeposition is a new bottom-up technique allowing the fast and simple synthesis of nanometals. Electrochemical dealloying is a top-down approach with the same purpose. In this work, we show that a combination of these two methods in sequence by pulse-reverse electrodeposition can be used to prepare high-surface-area nanostructured metals. Highly porous adherent platinum is obtained by the deposition of CuPt alloy during the cathodic cycles and the selective dissolution of copper during the anodic cycles. The convection created by the movement of the hydrogen bubbles increases the deposition rate and removes the dissolved copper ions from the diffusion layer, which ensures the deposition of a film with the same stoichiometry throughout the whole process. Due to the relatively high ratio of copper atoms on the surface in the as-deposited layer, it is proposed that the dealloying kinetics is significantly higher than that usually observed during the dealloying process in a model system. The proposed approach has several advantages over other methods, such as a very high growth rate and needlessness of any post-treatment processes. A detailed analysis of the effect of pulse-reverse waveform parameters on the properties of the films is presented. Mesoporous platinum with pores and ligaments having characteristic sizes of less than 10 nm, an equivalent surface area of up to ca. 220 m(2) cm(-3), and a roughness factor of more than 1000 is fabricated.

  17. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 36, Al-Khoud 123 (Oman); Boonruang, Sakoolkan, E-mail: sakoolkan.boonruang@nectec.or.th, E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th [Photonics Technology Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), 112 Thailand Science Park, PathumThani 12120 (Thailand); Mohammed, Waleed S., E-mail: sakoolkan.boonruang@nectec.or.th, E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th [Center of Research in Optoelectronics, Communication and Control Systems (BUCROCCS), School of Engineering, Bangkok University, PathumThani 12120 (Thailand); Dutta, Joydeep [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, SE-164 40 Kista, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing palladium supported zinc oxide multilayers and their nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-02-10

    We analyze surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor for sensing of small concentrations of hydrogen gas in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. One of the two probes considered has multilayers of zinc oxide (ZnO) and palladium (Pd) while the other has layer of their composite over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber. The analysis is carried out for different volume fractions of palladium nanoparticles dispersed in zinc oxide host material in the nanocomposite layer. For the analysis, a Maxwell-Garnett model is adopted for calculating the dielectric function of a ZnO:Pd nanocomposite having nanoparticles of dimensions smaller than the wavelength of radiation used. The effects of the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the nanocomposite and the thickness of the nanocomposite layer on the figure of merit of the sensor have been studied. The film thickness of the layer and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the ZnO:Pd nanocomposite layer have been optimized to achieve the maximum value of the figure of merit of the sensor. It has been found that the figure of merit of the sensing probe coated with ZnO:Pd nanocomposite is more than twofold of the sensing probe coated with multilayers of Pd and ZnO over a silver coated unclad core of the fiber; hence, the sensor with a nanocomposite layer works better than that with multilayers of zinc oxide and palladium. The sensor can be used for online monitoring and remote sensing of hydrogen gas.

  19. Crystal and molecular structures of sixteen charge-assisted hydrogen bond-mediated diisopropylammonium salts from different carboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihao; Hu, Kaikai; Jin, Shouwen; Ding, Aihua; Wang, Yining; Dong, Lingfeng; Gao, Xingjun; Wang, Daqi

    2017-10-01

    salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the sixteen investigated crystals the NH groups in the diisopropylamine are protonated when the carboxylic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated COOH groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O/CH3sbnd O, CH-π/CH3-π, CH3-Cπ, N-π, and π-π associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total structures. For the coexistence of the various weak interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both.

  20. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  1. Hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth in ferritic steels – a fractographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Di

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack growth (FCG behavior of a Fe-3wt.%Si ferritic alloy under different environmental conditions using in-situ electrochemical (cathodic hydrogen (H charging has been investigated. Three frequencies have been applied. Results clearly show that the FCG rate increased by a factor spanning from 20 to 1000 times, depending on the loading frequencies, when compared to the reference test in air. Lower frequency leads to higher FCG rate. A comprehensive fractographic analysis was carried out: the area fraction of different fracture surface features was measured and taken into statistical analysis. Based on these investigations, the possible mechanisms of H-enhanced FCG are discussed. Similar tests in high-pressure H gas from other studies were also compared and discussed. These results give a preliminary understanding of H effect in fatigue crack propagation procedure in ferritic alloys.

  2. Fiber orientation measurements by diffusion tensor imaging improve hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intramyocellular lipids in human leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaparla, Sunil K; Gao, Feng; Daniele, Giuseppe; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D

    2015-04-01

    Twelve healthy subjects underwent hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([Formula: see text]) acquisition ([Formula: see text]), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a [Formula: see text]-value of [Formula: see text], and fat-water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the Dixon method. Subject-specific muscle fiber orientation, derived from DTI, was used to estimate the lipid proton spectral chemical shift. Pennation angles were measured as 23.78 deg in vastus lateralis (VL), 17.06 deg in soleus (SO), and 8.49 deg in tibialis anterior (TA) resulting in a chemical shift between extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) of 0.15, 0.17, and 0.19 ppm, respectively. IMCL concentrations were [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] in SO, VL, and TA, respectively. Significant differences were observed in IMCL and EMCL pairwise comparisons in SO, VL, and TA ([Formula: see text]). Strong correlations were observed between total fat fractions from [Formula: see text] and Dixon MRI for VL ([Formula: see text]), SO ([Formula: see text]), and TA ([Formula: see text]). Bland-Altman analysis between fat fractions (FFMRS and FFMRI) showed good agreement with small limits of agreement (LoA): [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 0.69%) in VL, [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 1.33%) in SO, and [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 0.47%) in TA. The results of this study demonstrate the variation in muscle fiber orientation and lipid concentrations in these three skeletal muscle types.

  3. Passivation of boron in silicon by hydrogen and muonium: calculation of electric field gradients, quadrupole resonance frequencies and cross relaxation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maric, Dj.M.; Meier, P.F.; Vogel, S.; Davis, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of studying impurity passivation complexes in semiconductors by quadrupole resonance spectroscopy is examined. The problem is illustrated for the case of boron in silicon passivated with hydrogen or, equivalently, with muonium, since the radioactive light isotope in principle offers a greater sensitivity for detection of the spectra. Ab initio calculations on suitable cluster models of the passivation complexes provide estimates of the electric field gradients at the quadrupolar nuclei, and thereby predictions of the quadrupole resonance frequencies. Detection via cross-relaxation techniques is proposed, notably muon level crossing resonance (μLCR), and illustrated by calculation of the time dependence of the muon polarization function. Possible reasons for the absence of quadrupolar resonances in μLCR spectra recorded in exploratory experiments are discussed; these include the existence of a local tunnelling mode for the lighter isotope. (author)

  4. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  5. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4 assisted by hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan-Liang; Liu, Yi-Ling; Tong, Li-Ge

    2018-04-01

    Water pollution has caused much attention nowadays. Photocatalysis as a kind of advanced oxidation technology has been widely studied in the field of environmental pollution control. As a stable non-metal photocatalyst, the photocatalytic activity of g-C3N4 assisted by H2O2 was investigated for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. The combination of g-C3N4 and H2O2 has much higher activity than that of pure g-C3N4 or H2O2. Neutral solution is preferred for the high phtotocatalytic activity of g-C3N4 with H2O2. The effect of the amount of catalyst, H2O2 concentration and RhB concentration was investigated. Photocatalytic mechanism study using radical scavenger showed free radicals {{{{O}}}2}- and · OH are the main active species. g-C3N4 assisted by H2O2 showed good photostability and repeatability after five cycles of degradation experiment.

  6. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhathan, P., E-mail: PPrabhathan@ntu.edu.sg; Murukeshan, V. M. [Centre for Optical and Laser Engineering (COLE), School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-09-15

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ∼60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  7. A dynamic study on the sulfuric acid distillation column for VHTR-assisted hydrogen production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngjoon, Shin; Heesung, Shin; Jiwoon, Jang; Kiyoung, Lee; Jonghwa, Chang

    2007-01-01

    The sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle and the Westinghouse sulfur hybrid cycle coupled to a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) are well known as a feasible technology to produce hydrogen. The concentration of the sulfuric acid solution and its decomposition are essential parts in both cycles. In this paper, the thermophysical properties which are the boiling point, latent heat, and the partial pressures of water, sulfuric acid, and sulfur trioxide have been correlated as a function of the sulfuric acid concentration for the H 2 SO 4 and H 2 O binary chemical system, based on the data in Perry's chemical engineers' hand-book and other experimental data. By using these thermophysical correlations, a dynamic analysis of a sulfuric acid distillation column has been performed to establish the column design requirements and its optimum operation condition. From the results of the dynamic analysis, an optimized column system is anticipated for a distillation column equipped with 2 ideal plates and a second plate feeding system from the bottom plate. The effects of the hold-up of the re-boiler and the reflux ratio from the top product stream on the elapsing time when the system progresses toward a steady state have been analyzed. (authors)

  8. Hydrogen-surfactant-assisted coherent growth of GaN on ZnO substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhang, Yiou; Tse, Kinfai; Zhu, Junyi

    2018-01-01

    Heterostructures of wurtzite based devices have attracted great research interest because of the tremendous success of GaN in light emitting diodes (LED) industry. High-quality GaN thin films on inexpensive and lattice matched ZnO substrates are both commercially and technologically desirable. Intrinsic wetting conditions, however, forbid such heterostructures as the energy of ZnO polar surfaces is much lower than that of GaN polar surfaces, resulting in 3D growth mode and poor crystal quality. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose the use of surfactant hydrogen to dramatically alter the growth mode of the heterostructures. Stable H-involved surface configurations and interfaces are investigated with the help of our newly developed modelling techniques. The temperature and chemical potential dependence of our proposed strategy, which is critical in experiments, is predicted by applying the experimental Gibbs free energy of H2. Our thermodynamic wetting condition analysis is a crucial step for the growth of GaN on ZnO, and we find that introducing H will not degrade the stability of ZnO substrate. This approach will allow the growth of high-quality GaN thin films on ZnO substrates. We believe that our new strategy may reduce the manufactory cost, improve the crystal quality, and improve the efficiency of GaN-based devices.

  9. Efficient and rapid microwave-assisted route to synthesize Pt–MnOx hydrogen peroxide sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivrak, Hilal; Alal, Orhan; Atbas, Dilan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon supported Pt-MnOx catalyst could be synthesized succesfully by microwave irradiation method. • Carbon supported Pt-MnOx non-enzymatic H 2 O 2 sensor exhibits excellent selectivity, stability, and reproducibility • Carbon supported Pt-MnOx sensor can effectively resist the effect of interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is proposed based on carbon supported Pt-MnO x and Pt nanoparticles, successfully synthesized via microwave irradiation polyol method. The physicochemical properties of the Pt-MnO x and Pt nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrochemical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). Electrochemical measurements indicate that the oxidation current of H 2 O 2 is linear (R 2 =0.998) to its concentration from 2 μM to 4.0 mM with a detection limit of 0.7 μM (signal/noise = 3). In addition, Pt-MnO x is not affected by ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) which are common interfering species. Meanwhile, this Pt-MnO x non-enzymatic H 2 O 2 sensor exhibits excellent selectivity, stability and reproducibility. Thus, this novel non-enzymatic sensor can be found practical applications in H 2 O 2 detection

  10. Tunable THz wave absorption by graphene-assisted plasmonic metasurfaces based on metallic split ring resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Gerislioglu, Burak; Kaya, Serkan; Pala, Nezih

    2017-01-01

    Graphene plasmonics has been introduced as a novel platform to design various nano- and microstructures to function in a wide range of spectrum from optical to THz frequencies. Herein, we propose a tunable plasmonic metamaterial in the THz regime by using metallic (silver) concentric microscale split ring resonator arrays on a multilayer metasurface composed of silica and silicon layers. We obtained an absorption percentage of 47.9% including two strong Fano resonant dips in THz regime for the purely plasmonic metamaterial without graphene layer. Considering the data of an atomic graphene sheet (with the thickness of ~0.35 nm) in both analytical and experimental regimes obtained by prior works, we employed a graphene layer under concentric split ring resonator arrays and above the multilayer metasurface to enhance the absorption ratio in THz bandwidth. Our numerical and analytical results proved that the presence of a thin graphene layer enhances the absorption coefficient of MM to 64.35%, at the highest peak in absorption profile that corresponds to the Fano dip position. We also have shown that changing the intrinsic characteristics of graphene sheet leads to shifts in the position of Fano dips and variations in the absorption efficiency. The maximum percentage of absorption (~67%) was obtained for graphene-based MM with graphene layer with dissipative loss factor of 1477 Ω. Employing the antisymmetric feature of the split ring resonators, the proposed graphene-based metamaterial with strong polarization dependency is highly sensitive to the polarization angle of the incident THz beam.

  11. Design challenges for matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and infrared resonant laser evaporation equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, James A.

    2011-11-01

    Since the development of the Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) process by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the late 1990s, MAPLE has become an active area of research for the deposition of a variety of polymer, biological, and organic thin films. As is often the case with advancements in thin-film deposition techniques new technology sometimes evolves by making minor or major adjustments to existing deposition process equipment and techniques. This is usually the quickest and least expensive way to try out new ideas and to "push the envelope" in order to obtain new and unique scientific results as quickly as possible. This process of "tweaking" current equipment usually works to some degree, but once the new process is further refined overall designs for a new deposition tool based on the critical attributes of the new process typically help capitalize more fully on the all the salient features of the new and improved process. This certainly has been true for the MAPLE process. In fact the first MAPLE experiments the polymer/solvent matrix was mixed and poured into a copper holder held at LN2 temperature on a laboratory counter top. The holder was then quickly placed onto a LN2 cooled reservoir in a vacuum deposition chamber and placed in a vertical position on a LN2 cooled stage and pumped down as quickly as possible. If the sample was not placed into the chamber quickly enough the frozen matrix would melt and drip into the bottom of the chamber onto the chambers main gate valve making a bit of a mess. However, skilled and motivated scientists usually worked quickly enough to make this process work most of the time. The initial results from these experiments were encouraging and led to several publications which sparked considerable interest in this newly developed technique Clearly this approach provided the vision that MAPLE was a viable deposition process, but the equipment was not optimal for conducting MAPLE experiments on a regular basis

  12. Mechanistic study on ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadoss, Govindarajan; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the ultrasound assisted pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse (SCB) using metal salt with hydrogen peroxide for bioethanol production. Among the different metal salts used, maximum holocellulose recovery and delignification were achieved with ultrasound assisted titanium dioxide (TiO2) pretreatment (UATP) system. At optimum conditions (1% H2O2, 4 g SCB dosage, 60 min sonication time, 2:100 M ratio of metal salt and H2O2, 75°C, 50% ultrasound amplitude and 70% ultrasound duty cycle), 94.98 ± 1.11% holocellulose recovery and 78.72 ± 0.86% delignification were observed. The pretreated SCB was subjected to dilute acid hydrolysis using 0.25% H2SO4 and maximum xylose, glucose and arabinose concentration obtained were 10.94 ± 0.35 g/L, 14.86 ± 0.12 g/L and 2.52 ± 0.27 g/L, respectively. The inhibitors production was found to be very less (0.93 ± 0.11 g/L furfural and 0.76 ± 0.62 g/L acetic acid) and the maximum theoretical yield of glucose and hemicellulose conversion attained were 85.8% and 77%, respectively. The fermentation was carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and at the end of 72 h, 0.468 g bioethanol/g holocellulose was achieved. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of pretreated SCB was made and its morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compounds formed during the pretreatment were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen plasma enhanced alignment on CNT-STM tips grown by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, Fa-Kuei; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Ueda, Kazuyuki; Ohira, Yutaka; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown directly on a scanning tunneling microscopy tip by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and effects of hydrogen plasma treatment on the tip have been investigated in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The unaligned CNTs on the as-grown tip apex have been realigned and reshaped by subsequent hydrogen plasma treatment. The diameter of CNTs is enlarged mainly due to amorphous layers being re-sputtered over their outer shells

  14. Fano resonance assisting plasmonic circular dichroism from nanorice heterodimers for extrinsic chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Huang, Yingzhou; Fang, Liang; Chen, Guo; Wei, Hua; Fang, Yurui

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the circular dichroisms (CD) of nanorice heterodimers consisting of two parallel arranged nanorices with the same size but different materials are investigated theoretically. Symmetry-breaking is introduced by using different materials and oblique incidence to achieve strong CD at the vicinity of Fano resonance peaks. We demonstrate that all Au-Ag heterodimers exhibit multipolar Fano resonances and strong CD effect. A simple quantitative analysis shows that the structure with larger Fano asymmetry factor has stronger CD. The intensity and peak positions of the CD effect can be flexibly tuned in a large range by changing particle size, shape, the inter-particle distance and surroundings. Furthermore, CD spectra exhibit high sensitivity to ambient medium in visible and near infrared regions. Our results here are beneficial for the design and application of high sensitive CD sensors and other related fields.

  15. Hybrid plasmonic waveguide-assisted Metal–Insulator–Metal ring resonator for refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, M. A.; Khonina, S. N.; Kazanskiy, N. L.

    2018-05-01

    A highly sensitive refractive index sensor based on an integrated hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPWG) and a Metal-Insulator-Metal (M-I-M) micro-ring resonator is presented. In our design, there are two slot-waveguide-based micro-rings that encircle a gold disc. The outer slot WG is formed by the combination of Silicon-Air-Gold ring and the inner slot-waveguide is formed by Gold ring-Air-Gold disc. The slot-waveguide rings provide an interaction length sufficient to accumulate a detectable wavelength shift. The transmission spectrum and electric field distribution of this sensor structure are simulated using Finite Element Method (FEM). The sensitivity of this micro-ring resonator is achieved at 800 nm/RIU which is about six times higher than that of the conventional Si ring with the same geometry. Our proposed sensor design has a potential to find further applications in biomedical science and nano-photonic circuits.

  16. Photon-Assisted Resonant Chiral Tunneling Through a Bilayer Graphene Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips A. H.; Mina A. N.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic transport property of a bilayer graphene is investigated under the effect of an electromagnetic field. We deduce an expression for the conductance by solving the Dirac equation. This conductance depends on the barrier height for graphene and the energy of the induced photons. A resonance oscillatory behavior of the conductance is observed. These oscillations are strongly depends on the barrier height for chiral tunneling through graphene. This oscillatory behavio...

  17. Neighboring Hetero-Atom Assistance of Sacrificial Amines to Hydrogen Evolution Using Pt-Loaded TiO2-Photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Yasuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic H2 evolution was examined using Pt-loaded TiO2-photocatalyst in the presence of amines as sacrificial agents. In the case of amines with all of the carbon attached to the hetero-atom such as 2-aminoethanol, 1,2-diamonoethane, 2-amino-1,3-propanediol, and 3-amino-1,2-propanediol, they were completely decomposed into CO2 and water to quantitatively evolve H2. On the other hand, the amines with both hetero-atoms and one methyl group at the β-positions (neighboring carbons of amino group such as 2-amino-1-propanol and 1,2-diaminopropane were partially decomposed. Also, the photocatalytic H2 evolution using amines without the hetero-atoms at the β-positions such as ethylamine, propylamine, 1-butylamine, 1,3-diaminopropane, 2-propylamine, and 2-butylamine was inefficient. Thus, it was found that the neighboring hetero-atom strongly assisted the degradation of sacrificial amines. Moreover, rate constants for H2 evolution were compared among amines. In conclusion, the neighboring hetero-atom did not affect the rate constants but enhanced the yield of hydrogen evolution.

  18. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  19. Polyaniline assisted by TiO2:SnO2 nanoparticles as a hydrogen gas sensor at environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirian, Shahruz; Milani Moghaddam, Hossain

    2015-02-01

    In the present research, polyaniline assisted by TiO2:SnO2 nanoparticles was synthesized and deposited onto an epoxy glass substrate with Cu-interdigited electrodes for gas sensing application. To examine the efficiency of the polyaniline/TiO2:SnO2 nanocomposite (PTS) as a hydrogen (H2) gas sensor, its nature, stability, response, recovery/response time have been studied with a special focus on its ability to work at environmental conditions. H2 gas sensing results demonstrated that a PTS sensor with 20 and 10 wt% of anatase-TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles, respectively, has the best response time (75 s) with a recovery time of 117 s at environmental conditions. The highest (lowest) response (recovery time) was 6.18 (46 s) in PTS sensor with 30 and 15 wt% of anatase- (rutile-)TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles, respectively, at 0.8 vol.% H2 gas. Further, the H2 gas sensing mechanism of PTS sensor has also been studied.

  20. Highly sensitive and selective determination of hydrogen sulfide by resonance light scattering technique based on silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yangfang; Chen, Shu; Long, Yunfei

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a green approach to prepare DNA-templated silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) from the direct reaction between Ag + and ascorbic acid in the presence of DNA and sodium hydroxide. The Ag-NPs showed strong resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity property. Then, the interaction between hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and Ag-NPs was studied by measuring their RLS spectra. The results showed that there is a strong interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which resulted in a decrease in the size of Ag-NPs and a decrease in the RLS intensity of the Ag-NPs solution at the wavelength of 467 nm. The results demonstrated that the RLS technique offers a sensitive and simple tool for investigating the interaction between Ag-NPs and H 2 S, which can be applied to detect H 2 S with high sensitivity and selectivity without complex readout equipment. The linear range for H 2 S determination was found to be the range from 5.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -7  mol L -1 , and the detection limit (3σ/k) was 2.8 × 10 -9  mol L -1 . Moreover, the proposed method was applied for the determination of H 2 S in natural water samples with satisfactory results. Graphical abstract The application of Ag-NPs in H 2 S detection.

  1. Detection of atomic and molecular hydrogen in post-discharge by resonant multi-photo-ionisation. Determination of absolute atomic densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persuy, Philippe

    1990-01-01

    Within the frame of studies on devices for physical vapour deposition, and on phenomena leading to these depositions, this research thesis reports the development of a laser-diagnosis based on the phenomenon of resonant multi-photo-ionisation, and an attempt to obtain from it values of the absolute concentration of atomic hydrogen. After some recalls on the diversity of multi-photon phenomena, their theoretical and experimental evolutions, and on the particular role of hydrogen, the author reports experiments performed at 307.7 and 364.7 nm which respectively addressed the post-discharge detection of molecular hydrogen and of atomic hydrogen. A model is presented which addresses the interaction volume, and results of experiments of atom multi-photo-ionisation are reported. One of the results of this model is an assessment of the cross-section of the excitation with three photons of the hydrogen atom. This result is then used to determine the absolute density of atoms in fundamental state for different discharge conditions. Finally, the author presents the calculation software and some curve examples displaying the evolution of the number of ions and of excited states within the interaction volume [fr

  2. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  3. Photon-Assisted Resonant Chiral Tunneling Through a Bilayer Graphene Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic transport property of a bilayer graphene is investigated under the effect of an electromagnetic field. We deduce an expression for the conductance by solving the Dirac equation. This conductance depends on the barrier height for graphene and the energy of the induced photons. A resonance oscillatory behavior of the conductance is observed. These oscillations are strongly depends on the barrier height for chiral tunneling through graphene. This oscillatory behavior might be due to the interference of different central band and sidebands of graphene states. The present investigation is very important for the application of bilayer graphene in photodetector devices, for example, far-infrared photodevices and ultrafast lasers.

  4. Exergy analysis of a hydrogen fired combined cycle with natural gas reforming and membrane assisted shift reactors for CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsonios, K.; Panopoulos, K.D.; Doukelis, A.; Koumanakos, A.; Kakaras, Em.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Exergy analysis of NGCC with CCS. ► WGS-MR: exergetically efficient technology for CCS, less than 2% total exergy losses. ► 10% of total exergy dissipation in the ATR. ► Optimization of ATR operation and CO 2 stream treatment. - Abstract: Hydrogen production from fossil fuels together with carbon capture has been suggested as a means of providing a carbon free power. The paper presents a comparative exergetic analysis performed on the hydrogen production from natural gas with several combinations of reactor systems: (a) oxy or air fired autothermal reforming with subsequent water gas shift reactor and (b) membrane reactor assisted with shift catalysts. The influence of reactor temperature and pressure as well as operating parameter steam-to-carbon ratio, is also studied exergetically. The results indicate optimal power plant configurations with CO 2 capture, or hydrogen delivery for industrial applications.

  5. Resonant tunneling assisted propagation and amplification of plasmons in high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, Shubhendu; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi; Xing, Huili Grace; Rajan, Siddharth; Volakis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    A rigorous theoretical and computational model is developed for the plasma-wave propagation in high electron mobility transistor structures with electron injection from a resonant tunneling diode at the gate. We discuss the conditions in which low-loss and sustainable plasmon modes can be supported in such structures. The developed analytical model is used to derive the dispersion relation for these plasmon-modes. A non-linear full-wave-hydrodynamic numerical solver is also developed using a finite difference time domain algorithm. The developed analytical solutions are validated via the numerical solution. We also verify previous observations that were based on a simplified transmission line model. It is shown that at high levels of negative differential conductance, plasmon amplification is indeed possible. The proposed rigorous models can enable accurate design and optimization of practical resonant tunnel diode-based plasma-wave devices for terahertz sources, mixers, and detectors, by allowing a precise representation of their coupling when integrated with other electromagnetic structures

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  7. Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation Of Inorganic Nanoparticles And Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Ryan; Lantz, Kevin R.; Dhawan, Anuj; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2010-10-01

    In this research, resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit different classes of inorganic nanoparticles, including bare, un-encapsulated ZnO and Au nanoparticles, as well as ligand-encapsulated CdSe colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). RIR-MAPLE has been used for thin-film deposition of different organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposites using some of these inorganic nanoparticles, including CdSe CQD-poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene] (MEH-CN-PPV) nanocomposites and Au nanoparticle-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites. The unique contribution of this research is that a technique is demonstrated for the deposition of organic-based thin-films requiring solvents with bond energies that do not have to be resonant with the laser energy. By creating an emulsion of solvent and ice in the target, RIR-MAPLE using a 2.94 μm laser can deposit most material systems because the hydroxyl bonds in the ice component of the emulsion matrix are strongly resonant with the 2.94 μm laser. In this way, the types of materials that can be deposited using RIR-MAPLE has been significantly expanded. Furthermore, materials with different solvent bond energies can be co-deposited without concern for material degradation and without the need to specifically tune the laser energy to each material solvent bond energy, thereby facilitating the realization of organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposite thin-films. In addition to the structural characterization of the inorganic nanoparticle and hybrid nanocomposite thin-films deposited using this RIR-MAPLE technique, optical characterization is presented to demonstrate the potential of such films for optoelectronic device applications.

  8. Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation Of Inorganic Nanoparticles And Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, Ryan; Lantz, Kevin R.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.; Dhawan, Anuj; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-01-01

    In this research, resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit different classes of inorganic nanoparticles, including bare, un-encapsulated ZnO and Au nanoparticles, as well as ligand-encapsulated CdSe colloidal quantum dots (CQDs). RIR-MAPLE has been used for thin-film deposition of different organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposites using some of these inorganic nanoparticles, including CdSe CQD-poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy )-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene](MEH-CN-PPV) nanocomposites and Au nanoparticle-poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) nanocomposites. The unique contribution of this research is that a technique is demonstrated for the deposition of organic-based thin-films requiring solvents with bond energies that do not have to be resonant with the laser energy. By creating an emulsion of solvent and ice in the target, RIR-MAPLE using a 2.94 μm laser can deposit most material systems because the hydroxyl bonds in the ice component of the emulsion matrix are strongly resonant with the 2.94 μm laser. In this way, the types of materials that can be deposited using RIR-MAPLE has been significantly expanded. Furthermore, materials with different solvent bond energies can be co-deposited without concern for material degradation and without the need to specifically tune the laser energy to each material solvent bond energy, thereby facilitating the realization of organic/inorganic hybrid nanocomposite thin-films. In addition to the structural characterization of the inorganic nanoparticle and hybrid nanocomposite thin-films deposited using this RIR-MAPLE technique, optical characterization is presented to demonstrate the potential of such films for optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Thermally Assisted Macroscopic Quantum Resonance on a Single-Crystal of Mn12-ac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionti, F.; Thomas, L.; Ballou, R.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Barbara, B.; Sulpice, A.; Sessoli, R.; Gatteschi, D.

    1997-03-01

    Magnetization measurements have been performed on a single mono-crystal of the molecule Mn12-acetate (L. Thomas, F. Lionti, R. Ballou, R. Sessoli, D. Gatteschi and B. Barbara, Nature, 383, 145 (1996).). Steps were observed in the hysteresis loop for values of the applied field at which level crossings of the collective spin states of each manganese clusters take place. The influence of quartic terms is taken into account. At these fields, the magnetization relaxes at short time scales, being otherwise essentially blocked. This novel behavior is interpreted in terms of resonant quantum tunneling of the magnetization from thermally activated energy levels. Hysteresis loop measurements performed for different field orientations and ac-susceptibility experiments, confirm general trends of this picture.

  10. Fiber Bragg grating assisted surface plasmon resonance sensor with graphene oxide sensing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasu, P. T.; Noor, A. S. M.; Shabaneh, A. A.; Yaacob, M. H.; Lim, H. N.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    A single mode fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used to generate Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The uniform gratings of the FBG are used to scatter light from the fiber optic core into the cladding thus enabling the interaction between the light and a thin gold film in order to generate SPR. Applying this technique, the cladding around the FBG is left intact, making this sensor very robust and easy to handle. A thin film of graphene oxide (GO) is deposited over a 45 nm gold film to enhance the sensitivity of the SPR sensor. The gold coated sensor demonstrated high sensitivity of approximately 200 nm/RIU when tested with different concentrations of ethanol in an aqueous medium. A 2.5 times improvement in sensitivity is observed with the GO enhancement compared to the gold coated sensor.

  11. Dipole-resonance assisted isomerization in the electronic ground state using few-cycle infrared pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skocek, Oliver; Uiberacker, Christoph; Jakubetz, Werner

    2011-06-30

    A computational investigation of HCN → HNC isomerization in the electronic ground state by one- and few-cycle infrared pulses is presented. Starting from a vibrationally pre-excited reagent state, isomerization yields of more than 50% are obtained using single one- to five-cycle pulses. The principal mechanism includes two steps of population transfer by dipole-resonance (DR), and hence, the success of the method is closely linked to the polarity of the system and, in particular, the stepwise change of the dipole moment from reactant to transition state and on to products. The yield drops massively if the diagonal dipole matrix elements are artificially set to zero. In detail, the mechanism includes DR-induced preparation of a delocalized vibrational wavepacket, which traverses the barrier region and is finally trapped in the product well by DR-dominated de-excitation. The excitation and de-excitation steps are triggered by pulse lobes of opposite field direction. As the number of optical cycles is increased, the leading field lobes prepare a vibrational superposition state by off-resonant ladder climbing, which is then subjected to the three steps of the principal isomerization mechanism. DR excitation is more efficient from a preformed vibrational wavepacket than from a molecular eigenstate. The entire process can be loosely described as Tannor-Kosloff-Rice type transfer mechanism on a single potential surface effected by a single pulse, individual field lobes assuming the roles of pump- and dump-pulses. Pre-excitation to a transient wavepacket can be enhanced by applying a separate, comparatively weak few-cycle prepulse, in which the prepulse prepares a vibrational wavepacket. The two-pulse setup corresponds to a double Tannor-Kosloff-Rice control scheme on a single potential surface.

  12. Fundamental study of hydrogen-attachment-induced peptide fragmentation occurring in the gas phase and during the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Hidenori; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2018-05-09

    Mass spectrometry with hydrogen-radical-mediated fragmentation techniques has been used for the sequencing of proteins/peptides. The two methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) and hydrogen attachment/abstraction dissociation (HAD) are known as hydrogen-radical-mediated fragmentation techniques. MALDI-ISD occurs during laser induced desorption processes, whereas HAD utilizes the association of hydrogen with peptide ions in the gas phase. In this study, the general mechanisms of MALDI-ISD and HAD of peptides were investigated. We demonstrated the fragmentation of four model peptides and investigated the fragment formation pathways using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The current experimental and computational joint study indicated that MALDI-ISD and HAD produce aminoketyl radical intermediates, which immediately undergo radical-induced cleavage at the N-Cα bond located on the C-terminal side of the radical site, leading to the c'/z˙ fragment pair. In the case of MALDI-ISD, the z˙ fragments undergo a subsequent reaction with the matrix to give z' and matrix adducts of the z fragments. In contrast, the c' and z˙ fragments react with hydrogen atoms during the HAD processes, and various fragment species, such as c˙, c', z˙ and z', were observed in the HAD-MS/MS mass spectra.

  13. Design of Contactlessly Powered and Piezoelectrically Actuated Tools for Non-Resonant Vibration Assisted Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Silge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents a novel design approach for vibration assisted machining (VAM. A lot of research has already been done regarding the influence of superimposed vibrations during a milling process, but there is almost no information about how to design a VAM tool where the tool is actually rotating. The proposed system consists of a piezoelectric actuator for vibration excitation, an inductive contactless energy transfer system and an electronic circuit for powering the actuated tool. The main benefit of transferring the required power without mechanical contact is that the maximum spindle speed is no longer restricted by friction of slip rings. A detailed model is shown that enables for preliminary estimation of the system’s response to different excitation signals. Experimental data are provided to validate the model. Finally, some parts are shown that have been manufactured using the contactlessly actuated milling tool.

  14. 1H MAS NMR (magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques for the quantitative determination of hydrogen types in solid catalysts and supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gordon J; Afeworki, Mobae; Calabro, David C; Chase, Clarence E; Smiley, Randolph J

    2004-06-01

    Distinct hydrogen species are present in important inorganic solids such as zeolites, silicoaluminophosphates (SAPOs), mesoporous materials, amorphous silicas, and aluminas. These H species include hydrogens associated with acidic sites such as Al(OH)Si, non-framework aluminum sites, silanols, and surface functionalities. Direct and quantitative methodology to identify, measure, and monitor these hydrogen species are key to monitoring catalyst activity, optimizing synthesis conditions, tracking post-synthesis structural modifications, and in the preparation of novel catalytic materials. Many workers have developed several techniques to address these issues, including 1H MAS NMR (magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance). 1H MAS NMR offers many potential advantages over other techniques, but care is needed in recognizing experimental limitations and developing sample handling and NMR methodology to obtain quantitatively reliable data. A simplified approach is described that permits vacuum dehydration of multiple samples simultaneously and directly in the MAS rotor without the need for epoxy, flame sealing, or extensive glovebox use. We have found that careful optimization of important NMR conditions, such as magnetic field homogeneity and magic angle setting are necessary to acquire quantitative, high-resolution spectra that accurately measure the concentrations of the different hydrogen species present. Details of this 1H MAS NMR methodology with representative applications to zeolites, SAPOs, M41S, and silicas as a function of synthesis conditions and post-synthesis treatments (i.e., steaming, thermal dehydroxylation, and functionalization) are presented.

  15. Main component analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of hydrogenation products of tars from Kansk-Achinsk Achinsk and Cheremkhovsk coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Donskikh, V.I.; Rokhina, E.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Possibility is discussed of examining nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C quantitative spectra of coal tar hydrogenation products using main component factorial analysis and applying special mathematical methods of processing experimental data. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of hydrogenation products of low temperature Cheremkhovsk coal carbonization tar and rapid pyrolysis Kansk-Achinsk coal tar were obtained on a WP-200SY (Bruker) spectrometer at 50.3 and 200.1 MHz, respectively. Data processing was carried out on an ODRA-1304 computer. Comparative correlation of parameters are given of tars and hydrogenation products which consist of hydrogenation of aromatic cycles and destruction of alkyl substituents, and factorial loads on structural parameters of tar hydrogenation products. 11 references.

  16. Implications for psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy: functional magnetic resonance imaging study with psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, R L; Leech, R; Williams, T M; Erritzoe, D; Abbasi, N; Bargiotas, T; Hobden, P; Sharp, D J; Evans, J; Feilding, A; Wise, R G; Nutt, D J

    2012-03-01

    Psilocybin is a classic psychedelic drug that has a history of use in psychotherapy. One of the rationales for its use was that it aids emotional insight by lowering psychological defences. To test the hypothesis that psilocybin facilitates access to personal memories and emotions by comparing subjective and neural responses to positive autobiographical memories under psilocybin and placebo. Ten healthy participants received two functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (2 mg intravenous psilocybin v. intravenous saline), separated by approximately 7 days, during which they viewed two different sets of 15 positive autobiographical memory cues. Participants viewed each cue for 6 s and then closed their eyes for 16 s and imagined re-experiencing the event. Activations during this recollection period were compared with an equivalent period of eyes-closed rest. We split the recollection period into an early phase (first 8 s) and a late phase (last 8 s) for analysis. Robust activations to the memories were seen in limbic and striatal regions in the early phase and the medial prefrontal cortex in the late phase in both conditions (Ppsilocybin that were absent under placebo. Ratings of memory vividness and visual imagery were significantly higher after psilocybin (Ppsilocybin enhances autobiographical recollection implies that it may be useful in psychotherapy either as a tool to facilitate the recall of salient memories or to reverse negative cognitive biases.

  17. Enhancement in sensitivity of graphene-based zinc oxide assisted bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Kushwaha, Angad S.; Srivastava, Monika; Mishra, H.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    In the present communication, a highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with Kretschmann configuration having alternate layers, prism/zinc oxide/silver/gold/graphene/biomolecules (ss-DNA) is presented. The optimization of the proposed configuration has been accomplished by keeping the constant thickness of zinc oxide (32 nm), silver (32 nm), graphene (0.34 nm) layer and biomolecules (100 nm) for different values of gold layer thickness (1, 3 and 5 nm). The sensitivity of the proposed SPR biosensor has been demonstrated for a number of design parameters such as gold layer thickness, number of graphene layer, refractive index of biomolecules and the thickness of biomolecules layer. SPR biosensor with optimized geometry has greater sensitivity (66 deg/RIU) than the conventional (52 deg/RIU) as well as other graphene-based (53.2 deg/RIU) SPR biosensor. The effect of zinc oxide layer thickness on the sensitivity of SPR biosensor has also been analysed. From the analysis, it is found that the sensitivity increases significantly by increasing the thickness of zinc oxide layer. It means zinc oxide intermediate layer plays an important role to improve the sensitivity of the biosensor. The sensitivity of SPR biosensor also increases by increasing the number of graphene layer (upto nine layer).

  18. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Ina; Castaing, Jacques; Calligaro, Thomas; Salomon, Joseph; Aucouturier, Marc; Reinholz, Uwe; Weise, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS

  19. Analyses of hydrogen in quartz and in sapphire using depth profiling by ERDA at atmospheric pressure: Comparison with resonant NRA and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Ina [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Castaing, Jacques [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)]. E-mail: jacques.castaing@culture.fr; Calligaro, Thomas [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Salomon, Joseph [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Aucouturier, Marc [Laboratoire du Centre de recherche et de restauration des musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Reinholz, Uwe [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Hans-Peter [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen is present in anhydrous materials as a result of their synthesis and of their environment during conservation. IBA provides techniques to measure H concentration depth profiles allowing to identify various aspects of the materials including the history of objects such as gemstones used in cultural heritage. A newly established ERDA set-up, using an external microbeam of alpha particles, has been developed to study hydrated near-surface layers in quartz and sapphire by non-destructive H depth profiling in different atmospheres. The samples were also analysed using resonant NRA and SIMS.

  20. The interpretation of resonance formation in coupled-channel models of positron scattering by atomic hydrogen using localized optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Hewitt, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    Above-threshold resonances can occur in coupled-channel models of the e + + H system when Ps formation is taken into account (although it should be pointed out that, in this specific system, resonances do not occur in an exact theory). In general, to understand the mechanism of resonance formation it is useful to obtain the exact optical potential in a given channel in a localized form. The methods of achieving this localization are discussed with reference to a specific application to the resonance found in the two-state approximation for the l = 0 partial wave. (author)

  1. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of bio-alcohols. The use of conventional and membrane-assisted catalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    The energy consumption around the globe is on the rise due to the exponential population growth and urbanization. There is a need for alternative and non-conventional energy sources, which are CO{sub 2}-neutral, and a need to produce less or no environmental pollutants and to have high energy efficiency. One of the alternative approaches is hydrogen economy with the fuel cell (FC) technology which is forecasted to lead to a sustainable society. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is recognized as a potential fuel and clean energy carrier being at the same time a carbon-free element. Moreover, H{sub 2} is utilized in many processes in chemical, food, metallurgical, and pharmaceutical industry and it is also a valuable chemical in many reactions (e.g. refineries). Non-renewable resources have been the major feedstock for H{sub 2} production for many years. At present, {approx}50% of H{sub 2} is produced via catalytic steam reforming of natural gas followed by various down-stream purification steps to produce {approx}99.99% H{sub 2}, the process being highly energy intensive. Henceforth, bio-fuels like biomass derived alcohols (e.g. bio-ethanol and bio-glycerol), can be viable raw materials for the H{sub 2} production. In a membrane based reactor, the reaction and selective separation of H{sub 2} occur simultaneously in one unit, thus improving the overall reactor efficiency. The main motivation of this work is to produce H{sub 2} more efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way from bio-alcohols with a high H{sub 2} selectivity, purity and yield. In this thesis, the work was divided into two research areas, the first being the catalytic studies using metal decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) based catalysts in steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) at low temperatures (<450 deg C). The second part was the study of steam reforming (SR) and the water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions in a membrane reactor (MR) using dense and composite Pd-based membranes to produce high purity H{sub 2}. CNTs

  2. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of PVP-coated ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahdatkhah, Parisa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Madaah Hosseini, Hamid Reza, E-mail: Madaah@sharif.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodaei, Azin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Montazerabadi, Ali Reza [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Irajirad, Rasoul [Biomolecular Image Analysis Group, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oghabian, Mohamad Ali [Biomolecular Image Analysis Group, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Delavari, Hamid H., E-mail: Hamid.delavari@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, PO Box 14115-143 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-12

    Highlights: • A rapid microwave-assisted polyol process used to synthesize Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. • In situ surface modification of ultrasmall Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs with PVP has been performed. • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs shows considerable increasing of relaxivity in comparison to Gd-chelates. • PVP-covered Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs show appropriate stability for approximately 15 days. • Spectrophotometric indicates the leaching of free Gd ions not occurred versus time. - Abstract: Synthesis of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated ultrasmall Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) with enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted signal intensity and r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} ratio close to unity is performed by a microwave-assisted polyol process. PVP coated Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs with spherical shape and uniform size of 2.5 ± 0.5 nm have been synthesized below 5 min and structure and morphology confirmed by HRTEM, XRD and FTIR. The longitudinal (r{sub 1}) and transversal relaxation (r{sub 2}) of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs is measured by a 3 T MRI scanner. The results showed considerable increasing of relaxivity for Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs in comparison to gadolinium chelates which are commonly used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, a mechanism for Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs formation and in situ surface modification of PVP-grafted Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}NPs is proposed.

  3. Hydrogen assisted cracking and CO2 corrosion behaviors of low-alloy steel with high strength used for armor layer of flexible pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Zhou, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaonan; Wang, Yuxin; Liu, Chuan; Xu, Guoxiang; Misra, R. D. K.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) were carried out to study hydrogen assisted cracking behavior (HIC, SSCC and HE) of high strength pipeline steel used for armor layer of flexible pipe in ocean. The CO2 corrosion behavior of designed steel with high strength was studied by using immersion experiment. The experimental results demonstrate that the corrosion resistance of designed steel with tempered martensite to HIC, SSCC and HE is excellent according to specific standards, which contributes to the low concentration of dislocation and vacancies previously formed in cold rolling process. The corrosion mechanism of hydrogen induced cracking of designed steel, which involves in producing process, microstructure and cracking behavior, is proposed. The designed steel with tempered martensite shows excellent corrosion resistance to CO2 corrosion. Cr-rich compound was first formed on the coupon surface exposed to CO2-saturated brine condition and chlorine, one of the corrosion ions in solution, was rich in the inner layer of corrosion products.

  4. The influence of wavelength, temporal sequencing, and pulse duration on resonant infrared matrix-assisted laser processing of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Schoeffling, Jonathan; Jimenez, Richard; Zinderman, Brian; Yi, SunYong; Bubb, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    We have carried out a systematic investigation of laser ablation plume interactions in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation. The laser source utilized in this study was a mid-infrared OPO capable of dual sequential ns pulses with adjustable delay ranging from 1 to 100 μs. This unique capability enabled us both to probe the ablation plume with a second laser pulse, and to effectively double the laser fluence. The primary ablation target used for this study consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) dissolved in a binary mixture of methanol and toluene. Both the critical thermodynamic and optical properties of the binary mixture were determined and used to interpret our results. We found that deposition rates associated with single pulse irradiation tracks with the optical absorption coefficient in the spectral range from 2,700 to 3,800 nm. In the case of dual sequential pulses, discrepancies in this trend have been linked to the rate of change in the optical absorption coefficient with temperature. The influence of fluence on deposition rate was found to follow a sigmoidal dependence. Surface roughness was observed to have a diametrically opposed trend with pulse delay depending on whether the OH or CH vibrational mode was excited. In the case of CH excitation, we suggest that the rougher films are due to the absorbance of the second pulse by droplets within the plume containing residual solvent which leads to the formation of molecular balloons and hence irregularly shaped features on the substrate.

  5. Implant test and acoustic emission technique used to investigate hydrogen assisted cracking in the melted zone of a welded HSLA-80 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fals, H. C.; Trevisan, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Weld metal hydrogen assisted cracking was studied using two flux cored wire (AWS E 70T-5 and AWS E 120 T5-K4) and a mixture gas of CO 2 +5% H 2 to induce values of diffusible hydrogen in high strength low alloy steel (HSLA-80) weldments. An acoustical Emission Measurement System (AEMS) RMS voltmeter was coupled to the implant test (NF 89-100) apparatus to determine energy, amplitude and event numbers of signal. All cracks were initiated in the partially melted zone and propagated into the coarse-grained region of the heat affected zone when E 70 T5 consumable was used, and the quasi-cleavage fracture mode was predominant. When E 120 T5 K4 consumable was used the cracks propagated vertically across the fusion zone, and a mixed fracture mode was the most important. A significant relationship between acoustic emission parameters and fracture modes was found. (Author) 12 refs

  6. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N.

    2004-01-01

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is ∼50 and ∼25 μm, respectively. The length of individual GNF is ∼50 μm and diameter ∼0.25 μm. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of ∼80 atm as against ∼120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is ∼17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined

  7. Studies on synthesis and hydrogenation behaviour of graphitic nanofibres prepared through palladium catalyst assisted thermal cracking of acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Tiwari, R.S.; Srivastava, O.N

    2004-11-03

    The nano-variants of carbon including graphitic nanofibres (GNF) have recently been considered to be exotic (light weight, high storage capacity) hydrogen storage materials. In the present paper, we report growth of aligned bundles of GNF. The length and width of cross-section of the bundles is {approx}50 and {approx}25 {mu}m, respectively. The length of individual GNF is {approx}50 {mu}m and diameter {approx}0.25 {mu}m. The GNFs have been synthesized through thermal decomposition of acetylene using palladium (Pd) sheets as catalyst. This represents a new form of catalyst. The GNFs bundles grown by the present method are easier to hydrogenate. They adsorb hydrogen at a lower pressure of {approx}80 atm as against {approx}120 atm for the GNF grown in the earlier studies. The storage capacity obtained in the present investigation is {approx}17 wt.%. Electron microscopic investigations reveal that as against the as grown GNF, the hydrogenated version embodies microstructures exhibiting fragmentation of graphitic layer bundles. The reasons for the growth of GNF in the form of aligned bundles, the ease of hydrogenation and relevance of GNF fragmentation after hydrogenation have been outlined.

  8. Dynamics of circular hydrogen bond array in calix[4]arene in a nonpolar solvent: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lang, J.; Deckerová, V.; Czernek, Jiří; Lhoták, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 122, - (2005), 044506/1-044506/11 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : hydrogen bonds * organic compounds * spin-spin relaxation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.138, year: 2005

  9. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen diffusion and electron tunneling in Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niki, Haruo; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Oshiro, Morihito; Yogi, Mamoru [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Seki, Ichiro; Fukuhara, Mikio [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Using the Fourier transform of the echo envelope, the proton line shapes, spin-lattice relaxation time, and spin-spin relaxation time have been measured in a (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} glassy alloy at 1.83 T ({approx}78 MHz) and at temperatures between 1.8 and 300 K. First, the spectral line width decreases abruptly between 1.8 and 2.1 K. Next, it remains almost constant at 13 kHz up to {approx}150 K. Finally, the line width decreases as the temperature increases from {approx}150 to 300 K. The initial decrease in the spectral line width is ascribed to the distribution of the external field, which is caused by the penetration of vortices in the superconducting state. The subsequent leveling off in the spectral line width is ascribed to the dipole-dipole interaction between protons when hydrogen atoms are trapped into vacancies among the Zr-centered icosahedral Zr{sub 5}Ni{sub 5}Nb{sub 3} clusters. The final decrease in the spectral line width is ascribed to the motional narrowing of the width that is caused by the movement of hydrogen atoms. The temperature dependences of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation time showed that at temperature above 150 K and the activation energy of 8.7 kJ/mol allowed the hydrogen atoms to migrate among the clusters. The distance between the hydrogen atoms is estimated to be 2.75 A. Hydrogen occupancies among clusters in the (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} glassy alloy play an important role in the diffusion behavior and in the electronic properties of this alloy.

  10. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  11. Large scale, highly dense nanoholes on metal surfaces by underwater laser assisted hydrogen etching near nanocrystalline boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dong; Zhang, Martin Yi; Ye Chang; Liu Zhikun; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    A new method to generate large scale and highly dense nanoholes is presented in this paper. By the pulsed laser irradiation under water, the hydrogen etching is introduced to form high density nanoholes on the surfaces of AISI 4140 steel and Ti. In order to achieve higher nanohole density, laser shock peening (LSP) followed by recrystallization is used for grain refinement. It is found that the nanohole density does not increase until recrystallization of the substructures after laser shock peening. The mechanism of nanohole generation is studied in detail. This method can be also applied to generate nanoholes on other materials with hydrogen etching effect.

  12. Resonances of the confined hydrogen atom and the Lamb-Dicke effect in non-relativistic qed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faupin, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We study a model describing a system of one dynamical nucleus and one electron confined by their center of mass and interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. We impose an ultraviolet cutoff and assume that the fine-structure constant is sufficiently small. Using a renormalization grou...... method (based on [3, 4]), we prove that the unperturbed eigenvalues turn into resonances when the nucleus and the electron are coupled to the radiation field. This analysis is related to the Lamb–Dicke effect....

  13. Hydrogen and electricity production in a light-assisted microbial photoelectrochemical cell with CaFe2O4 photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jian-Shan; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2017-04-01

    A microbial photoelectrochemical cell (MPEC) was designed with a p-type CaFe2O4 semiconductor as the photoelectrode for simultaneous hydrogen and electricity production under light illumination. The CaFe2O4 photoelectrode was synthesized by the sol-gel method and well characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, and UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The linear sweep voltammogram of the CaFe2O4 photoelectrode presented the cathodic photocurrent output. For the MPEC, with an external resistance of 2000 Ω, the maximum power density of 143 mW was obtained. Furthermore, with an external resistance of 100 Ω, the maximum hydrogen production rate of 6.7 μL·cm-2 could be achieved. The MPEC with CaFe2O4 photocathode was compared to MPEC with other photocathodes as well as photocatalytic water splitting technology.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrogen mobility in LaY2Ni9Hx and CeY2Ni9Hx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloninin, A.V.; Buzlukov, A.L.; Skripov, A.V.; Latroche, M.; Paul-Boncour, V.

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the mobility of hydrogen in the ternary compounds LaY 2 Ni 9 and CeY 2 Ni 9 , we have measured the proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and the proton spin-lattice relaxation rates R 1 for LaY 2 Ni 9 H x (x=0.78 and 10.3) and CeY 2 Ni 9 H x (x=0.79 and 7.2). The measurements have been performed at the resonance frequencies of 14, 23.8 and 90 MHz over the temperature range of 11-404 K. For LaY 2 Ni 9 H x , the behavior of R 1 is consistent with the presence of a considerable contribution due to motionally modulated dipole-dipole interaction between nuclear spins. This contribution can be satisfactorily described in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model with a Gaussian distribution of activation energies for hydrogen diffusion; the value of the average activation energy resulting from such a description for LaY 2 Ni 9 H 10.3 is approximately 0.36 eV. For CeY 2 Ni 9 H x compounds, the measured proton spin-lattice relaxation rates are dominated by the contribution due to the interaction between proton spins and paramagnetic centers over the entire temperature range studied. Only qualitative information on H mobility in these compounds has been obtained from the narrowing of NMR spectra. Possible paths of H diffusion in LaY 2 Ni 9 H x and CeY 2 Ni 9 H x are discussed in terms of the distances between the interstitial sites occupied by hydrogen. - Graphical abstract: The temperature dependences of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rates R 1 measured at 14, 23.8 and 90 MHz for LaY 2 Ni 9 H 10.3 . The frequency-dependent increase in R 1 at T>250 K indicates the onset of the motional contribution to the relaxation rates

  15. Cd2SiO4/Graphene nanocomposite: Ultrasonic assisted synthesis, characterization and electrochemical hydrogen storage application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjedi-Arani, Maryam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2018-05-01

    For the first time, a simple and rapid sonochemical technique for preparing of pure Cd 2 SiO 4 nanostructures has been developed in presence of various surfactants of SDS, CTAB and PVP. Uniform and fine Cd 2 SiO 4 nanoparticle was synthesized using of polymeric PVP surfactant and ultrasonic irradiation. The optimized cadmium silicate nanostructures added to graphene sheets and Cd 2 SiO 4 /Graphene nanocomposite synthesized through pre-graphenization. Hydrogen storage capacity performances of Cd 2 SiO 4 nanoparticle and Cd 2 SiO 4 /Graphene nanocomposite were compared. Obtained results represent that Cd 2 SiO 4 /Graphene nanocomposites have higher hydrogen storage capacity than Cd 2 SiO 4 nanoparticles. Cd 2 SiO 4 /Graphene nanocomposites and Cd 2 SiO 4 nanoparticles show hydrogen storage capacity of 3300 and 1300 mAh/g, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup of 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score

  17. Microwave-assisted modulated synthesis of zirconium-based metal–organic framework (Zr-MOF) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-based metal–organic framework (Zr-MOF) was synthesized using a microwave-assisted modulated method in a short reaction time of 5 min. The Zr-MOF material was highly crystalline with well-defined octahedral shaped crystals, and it exhibited...

  18. Tetrel, Chalcogen, and Charge-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in 2-((2-Carboxy-1-(substituted-2-hydroxyethylthio Pyridin-1-ium Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firudin I. Guseinov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of 2-chloro-2-(diethoxymethyl-3-substitutedoxirane or 1-chloro-1-(substituted -3,3-diethoxypropan-2-one with pyridine-2-thiol in EtOH at 25 °C yields 3-(diethoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-substituted-2,3-dihydrothiazolo[3,2-a]pyridin-4-ium chlorides, which subsequently, in MeCN at 85°C, transforms into ring-opening products, 2-((2-carboxy-1-(substituted -2-hydroxyethylthiopyridin-1-ium chlorides. The tetrel (C···O and chalcogen (S···O bonds are found in the structures of 5 and 6, respectively. Compound 6 is also present in halogen bonding with a short O···Cl distance (3.067 Å. Both molecules are stabilized in crystal by tetrel, chalcogen, and multiple charge-assisted hydrogen bonds.

  19. Structural, optical, and hydrogenation properties of ZnO nanowall networks grown on a Si (1 1 1) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Zhang, Z.Z.; Li, B.H.; Shen, D.Z.; Yao, B.; Zhang, J.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Fan, X.W.

    2008-01-01

    ZnO nanowall networks were grown on a Si (1 1 1) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (P-MBE) without using catalysts. Scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM) confirmed the formation of nanowalls with a thickness of about 10-20 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the ZnO nanowall networks were crystallized in a wurtzite structure with their height parallel to the direction. Photoluminescence (PL) of the ZnO nanowall networks exhibited free excitons (FEs), donor-bound exciton (D 0 X), donor-acceptor pair (DAP), and free exciton to acceptor (FA) emissions. The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowall networks was discussed, and their hydrogenation was also studied

  20. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  1. Hydrogen peroxide-assisted synthesis of novel three-dimensional octagonal-like CuO nanostructures with enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Chu, Deqing; Wang, Limin; Hu, Wenhui; Yang, Huifang; Sun, Jingjing; Zhu, Shaopeng; Wang, Guowei; Tao, Jian; Zhang, Songsong

    2018-04-01

    Novel three-dimensional octagonal-like CuO micro-/nanostructures with diameters ranging from 10 to 15 μm have been successfully prepared by hydrogen peroxide-assisted hydrothermal method and subsequent calcination. The product morphology can be changed by simply ordering the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). When the amounts of H2O2 is increased, the length of the corner portion is increased and the width is narrower. The obtained octagonal CuO nanostructures were evaluated for their ability for the degradation of hazardous organic contaminants in water under visible-light irradiation. Comparing with commercial CuO and other CuO products, the CuO octagonal nanostructures exhibit excellent performance for photocatalytic decomposition of RhB (Rhodamine B). It is well established that effective photocatalytic performance results from its unique 3D octagonal nanostructures. We believe that the present work will provide some ideas for further fabrication of other novel nanostructures and exploration of their applications.

  2. Quantitative characterization of cleavage and hydrogen-assisted quasi-cleavage fracture surfaces with the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merson, E. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Kudrya, A.V.; Trachenko, V.A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and the Physics of Strength, NUST MISiS, Moscow 119490 (Russian Federation); Merson, D. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Kazan Federal University, Naberezhnye Chelny 423812, Republic of Tatarstan (Russian Federation); Danilov, V. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. [Institute of Advanced Technologies, Togliatti State University, 445667 (Russian Federation); Department of Engineering Design and Materials, Norwegian University of Science and Technology – NTNU, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-05-17

    “True” cleavage (TC) and quasi-cleavage (QC) fracture surfaces of low-carbon steel specimens tested in liquid nitrogen and after hydrogen charging respectively were investigated by quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Topological and crystallographic features of the TC fracture surface are found in good agreement with the generally accepted cleavage mechanism: TC facets diameters correspond to those of grains; the crack path strictly follows the crystallographic orientation of grains and the most of the cleavage cracks are parallel to {100} planes. On the 2D SEM images, the QC facets appeared resembling the TC ones in terms of river line patterns, shapes and sizes. However, the substantial differences between the topography of these two kinds of fracture surfaces were revealed by 3D CLSM: the average misorientation angle between QC facets and the roughness of the QC fracture surface were much lower than those measured for TC. It is demonstrated that all these features are attributed to the specific fracture mechanism operating during hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  3. Quantitative characterization of cleavage and hydrogen-assisted quasi-cleavage fracture surfaces with the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merson, E.; Kudrya, A.V.; Trachenko, V.A.; Merson, D.; Danilov, V.; Vinogradov, A.

    2016-01-01

    “True” cleavage (TC) and quasi-cleavage (QC) fracture surfaces of low-carbon steel specimens tested in liquid nitrogen and after hydrogen charging respectively were investigated by quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Topological and crystallographic features of the TC fracture surface are found in good agreement with the generally accepted cleavage mechanism: TC facets diameters correspond to those of grains; the crack path strictly follows the crystallographic orientation of grains and the most of the cleavage cracks are parallel to {100} planes. On the 2D SEM images, the QC facets appeared resembling the TC ones in terms of river line patterns, shapes and sizes. However, the substantial differences between the topography of these two kinds of fracture surfaces were revealed by 3D CLSM: the average misorientation angle between QC facets and the roughness of the QC fracture surface were much lower than those measured for TC. It is demonstrated that all these features are attributed to the specific fracture mechanism operating during hydrogen-assisted cracking.

  4. Salt-assisted clean transfer of continuous monolayer MoS2 film for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heung-Yeol; Nguyen, Tri Khoa; Ullah, Farman; Yun, Jong-Won; Nguyen, Cao Khang; Kim, Yong Soo

    2018-03-01

    The transfer of two-dimensional (2D) materials from one substrate to another is challenging but of great importance for technological applications. Here, we propose a facile etching and residue-free method for transferring a large-area monolayer MoS2 film continuously grown on a SiO2/Si by chemical vapor deposition. Prior to synthesis, the substrate is dropped with water- soluble perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid tetrapotassium salt (PTAS). The as-grown MoS2 on the substrate is simply dipped in water to quickly dissolve PTAS to yield the MoS2 film floating on the water surface, which is subsequently transferred to the desired substrate. The morphological, optical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results show that our method is useful for fast and clean transfer of the MoS2 film. Specially, we demonstrate that monolayer MoS2 film transferred onto a conducting substrate leads to excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction with low overpotential (0.29 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode) and Tafel slope (85.5 mV/decade).

  5. The effect of the gas composition on hydrogen-assisted NH3-SCR over Ag/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamm, Stefanie; Fogel, Sebastian; Gabrielsson, Pär

    2013-01-01

    In addition to high activity in hydrocarbon-SCR, Ag/Al2O3 catalysts show excellent activity for NOx reduction for H2-assisted NH3-SCR already at 200°C. Here, we study the influence of different gas compositions on the activity of a pre-sulfated 6wt% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst for NOx reduction, and oxidat...

  6. Hydrogen interstitial in H-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Nishimura, T. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kuriyama, K., E-mail: kuri@ionbeam.hosei.ac.jp [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kushida, K. [Department of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyoiku University, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are evaluated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 5.0 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The maximum of the concentration of the implanted H estimated by a TRIM simulation is at 3600 nm in depth. The resistivity decreases from ∼10{sup 3} Ω cm for un implanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted, 2.3 × 10{sup −1} Ω cm for 200 °C annealed, and 3.2 × 10{sup −1} Ω cm for 400 °C annealed samples. The ERDA measurements can evaluate the concentration of hydrogens which move to the vicinity of the surface (surface to 300 nm or 100 nm) because of the diffusion by the annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 2.0 MeV helium beam is ∼3.8 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} for annealed samples. From EPR measurements, the oxygen vacancy of +charge state (V{sub o}{sup +}) is observed in as-implanted samples. The V{sub o}{sup +} related signal (g = 1.96) observed under no illumination disappears after successive illumination with a red LED and appears again with a blue light illumination. The activation energy of as-implanted, 200 °C annealed, and 400 °C annealed samples estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration lies between 29 meV and 23 meV, suggesting the existence of H interstitial as a shallow donor level.

  7. Do resonance-assisted intramolecular halogen bonds exist without a charge transfer and a sigma-hole?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Deepa, Palanisamy; Kolandaivel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 41 (2015), s. 27496-27508 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio * hydrogen bonds * noncovalent interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  8. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S.; Muhl S, S.

    2004-01-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H 2 /CH 4 in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10 -4 to 6x10 -4 Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  9. Microwave-Assisted Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol Employing a Green and Noble Metal-Free Copper Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Pedro N; de Almeida, João M A R; Carvalho, Yuri; Priecel, Peter; Falabella Sousa-Aguiar, Eduardo; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A

    2016-12-20

    Green, inexpensive, and robust copper-based heterogeneous catalysts achieve 100 % conversion and 99 % selectivity in the conversion of furfural to furfuryl alcohol when using cyclopentyl-methyl ether as green solvent and microwave reactors at low H 2 pressures and mild temperatures. The utilization of pressurized microwave reactors produces a 3-4 fold increase in conversion and an unexpected enhancement in selectivity as compared to the reaction carried out at the same conditions using conventional autoclave reactors. The enhancement in catalytic rate produced by microwave irradiation is temperature dependent. This work highlights that using microwave irradiation in the catalytic hydrogenation of biomass-derived compounds is a very strong tool for biomass upgrade that offers immense potential in a large number of transformations where it could be a determining factor for commercial exploitation. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high-energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom, a saddle point (called the Stark saddle point) appears. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy, one can find classical orbits that are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths, observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength, the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation, another orbit of similar shape is found. This orbit becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum mechanically exact calculations, we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincaré sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  11. Phase and ellipticity dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution in non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, M; Wane, S T, E-mail: mamadou.faye@ucad.edu.sn [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Boulevard Martin Luther King, (Corniche Ouest) BP 5005-Dakar Fann (Senegal)

    2011-03-14

    We study the ellipticity and the dependence on the phase lag (lead) (between the semimajor and the semiminor axes of the field components) of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) in the non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. We establish exact analytical expressions for azimuthal PAD for 3s, 3p and 3d excited initial states, marked by the occurrence of an asymmetric term. This term gives rise to elliptic dichroism (ED), which can be obtained in two ways: either with the left (versus right) ellipticity, or with the phase lag (versus lead); for 3s and 3p initial states, it is shown that the quantum phase of continua is directly related to the phase lag, one-photon below-threshold ionization, and indirectly one photon above. Another important result is that the magnetic sublevels, m = 0, for 3p and m = {+-}1, for 3d, do not contribute to the azimuthal PAD. Our numerical results show, for 3s and 3d, and near-threshold ionization, that the PAD has maxima either along the semimajor or the semiminor axis, while for above-threshold ionization, they are always shifted from these axes. However, the maxima of the corresponding ED coincide with the PAD maxima, while for 3p, they are shifted from the PAD minima. A strong dependence of the ED sign is noted, regardless of the state or the process. However, strong ED signals are obtained for the 3s initial state and below-threshold ionization.

  12. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  13. Organic Thin Films Deposited by Emulsion-Based, Resonant Infrared, Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation: Fundamentals and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wangyao

    Thin film deposition techniques are indispensable to the development of modern technologies as thin film based optical coatings, optoelectronic devices, sensors, and biological implants are the building blocks of many complicated technologies, and their performance heavily depends on the applied deposition technique. Particularly, the emergence of novel solution-processed materials, such as soft organic molecules, inorganic compounds and colloidal nanoparticles, facilitates the development of flexible and printed electronics that are inexpensive, light weight, green and smart, and these thin film devices represent future trends for new technologies. One appealing feature of solution-processed materials is that they can be deposited into thin films using solution-processed deposition techniques that are straightforward, inexpensive, high throughput and advantageous to industrialize thin film based devices. However, solution-processed techniques rely on wet deposition, which has limitations in certain applications, such as multi-layered film deposition of similar materials and blended film deposition of dissimilar materials. These limitations cannot be addressed by traditional, vacuum-based deposition techniques because these dry approaches are often too energetic and can degrade soft materials, such as polymers, such that the performance of resulting thin film based devices is compromised. The work presented in this dissertation explores a novel thin film deposition technique, namely emulsion-based, resonant infrared, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE), which combines characteristics of wet and dry deposition techniques for solution-processed materials. Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE to deposit uniform and continuous organic, nanoparticle and blended films, as well as hetero-structures that otherwise are difficult to achieve. However, fundamental understanding of the growth mechanisms that govern

  14. Innovative Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery system (FREE-D System) for a ventricular assist device using wireless power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Benjamin H; Smith, Joshua R; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovation of a smaller, single moving part has an advantage over earlier large pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) prone to mechanical failure. Drivelines limit the potential for extended patient survival durations with newer pumps and act as source for infection, increased morbidity, rehospitalizations, and reduced quality of life. The Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery (FREE-D) wireless power system uses magnetically coupled resonators to efficiently transfer power. We demonstrate the efficiency over distance of this system. The experimental setup consists of an radiofrequency amplifier and control board which drives the transmit resonator coil, and a receiver unit consisting of a resonant coil attached to a radiofrequency rectifier and power management module. The power management module supplies power to the axial pump, which was set at 9,600 rpm. To achieve a seamless wireless delivery in any room size, we introduced a third relay coil. This relay coil can be installed throughout a room, whereas a single relay coil could be built into a jacket worn by the patient, which would always be within range of the receive coil implanted in the patient's body. The power was delivered over a meter distance without interruptions or fluctuations with coil, rectifier, and regulator efficiency more than 80% and overall system efficiency of 61%. The axial pump worked well throughout the 8 hours of continuous operation. Having same setup on the opposite side can double the distance. A tether-free operation of a VAD can be achieved by FREE-D system in room-size distances. It has the potential to make the VAD therapy more acceptable from the patient perspective.

  15. Investigation of zinc recovery by hydrogen reduction assisted pyrolysis of alkaline and zinc-carbon battery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebin, Burçak; Petranikova, Martina; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Zinc (Zn) recovery from alkaline and zinc-carbon (Zn-C) battery waste were studied by a laboratory scale pyrolysis process at a reaction temperature of 950°C for 15-60min residence time using 5%H 2(g) -N 2(g) mixture at 1.0L/min gas flow rate. The effect of different cooling rates on the properties of pyrolysis residue, manganese oxide particles, were also investigated. Morphological and structural characterization of the produced Zn particles were performed. The battery black mass was characterized with respect to the properties and chemical composition of the waste battery particles. The thermodynamics of the pyrolysis process was studied using the HSC Chemistry 5.11 software. A hydrogen reduction reaction of the battery black mass (washed with Milli-Q water) takes place at the chosen temperature and makes it possible to produce fine Zn particles by rapid condensation following the evaporation of Zn from the pyrolysis batch. The amount of Zn that can be separated from the black mass increases by extending the residence time. Recovery of 99.8% of the Zn was achieved at 950°C for 60min residence time using 1.0L/min gas flow rate. The pyrolysis residue contains MnO and Mn 2 O 3 compounds, and the oxidation state of manganese can be controlled by cooling rate and atmosphere. The Zn particles exhibit spherical and hexagonal particle morphology with a particle size varying between 200nm and 3µm. However the particles were formed by aggregation of nanoparticles which are primarily nucleated from the gas phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Whiteside

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, Wendy; Christensen, Jason; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2005-01-01

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver

  18. Computational study of plasma-assisted photoacoustic response from gold nanoparticles irradiated by off-resonance ultrafast laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatef, Ali; Darvish, Behafarid; Sajjadi, Amir Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are capable of enhancing the incident laser field in the form of scattered near field for even an off-resonance irradiation where the incident laser wavelength is far away from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). If the intensity of the pulse laser is large enough, this capability can be employed to generate a highly localized free electron (plasma) in the vicinity of the particles. The generated plasma can absorb more energy during the pulse, and this energy deposition can be considered as an energy source for structural mechanics calculations in the surrounding media to generate a photoacoustic (PA) signal. To show this, in this paper, we model plasma-mediated PA pressure wave propagation from a 100-nm AuNPs and the surrounding media irradiated by an ultrashort pulse laser. In this model, the AuNP is immersed in water and the laser pulse width is ranging from 70 fs to 2 ps at the wavelength of 800 nm (off-resonance). Our results qualitatively show the substantial impact of the energy deposition in plasma on the PA signal through boosting the pressure amplitudes up to ∼1000 times compared to the conventional approach.

  19. Computational study of plasma-assisted photoacoustic response from gold nanoparticles irradiated by off-resonance ultrafast laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatef, Ali, E-mail: alih@nipissingu.ca; Darvish, Behafarid [Nipissing University, Nipissing Computational Physics Laboratory (NCPL), Department of Computer Science and Mathematics (Canada); Sajjadi, Amir Yousef [Massachusetts General Hospital, Cutaneous Biology Research Center (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are capable of enhancing the incident laser field in the form of scattered near field for even an off-resonance irradiation where the incident laser wavelength is far away from the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). If the intensity of the pulse laser is large enough, this capability can be employed to generate a highly localized free electron (plasma) in the vicinity of the particles. The generated plasma can absorb more energy during the pulse, and this energy deposition can be considered as an energy source for structural mechanics calculations in the surrounding media to generate a photoacoustic (PA) signal. To show this, in this paper, we model plasma-mediated PA pressure wave propagation from a 100-nm AuNPs and the surrounding media irradiated by an ultrashort pulse laser. In this model, the AuNP is immersed in water and the laser pulse width is ranging from 70 fs to 2 ps at the wavelength of 800 nm (off-resonance). Our results qualitatively show the substantial impact of the energy deposition in plasma on the PA signal through boosting the pressure amplitudes up to ∼1000 times compared to the conventional approach.

  20. Quantum-coherence-assisted tunable on- and off-resonance tunneling through a quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianqi; Zeng Ruixi

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-dot-molecular phase coherence (and the relevant quantum-interference-switchable optical response) can be utilized to control electromagnetic wave propagation via a gate voltage, since quantum-dot molecules can exhibit an effect of quantum coherence (phase coherence) when quantum-dot-molecular discrete multilevel transitions are driven by an electromagnetic wave. Interdot tunneling of carriers (electrons and holes) controlled by the gate voltage can lead to destructive quantum interference in a quantum-dot molecule that is coupled to an incident electromagnetic wave, and gives rise to a quantum coherence effect (e.g., electromagnetically induced transparency, EIT) in a quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film. The tunable on- and off-resonance tunneling effect of an incident electromagnetic wave (probe field) through such a quantum-coherent quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film is investigated. It is found that a high gate voltage can lead to the EIT phenomenon of the quantum-dot-molecular systems. Under the condition of on-resonance light tunneling through the present quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film, the probe field should propagate without loss if the probe frequency detuning is zero. Such an effect caused by both EIT and resonant tunneling, which is sensitive to the gate voltage, can be utilized for designing devices such as photonic switching, transistors, and logic gates. (author)

  1. Highly stretchable strain sensor based on polyurethane substrate using hydrogen bond-assisted laminated structure for monitoring of tiny human motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Zhao, Yunong; Wang, Yang; Guo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yangyang; Liu, Ping; Liu, Caixia; Zhang, Yugang

    2018-03-01

    Strain sensors used as flexible and wearable electronic devices have improved prospects in the fields of artificial skin, robotics, human-machine interfaces, and healthcare. This work introduces a highly stretchable fiber-based strain sensor with a laminated structure made up of a graphene nanoplatelet layer and a carbon black/single-walled carbon nanotube synergetic conductive network layer. An ultrathin, flexible, and elastic two-layer polyurethane (PU) yarn substrate was successively deposited by a novel chemical bonding-based layered dip-coating process. These strain sensors demonstrated high stretchability (˜350%), little hysteresis, and long-term durability (over 2400 cycles) due to the favorable tensile properties of the PU substrate. The linearity of the strain sensor could reach an adjusted R-squared of 0.990 at 100% strain, which is better than most of the recently reported strain sensors. Meanwhile, the strain sensor exhibited good sensibility, rapid response, and a lower detection limit. The lower detection limit benefited from the hydrogen bond-assisted laminated structure and continuous conductive path. Finally, a series of experiments were carried out based on the special features of the PU strain sensor to show its capacity of detecting and monitoring tiny human motions.

  2. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of defect-mediated Cd1-xZnxS/MoS2/graphene hollow spheres for highly efficient hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruifeng; Zhang, Yihe; Li, Baoying; Yu, Xuelian; Liu, Huijuan; An, Xiaoqiang; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-06-28

    Moderate efficiency and the utilization of noble metal cocatalysts are the key factors that restrict the large-scale application of photocatalytic hydrogen production. To develop more efficient photocatalysts based on earth abundant elements, either a new material strategy or a fundamental understanding of the semiconductor/cocatalyst interfaces is highly desirable. In this paper, we studied the feasibility of in situ formation of defect-rich cocatalysts on graphene-based photocatalysts. A facile biomolecule-assisted strategy was used to self-assmble Cd1-xZnxS/MoS2/graphene hollow spheres. The defect-mediated cocatalyst and synergetic charge transfer around heterostructured interfaces exhibit a significant impact on the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of multicomponent solid solutions. With engineered interfacial defects, Cd0.8Zn0.2S/MoS2/graphene hollow spheres exhibited a 63-fold improved H2 production rate, which was even 2 and 3.8 times higher than those of CdS/MoS2/graphene hollow spheres and Cd0.8Zn0.2S/Pt. Therefore, our research provides a promising approach for the rational design of high-efficiency and low-cost photocatalysts for solar fuel production.

  3. Phase and ellipticity dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution in non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faye, M; Wane, S T

    2011-01-01

    We study the ellipticity and the dependence on the phase lag (lead) (between the semimajor and the semiminor axes of the field components) of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) in the non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. We establish exact analytical expressions for azimuthal PAD for 3s, 3p and 3d excited initial states, marked by the occurrence of an asymmetric term. This term gives rise to elliptic dichroism (ED), which can be obtained in two ways: either with the left (versus right) ellipticity, or with the phase lag (versus lead); for 3s and 3p initial states, it is shown that the quantum phase of continua is directly related to the phase lag, one-photon below-threshold ionization, and indirectly one photon above. Another important result is that the magnetic sublevels, m = 0, for 3p and m = ±1, for 3d, do not contribute to the azimuthal PAD. Our numerical results show, for 3s and 3d, and near-threshold ionization, that the PAD has maxima either along the semimajor or the semiminor axis, while for above-threshold ionization, they are always shifted from these axes. However, the maxima of the corresponding ED coincide with the PAD maxima, while for 3p, they are shifted from the PAD minima. A strong dependence of the ED sign is noted, regardless of the state or the process. However, strong ED signals are obtained for the 3s initial state and below-threshold ionization.

  4. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  5. Detection of norovirus virus-like particles using a surface plasmon resonance-assisted fluoroimmunosensor optimized for quantum dot fluorescent labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiba, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Yuki; Wang, Xiaomin; Shirato, Haruko; Higo-Moriguchi, Kyoko; Taniguchi, Koki; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Fujimaki, Makoto

    2017-07-15

    A highly sensitive biosensor to detect norovirus in environment is desired to prevent the spread of infection. In this study, we investigated a design of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-assisted fluoroimmunosensor to increase its sensitivity and performed detection of norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs). A quantum dot fluorescent dye was employed because of its large Stokes shift. The sensor design was optimized for the CdSe-ZnS-based quantum dots. The optimal design was applied to a simple SPR-assisted fluoroimmunosensor that uses a sensor chip equipped with a V-shaped trench. Excitation efficiency of the quantum dots, degree of electric field enhancement by SPR, and intensity of autofluorescence of a substrate of the sensor chip were theoretically and experimentally evaluated to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. As the result, an excitation wavelength of 390nm was selected to excite SPR on an Al film of the sensor chip. The sandwich assay of norovirus VLPs was performed using the designed sensor. Minimum detectable concentration of 0.01ng/mL, which corresponds to 100 virus-like particles included in the detection region of the V-trench, was demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring Biosignatures Associated with Thenardite by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (GALDI-FTICR-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Timothy R. McJunkin; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2008-10-01

    Geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) has been employed to determine how effectively bio/organic molecules associated with the mineral thenardite (Na2SO4) can be detected. GALDI is based on the ability of the mineral host to assist desorption and ionization of bio/organic molecules without additional sample preparation. When glycine was mixed with thenardite, glycine was deprotonated to produce C2H4NO-2 at m/z 74.025. The combination of stearic acid with thenardite produced a complex cluster ion at m/z 390.258 in the negative mode, which was assigned a composition ofC18H39O7Na-. Anatural sample of thenardite from Searles Lake in California also produced a peak at m/z 390.260. The bio/organic signatures in both the laboratory-based and natural samples were heterogeneously dispersed as revealed by chemical imaging. The detection limits for the stearic acid and thenardite combination were estimated to be 3 parts per trillion or~7 zeptomoles (10-21) per laser spot. Attempts to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by co-adding FTICR-MS data predetermined to contain the biosignatures of interest revealed problems due to a lack of phase coherence between data sets.

  7. Optical solver for a system of ordinary differential equations based on an external feedback assisted microring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang

    2017-06-15

    Systems of ordinary differential equations (SODEs) are crucial for describing the dynamic behaviors in various systems such as modern control systems which require observability and controllability. In this Letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-optical SODE solver based on the silicon-on-insulator platform. We use an add/drop microring resonator to construct two different ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and then introduce two external feedback waveguides to realize the coupling between these ODEs, thus forming the SODE solver. A temporal coupled mode theory is used to deduce the expression of the SODE. A system experiment is carried out for further demonstration. For the input 10 GHz NRZ-like pulses, the measured output waveforms of the SODE solver agree well with the calculated results.

  8. Atomic population redistribution in a dense Ga vapour proceeding via energy pooling ionization induced by resonant laser-assisted collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsanti, S; Bicchi, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we report on the atomic population redistribution originating from the ionization that takes place in a dense Ga vapour kept in quartz cells and resonantly excited by laser radiation, in the collisions between two excited atoms. This ionization process is known as energy-pooling ionization (EPI). The electron/ion recombination that takes place in the low density plasma produced gives rise to population in the atomic Rydberg levels and from the latter via cascade transitions to lower lying ones. We have monitored the fluorescences relative to the radiative emissions from such levels, namely those corresponding to the nP → 5S 1/2 series, with 9 ≤ n ≤ 26, and the 4D → 4P 1/2,3/2 transitions. Their characteristics testify to their origin as being due to the EPI process. Further confirmation is obtained by performing a time-resolved analysis of such fluorescences, whose appearance and time evolution is strongly influenced by the dynamics of the process. The effect of the introduction of a few Torr of buffer gas inside the quartz cell, resulting in the quenching of all the fluorescences for n ≥ 12, is also discussed

  9. Colorimetric Detection Based on Localised Surface Plasmon Resonance Optical Characteristics for the Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide Using Acacia Gum–Stabilised Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Alzahrani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles in sensing is attracting the interest of many researchers. The aim of this work was to fabricate Acacia gum–stabilised silver nanoparticles (SNPs using green chemistry to use them as a highly sensitive and cost-effective localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR colorimeter sensor for the determination of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 . Silver nanoparticles were fabricated by the reduction of an inorganic precursor silver nitrate solution (AgNO 3 using white sugar as the reducing reagent and Acacia gum as the stabilising reagent and a sonication bath to form uniform silver nanoparticles. The fabricated nanoparticles were characterised by visual observation, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The TEM micrographs of the synthesised nanoparticles showed the presence of spherical nanoparticles with sizes of approximately 10 nm. The EDAX spectrum result confirmed the presence of silver (58%, carbon (30%, and oxygen (12%. Plasmon colorimetric sensing of H 2 O 2 solution was investigated by introducing H 2 O 2 solution into Acacia gum–capped SNP dispersion, and the change in the LSPR band in the UV-Vis region of spectra was monitored. In this study, it was found that the yellow colour of Acacia gum–stabilised SNPs gradually changed to transparent, and moreover, a remarkable change in the LSPR absorbance strength was observed. The calibration curve was linear over 0.1–0.00001 M H 2 O 2 , with a correlation estimation ( R 2 of .953. This was due to the aggregation of SNPs following introduction of the H 2 O 2 solution. Furthermore, the fabricated SNPs were successfully used to detect H 2 O 2 solution in a liquid milk sample, thereby demonstrating the ability of the fabricated SNPs to detect H 2 O 2

  10. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  11. Hydrogen assisted biological biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria

    Wind and biomass are promoted worldwide as sustainable forms of energy. Anaerobic digestion of biomass produces biogas with ∼50−70% CH4 and 30−50% CO2. However, biogas with >90% CH4 content has higher heating value, can be injected into the natural gas grid or used as alternative to natural gas...... as vehicle fuel. Methods currently available for biogas upgrading mainly consists of physicochemical CO2 removal, requiring the use of chemical substances and energy input and, thus, increasing process costs. This PhD project proposes an alternative to existing biogas upgrading technologies, where H2......, produced by water electrolysis, using excess of electricity from wind mills, is coupled with the CO2 contained in the biogas to convert them to CH4. This process is defined as biological biogas upgrading and is carried out by hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea that couples CO2 with H2 to produce...

  12. The efficacy and utilisation of preoperative multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: does it change the surgical dissection plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavukçu, Hasan Hüseyin; Aytaç, Ömer; Balcı, Numan Cem; Kulaksızoğlu, Haluk; Atuğ, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the use of multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. We prospectively evaluated 60 consecutive patients, including 30 patients who had (Group 1), and 30 patients who had not (Group 2) mp-MRI before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Based on the findings of mp-MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial in the mp-MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason sum scores and surgical margin positivity. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, final pathological Gleason score and surgical margin positivity. mp-MRI changed the initial surgical plan in 18 of 30 patients (60%) in Group 1. In seventeen of these patients (56%) surgical plan was changed from non-nerve sparing to interfascial nerve sparing plan. In one patient dissection plan was changed to non-nerve sparing technique which had extraprostatic extension on final pathology. Surgical margin positivity was similar in Groups 1, and 2 (16% and 13%, respectively) although, Group 1 had higher number of high- risk patients. mp-MRI confirmed the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 27 of of 30 patients (90%). Preoperative mp-MRI effected the decision to perform a nerve-sparing technique in 56% of the patients in our study; moreover, changing the dissection plan from non-nerve-sparing technique to a nerve sparing technique did not increase the rate of surgical margin positivity.

  13. Strong band edge luminescence from InN films grown on Si substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodo, Tokuo; Yona, Hiroaki; Ando, Hironori; Nosei, Daiki; Harada, Yoshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    We observed strong band edge luminescence at 8.5-200 K from 200-880 nm thick InN films grown on 10 nm thick InN buffer layers on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The InN film on the Si(001) substrate exhibited strong band edge photoluminescence (PL) emission at 1.814 eV at 8.5 K, tentatively assigned as donor to acceptor pair [DAP (α-InN)] emission from wurtzite-InN (α-InN) crystal grains, while those on Si(111) showed other stronger band edge PL emissions at 1.880, 2.081 and 2.156 eV, tentatively assigned as donor bound exciton [D 0 X(α-InN)] from α-InN grains, DAP (β-InN) and D 0 X (β-InN) emissions from zinc blende-InN (β-InN) grains, respectively

  14. Enhanced spectrophotometric detection of Hg in water samples by surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles after preconcentration with vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, Estefanía M.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2016-10-01

    This article presents an efficient, simple, and cost-effective method for the determination of trace amounts of Hg by vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled to microvolume UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This method correlates changes in the intensity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) after interaction with Hg2+ ion. Spectroscopic measurements of the TOABr-coated Au NPs phase with particular absorption properties (strong and well-defined absorption bands) after analyte extraction by VALLME, provide an accurate and sensitive determination of Hg in water samples, comparable with measurements obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Different variables including sample volume, extraction time, and TOABr-coated Au NPs dispersion volume were carefully studied; final experimental conditions were 5 mL, 120 μL and 5 min respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.8 ng mL- 1. The calibration curve was linear at concentrations between the limit of quantification (LOQ) (4.9 ng mL- 1) and up to at least 120 ng mL- 1 of Hg. The relative standard deviation for six replicate determinations of 20 ng mL- 1 of Hg was 4.7%. This method exhibited an excellent analytical performance in terms of selectivity and sensitivity and it was finally applied for Hg determination in spiked tap and mineral water samples.

  15. Measurement of hydrogen in BCN films by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Inst., of Ishikawa, Kanazawa (Japan); Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influence on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem produce the films with the properties required. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are effective for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A specially designed spectrometer is employed for the detailed determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43MeV {gamma}-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, {alpha}{gamma}){sup 12}C at the 6.385MeV. In this study, the BCN films were formed on silicon substrate by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B{sub 4}C solid and nitrogen was supplied by ion implantation simultaneously. The concentrations of hydrogen in BCN films were measured using RNRA. The mechanical properties of BCN films were evaluated using an ultra-micro-hardness tester. It was confirmed that the hardness of BCN films increased with increasing the concentration of hydrogen. (author)

  16. X-ray Crystallographic, Multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of the Ni(P(Cy)2N(tBu)2)2(n+) Hydrogen Oxidation Catalyst in the Ni(I) Oxidation State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Jens; Westwood, Mark; Mardis, Kristy L; Brown, Tiara L; Pitts-McCoy, Anthony M; Hopkins, Michael D; Poluektov, Oleg G

    2015-07-06

    The Ni(I) hydrogen oxidation catalyst [Ni(P(Cy)2N(tBu)2)2](+) (1(+); P(Cy)2N(tBu)2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) has been studied using a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques (X-, Q-, and D-band, electron-nuclear double resonance, hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy), X-ray crystallography, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Crystallographic and DFT studies indicate that the molecular structure of 1(+) is highly symmetrical. EPR spectroscopy has allowed determination of the electronic g tensor and the spin density distribution on the ligands, and revealed that the Ni(I) center does not interact strongly with the potentially coordinating solvents acetonitrile and butyronitrile. The EPR spectra and magnetic parameters of 1(+) are found to be distinctly different from those for the related compound [Ni(P(Ph)2N(Ph)2)2](+) (4(+)). One significant contributor to these differences is that the molecular structure of 4(+) is unsymmetrical, unlike that of 1(+). DFT calculations on derivatives in which the R and R' groups are systematically varied have allowed elucidation of structure/substituent relationships and their corresponding influence on the magnetic resonance parameters.

  17. Coumarins as new matrices for matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric analysis of hydrophobic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hang, E-mail: hangwang@sjtu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Dai, Bona [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Bin [Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease Pathogenesis and Intervention of Hubei Province, College of Medicine, Hubei Polytechnic University, Huangshi, Hubei 435003 (China); Lu, Han [Department of Anesthesiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), 197, Rui Jin Er Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-07-02

    Highlights: • Coumarins were used as new MALDI matrices. • Coumarins were used for MALDI-FT ICR MS detection of hydrophobic compounds. • DCA had improvement in detection sensitivity, stability, selectivity and reproducibility. • DCA was applied to sterols detection in yeast cells. - Abstract: Hydrophobic compounds with hydroxyl, aldehyde or ketone groups are generally difficult to detect using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), because these compounds have low proton affinity and are poorly ionized by MALDI. Herein, coumarins have been used as new matrices for MALDI-MS analysis of a variety of hydrophobic compounds with low ionization efficiency, including steroids, coenzyme Q10, a cyclic lipopeptide and cholesterol oleate. Five coumarins, including coumarin, umbelliferone, esculetin, 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCA) and 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DCA), were compared with the conventional matrices of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Coumarins with hydroxyl or carboxylic acid groups enabled detection. Taking DCA as an example, this matrix proved to be superior to DHB or CHCA in detection sensitivity, stability, spot-to-spot and sample-to-sample reproducibility, and accuracy. DCA increased the stability of the target compounds and decreased the loss of water. The [M + Na]{sup +} peaks were observed for all target compounds by adding NaCl as an additive, and the [M − H{sub 2}O + H]{sup +} and [M + H]{sup +} peaks decreased. DCA was selected for the identification of sterols in yeast cells, and thirteen sterols were detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometry. This work demonstrates the potential of DCA as a new matrix for detection of hydrophobic molecules by MALDI-MS and provides an alternative tool for screening sterols in antifungal research.

  18. Morphology and structure evolution of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering with electron cyclotron resonance plasma assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Man, E-mail: man.nie@helmholtz-berlin.de; Ellmer, Klaus [Department of Solar Fuels and Energy Storage Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-28

    Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} (CIGS) films were deposited on Mo coated soda lime glass substrates using an electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced one-step reactive magnetron co-sputtering process (ECR-RMS). The crystalline quality and the morphology of the Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. We also compared these CIGS films with films previously prepared without ECR assistance and find that the crystallinity of the CIGS films is correlated with the roughness evolution during deposition. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the surface topography and to derive one-dimensional power spectral densities (1DPSD). All 1DPSD spectra of CIGS films exhibit no characteristic peak which is typical for the scaling of a self-affine surface. The growth exponent β, characterizing the roughness R{sub q} evolution during the film growth as R{sub q} ∼ d{sup β}, changes with film thickness. The root-mean-square roughness at low temperatures increases only slightly with a growth exponent β = 0.013 in the initial growth stage, while R{sub q} increases with a much higher exponent β = 0.584 when the film thickness is larger than about 270 nm. Additionally, we found that the H{sub 2}S content of the sputtering atmosphere and the Cu- to-(In + Ga) ratio has a strong influence of the morphology of the CIGS films in this one-step ECR-RMS process.

  19. Novel wideband microwave polarization network using a fully-reconfigurable photonic waveguide interleaver with a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Beeker, Willem; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-02-11

    We propose and demonstrate a novel wideband microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas. The polarization network is based on a waveguide-implemented fully-reconfigurable optical interleaver using a two-ring resonator-assisted asymmetric Mach-Zehnder structure. For microwave photonic signal processing, this structure is able to serve as a wideband 2 × 2 RF coupler with reconfigurable complex coefficients, and therefore can be used as a polarization network for wideband antennas. Such a device can equip the antennas with not only the polarization rotation capability for linear-polarization signals but also the capability to operate with and tune between two opposite circular polarizations. Operating together with a particular modulation scheme, the device is also able to serve for simultaneous feeding of dual-polarization signals. These photonic-implemented RF functionalities can be applied to wideband antenna systems to perform agile polarization manipulations and tracking operations. An example of such a interleaver has been realized in TriPleX waveguide technology, which was designed with a free spectral range of 20 GHz and a mask footprint of smaller than 1 × 1 cm. Using the realized device, the reconfigurable complex coefficients of the polarization network were demonstrated with a continuous bandwidth from 2 to 8 GHz and an in-band phase ripple of smaller than 5 degree. The waveguide structure of the device allows it to be further integrated with other functional building blocks of a photonic integrated circuit to realize on-chip, complex microwave photonic processors. Of particular interest, it can be included in an optical beamformer for phased array antennas, so that simultaneous wideband beam and polarization trackings can be achieved photonically. To our knowledge, this is the first-time on-chip demonstration of an integrated microwave photonic polarization network for dual linear-polarized antennas.

  20. pH and temperature effects on the molecular conformation of the porcine pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor as detected by hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, A.; Menegatti, E.; Guarneri, M.

    1982-01-01

    1 H NMR spectra of the porcine pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) have been recorded vs. pH and temperature. Of the two tyrosines, one titrates with a pK of 1.25, while the resonances from the other are pH insensitive in the investigated range 4.8 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 12. This is consistent with PSTI having one Tyr solvent exposed (Try-20) and the other buried (Tyr-31). The resonances from the lysyl epsilon-CH 2 protons titrate with a pK of 10.95. The titration is accompanied by a pronounced line broadening, which starts near pH 8.5. Between pH 11.5 and pH 12 the epsilon-CH 2 resonances recover their low pH line width. Titration curves for the lysines and Tyr-20 reflect single proton ionization equilibria, suggesting that these residues do not interact among themselves. On the basis of double resonance experiments, combined with analysis of chemical shifts, spin-spin couplngs, and line widths, all methyl resonances are identified and followed as functions of pH and temperature. The γ-CH 3 doublet from the N-terminal Thr-1 is assigned by comparison between spectra of forms I and II of the inhibitor, the latter lacking the first four residues of form I. The β-CH 3 resonance from Ala-7 is also assigned. Proton resonance parameters of methyl groups are shown to afford useful NMR probes for the characterization of local nonbonded interactions, microenvironments, and mobilities

  1. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  2. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  3. UV Light-Assisted Synthesis of Highly Efficient Pd-Based Catalyst over NiO for Hydrogenation of o-Chloronitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weidong; Xu, Bin; Fan, Guangyin; Zhang, Kaiming; Xiang, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoqiang

    2018-04-14

    Supported Pd-based catalyst over active nickel oxide (NiO) was repared using the impregnation method companying with UV-light irradiation. Moreover, the catalytic performance of the obtained Pd-based catalysts was evaluated towards the hydrogenation of o -chloronitrobenzene ( o -CNB). Observations indicate that the as-prepared UV-irradiated Pd/NiO catalyst with a mole fraction 0.2% (0.2%Pd/NiO) has higher activity and selectivity in the o -CNB hydrogenation. Especially, UV-light irradiation played a positive role in the improvement of catalytic activity of 0.2%Pd/NiO catalyst, exhibiting an excess 11-fold activity superiority in contrast with non-UV-irradiated 0.2%Pd/NiO catalyst. In addition, it was investigated that effects of varied factors (i.e., reaction time, temperature, o -CNB/Pd ratio, Pd loading, hydrogen pressure) on the selective hydrogenation of ο -CNB catalyzed by UV-irradiated 0.2%Pd/NiO catalyst. Under the reaction conditions of 60 °C, 0.5 h, 1 MPa H₂ pressure, 100% conversion of o -CNB, and 81.1% o -CAN selectivity were obtained, even at high molar ratio (8000:1) of o -CNB to Pd.

  4. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  5. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and frozen-section analysis efficiently predict upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients undergoing nerve-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Roberto; Cozzi, Gabriele; Petralia, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Renne, Giuseppe; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Cioffi, Antonio; Cordima, Giovanni; Ferro, Matteo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Mazzoleni, Federica; Musi, Gennaro; Mistretta, Francesco Alessandro; Serino, Alessandro; Tringali, Valeria Maria Lucia; Coman, Ioan; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in predicting upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). MpMRI may reduce positive surgical margins (PSM) and improve nerve-sparing during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for localized prostate cancer PCa.This was a retrospective, monocentric, observational study. We retrieved the records of patients undergoing RARP from January 2012 to December 2013 at our Institution. Inclusion criteria were: PSA <10 ng/mL; clinical stage

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  8. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  9. A study of charge independence and symmetry from π+ and π- total cross sections on hydrogen and deuterium near the 3,3 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Domingo, J.J.; Hirt, W.; Schwaller, P.

    1978-01-01

    The total cross sections for π +- p and π +- d scattering have been measured in the energy range 70-370 MeV in a classical transmission experiment using multiwire proportional chambers. The hydrogen data agree quite well with earlier measurements. After correcting the results for the direct effects of the Coulomb potential, energy differences of a few percent were found between the π + d and π - d cross sections. This charge symmetry violation can be parameterised in terms of mass and width differences between the Δ-isobars in agreement with the predictions of the quark model. (Auth.)

  10. Direct coupling of a liquid chromatograph to a continuous flow hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance detector for analysis of petroleum and synthetic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haw, J.F.; Glass, T.E.; Hausler, D.W.; Motell, E.; Dorn, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    Initial results obtained for a flow 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detector directly coupled to a liquid chromatography unit are described. Results achieved for a model mixture and several jet fuel samples are discussed. Chromatographic separation of alkanes, alkylbenzenes, and substituted naphthalenes present in the jet fuel samples are easily identified with the 1 H NMR detector. Results with our present flow 1 H NMR insert indicate that 5-Hz linewidths are readily obtainable for typical chromatographic flow rates. The limitations and advantages of this liquid chromatography detector are compared with more commonly employed detectors (e.g., refractive index detectors). 11 figures

  11. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  12. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Awazu, Kaoru; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV γ-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions 1 H( 15 N, α γ) 12 C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B 4 C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  13. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko [Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, {alpha} {gamma}){sup 12}C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B{sub 4}C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  14. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  15. A kinetic model of the hydrogen assisted selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia over Ag/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamm, Stefanie; Olsson, Louise; Fogel, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    A global kinetic model which describes H2-assisted NH3-SCR over an Ag/Al2O3 monolith catalyst has been developed. The intention is that the model can be applied for dosing NH3 and H2 to an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst in a real automotive application as well as contribute to an increased understanding of th...

  16. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is...

  17. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  18. Nickel induced re-structuring of 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanotubes: Role of radical hydrogen in catalyst assisted growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby

    2017-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the structural evolution of 1D graphene nanotubes (GNTs) by the cutting of two dimensional (2D) graphene oxide (GO) sheet in reducing environment at ambient conditions in presence of Ni metal in acidic environment. We observed that in-situ generated radical hydrogen (Hrad) responsible for cutting of graphene sheets and re-structuring of 2D sheet structure to one 1D nanotubes. Structural evolution of GNTs was confirmed by using of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The current vs. voltage (I-V) characteristics of GNTs displayed room temperature (RT) negative differential resistance (NDR) effect which is typical in nanowires, suggested the applicability of nanomaterial for various kind of electronics applications such as memory devices and transistors fabrication.

  19. Does non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging have a role in assisting the clinical diagnosis of cholesteatoma in selected cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R; Lingam, R K; Chandrasekharan, D; Singh, A

    2018-03-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with suspected, but not clinically evident, cholesteatoma. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies (using a half-Fourier single-shot turbo-spin echo sequence) was conducted. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed to determine indications for imaging and operative findings. Seventy-eight investigations in 74 patients with suspected cholesteatoma aged 5.7-79.2 years (mean, 41.7 years) were identified. Operative confirmation was available in 44 ears. Diagnostic accuracy of the imaging technique was calculated using operative findings as a 'gold standard'. Sensitivity of the investigation was examined via comparison with clinically evident cholesteatoma. The accuracy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma was 63.6 per cent. The imaging technique was significantly less accurate in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma than clinically evident disease (p < 0.001). Computed tomography and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may be complementary in assessment of suspected cholesteatoma, but should be used with caution, and clinical judgement is paramount.

  20. Comparison of Langmuir probe and multipole resonance probe measurements in argon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen mixtures in a double ICP discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Oberberg, Moritz; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The results of a Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP) are compared to a Langmuir probe in measuring the electron density in Ar, H2, N2, and O2 mixtures. The MRP was designed for measurements in industry processes, i.e., coating or etching. To evaluate a possible influence on the MRP measurement due to molecular gases, different plasmas with increasing molecular gas content in a double inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa at 500 W are used. The determined electron densities from the MRP and the Langmuir probe slightly differ in H2 and N2 diluted argon plasmas, but diverge significantly with oxygen. In pure molecular gas plasmas, electron densities measured with the MRP are always higher than those measured with the Langmuir Probe, in particular, in oxygen containing mixtures. The differences can be attributed to etching of the tungsten wire in the Ar:O2 mixtures and rf distortion in the pure molecular discharges. The influence of a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function, negative ions or secondary electron emission seems to be of no or only minor importance.

  1. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  2. Ultrasound assisted dispersion of different amount of Ni over ZSM-5 used as nanostructured catalyst for hydrogen production via CO2 reforming of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafaeian, Yaser; Haghighi, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Sogand

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A series of Ni/ZSM-5 nanocatalysts with different amount of Ni were prepared via ultrasound assisted method and characterized with XRD, FESEM, TEM, BET and FTIR techniques. The research deals with catalyst development for dry reforming of methane with the aim of reaching the most stable catalyst specifically over nano-sized catalysts. About more than 99% of Ni particles size is less than 100 nm for the sample prepared with 8% Ni, which is essential to the relative suppression of the carbon formation on catalysts. Catalyst prepared with 8% Ni content showed superior activity in process expected due to its better catalytic properties. - Highlights: • Using ZSM-5 zeolite in dry reforming of methane. • Employing ultrasound energy in synthesis of Ni/ZSM-5 nanocatalyst. • Enhancement of Ni particles size to meet desired catalyst at lower amount of Ni loading. • Dry reforming of methane over Ni/ZSM-5 nanocatalyst with different Ni-loading. • Superior activity of Ni/ZSM-5 nanocatalyst synthesized with 8% Ni content. - Abstract: Carbon dioxide reforming of methane is an interesting route for synthesis gas production especially over nanostructured catalysts. The present research deals with nanocatalyst development by sonochemical method for dry reforming of methane with the aim of reaching the most efficient nanocatalyst. Effect of Ni metal content, one of the most significant variables, on the properties of the ZSM-5 supported nanocatalysts was taken into account. The Ni/ZSM-5 nanocatalysts were prepared via assisted traditional impregnation method via ultrasound irradiation and characterized with XRD, FESEM, TEM, BET and FTIR techniques. Comparison of XRD patterns implies that the peaks related to NiO become sharper by increasing metal content over the support. In the case of nanocatalysts with lower metal content (3% and 8%), the beneficial influence of ultrasound assisted procedure become more pronounced and the observed reduction in

  3. Enhancement of Ag-Based Plasmonic Photocatalysis in Hydrogen Production from Ammonia Borane by the Assistance of Single-Site Ti-Oxide Moieties within a Silica Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Priyanka; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2017-03-13

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have gained great attention owing to their interesting plasmonic properties and efficient catalysis under visible-light irradiation. In this study, an Ag-based plasmonic catalyst supported on mesoporous silica with isolated and tetrahedrally coordinated single-site Ti-oxide moieties, namely, Ag/Ti-SBA-15, was designed with the purpose of utilizing the broad spectral range of solar energy. The Ti-SBA-15 support allows the deposition of small Ag NPs with a narrow size distribution. The chemical structure, morphology, and optical properties of the prepared catalyst were characterized by techniques such as UV/Vis, FT extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field-emission SEM, TEM, and N 2 physisorption studies. The catalytic activity of Ag/Ti-SBA-15 in hydrogen production from ammonia borane by hydrolysis was significantly enhanced in comparison with Ag/SBA-15 without Ti-oxide moieties and Ag/TiO 2 /SBA-15 involving agglomerated TiO 2 , both in the dark and under light irradiation. Improved electron transfer under light irradiation caused by the creation of heterojunctions between Ag NPs and Ti-oxide moieties explains the results obtained in the present study. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrogen Production on Ag-Pd/TiO2 Bimetallic Catalysts: Is there a Combined Effect of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Schottky Mechanism on the Photo-Catalytic Activity?

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Muhammad A.; Al-Oufi, Maher; Wahab, Ahmed K.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Idriss, Hicham

    2017-01-01

    Despite many observations that plasmonics can enhance photocatalytic reactions, their relative role in the overall reaction rate is not thoroughly investigated. Here we report that silver nanoparticles contribution in the reaction rate by its plasmonic effect is negligible when compared to that of Pd (Schottky effect). To conduct the study a series of Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production from water in the presence of an organic sacrificial agent. Pd was chosen as a standard high work function metal needed for the Schottky junction to pump away electrons from the conduction band of the semiconductor and Ag (whose work function is ca. 1 eV lower than that of Pd) for its high plasmonic resonance response at the edge of the bandgap of TiO2. While H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag in the Pd−Ag series, the system performed less than that of pure Pd. In other words, the plasmonic contribution of Ag in the Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalyst for hydrogen production, while confirmed using different excitation energies, is small. Therefore, the “possible” synergistic effect of plasmonic (in the case of Ag) and Schottky-mechanism (in the case of Pd) is minor when compared to that of Schottky-effect alone.

  5. Hydrogen Production on Ag-Pd/TiO2 Bimetallic Catalysts: Is there a Combined Effect of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Schottky Mechanism on the Photo-Catalytic Activity?

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Muhammad A.

    2017-03-28

    Despite many observations that plasmonics can enhance photocatalytic reactions, their relative role in the overall reaction rate is not thoroughly investigated. Here we report that silver nanoparticles contribution in the reaction rate by its plasmonic effect is negligible when compared to that of Pd (Schottky effect). To conduct the study a series of Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production from water in the presence of an organic sacrificial agent. Pd was chosen as a standard high work function metal needed for the Schottky junction to pump away electrons from the conduction band of the semiconductor and Ag (whose work function is ca. 1 eV lower than that of Pd) for its high plasmonic resonance response at the edge of the bandgap of TiO2. While H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag in the Pd−Ag series, the system performed less than that of pure Pd. In other words, the plasmonic contribution of Ag in the Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalyst for hydrogen production, while confirmed using different excitation energies, is small. Therefore, the “possible” synergistic effect of plasmonic (in the case of Ag) and Schottky-mechanism (in the case of Pd) is minor when compared to that of Schottky-effect alone.

  6. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  7. A Fast and Cost-Effective Detection of Melamine by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Using a Novel Hydrogen Bonding-Assisted Supramolecular Matrix and Gold-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Neng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast and cost-effective melamine detection approach has been developed based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS using a novel hydrogen bonding-assisted supramolecular matrix. The detection utilizes Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticles coated with 5-aminoorotic acid (AOA as a SERS active substrate (Fe3O4/Au–AOA, and Rhodamine B (RhB conjugated AOA as a Raman reporter (AOA–RhB. Upon mixing the reagents with melamine, a supramolecular complex [Fe3O4/Au–AOA•••melamine•••AOA–RhB] was formed due to the strong multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between AOA and melamine. The complex was separated and concentrated to a pellet by an external magnet and used as a supramolecular matrix for the melamine detection. Laser excitation of the complex pellet produced a strong SERS signal diagnostic for RhB. The logarithmic intensity of the characteristic RhB peaks was found to be proportional to the concentration of melamine with a limit of detection of 2.5 µg/mL and a detection linearity range of 2.5~15.0 µg/mL in milk. As Fe3O4 nanoparticles and AOA are thousands of times less expensive than the monoclonal antibody used in a traditional sandwich immunoassay, the current assay drastically cut down the cost of melamine detection. The current approach affords promise as a biosensor platform that cuts down sample pre-treatment steps and measurement expense.

  8. Hydrogen in disordered and amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambakidis, G; Bowman, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topoics: elements of the theory of amorphous semiconductors; electronic structure of alpha-SiH; fluctuation induced gap states in amorphous hydrogenated silicon; hydrogen on semiconductor surfaces; the influence of hydrogen on the defects and instabilities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon; deuteron magnetic resonance in some amorphous semiconductors; formation of amorphous metals by solid state reactions of hydrogen with an intermetallic compound; NMR studies of the hydrides of disordered and amorphous alloys; neutron vibrational spectroscopy of disordered metal-hydrogen system; dynamical disorder of hydrogen in LaNi /SUB 5-y/ M /SUB y/ hydrides studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering; recent studies of intermetallic hydrides; tritium in Pd and Pd /SUB 0.80/ Sg /SUB 0.20/ ; and determination of hydrogen concentration in thin films of absorbing materials

  9. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  10. Shape-Controlled Generation of Gold Nanoparticles Assisted by Dual-Molecules: The Development of Hydrogen Peroxide and Oxidase-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifang Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the assist of dual-molecules, 2-(N-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES and sodium citrate, gold nanoparticles (GNPs with different shapes can be generated in the H2O2-mediated reduction of chloroauric acid. This one-pot reaction can be employed to sensitively detect H2O2, probe substrates or enzymes in oxidase-based reactions as well as prepare branched GNPs controllably. By the “naked eye,” 20 μM H2O2, 0.1 μM glucose, and 0.26 U/mL catalase could be differentiated, respectively. By spectrophotometer, the detected limits of H2O2, glucose, and catalase were 1.0 μM, 0.01 μM, and 0.03 U/mL, respectively, and the detection linear ranges for them were 5.0–400 μM, 0.01–0.3 mM, and 0.03–0.78 U/mL, respectively. The proposed “dual-molecules assist” strategy probably paves a new way for the fabrication of nanosensors based on the growth of anisotropic metal nanoparticles, and the developed catalase sensor can probably be utilized to fabricate ultrasensitive ELISA methods for various analytes.

  11. Microbial electrolysis cells as innovative technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Hristov, Georgi; Mitov, Mario; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production is becoming increasingly important in view of using hydrogen in fuel cells. However, most of the production of hydrogen so far comes from the combustion of fossil fuels and water electrolysis. Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC), also known as Bioelectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor, is an ecologically clean, renewable and innovative technology for hydrogen production. Microbial electrolysis cells produce hydrogen mainly from waste biomass assisted by various bacteria strains. The principle of MECs and their constructional elements are reviewed and discussed. Keywords: microbial Electrolysis Cells, hydrogen production, waste biomass purification

  12. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  13. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  14. Computer-assisted superimposition of magnetic resonance and high-resolution technetium-99m-HMPAO and thallium-201 SPECT images of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Johnson, K.A.; Carvalho, P.A.; Schwartz, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Chen, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method for registering three-dimensional CT, MR, and PET data sets that require no special patient immobilization or other precise positioning measures was adapted to high-resolution SPECT and MRI and was applied in 14 subjects [five normal volunteers, four patients with dementia (Alzheimer's disease), two patients with recurrent glioblastoma, and three patients with focal lesions (stroke, arachnoid cyst and head trauma)]. T2-weighted axial magnetic resonance images and transaxial 99mTc-HMPAO and 201Tl images acquired with an annular gamma camera were merged using an objective registration (translation, rotation and rescaling) program. In the normal subjects and patients with dementia and focal lesions, focal areas of high uptake corresponded to gray matter structures. Focal lesions observed on MRI corresponded to perfusion defects on SPECT. In the patients who had undergone surgical resection of glioblastoma followed by interstitial brachytherapy, increased 201Tl corresponding to recurrent tumor could be localized from the superimposed images. The method was evaluated by measuring the residuals in all subjects and translational errors due to superimposition of deep structures in the 12 subjects with normal thalamic anatomy and 99mTc-HMPAO uptake. This method for superimposing magnetic resonance and high-resolution SPECT images of the brain is a useful technique for correlating regional function with brain anatomy

  15. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  16. Minimally invasive surgery using the open magnetic resonance imaging system combined with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for synchronous hepatic and pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer: report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Koichiro; Shiomi, Hisanori; Naka, Shigeyuki; Hanaoka, Jun; Tani, Tohru

    2015-05-01

    Simultaneous resection of hepatic and pulmonary metastases (HPM) from colorectal cancer (CRC) has been reported to be effective, but it is also considered invasive. We report the preliminary results of performing minimally invasive surgery using the open magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system to resect synchronous HPM from CRC in four patients. All four patients were referred for thoracoscopy-assisted interventional MR-guided microwave coagulation therapy (T-IVMR-MCT) combined with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The median diameters of the HPM were 18.2 and 23.2 mm, respectively. The median duration of VATS and T-IVMR-MCT was 82.5 and 139 min, respectively. All patients were discharged without any major postoperative complications. One patient was still free of disease at 24 months and the others died of disease progression 13, 36, and 47 months without evidence of recurrence in the treated area. Thus, simultaneous VATS + T-IVMR-MCT appears to be an effective option as a minimally invasive treatment for synchronous HPM from CRC.

  17. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  18. Resonance hairpin and Langmuir probe-assisted laser photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density in a pulsed dc magnetron discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, James W.; Dodd, Robert; You, S.-D.; Sirse, Nishant; Karkari, Shantanu Kumar [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Republic of Ireland (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Republic of Ireland and Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2011-05-15

    The time-resolved negative oxygen ion density n{sub -} close to the center line in a reactive pulsed dc magnetron discharge (10 kHz and 50% duty cycle) has been determined for the first time using a combination of laser photodetachment and resonance hairpin probing. The discharge was operated at a power of 50 W in 70% argon and 30% oxygen gas mixtures at 1.3 Pa pressure. The results show that the O{sup -} density remains pretty constant during the driven phase of the discharge at values typically below 5x10{sup 14} m{sup -3}; however, in the off-time, the O{sup -} density grows reaching values several times those in the on-time. This leads to the negative ion fraction (or degree of electronegativity) {alpha}=n{sub -}/n{sub e} being higher in the off phase (maximum value {alpha}{approx}1) than in the on phase ({alpha}=0.05-0.3). The authors also see higher values of {alpha} at positions close to the magnetic null than in the more magnetized region of the plasma. This fractional increase in negative ion density during the off-phase is attributed to the enhanced dissociative electron attachment of highly excited oxygen molecules in the cooling plasma. The results show that close to the magnetic null the photodetached electron density decays quickly after the laser pulse, followed by a slow decay over a few microseconds governed by the negative ion temperature. However, in the magnetized regions of the plasma, this decay is more gradual. This is attributed to the different cross-field transport rates for electrons in these two regions. The resonance hairpin probe measurements of the photoelectron densities are compared directly to photoelectron currents obtained using a conventional Langmuir probe. There is good agreement in the general trends, particularly in the off-time.

  19. Producing light hydrocarbons by destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fohlen, J H

    1928-06-20

    A method of obtaining light hydrocarbons from fuels and natural or industrial carbonaceous materials by cracking under pressure from 5 to 200 atmospheres and within a temperature range of 200 to 1,000/sup 0/C, the cracking operation being assisted by the presence of catalysts such as metallic halides, simultaneously, with hydrogenation by means of nascent hydrogen in the reaction chamber.

  20. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  2. The Efficacy and Utilisation of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Does it Change the Surgical Dissection Plan? A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Tavukçu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated the effect of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the dissection plan of the neurovascular bundle and the oncological results of our patients who underwent robotic radical prostatectomy operation. Materials and Methods: We prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients, 15 of whom had prostate MRI before the operation, and 15 of whom did not. With the findings of MRI, the dissection plan was changed as intrafascial, interfascial, and extrafascial technique in the MRI group. Two groups were compared in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA, and Gleason scores (GSs. Surgical margin status was also checked with the final pathology. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, PSA, biopsy GS, and final pathological GS. MRI changed the initial surgical plan to a nerve-sparing technique in 7 of the 15 patients. Only one patient in the MRI group had a positive surgical margin on bladder neck. MRI was confirmed as the primary tumour localisation in the final pathology in 93.3% of patients. Conclusion: Preoperative prostate MRI influenced the decision to carry out a nerve-sparing technique in 46% of the patients in our study; however, the change to a nerve-sparing technique did not seem to compromise the surgical margin positivity.

  3. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  4. Circular states of atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwak, R.; Holley, J.; Chang, P.P.; Paine, S.; Kleppner, D.; Ducas, T.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the creation of circular states of hydrogen by adiabatic transfer of a Rydberg state in crossed electric and magnetic fields, and also by adiabatic passage in a rotating microwave field. The latter method permits rapid switching between the two circular states of a given n manifold. The two methods are demonstrated experimentally, and results are presented of an analysis of the field ionization properties of the circular states. An application for the circular states is illustrated by millimeter-wave resonance in hydrogen of the n=29→n=30 transition. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  6. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  7. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphahlele, Malose Jack; Maluleka, Marole Maria; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Mampa, Richard Mokome

    2017-01-04

    The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N -unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (¹H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman) and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT) method. The hindered rotation of the C(O)-NH₂ single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the ¹H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide ( ABB ) as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar-NH₂ single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set revealed that the conformer ( A ) with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  8. Spectroscopic, DFT, and XRD Studies of Hydrogen Bonds in N-Unsubstituted 2-Aminobenzamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the mono- and the dihalogenated N-unsubstituted 2-aminobenzamides were characterized by means of the spectroscopic (1H-NMR, UV-Vis, FT-IR, and FT-Raman and X-ray crystallographic techniques complemented with a density functional theory (DFT method. The hindered rotation of the C(O–NH2 single bond resulted in non-equivalence of the amide protons and therefore two distinct resonances of different chemical shift values in the 1H-NMR spectra of these compounds were observed. 2-Amino-5-bromobenzamide (ABB as a model confirmed the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds between oxygen and the amine hydrogen. However, intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the amine protons was not observed in the solution phase due to a rapid exchange of these two protons with the solvent and fast rotation of the Ar–NH2 single bond. XRD also revealed the ability of the amide unit of these compounds to function as a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor simultaneously to form strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen of one molecule and the NH moiety of the amine or amide group of the other molecule and between the amine nitrogen and the amide hydrogen of different molecules. DFT calculations using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p basis set revealed that the conformer (A with oxygen and 2-amine on the same side predominates possibly due to the formation of a six-membered intramolecular ring, which is assisted by hydrogen bonding as observed in the single crystal XRD structure.

  9. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (β-In 2 O 3 ) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal (α)-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although β-In 2 O 3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N 2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N 2 -annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N 2 -annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]≤0.5%). Although [O]∝1% could be estimated by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed in N 2 -annealed InN films, [O]≤0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed by H 2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O 2 , using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  11. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  12. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10 5 and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  13. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 105 and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA).

  14. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  15. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  16. Paramagnetic defects in hydrogenated amorphous carbon powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeble, D J; Robb, K M; Smith, G M; Mkami, H El; Rodil, S E; Robertson, J

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon materials typically contain high concentrations of paramagnetic defects, the density of which can be quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In this work EPR measurements near 9.5, 94, and 189 GHz have been performed on polymeric and diamond-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) powder samples. A similar single resonance line was observed at all frequencies for the two forms of a-C:H studied. No contributions to the spectrum from centres with resolved anisotropic g-values as reported earlier were detected. An increase in linewidth with microwave frequency was observed. Possible contributions to this frequency dependence are discussed

  17. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-09-01

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  18. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion

  19. Thermal properties of hydrogenated liquid natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Natural rubber (NR) was modified to form liquid natural rubber (LNR) via photooxidative degradation. Hydrogenated liquid natural rubber (HLNR) was synthesized by using diimide as source of hydrogen which the diimide is produced by thermolysis of p-toluenesulfonyl hydrazide (TSH). The structure of HLNR was characterized by determining the changes of main peaks in Fourier Transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra after hydrogenation. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the HLNR had higher decomposition temperature compared to LNR and the decomposition temperature is directly proportional to the percentage of conversion.

  20. Spin density projection-assisted R2 magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in the management of body iron stores in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions: an audit and retrospective study in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C; Patton, W N; Tapp, H E; Taylor, D J; St Pierre, T G

    2012-09-01

    To assess the impact of non-invasive monitoring of liver iron concentration (LIC) on management of body iron stores in patients receiving multiple blood transfusions. A retrospective audit was conducted on clinical data from 40 consecutive subjects with haemolytic anaemias or ineffective haematopoiesis who had been monitored non-invasively for LIC over a period of at least 1 year. LIC was measured with spin density projection-assisted proton transverse relaxation rate-magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen clinical decisions were explicitly documented in the case notes as being based on LIC results. Decisions comprised initiation of chelation therapy, increasing chelator dose, decreasing chelator dose and change of mode of delivery of deferioxamine from subcutaneous to intravenous. The geometrical mean LIC for the cohort dropped significantly (P= 0.008) from 6.8 mg Fe/g dry tissue at initial measurement to 4.8 mg Fe/g dry tissue at final measurement. The proportion of subjects with LIC in the range associated with greatly increased risk of cardiac disease and death (>15 mg Fe/g dry tissue) dropped significantly (P= 0.01) from 14 of 40 subjects at initial measurement to 5 of 40 subjects at final measurement. No significant changes in the geometrical mean of serum ferritin or the proportion of subjects with serum ferritin above 2500 or 1500 µg/L were observed. The data are consistent with previous observations that introduction of non-invasive monitoring of LIC can contribute to a decreased body iron burden through improved clinical decision making and improved feedback to patients and hence improved adherence to chelation therapy.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  2. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  3. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  4. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  5. In situ NMR studies of hydrogen storage kinetics and molecular diffusion in clathrate hydrate at elevated hydrogen pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuchi, T. [Okayama Univ., Misasa, Tottori (Japan); Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The challenge of storing high-density hydrogen into compact host media was investigated. The conventional storage scheme where an aqueous solution is frozen with hydrogen gas is too slow for practical use in a hydrogen-based society. Therefore, the authors developed a faster method whereby hydrogen was stored into gas hydrates. The hydrogen gas was directly charged into hydrogen-free, crystalline hydrate powders with partly empty lattices. The storage kinetics and hydrogen diffusion into the hydrate was observed in situ by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a pressurized tube cell. At pressures up to 20 MPa, the storage was complete within 80 minutes, as observed by growth of stored-hydrogen peak into the hydrate. Hydrogen diffusion within the crystalline hydrate media is the rate-determining step of current storage scheme. Therefore, the authors measured the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen molecules using the pulsed field gradient NMR method. The results show that the stored hydrogen is very mobile at temperatures down to 250 K. As such, the powdered hydrate media should work well even in cold environments. Compared with more prevailing hydrogen storage media such as metal hydrides, clathrate hydrates have the advantage of being free from hydrogen embrittlement, more chemically durable, more environmentally sound, and economically affordable. It was concluded that the powdered clathrate hydrate is suitable as a hydrogen storage media. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  7. Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  8. The hydrogen village in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.; Smith, R.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' A Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a public/private partnership with an objective to accelerate the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technology in Canada and firmly position Canada as the international leader in this sector. The first Hydrogen Village is planned for the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and will make use of existing hydrogen and fuel cell deployments to assist in its creation. This five year GTA Hydrogen Village program is planned to begin operations in 2004. The Hydrogen Village will demonstrate and deploy various hydrogen production and delivery techniques as well as fuel cells for stationary, transportation (mobile) and portable applications. This paper will provide an overview of the Hydrogen Village and identify the missions, objectives, members and progress within the H2V. (author)

  9. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ... Primarily, older persons or their families pay the cost of assisted living. Some health and long-term care insurance policies ...

  10. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  11. Ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as a novel matrix for rapid quantitative and qualitative determination of serum free fatty acids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yaping [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Wang, Yanmin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Heze Municipal Hospital, Shandong (China); Guo, Shuai; Guo, Yumei; Liu, Hui [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Li, Zhili, E-mail: lizhili@ibms.pumc.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics and Structural Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dongdan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China)

    2013-09-10

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel MALDI matrix for the detection of serum free fatty acids is ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride. •Multiple point internal standard calibration curves were constructed for nine FFAs, respectively, with excellent correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999. •The MALDI-MS approach was used to rapidly differentiate the patients with and without hyperglycemia and healthy controls. -- Abstract: The blood free fatty acids (FFAs), which provide energy to the cell and act as substrates in the synthesis of fats, lipoproteins, liposaccharides, and eicosanoids, involve in a number of important physiological processes. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR MS) with ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (ATNEDC) as a novel MALDI matrix in a negative ion mode was employed to directly quantify serum FFAs. Multiple point internal standard calibration curves between the concentration ratios of individual fatty acids to internal standard (IS, C{sub 17:0}) versus their corresponding intensity ratios were constructed for C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:1}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 18:0}, C{sub 18:1}, C{sub 18:2}, C{sub 18:3}, C{sub 20:4}, and C{sub 22:6}, respectively, in their mixture, with correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999 and limits of detection (LODs) between 0.2 and 5.4 μM, along with the linear dynamic range of more than two orders of magnitude. The results indicate that the multiple point internal standard calibration could reduce the impact of ion suppression and improve quantification accuracy in the MALDI mode. The quantitative results of nine FFAs from 339 serum samples, including 161 healthy controls, 118 patients with hyperglycemia and 60 patients without hyperglycemia show that FFAs levels in hyperglycemic patient sera are significantly higher than those in healthy

  12. Ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride as a novel matrix for rapid quantitative and qualitative determination of serum free fatty acids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Yanmin; Guo, Shuai; Guo, Yumei; Liu, Hui; Li, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel MALDI matrix for the detection of serum free fatty acids is ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride. •Multiple point internal standard calibration curves were constructed for nine FFAs, respectively, with excellent correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999. •The MALDI-MS approach was used to rapidly differentiate the patients with and without hyperglycemia and healthy controls. -- Abstract: The blood free fatty acids (FFAs), which provide energy to the cell and act as substrates in the synthesis of fats, lipoproteins, liposaccharides, and eicosanoids, involve in a number of important physiological processes. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR MS) with ammonia-treated N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine dihydrochloride (ATNEDC) as a novel MALDI matrix in a negative ion mode was employed to directly quantify serum FFAs. Multiple point internal standard calibration curves between the concentration ratios of individual fatty acids to internal standard (IS, C 17:0 ) versus their corresponding intensity ratios were constructed for C 14:0 , C 16:1 , C 16:0 , C 18:0 , C 18:1 , C 18:2 , C 18:3 , C 20:4 , and C 22:6 , respectively, in their mixture, with correlation coefficients between 0.991 and 0.999 and limits of detection (LODs) between 0.2 and 5.4 μM, along with the linear dynamic range of more than two orders of magnitude. The results indicate that the multiple point internal standard calibration could reduce the impact of ion suppression and improve quantification accuracy in the MALDI mode. The quantitative results of nine FFAs from 339 serum samples, including 161 healthy controls, 118 patients with hyperglycemia and 60 patients without hyperglycemia show that FFAs levels in hyperglycemic patient sera are significantly higher than those in healthy controls and patients without

  13. Human Plasma N-glycosylation as Analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance-MS Associates with Markers of Inflammation and Metabolic Health*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiding, Karli R.; Ruhaak, L. Renee; Uh, Hae-Won; el Bouhaddani, Said; van den Akker, Erik B.; Plomp, Rosina; McDonnell, Liam A.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Beekman, Marian; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation is an abundant co- and post-translational protein modification of importance to protein processing and activity. Although not template-defined, glycosylation does reflect the biological state of an organism and is a high-potential biomarker for disease and patient stratification. However, to interpret a complex but informative sample like the total plasma N-glycome, it is important to establish its baseline association with plasma protein levels and systemic processes. Thus far, large-scale studies (n >200) of the total plasma N-glycome have been performed with methods of chromatographic and electrophoretic separation, which, although being informative, are limited in resolving the structural complexity of plasma N-glycans. MS has the opportunity to contribute additional information on, among others, antennarity, sialylation, and the identity of high-mannose type species. Here, we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)-MS to study the total plasma N-glycome of 2144 healthy middle-aged individuals from the Leiden Longevity Study, to allow association analysis with markers of metabolic health and inflammation. To achieve this, N-glycans were enzymatically released from their protein backbones, labeled at the reducing end with 2-aminobenzoic acid, and following purification analyzed by negative ion mode intermediate pressure MALDI-FTICR-MS. In doing so, we achieved the relative quantification of 61 glycan compositions, ranging from Hex4HexNAc2 to Hex7HexNAc6dHex1Neu5Ac4, as well as that of 39 glycosylation traits derived thereof. Next to confirming known associations of glycosylation with age and sex by MALDI-FTICR-MS, we report novel associations with C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), body mass index (BMI), leptin, adiponectin, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), insulin, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and smoking. Overall, the

  14. Human Plasma N-glycosylation as Analyzed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance-MS Associates with Markers of Inflammation and Metabolic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiding, Karli R; Ruhaak, L Renee; Uh, Hae-Won; El Bouhaddani, Said; van den Akker, Erik B; Plomp, Rosina; McDonnell, Liam A; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline; Beekman, Marian; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    Glycosylation is an abundant co- and post-translational protein modification of importance to protein processing and activity. Although not template-defined, glycosylation does reflect the biological state of an organism and is a high-potential biomarker for disease and patient stratification. However, to interpret a complex but informative sample like the total plasma N-glycome, it is important to establish its baseline association with plasma protein levels and systemic processes. Thus far, large-scale studies (n >200) of the total plasma N-glycome have been performed with methods of chromatographic and electrophoretic separation, which, although being informative, are limited in resolving the structural complexity of plasma N-glycans. MS has the opportunity to contribute additional information on, among others, antennarity, sialylation, and the identity of high-mannose type species.Here, we have used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)-MS to study the total plasma N-glycome of 2144 healthy middle-aged individuals from the Leiden Longevity Study, to allow association analysis with markers of metabolic health and inflammation. To achieve this, N-glycans were enzymatically released from their protein backbones, labeled at the reducing end with 2-aminobenzoic acid, and following purification analyzed by negative ion mode intermediate pressure MALDI-FTICR-MS. In doing so, we achieved the relative quantification of 61 glycan compositions, ranging from Hex 4 HexNAc 2 to Hex 7 HexNAc 6 dHex 1 Neu5Ac 4 , as well as that of 39 glycosylation traits derived thereof. Next to confirming known associations of glycosylation with age and sex by MALDI-FTICR-MS, we report novel associations with C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), body mass index (BMI), leptin, adiponectin, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), insulin, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and smoking. Overall

  15. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  16. Evaluation of hydrogen trapping mechanisms during performance of different hydrogen fugacity in a lean duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, R., E-mail: barrav@post.bgu.ac.il [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Eliezer, D. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Glam, B.; Eliezer, S.; Moreno, D. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2015-11-05

    Hydrogen trapping behavior in a lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) is studied by means of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The susceptibility of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement is directly related to the trap characteristics: source or sink (reversible or irreversible, respectively). Since trapping affects the metal's diffusivity, it has a major influence on the hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) phenomenon. It is known from previously published works that the susceptibility will depend on the competition between reversible and irreversible traps; meaning a direct relation to the hydrogen's initial state in the steel. In this research the trapping mechanism of LDS, exposed to different hydrogen charging environments, is analyzed by means of TDS. The TDS analysis was supported and confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydrogen quantitative measurements and microstructural observations. It was found that gaseous charging (which produces lower hydrogen fugacity) creates ∼22% higher activation energy for hydrogen trapping compared with cathodic charging (which produces higher hydrogen fugacity). These results are due to the different effects on the hydrogen behavior in LDS which causes a major difference in the hydrogen contents and different hydrogen assisted phase transitions. The highest activation energy value in the cathodic charged sample was ascribed to the dominant phase transformation of γ → γ{sup ∗}, whereas in the gaseous charged sample it was ascribed to the dominant formation of intermetallic compound, sigma (σ). The relation between hydrogen distribution in LDS and hydrogen trapping mechanism is discussed in details. - Highlights: • The relation between hydrogen distribution and trapping in LDS is discussed. • Hydrogen's initial state in LDS causes different microstructural changes. • Gaseous charged LDS creates higher trapping energy compared to cathodic charged LDS. • The dominant phase transformation in

  17. Conversion rate of para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen: implications for PHIP gas storage and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    To determine the storability of para-hydrogen before reestablishment of the room temperature thermal equilibrium mixture. Para-hydrogen was produced at near 100% purity and mixed with different oxygen quantities to determine the rate of conversion to the thermal equilibrium mixture of 75: 25% (ortho: para) by detecting the ortho-hydrogen (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance using a 9.4 T imager. The para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen velocity constant, k, near room temperature (292 K) was determined to be 8.27 ± 1.30 L/mol · min(-1). This value was calculated utilizing four different oxygen fractions. Para-hydrogen conversion to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen can be minimized for long term storage with judicious removal of oxygen contamination. Prior calculated velocity rates were confirmed demonstrating a dependence on only the oxygen concentration.

  18. Containment air circulation for optimal hydrogen recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.; Krause, M.

    1997-01-01

    An accepted first-line defense for hydrogen mitigation is to design for the hydrogen to be rapidly mixed with the containment atmosphere and diluted to below flammability concentrations. Then, as hydrogen continues to be produced in the longer term, recombiners can be used to remove hydrogen: recombiners can be located in forced-air ducts or passive recombiners can be distributed within containment and the heat of recombination used to promote local air circulation. However, this principle does not eliminate the possibility of high hydrogen concentrations at locations removed from the recombiners. An improvement on this strategy is to arrange for a specific, buoyancy-driven, overall circulation of the containment atmosphere such that the recombiners can be located within the recirculation flow, immediately downstream of the hydrogen source. This would make the mixing process more predictable and solve the mass-transfer problem associated with distributed recombiners. Ideally, the recombiners would be located just above the hydrogen source so that the heat of recombination would assist the overall circulation. In this way, the hydrogen would be removed as close as possible to the source, thereby minimizing the amount of hydrogen immediately downstream of the source and reducing the hydrogen concentration to acceptable levels at other locations. Such a strategy requires the containment volume to be divided into an upflow path, past the hydrogen source and the recombiner, and a downflow path to complete the circuit. The flow could be generated actively using fans or passively using buoyancy forces arising from the difference in density of gases in the upfiow and downflow paths; the gases in the downflow path being cooled at an elevated heat sink. (author)

  19. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  20. Novel Hydrogen Compounds from a Potassium Carbonate Electrolytic Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Randell L.

    2000-01-01

    Novel compounds containing hydrogen in new hydride and polymeric states that demonstrate novel hydrogen chemistry have been isolated following the electrolysis of a K 2 CO 3 electrolyte with the production of excess energy. Inorganic hydride clusters K[KH KHCO 3 ] n + and hydrogen polymer ions such as OH 23 + and H 16 - were identified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The presence of compounds containing new states of hydrogen was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  1. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  2. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  3. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  4. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  5. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  6. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  8. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  9. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  10. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  11. New concepts in hydrogen production in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnason, B.; Sigfusson, T.I.; Jonsson, V.K.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents some new concepts of hydrogen production in Iceland for domestic use and export. A brief overview of the Icelandic energy consumption and available resources is given. The cost of producing hydrogen by electrolysis is calculated for various alternatives such as plant size, load factors and electricity cost. Comparison is made between the total cost of liquid hydrogen delivered to Europe from Iceland and from Northern America, showing that liquid hydrogen delivered to Europe from Iceland would be 9% less expensive. This assumes conventional technology. New technologies are suggested in the paper and different scenarios for geothermally assisted hydrogen production and liquefaction are discussed. It is estimated that the use of geothermal steam would lead to 19% lower hydrogen gas production costs. By analysing the Icelandic fishing fleet, a very large consumer of imported fuel, it is argued that a transition of fuel technology from oil to hydrogen may be a feasible future option for Iceland and a testing ground for changing fuel technology. (Author)

  12. Hydrogen in portable devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garche, J. [ZSW - Electrochemical Energy storage and energy Conversion Division, Baden Wuerttemberg (Germany); Stimmer, U. [Technische Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Friedrich, A.K. [ZAE Bayern (Germany); Fiedenhans' l, R. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Res. Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-10-01

    Fuel cells were originally intended for use in power plants and vehicles. More recently, developers realised the possibility for building much smaller units and for lower prices per kilowatt than their larger relatives. This has led to a strong interest in developing small fuel cells. Small fuel cells could replace batteries in portable electronic equipment and internal combustion engines in portable generators. The upper limit for portable generators is about 5kW, mainly because of the weight of the fuel cell. The main applications for low-power fuel cells are mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptop and notebook computers, cameras, medical equipment, military applications and other portable electronic devices. In comparison to batteries, fuel cells can supply much more power per unit volume or weight, though they have lower output voltages and are slower to respond to transients. Fuel cell types that are suitable for portable applications include: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) using pure hydrogen, PEMFCs using hydrogen-rich gases from hydrocarbon or alcohol reforming, direct methanol fuel cells and, high-temperature fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) using hydrocarbons directly. Fuel cells for portable devices is becoming a niche, high-value market area which has good opportunities for a fast introduction of fuel cell technology and for the first consumer products in the electronic market can be expected within the coming year and is believed to grow rapidly thereafter. Danish industry is involved in the development of SOFC, PEMFC and DMFC fuel cells and the industry has in particular a strong position in system components and complete systems. An important area for Danish industry is system integration, where fuel cells and hydrogen technologies are implemented in electrical powered products. This is an area that is particular suited for small and medium sized enterprises and for

  13. Hydrogen in portable devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garche, J.; Stimmer, U.; Friedrich, A.K.; Fiedenhans'l, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells were originally intended for use in power plants and vehicles. More recently, developers realised the possibility for building much smaller units and for lower prices per kilowatt than their larger relatives. This has led to a strong interest in developing small fuel cells. Small fuel cells could replace batteries in portable electronic equipment and internal combustion engines in portable generators. The upper limit for portable generators is about 5kW, mainly because of the weight of the fuel cell. The main applications for low-power fuel cells are mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptop and notebook computers, cameras, medical equipment, military applications and other portable electronic devices. In comparison to batteries, fuel cells can supply much more power per unit volume or weight, though they have lower output voltages and are slower to respond to transients. Fuel cell types that are suitable for portable applications include: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) using pure hydrogen, PEMFCs using hydrogen-rich gases from hydrocarbon or alcohol reforming, direct methanol fuel cells and, high-temperature fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) using hydrocarbons directly. Fuel cells for portable devices is becoming a niche, high-value market area which has good opportunities for a fast introduction of fuel cell technology and for the first consumer products in the electronic market can be expected within the coming year and is believed to grow rapidly thereafter. Danish industry is involved in the development of SOFC, PEMFC and DMFC fuel cells and the industry has in particular a strong position in system components and complete systems. An important area for Danish industry is system integration, where fuel cells and hydrogen technologies are implemented in electrical powered products. This is an area that is particular suited for small and medium sized enterprises and for

  14. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  15. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. These resonances occur when the betatron oscillation wave numbers ν/sub x/ or ν/sub y/ and the synchrotron wave number ν/sub s/ satisfy the relation (ν/sub x,y/ - mν/sub s/) = 5, with m an integer denoting the m/sup th/ satellite. The main difference between SPEAR II and SPEAR I is the value of ν/sub s/, which in SPEAR II is approximately 0.04, an order of magnitude larger than in SPEAR I. An ad hoc meeting was held at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, where details of the SPEAR II results were presented and various possible mechanisms for producing these resonances were discussed. Later, experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  16. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  17. International assistance. Licensing assistance project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.

    1999-01-01

    Description of licensing assistance project for VATESI is presented. In licensing of unit No.1 of INPP VATESI is supported by many western countries. Experts from regulatory bodies or scientific organizations of those countries assist VATESI staff in reviewing documentation presented by INPP. Among bilateral cooperation support is provided by European Commission through Phare programme

  18. Hydrogen production by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Lee, M. J.; Jin, J. H.; Park, K. B.; Cho, Y. H.; Jeong, H. S.; Chung, H. H.; Jeong, Y. S.; Ahn, S. S.

    2001-04-01

    In this work, various kinds of catalysts including a nanosize TiO2 (nTiO 2 ) were examined in respect to the efficiency of H2 production by gamma rays.The different activity of catalysts was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). A combination of EPR and spin-trapping method was also used to detect unstable radicals such as hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms to investigate the effect of catalysts and additives on the efficiency of H2 production. A nanosize TiO 2 (nTiO 2 ) catalyst that showed an excellent activity in the production of H2 from water by gamma rays were examined in respect to the efficiency of H2 production with concomitant treatment of metal-EDTA complexes that are main wastes of chemical cleaning wastewater. As a result, among the catalysts examined in this work, a nanosize TiO2 (nTiO 2 ) showed the most efficient H2 production and the efficiency increased upon reapplication. This catalyst was also successfully used to produce H2 with concomitant treatment of metal-EDTA complexes

  19. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  20. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  1. Spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies on some intramolecularly hydrogen bonded arylhydrazones: Crystal and molecular structure of 2-(2-(3-nitrophenyl)hydrazono)-5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukumar, A.; Arul Prakasam, B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of arylhydrazone derivatives ( 1- 7) were prepared by the coupling of acetylacetone/dimedone with respective aromatic diazonium salts and characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The IR and NMR spectral data clearly manifests the effective intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all the cases. Cyclic voltammetric studies certainly indicate that in all the cases the reduced center is C dbnd N bond of hydrazonic moiety. The single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 2-(2-(3-nitrophenyl)hydrazono)-5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione ( 6) is also reported. Single crystal X-ray analysis of 6 evidences the intramolecular hydrogen bonding with the N(2)⋯O(4) distance of 2.642(15) Å, which can be designated as S(6) according to Etter's graph nomenclature. The cyclohexane ring conformation in the molecule ( 6) can be described as an envelope. RAHB studies suggest that the resonance assistance for hydrogen bonding is significantly reduced for the compound ( 6) due to the non-planarity of the six atoms which are involved in resonant cycle S(6) of Etter's graph. The planarity of the resonant cycle S(6) is very much disturbed by the conformational requirement of the cyclohexane ring and hence RAHB concept is less operative in this case.

  2. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  3. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma; Peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo hidrogenado (a-C:H) obtenidas mediante deposito quimico de vapores asistido por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [IIM-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10{sup -4} to 6x10{sup -4} Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  4. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  5. Hydrogen retention in ion irradiated steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Lewis, M.B.; Lee, E.H.

    1998-01-01

    In the future 1--5 MW Spallation Neutron Source, target radiation damage will be accompanied by high levels of hydrogen and helium transmutation products. The authors have recently carried out investigations using simultaneous Fe/He,H multiple-ion implantations into 316 LN stainless steel between 50 and 350 C to simulate the type of radiation damage expected in spallation neutron sources. Hydrogen and helium were injected at appropriate energy and rate, while displacement damage was introduced by nuclear stopping of 3.5 MeV Fe + , 1 microm below the surface. Nanoindentation measurements showed a cumulative increase in hardness as a result of hydrogen and helium injection over and above the hardness increase due to the displacement damage alone. TEM investigation indicated the presence of small bubbles of the injected gases in the irradiated area. In the current experiment, the retention of hydrogen in irradiated steel was studied in order to better understand its contribution to the observed hardening. To achieve this, the deuterium isotope ( 2 H) was injected in place of natural hydrogen ( 1 H) during the implantation. Trapped deuterium was then profiled, at room temperature, using the high cross-section nuclear resonance reaction with 3 He. Results showed a surprisingly high concentration of deuterium to be retained in the irradiated steel at low temperature, especially in the presence of helium. There is indication that hydrogen retention at spallation neutron source relevant target temperatures may reach as high as 10%

  6. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  7. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is mobile and can easily move through the material). Hydrogen diffuses ... The determination of the relationship of light-enhanced hydrogen motion to ... term is negligible, and using the thermodynamic relation given below f(c) = kBT .... device-applications problematic but the normal state can be recovered by a thermal an-.

  8. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...

  9. Gravitoelectromagnetic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between gravitational and electromagnetic radiation has a rather long research history. It is well known, in particular, that gravity-wave distortions can drive propagating electromagnetic signals. Since forced oscillations provide the natural stage for resonances to occur, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances have been investigated as a means of more efficient gravity-wave detection methods. In this report, we consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields on a Minkowski background, which also applies to astrophysical environments where gravity is weak, at the second perturbative level. We use covariant methods that describe gravitational waves via the transverse component of the shear, instead of pure-tensor metric perturbations. The aim is to calculate the properties of the electromagnetic signal, which emerges from the interaction of its linear counterpart with an incoming gravitational wave. Our analysis shows how the wavelength and the amplitude of the gravitationally driven electromagnetic wave vary with the initial conditions. More specifically, for certain initial data, the amplitude of the induced electromagnetic signal is found to diverge. Analogous, diverging, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances were also reported in cosmology. Given that, we extend our Minkowski space study to cosmology and discuss analogies and differences in the physics and in the phenomenology of the Weyl-Maxwell coupling between the aforementioned two physical environments.

  10. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  11. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  12. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  13. Light-water-reactor hydrogen manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Cummings, J.C.; Sherman, M.P.; Kupiec, C.F.; Healy, R.J.; Caplan, J.S.; Sandhop, J.R.; Saunders, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    A manual concerning the behavior of hydrogen in light water reactors has been prepared. Both normal operations and accident situations are addressed. Topics considered include hydrogen generation, transport and mixing, detection, and combustion, and mitigation. Basic physical and chemical phenomena are described, and plant-specific examples are provided where appropriate. A wide variety of readers, including operators, designers, and NRC staff, will find parts of this manual useful. Different sections are written at different levels, according to the most likely audience. The manual is not intended to provide specific plant procedures, but rather, to provide general guidance that may assist in the development of such procedures

  14. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  15. Influence of post-hydrogenation upon electrical, optical and structural properties of hydrogen-less sputter-deposited amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, S., E-mail: sebastian.gerke@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Becker, H.-W.; Rogalla, D. [RUBION — Central Unit for Ion Beams and Radioisotopes, University of Bochum, Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Singer, F.; Brinkmann, N.; Fritz, S.; Hammud, A.; Keller, P.; Skorka, D.; Sommer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Weiß, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Flege, S. [Department of Materials Science, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 (Germany); Hahn, G. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Job, R. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Münster University of Applied Sciences, Steinfurt 48565 (Germany); Terheiden, B. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is common in the production of technical devices and can be deposited by several techniques. In this study intrinsic and doped, hydrogen-less amorphous silicon films are RF magnetron sputter deposited and post-hydrogenated in a remote hydrogen plasma reactor at a temperature of 370 °C. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of a boron doped (p) a-Si layer shows that the concentration of dopants in the sputtered layer becomes the same as present in the sputter-target. Improved surface passivation of phosphorous doped 5 Ω cm, FZ, (n) c-Si can be achieved by post-hydrogenation yielding a minority carrier lifetime of ~ 360 μs finding an optimum for ~ 40 nm thin films, deposited at 325 °C. This relatively low minority carrier lifetime indicates high disorder of the hydrogen-less sputter deposited amorphous network. Post-hydrogenation leads to a decrease of the number of localized states within the band gap. Optical band gaps (Taucs gab as well as E{sub 04}) can be determined to ~ 1.88 eV after post-hydrogenation. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and optical Raman investigations show that the sputtered layers are amorphous and stay like this during post-hydrogenation. As a consequence of the missing hydrogen during deposition, sputtered a-Si forms a rough surface compared to CVD a-Si. Atomic force microscopy points out that the roughness decreases by up to 25% during post-hydrogenation. Nuclear resonant reaction analysis permits the investigation of hydrogen depth profiles and allows determining the diffusion coefficients of several post-hydrogenated samples from of a model developed within this work. A dependency of diffusion coefficients on the duration of post-hydrogenation indicates trapping diffusion as the main diffusion mechanism. Additional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements show that hardly any interstitial hydrogen exists in the post-hydrogenated a-Si layers. The results of this study open the way for

  16. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstaple, A.G.; Petrella, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  17. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  18. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  19. Conduction Mechanism in a Molecular Hydrogen Contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2005-01-01

    We present first principles calculations for the conductance of a hydrogen molecule bridging a pair of Pt electrodes. The transmission function has a wide plateau with Tapproximate to1 which extends across the Fermi level and indicates the existence of a single, robust conductance channel with ne...... allow us to derive a resonant-level model for the system with all parameters determined from the fully self-consistent Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian....

  20. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  1. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    H molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise

  2. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  3. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  4. Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Warren

    2012-02-03

    Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

  5. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  6. Electro-catalytic conversion of ethanol in solid electrolyte cells for distributed hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, HyungKuk; Giddey, Sarbjit; Badwal, Sukhvinder P.S.; Mulder, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ethanol assisted water electrolysis reduces electric energy input by more than 50%. • Partial oxidation of ethanol leads to formation of undesired chemicals. • Degradation occurs due to formation of by-products and poisoning of catalyst. • Better catalyst has the potential to increase ethanol to H_2 conversion efficiency. • A plausible ethanol electro-oxidation mechanism has been proposed - Abstract: The global interest in hydrogen/fuel cell systems for distributed power generation and transport applications is rapidly increasing. Many automotive companies are now bringing their pre-commercial fuel cell vehicles in the market, which will need extensive hydrogen generation, distribution and storage infrastructure for fueling of these vehicles. Electrolytic water splitting coupled to renewable sources offers clean on-site hydrogen generation option. However, the process is energy intensive requiring electric energy >4.2 kWh for the electrolysis stack and >6 kWh for the complete system per m"3 of hydrogen produced. This paper investigates using ethanol as a renewable fuel to assist with water electrolysis process to substantially reduce the energy input. A zero-gap cell consisting of polymer electrolyte membrane electrolytic cells with Pt/C and PtSn/C as anode catalysts were employed. Current densities up to 200 mA cm"−"2 at 70 °C were achieved at less than 0.75 V corresponding to an energy consumption of about 1.62 kWh m"−"3 compared with >4.2 kWh m"−"3 required for conventional water electrolysis. Thus, this approach for hydrogen generation has the potential to substantially reduce the electric energy input to less than 40% with the remaining energy provided by ethanol. However, due to performance degradation over time, the energy consumption increased and partial oxidation of ethanol led to lower conversion efficiency. A plausible ethanol electro-oxidation mechanism has been proposed based on the Faradaic conversion of ethanol and

  7. Hybrid Theory of Electron-Hydrogenic Systems Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate electron-hydrogen and electron-hydrogenic cross sections are required to interpret fusion experiments, laboratory plasma physics and properties of the solar and astrophysical plasmas. We have developed a method in which the short-range and long-range correlations can be included at the same time in the scattering equations. The phase shifts have rigorous lower bounds and the scattering lengths have rigorous upper bounds. The phase shifts in the resonance region can be used to calculate very accurately the resonance parameters.

  8. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  9. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  10. Solutions to commercializing metal hydride hydrogen storage products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, J.J.; Belanger, R.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Whilst the concept of a Hydrogen economy in the broad sense may for some analysts and Fuel Cell technology developers be an ever moving target the use of hydrogen exists and is growing in other markets today. The use of hydrogen is increasing. Who are the users? What are their unique needs? How can they better be served? As the use of hydrogen increases there are things we can do to improve the perception and handling of hydrogen as an industrial gas that will impact the future issues of hydrogen as a fuel thereby assisting the mainstream availability of hydrogen fuel a reality. Factors that will induce change in the way hydrogen is used, handled, transported and stored are the factors to concentrate development efforts on. Other factors include: cost; availability; safety; codes and standards; and regulatory authorities acceptance of new codes and standards. New methods of storage and new devices in which the hydrogen is stored will influence and bring about change and increased use. New innovative products based on Metal Hydride hydrogen storage will address some of the barriers to widely distributed hydrogen as a fuel or energy carrier to which successful fuel cell product commercialization is subject. Palcan has developed innovative products based on it's Rare Earth Metal Hydride alloy. Some of these innovations will aid the distribution of hydrogen as a fuel and offer alternatives to the existing hydrogen user and to the Fuel Cell product developer. An overview of the products and how these products will affect the distribution and use of hydrogen as an industrial gas and fuel is presented. (author)

  11. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  12. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  14. Hydrogen and its challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schal, M.

    2008-01-01

    The future of hydrogen as a universal fuel is in jeopardy unless we are able to produce it through an environment-friendly way and at a competitive cost. Today almost all the hydrogen used in the world is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. This process releases 8 tonnes of CO 2 per tonne of hydrogen produced. Other means of producing hydrogen are the hydrolysis, the very high temperature hydrolysis, and the direct chemical dissociation of water, these processes are greener than steam reforming but less efficient. About one hundred buses in the world operate on fuel cells fed by hydrogen, but it appears that the first industrial use of hydrogen at great scale will be for the local generation of electricity. Globally the annual budget for research concerning hydrogen is 4.4 milliard (10 9 ) euros worldwide. (A.C.)

  15. Microfluidic-assisted fabrication of flexible and location traceable organo-motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyoung Duck; Kwak, Byung Kook; Sanchez, Samuel; Kim, Dong Sung

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we fabricate a flexible and location traceable micromotor, called organo-motor, assisted by microfluidic devices and with high throughput. The organo-motors are composed of organic hydrogel material, poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), which can provide the flexibility of their structure. For spatial and temporal traceability of the organo-motors under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION; Fe3O4) were incorporated into the PEGDA microhydrogels. Furthermore, a thin layer of platinum (Pt) was deposited onto one side of the SPION-PEGDA microhydrogels providing geometrical asymmetry and catalytic propulsion in aqueous fluids containing hydrogen peroxide solution, H2O2. Furthermore, the motion of the organo-motor was controlled by a small external magnet enabled by the presence of SPION in the motor architecture.

  16. Micro hydrogen for portable power : generating opportunities for hydrogen and fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A new fuel cell technology for portable applications was reviewed. Success for the fuel cell industry will be achieved primarily by supplanting lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells for portable applications have clear advantages to batteries in addition to their known environmental benefits. Micro hydrogen {sup TM} is the integrated combination of hydrogen fuel cell, hydrogen storage and delivery, fluidic interconnects and power conditioning electronics required for creating high energy density portable power sources. The small size, low heat production, environmental sustainability and refueling flexibility of the systems provides enormous economic opportunities for the use of micro hydrogen in cell phone technology, personal digital assistants and other electronic gadgets. Details of a trial to test and evaluate micro hydrogen fuel cell powered bike lights were presented. Further programs are planned for external demonstrations of high-beam search and rescue lighting, flashlights for security personnel and portable hydrogen power sources that will be used by multiple organizations throughout British Columbia. It was concluded that fuel cell technology must match the lithium-ion battery's performance by providing fast recharge, high energy density, and adaptability. Issues concerning refueling and portable and disposable cartridges for micro hydrogen systems were also discussed. 8 figs.

  17. Explosive hydrogen brning of 35Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilidas, C.; Goerres, J.; Ross, J.G.; Scheller, K.W.; Wiescher, M.; Azuma, R.E.; Roters, G.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Evans, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    Proton threshold states in 36 Ar have been studied via the reactions 35 Cl( 3 He,d) 36 Ar, 32 S( 6 Li,d) 36 Ar, 32 S(α,γ) 36 Ar, 35 Cl(p,γ) 36 Ar and 35 Cl(p,α) 32 S to investigate their influence on a possible SCl reaction cycle in explosive hydrogen burning. Three new states in 36 Ar have been observed in the ( 3 He,d) reaction at E x =8806, 8887 and 8923 keV. Deuteron angular distributions were measured for 14 states near the 35 Cl+p threshold and were analyzed with DWBA calculations. Values of transferred orbital angular momenta, spectroscopic factors and proton partial widths were determined. Gamma-ray spectra have been measured at ten (p,γ) resonances. Three new resonances were observed at E R =311, 416 and 627 keV, corresponding to 36 Ar states at E x =8806, 8909 and 9117 keV, respectively. Excitation and resonance energies, γ-ray branching ratios and resonance strengths are presented. The astrophysical implications of our results for explosive hydrogen burning of 35 Cl are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Ionic Liquid-Assisted Synthesis of Nanoscale (MoS2)x(SnO2)1-x on Reduced Graphene Oxide for the Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravula, Sudhir; Zhang, Chi; Essner, Jeremy B; Robertson, J David; Lin, Jian; Baker, Gary A

    2017-03-08

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted increased attention due to their enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance. More specifically, ternary TMD nanohybrids, such as MoS 2(1-x) Se 2x or bimetallic sulfides, have arisen as promising electrocatalysts compared to MoS 2 and MoSe 2 due to their electronic, morphologic, and size tunabilities. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of few-layered MoS 2 /rGO, SnS 2 /rGO, and (MoS 2 ) x (SnO 2 ) 1-x /rGO nanohybrids anchored on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through a facile hydrothermal reaction in the presence of ionic liquids as stabilizing, delayering agents. Spectroscopic and microscopic techniques (electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, and UV-vis spectrophotometry) are used to validate the hierarchical properties, phase identity, and the smooth compositional tunability of the (MoS 2 ) x (SnO 2 ) 1-x /rGO nanohybrids. Linear sweep voltammetry measurements reveal that incorporation of Sn into the ternary nanohybrids (as a discrete SnO 2 phase) greatly reduces the overpotential by 90-130 mV relative to the MoS 2 electrocatalyst. Significantly, the (MoS 2 ) 0.6 (SnO 2 ) 0.4 /rGO nanohybrid displays superior catalytic performance over MoS 2 alone, exhibiting a low overpotential (η 10 ) of 263 ± 5 mV and a small Tafel slope of 50.8 mV dec -1 . The hybrid catalyst shows high stability for the HER in acidic solutions, with negligible activity loss after 1000 cycles. The hierarchical structures and large surface areas possessing exposed, active edge sites make few-layered (MoS 2 ) x (SnO 2 ) 1-x /rGO nanohybrids promising nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for the HER.

  19. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as it does on the quality of care. The Administration on Aging, a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), offers these suggestions to help you ...

  20. Assistive Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have a disability or injury, you may use a number of assistive devices. These are tools, products or types of equipment that help you perform tasks and activities. They may help you move around, see, communicate, eat, or get ...

  1. Time of flight spectroscopy with muonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, G.M.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Time of flight techniques coupled with muonic deuterium and tritium atoms in vacuum can be used to measure parameters important in the understanding of muon catalyzed fusion interactions. Muonic deuterium atomic beams with energy of order 1 eV have been produced via transfer and emission from solid hydrogen containing small deuterium concentrations. Measurements of energy loss in pure deuterium are presented which test calculations of σ μd+D . Muonic tritium beams should be produced in a similar way, with an energy distribution which overlaps the predicted muonic molecular (dμt) formation resonances. The existence of resonances is crucial for high cycling rates in muon catalyzed fusion, but direct experimental verification of strengths and energies is not yet possible by other means. Results of simulations demonstrate how the resonance structure might be confirmed

  2. The certification of hydrogen in titanium. CRM No. 318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandendriessche, S.; Marchandise, H.; Vandecasteele, C.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the work done to certify the hydrogen content in a batch of 28 kg of commercial unalloyed titanium. The homogeneity of the three original sheets of metals was demonstrated. Samples were analysed by 10 laboratories using hydrogen extraction and thermal conductivity measurement and by 2 laboratories using a nuclear resonance reaction technique, but the accuracy of the latter was insufficient for a certification. On the basis of the measurements in 8 laboratories using extraction techniques, the hydrogen mass fraction in the titanium (CRM 318) is certified to be (12.2 +/- 0.8) ug/g

  3. Formation of vacancy clusters in tungsten crystals under hydrogen-rich condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Daiji; Iwakiri, Hirotomo; Morishita, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Di-vacancy formation assisted by hydrogen trapping is studied in terms of nucleation free-energies evaluated with density functional theory. Calculations give binding energies for single hydrogen atom as first- and second-nearest-neighbor of di-vacancies of 1.80 and 2.15 eV, respectively, which are significantly larger than that for mono-vacancies. At elevated atomic concentrations of interstitial hydrogen atoms, evaluated nucleation free-energies indicate that the hydrogen assisted di-vacancy formation becomes more favorable. It is suggested that the formation would be preceded by VH cluster formation.

  4. Formation of vacancy clusters in tungsten crystals under hydrogen-rich condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Daiji, E-mail: kato.daiji@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo, E-mail: iwakiri@edu.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Morishita, Kazunori, E-mail: morishita@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Di-vacancy formation assisted by hydrogen trapping is studied in terms of nucleation free-energies evaluated with density functional theory. Calculations give binding energies for single hydrogen atom as first- and second-nearest-neighbor of di-vacancies of 1.80 and 2.15 eV, respectively, which are significantly larger than that for mono-vacancies. At elevated atomic concentrations of interstitial hydrogen atoms, evaluated nucleation free-energies indicate that the hydrogen assisted di-vacancy formation becomes more favorable. It is suggested that the formation would be preceded by VH cluster formation.

  5. Hydrogen - From hydrogen to energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    More than a century ago, Jules Verne wrote in 'The Mysterious Island' that water would one day be employed as fuel: 'Hydrogen and oxygen, which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light'. Today, the 'water motor' is not entirely the dream of a writer. Fiction is about to become fact thanks to hydrogen, which can be produced from water and when burned in air itself produces water. Hydrogen is now at the heart of international research. So why do we have such great expectations of hydrogen? 'Hydrogen as an energy system is now a major challenge, both scientifically and from an environmental and economic point of view'. Dominated as it is by fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal), our current energy system has left a dual threat hovering over our environment, exposing the planet to the exhaustion of its natural reserves and contributing to the greenhouse effect. If we want sustainable development for future generations, it is becoming necessary to diversify our methods of producing energy. Hydrogen is not, of course, a source of energy, because first it has to be produced. But it has the twofold advantage of being both inexhaustible and non-polluting. So in the future, it should have a very important role to play. (author)

  6. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Williams, G.V.M.; Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H.; Markwitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper reports for the first time redistribution of hydrogen atoms in diamond like carbon thin films during ion implantation of low energy magnetic ions. • The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. • Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications. - Abstract: Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C_3H_6 deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  7. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Becker, H.-W. [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Williams, G.V.M. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • This paper reports for the first time redistribution of hydrogen atoms in diamond like carbon thin films during ion implantation of low energy magnetic ions. • The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. • Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications. - Abstract: Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  8. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  9. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  10. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, I.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Hay, D.R.; Wong, J.; Grant, J.; Benard, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  11. High density hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The interest in the properties of very dense hydrogen is prompted by its abundance in Saturn and Jupiter and its importance in laser fusion studies. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the metallic form of hydrogen may be a superconductor at relatively high temperatures and/or exist in a metastable phase at ambient pressure. For ten years or more, laboratories have been developing the techniques to study hydrogen in the megabar region (1 megabar = 100 GPa). Three major approaches to study dense hydrogen experimentally have been used, static presses, shockwave compression, and magnetic compression. Static tchniques have crossed the megabar threshold in stiff materials but have not yet been convincingly successful in very compressible hydrogen. Single and double shockwave techniques have improved the precision of the pressure, volume, temperature Equation of State (EOS) of molecular hydrogen (deuterium) up to near 1 Mbar. Multiple shockwave and magnetic techniques have compressed hydrogen to several megabars and densities in the range of the metallic phase. The net result is that hydrogen becomes conducting at a pressure between 2 and 4 megabars. Hence, the possibility of making a significant amount of hydrogen into a metal in a static press remains a formidable challenge. The success of such experiments will hopefully answer the questions about hydrogen's metallic vs. conducting molecular phase, superconductivity, and metastability. 4 figures, 15 references

  12. The energy carrier hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen to be used as a clean fuel for the production of heat and power, as well as for the propulsion of aeroplanes and vehicles, is described, in particular for Germany. First, attention is paid to the application of hydrogen as a basic material for the (petro)chemical industry, as an indirect energy source for (petro)chemical processes, and as a direct energy source for several purposes. Than the importance of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a large-scale application of renewable energy sources is discussed. Next an overview is given of new and old hydrogen production techniques from fossil fuels, biomass, or the electrolysis of water. Energetic applications of hydrogen in the transportation sector and the production of electric power and heat are mentioned. Brief descriptions are given of techniques to store hydrogen safely. Finally attention is paid to hydrogen research in Germany. Two hydrogen projects, in which Germany participates, are briefly dealt with: the Euro-Quebec project (production of hydrogen by means of hydropower), and the HYSOLAR project (hydrogen production by means of solar energy). 18 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  13. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okken, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO 2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H 2 -application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO 2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  14. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  15. Hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with a metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Taylor, Jared M.; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen is an essential component in many industrial processes. As a result of the recent increase in the development of shale gas, steam reforming of shale gas has received considerable attention as a major source of H2, and the more efficient use of hydrogen is strongly demanded. Palladium is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal and an effective catalyst for reactions related to hydrogen in a variety of industrial processes. Here, we present remarkably enhanced capacity and speed of hydrogen storage in Pd nanocrystals covered with the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 (copper(II) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The Pd nanocrystals covered with the MOF have twice the storage capacity of the bare Pd nanocrystals. The significantly enhanced hydrogen storage capacity was confirmed by hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The speed of hydrogen absorption in the Pd nanocrystals is also enhanced by the MOF coating.

  16. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  17. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  18. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  19. Hydrogen gains further momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2017-01-01

    As first industrial production projects should become a reality in the next few years, hydrogen as a source of energy will find important applications with mobility, which momentum is rapid and irresistible. Next steps will be the (large capacity) storage of hydrogen associated to power-to-gas systems and the generalization of renewable energies. This document presents 5 articles, which themes are: Description and explanation of the process of hydrogen production; Presentation of the H2V project for the construction, in Normandy, of the first operational industrial hydrogen production plant using electric power 100 pc generated by renewable energies; The conversion of electric power from renewable energies through hydrogen storage and fuel cells for buildings applications (Sylfen project); The development of a reversible fuel cell at Mines-Paris Tech University, that will be adapted to the storage of renewable electric power; Hydrogen as a lever for the development of zero-emission vehicles, from trucks to cars and bicycles

  20. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    . A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling......This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up...

  1. Foreign assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that providing energy assistance to developing countries remains a relatively low priority of the Agency for International Development. AID is helping some developing countries meet their energy needs, but this assistance varies substantially because of the agency's decentralized structure. Most AID energy funding has gone to a handful of countries-primarily Egypt and Pakistan. With limited funding in most other countries, AID concentrates on providing technical expertise and promoting energy policy reforms that will encourage both energy efficiency and leverage investment by the private sector and other donors. Although a 1989 congressional directive to pursue a global warming initiative has had a marginal impact on the agency's energy programming, many AID energy programs, including those directed at energy conservation, help address global warming concerns

  2. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation The NREL technology validation team works on validating hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles; hydrogen fueling infrastructure; hydrogen system components; and fuel cell use in early market applications such as

  3. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  5. Hydrogen storage container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  6. Hydrogen meter prooftesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Mettler, G.W.

    1976-04-01

    Two diffusion type hydrogen meters have been tested on the Prototype Applications Loop (PAL). The ANL designed unit was used to monitor hydrogen in sodium during FFTF startup and over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations resulting from chemical additions to the sodium and cover gas. A commercially available meter was added and its performance compared with the ANL unit. Details of the test work are described

  7. Photochemical hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Both technical and economic factors affect the cost of producing hydrogen by photochemical processes. Technical factors include the efficiency and the capital and operating costs of the renewable hydrogen conversion system; economic factors include discount rates, economic life, credit for co-product oxygen, and the value of the energy produced. This paper presents technical and economic data for a system that generates on-peak electric power form photochemically produced hydrogen

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Francesch, Judit

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  9. A Cadmium Anionic 1-D Coordination Polymer {[Cd(H2O6][Cd2(atr2(μ2-btc2(H2O4] 2H2O}n within a 3-D Supramolecular Charge-Assisted Hydrogen-Bonded and π-Stacking Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Tahli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal reaction of 4,4′-bis(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl (btr and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3btc with Cd(OAc2·2H2O at 125 °C in situ forms 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atr from btr, which crystallizes to a mixed-ligand, poly-anionic chain of [Cd2(atr2(µ2-btc2(H2O4]2–. Together with a hexaaquacadmium(II cation and water molecules the anionic coordination-polymeric forms a 3-D supramolecular network of hexaaquacadmium(II-catena-[bis(4-amino-1,2,4-triazoletetraaquabis(benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylatodicadmate(II] dihydrate, 1-D-{[Cd(H2O6][Cd2(atr2(µ2-btc2(H2O4] 2H2O}n which is based on hydrogen bonds (in part charge-assisted and π–π interactions.

  10. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  11. Hydrogen gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    A differential thermocouple hydrogen gas detector has one thermocouple junction coated with an activated palladium or palladium-silver alloy catalytic material to allow heated hydrogen gas to react with the catalyst and raise the temperature of that junction. The other juction is covered with inert glass or epoxy resin, and does not experience a rise in temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas. A coil heater may be mounted around the thermocouple junctions to heat the hydrogen, or the gas may be passed through a heated block prior to exposing it to the thermocouples

  12. Sustainable hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  13. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  14. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H 2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H 2 . Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  15. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Brighigna, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen fueled vehicles may just be the answer to the air pollution problem in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. This paper examines the feasibility of hydrogen as an automotive fuel by analyzing the following aspects: the chemical-physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems; current production technologies and commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. With reference to recent trial results being obtained in the USA, an assessment is also made of the feasibility of the use of methane-hydrogen mixtures as automotive fuels. The paper concludes with a review of progress being made by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the development of fuel storage and electronic fuel injection systems for hydrogen powered vehicles

  16. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, D.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Sglavo, V.; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  17. Palladium Nanoparticle Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pavlovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative hydrogen sensor based on palladium (Pd nanoparticle networks is described in the article. Made by Applied Nanotech Inc. sensor has a fast response time, in the range of seconds, which is increased at 80 °C due to higher hydrogen diffusion rates into the palladium lattice. The low detection limit of the sensor is 10 ppm of H2, and the high limit is 40,000 ppm. This is 100% of a lowest flammability level of hydrogen. This range of sensitivities complies with the requirements that one would expect for a reliable hydrogen sensor.

  18. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  19. Narrow dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdalov, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on np interactions indicating to existence of narrow resonances in pp-system are discussed. Possible theoretical interpretations of these resonances are given. Experimental characteristics of the dibaryon resonances with isospin I=2 are considered

  20. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  1. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  2. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  3. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  4. A Review of Fatigue Crack Growth for Pipeline Steels Exposed to Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, N; Slifka, A; Levy, Y; White, C

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen pipeline systems offer an economical means of storing and transporting energy in the form of hydrogen gas. Pipelines can be used to transport hydrogen that has been generated at solar and wind farms to and from salt cavern storage locations. In addition, pipeline transportation systems will be essential before widespread hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technology becomes a reality. Since hydrogen pipeline use is expected to grow, the mechanical integrity of these pipelines will need to be validated under the presence of pressurized hydrogen. This paper focuses on a review of the fatigue crack growth response of pipeline steels when exposed to gaseous hydrogen environments. Because of defect-tolerant design principles in pipeline structures, it is essential that designers consider hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth behavior in these applications.

  5. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use

    2004-08-31

    The announcement of a hydrogen fuel initiative in the President’s 2003 State of the Union speech substantially increased interest in the potential for hydrogen to play a major role in the nation’s long-term energy future. Prior to that event, DOE asked the National Research Council to examine key technical issues about the hydrogen economy to assist in the development of its hydrogen R&D program. Included in the assessment were the current state of technology; future cost estimates; CO2 emissions; distribution, storage, and end use considerations; and the DOE RD&D program. The report provides an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel in the nation’s future energy economy and describes a number of important challenges that must be overcome if it is to make a major energy contribution. Topics covered include the hydrogen end-use technologies, transportation, hydrogen production technologies, and transition issues for hydrogen in vehicles.

  6. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  7. Microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, D.J.; Currier, R.P.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Elliott, N.

    1991-01-01

    A microwave assisted process for production of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. A simple apparatus combining a chemical vapor infiltration reactor with a conventional 700 W multimode oven is described. Microwave induced inverted thermal gradients are exploited with the ultimate goal of reducing processing times on complex shapes. Thermal gradients in stacks of SiC (Nicalon) cloths have been measured using optical thermometry. Initial results on the ''inside out'' deposition of SiC via decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane in hydrogen are presented. Several key processing issues are identified and discussed. 5 refs

  8. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  9. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  10. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  11. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  12. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  13. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  14. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  15. Hydrogen pellet injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    In a hydrogen pellet injection device, a nozzle block having a hydrogen gas supply channel is disposed at the inner side of a main cryogenic housing, and an electric resistor is attached to the block. Further, a nozzle block and a hydrogen gas introduction pipe are attached by way of a thermal insulating spacer. Electric current is supplied to the resistor to positively heat the nozzle block and melt remaining solid hydrogen in the hydrogen gas supply channel. Further, the effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor is prevented from reaching the side of the hydrogen gas introduction pipe by the thermal insulation spacer. That is, the temperature of the nozzle block is directly and positively elevated, to melt the solid hydrogen rapidly. Preparation operation from the injection of the hydrogen pellet to the next injection can be completed in a shorter period of time compared with a conventional case thereby enabling to make the test more efficient. Further, only the temperature of the nozzle block is elevated with no effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor to other components by the thermal insulation flange. (N.H.)

  16. Hydrogen from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is generally regarded as the energy carrier of the future. The development of a process for hydrogen production from biomass complies with the policy of the Dutch government to obtain more renewable energy from biomass. This report describes the progress of the BWP II project, phase 2 of

  17. Resonance-Raman spectro-electrochemistry of intermediates in molecular artificial photosynthesis of bimetallic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, Linda; Guthmuller, Julien; Rabelo de Moraes, Inês; Kupfer, Stephan; Krieck, Sven; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Rau, Sven; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2014-05-25

    The sequential order of photoinduced charge transfer processes and accompanying structure changes were analyzed by UV-vis and resonance-Raman spectroscopy of intermediates of a Ru(ii) based photocatalytic hydrogen evolving system obtained by electrochemical reduction.

  18. Laser ionization and dissociation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments undertaken to further characterize the spectroscopic and photophysical properties of some important excited singlet states of molecular hydrogen and its deuterium isotopes are described. Attention was centered on high vibrational levels of the B, C, and B' states within about 1000 cm -1 of the second dissociation limit. A double-resonance excitation scheme was needed to access levels with a large average bond distance from the ground state. Two-photon absorption of tunable uv-laser radiation-pumped ground-state hydrogen molecules into selected rovibronic levels of the metastable EF double-minimum electronic state. A second tunable near-IR probe laser was scanned to generate ions by resonant multiphoton ionization, where the resonant levels were provided by B, C, B', and other levels near the dissociation limit. New information was obtained regarding line shapes and intensities. Time-of-flight ion mass selection permitted observation of additional excitation channels with dissociation superimposed on the ionization process to produce protons

  19. Measures for removing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Koehling, A.; Langer, G.; Poeschel, E.

    1984-01-01

    Basis for the investigation is a 1300-MW-PWR. The evolution of hydrogen was studied in design-basis and three hypothetical accident scenarios, the loss-of-coolant accident, the failure of emergency cooling system and core meltdown. It was shown that in the case of release rates of 4m 3 H 2 /h, the known post-accident hydrogen removal systems can be used and at medium rates up to 80 m 3 H 2 /h recombines of nuclear and non-nuclear industries are suitable under certain conditions. In the case of larger release rates it appears useful to apply a small recombiner of the type of the post-accident hydrogen removal system combined with an other hydrogen countermeasures. Recommendations are being made for the installation of an accident-proof hydrogen measuring system. (DG) [de

  20. Liquid hydrogen properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. I.; Han, K. Y.; Park, J.H.

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the input data, whose characteristic is thermodynamic and transport, in the form of equation for the thermo-hydraulic calculations using hydrogen as a working substance. The considered data in this report are particularly focused on the properties of para-hydrogen and of equilibrium-hydrogen around the working temperature range of the HANARO-CNS. The discussed properties of hydrogen are, in turn, the pressure of saturated vapors, the density, the heat of vaporization, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity. Several equations to fit the above-mentioned experimental data allow calculating the various properties of liquid hydrogen with high accuracy at all considered temperatures

  1. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  2. Hydrogen production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-07-01

    Old, present and new proceses for producing hydrogen are assessed critically. The emphasis throughout is placed on those processes which could be commercially viable before the turn of the century for large-scale hydrogen manufacture. Electrolysis of water is the only industrial process not dependent on fossil resources for large-scale hydrogen production and is likely to remain so for the next two or three decades. While many new processes, including those utilizing sunlight directly or indirectly, are presently not considered to be commercially viable for large-scale hydrogen production, research and development effort is needed to enhance our understanding of the nature of these processes. Water vapour electrolysis is compared with thermochemical processes: the former has the potential for displacing all other processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water

  3. Hydrogen storage using borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard BONNETOT; Laetitia LAVERSENNE

    2006-01-01

    The possibilities of hydrogen storage using borohydrides are presented and discussed specially in regard of the recoverable hydrogen amount and related to the recovering conditions. A rapid analysis of storage possibilities is proposed taking in account the two main ways for hydrogen evolution: the dehydrogenation obtained through thermal decomposition or the hydrolysis of solids or solutions. The recoverable hydrogen is related to the dehydrogenation conditions and the real hydrogen useful percentage is determined for each case of use. The high temperature required for dehydrogenation even when using catalyzed compounds lead to poor outlooks for this storage way. The hydrolysis conditions direct the chemical yield of the water consuming, and this must be related to the experimental conditions which rule the storage capacity of the 'fuel' derived from the borohydride. (authors)

  4. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  5. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, N.; Sasaki, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-09-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158 cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990 cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydrogen molecules is broad and asymmetric. It consists of at least two components, possibly arising from hydrogen molecules in different occupation sites in crystalline silicon. The rotational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 590 cm-1. The Raman band of Si-H stretching is observed for hydrogenation temperatures between 100 and 500 °C and the intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 250 °C.

  6. Azide derivatized anticancer agents of Vitamin K 3: X-ray structural, DSC, resonance spectral and API studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badave, Kirti; Patil, Yogesh; Gonnade, Rajesh; Srinivas, Darbha; Dasgupta, Rajan; Khan, Ayesha; Rane, Sandhya

    2011-12-01

    Compound 1 [1-imino (acetyl hydrazino)-Vitamin K 3], displays valence tautomerically related electronic isomers as Form I and Form II. Form I exhibits 2D packing fragment with 1D ribbon chains of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and shows EPR silent features. While Form II is EPR active and exhibits biradical nature with double quantum transitions at g = 2.0040. 1H NMR of compound 2, [1-imino (hydrazino carboxylate)-Vitamin K 3] and Form II exhibit π delocalization via resonance assisted H-bonding [RAHB] effect compared to Form I. Molecular interactions in Form I and II are visualized by DSC. The electronic structures of compounds 1 and 2 have been correlated to their API values by measuring anticancer activities, mitochondrial potentials and DNA shearing patterns. Form II and compound 2 indicate mitochondria mediated apoptosis (˜75% cell death) while Form I causes 35% cell death.

  7. Does chaos assist localization or delocalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jintao; Lu, Gengbiao; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua

    2014-12-01

    We aim at a long-standing contradiction between chaos-assisted tunneling and chaos-related localization study quantum transport of a single particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice. We find some near-resonant regions crossing chaotic and regular regions in the parameter space, and demonstrate that chaos can heighten velocity of delocalization in the chaos-resonance overlapping regions, while chaos may aid localization in the other chaotic regions. The degree of localization enhances with increasing the distance between parameter points and near-resonant regions. The results could be useful for experimentally manipulating chaos-assisted transport of single particles in optical or solid-state lattices.

  8. Two-photon transitions in hydrogen atoms embedded in weakly coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.; Ho, Y. K.

    2008-01-01

    The pseudostate method has been applied to calculate energy eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions of the hydrogen atom in Debye plasma environments. Resonant two-photon transition rates from the ground state of atomic hydrogen to 2s and 3s excited states have been computed as a function of photon frequency in the length and velocity gauges for different Debye lengths. A two-photon transparency is found in correspondence to each resonance for 1s-3s. The transparency frequency and resonance enhancement frequency vary significantly with the Debye length.

  9. The hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  10. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  11. A green hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.W. II [Clark Communications, Beverly Hills, CA (United States). Green Hydrogen Scientific Advisory Committee; Rifkin, J. [The Foundation on Economic Trends (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand. (author)

  12. A green hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Woodrow W.; Rifkin, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand

  13. The Italian hydrogen programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaele Vellone

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen could become an important option in the new millennium. It provides the potential for a sustainable energy system as it can be used to meet most energy needs without harming the environment. In fact, hydrogen has the potential for contributing to the reduction of climate-changing emissions and other air pollutants as it exhibits clean combustion with no carbon or sulphur oxide emissions and very low nitrogen oxide emissions. Furthermore, it is capable of direct conversion to electricity in systems such as fuel cells without generating pollution. However, widespread use of hydrogen is not feasible today because of economic and technological barriers. In Italy, there is an ongoing national programme to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier. This programme aims to promote, in an organic frame, a series of actions regarding the whole hydrogen cycle. It foresees the development of technologies in the areas of production, storage, transport and utilisation. Research addresses the development of technologies for separation and sequestration of CO 2 , The programme is shared by public organisations (research institutions and universities) and national industry (oil companies, electric and gas utilities and research institutions). Hydrogen can be used as a fuel, with significant advantages, both for electric energy generation/ co-generation (thermo-dynamic cycles and fuel cells) and transportation (internal combustion engine and fuel cells). One focus of research will be the development of fuel cell technologies. Fuel cells possess all necessary characteristics to be a key technology in a future economy based on hydrogen. During the initial phase of the project, hydrogen will be derived from fossil sources (natural gas), and in the second phase it will be generated from renewable electricity or nuclear energy. The presentation will provide a review of the hydrogen programme and highlight future goals. (author)

  14. Transient shielded liquid hydrogen containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, A.P.; Herring, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase has been limited in duration due to the thermal performance constraints of conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers available. Conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers lose hydrogen because of their relatively high heat leak and variations in usage pattern of hydrogen due to shutdowns. Local regulations also discourage venting of hydrogen. Long term storage of Liquid Hydrogen without product loss was usually accomplished using Liquid Nitrogen sacrificial shields. This paper reports on a new low heat leak container developed and patented that will extend the storage time of liquid hydrogen by five hundred percent. The principle of operation of the Transient Shields which makes the extraordinary performance of this container feasible is described in this paper. Also covered are the impact of this new container on present applications of hydrogen and the new opportunities afforded to Liquid hydrogen in the world hydrogen market

  15. Lateral distribution of NBD-PC fluorescent lipid analogs in membranes probed by molecular dynamics-assisted analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loura, Luís M S

    2012-11-08

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be potentially useful as they provide direct detailed information on transverse probe localization, relative probe orientation, and membrane surface area, all of which are required for analysis of FRET data. This is illustrated here for the FRET pairs involving 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as donor and either 1-palmitoyl,2-(6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] hexanoyl)- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C6-NBD-PC) or 1-palmitoyl,2-(12-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12-NBD-PC) as acceptors, in fluid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (DPPC, 50 °C). Incorporation of results from MD simulations improves the statistical quality of model fitting to the experimental FRET data. Furthermore, the decay of DPH in the presence of moderate amounts of C12-NBD-PC (>0.4 mol%) is consistent with non-random lateral distribution of the latter, at variance with C6-NBD-PC, for which aggregation is ruled out up to 2.5 mol% concentration. These conclusions are supported by analysis of NBD-PC fluorescence self-quenching. Implications regarding the relative utility of these probes in membrane studies are discussed.

  16. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  17. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...... that the particles do not disintegrate is explained by a sintering process at the working temperatures. Exposure to air does not impair the sorption ability; on the contrary, it appears that surface oxidation plays an important role in the reaction. Some handling problems, e.g. the reaction of the hydride with water...

  18. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  19. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  20. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  1. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  2. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  3. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  4. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  5. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  6. Sustainability of Hydrogen Supply Chain. Part II: Prioritizing and Classifying the Sustainability of Hydrogen Supply Chains based on the Combination of Extension Theory and AHP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Manzardo, Alessandro; Toniolo, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for prioritizing and classifying the sustainability of hydrogen supply chains and assist decision-making for the stakeholders/decision-makers. Multiple criteria for sustainability assessment of hydrogen supply chains are considered and multiple...... decision-makers are allowed to participate in the decision-making using linguistic terms. In this study, extension theory and analytic hierarchy process are combined to rate the sustainability of hydrogen supply chains. The sustainability of hydrogen supply chains could be identified according...

  7. Production of hydrogen from organic waste via hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, M.; Davis, B.R.; Roy, A.; Daugulis, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an integrated process is proposed that converts organic waste to hydrogen via hydrogen sulphide. The designed bioreactor has achieved high volumetric productivities comparable to methanogenic bioreactors. Proposed process has advantages of bio-methane production and is more resilient to process upset. Thermochemical conversion of hydrogen sulphide to hydrogen is exothermic and also requires smaller plant infrastructure

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the so far most extended investigation of the calculation of the coupling constant polarizability of a molecule. The components of the coupling constant polarizability are derivatives of the NMR indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant with respect to an external elec...

  9. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-01-01

    air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant gettering mechanism in both getter materials as evidenced by (1) consumption of oxygen in the bell jars, (2) production of free water in the bell jars, and (3) absence of chemical changes in both getter materials as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

  10. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant gettering mechanism in both getter materials as evidenced by (1) consumption of oxygen in the belljars, (2) production of free water in the belljars, and (3) absence of chemical changes in both getter materials as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

  11. Energy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in ortho-Hydroxybenzaldehydes, Phenones and Quinones. Transfer of Aromaticity from ipso-Benzene Ring to the Enol System(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Rusinska-Roszak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Intramolecular hydrogen bonding (HB is one of the most studied noncovalent interactions of molecules. Many physical, spectral, and topological properties of compounds are under the influence of HB, and there are many parameters used to notice and to describe these changes. Hitherto, no general method of measurement of the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bond (EHB has been put into effect. We propose the molecular tailoring approach (MTA for EHB calculation, modified to apply it to Ar-O-H∙∙∙O=C systems. The method, based on quantum calculations, was checked earlier for hydroxycarbonyl-saturated compounds, and for structures with resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB. For phenolic compounds, the accuracy, repeatability, and applicability of the method is now confirmed for nearly 140 structures. For each structure its aromaticity HOMA indices were calculated for the central (ipso ring and for the quasiaromatic rings given by intramolecular HB. The comparison of calculated HB energies and values of estimated aromaticity indices allowed us to observe, in some substituted phenols and quinones, the phenomenon of transfer of aromaticity from the ipso-ring to the H-bonded ring via the effect of electron delocalization.

  12. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  13. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concepts transferred from the gaseous state. Separation of a ... molecular mass to that calculated by colligative methods. It is important in ... namics is vital in the design and optimization of the materials for hydrogen ... vehicular applications.

  14. Hydrogen storage compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  15. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to...

  16. Canadian hydrogen strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, M.; Scepanovic, V.; Dube, J.; Hammerli, M.; Taylor, J.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In May of 2004, industry and government embarked on a process to create a strategic plan for development of the 'hydrogen economy' in Canada. The process was undertaken to determine how the development and commercialization of hydrogen technologies could be accelerated to yield a 'visible' reduction in greenhouse gases within the timeframe of Kyoto, while establishing a direction that addresses the necessity of far greater reductions in the future. Starting with a meeting of twenty seven experts drawn from the hydrogen technology, energy and transportation industries and government, a vision and mission for the planning process was developed. Two months later a second meeting was held with a broader group of stakeholders to develop hydrogen transition strategies that could achieve the mission, and from identifying the barriers and enablers for these strategies, an action plan was created. This paper reviews the results from this consultation process and discusses next steps. (author)

  17. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  18. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Exposure of many metals to gaseous hydrogen causes losses in elongation, reduction of area, and fracture toughness, and causes increases in slow crack growth rate or fatigue life compared with values obtained in air or vacuum. Hydrogen pressure, temperature, and purity significantly influence deleterious effects. The strength and structural characteristics of the metal influence the degradation of its properties by hydrogen. Several theories have been proposed to explain the loss of properties in hydrogen, but none has gained wide acceptance. The embrittlement mechanism and the role of diffusion are, therefore, open questions and need more quantitative experimental data both to test the proposed theories and to allow the development of realistic preventive measures. (U.S.)

  19. Hydrogen perspectives in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen energy is considered to present a potential effective options for achieving the greenhouse gas minimization. The MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry) of Japanese Government is promoting the WE-NET (World Energy Network System) Project which envisions (1) construction of a global energy network for effective supply, transportation, storage and utilization of renewable energy using hydrogen as an energy carrier as a long-term options of sustainable energy economy, and (2) promotion of market entry of hydrogen energy in near and/or mid future even before construction of a WE-NET system. In this paper, I would like to report how far the hydrogen energy technology development addressed under Phase I has progressed, and describe the outline of the Phase II Plan. (author)

  20. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  1. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  2. Hydrogenizing oils, asphalts, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1925-03-14

    The hydrogenation of carbonaceous solids in presence of combined sulfur, e.g., sulfides as described in the parent specification is applied to the treatment of rock oils, shale oils, resins, ozokerite, asphalt, and the like, or fractions, residues, or acid sludge or other conversion products thereof, alone or mixed. Preferably the hydrogen or other reducing gas is in excess and under pressure, and is either circuited or led through a series of treatment vessels, hydrogen being added for that used. In an example, residues from American crude oil are passed continuously with hydrogen at 200 atmospheres and 450 to 500/sup 0/C over pressed precipitated cobalt sulfide, the issuing gases being cooled to condense the light oil produced.

  3. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  4. Nuclear power and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robert.

    1982-06-01

    Ontario has been using CANDU reactors to produce electricity since 1962. The province does not have an electricity shortage, but it does have a shortage of liquid fuels. The government of Ontario is encouraging research into the production of hydrogen using electricity generated by a dedicated nuclear plant, and the safe and economical use of hydrogen both in the production of synthetic petroleum fuels and as a fuel in its own right

  5. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  6. A Rechargeable Hydrogen Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christudas Dargily, Neethu; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Devendrachari, Mruthunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Gautam, Manu; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-04-27

    We utilize proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen storage molecules to unlock a rechargeable battery chemistry based on the cleanest chemical energy carrier molecule, hydrogen. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and spectroelectrochemical analyses evidence the participation of protons during charge-discharge chemistry and extended cycling. In an era of anthropogenic global climate change and paramount pollution, a battery concept based on a virtually nonpolluting energy carrier molecule demonstrates distinct progress in the sustainable energy landscape.

  7. Hydrogen recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  8. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  9. Spectroscopy of vibrationally hot molecules: Hydrogen cyanide and acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient formula for calculating nuclear spin statistical weights is presented. New experimental methods to distinguish electric and magnetic multipole transitions are proposed and used to prove that the formaldehyde A - X 0-0 transition is a magnetic dipole transition. HIgh resolution vacuum ultraviolet studies of the A → X fluorescence excitation spectrum of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) have: (i) determined that only the (0,1,0) vibrational level of the HCN A-state has a sufficiently long fluorescence lifetime to be suitable for Stimulated Emission Pumping (SEP) studies; and (ii) measured the electric dipole moment of the A-state. Several transitions in the hydrogen cyanide A → X SEP spectrum are shown to be due to the axis-switching mechanism. From a Franck-Condon plot of the intensities and a comparison between sums of predicted rotational constants and sums of observed rotational constants, all of the remaining transitions in the SEP spectrum can be securly assigned. Two weak resonances; a 2:3 CH:CN stretch Fermi resonance and a 6:2 bend:CN stretch resonance appear in the SEP spectrum. Excitation of the CH stretching vibration is predicted and shown to be entirely absent, apart from resonances, in the HCN SEP spectrum. A → X SEP spectra of acetylene (HCCH) near E VIB = 7,000 cm -1 display a wealth of strong and fully assignable anharmonic resonances and forbidden rotational transitions. It is proved that Darling-Dennison resonance between the cis and trans bending vibrations is the crucial first step in a series of anharmonic resonances which can transfer nearly all the vibrational energy out of the initial CC stretch/trans-bend excitation at high vibrational energy. Secondary steps in the vibrational energy flow are vibrational-l-resonance and the '2345' Fermi resonance. For short times, the vibrational energy redistribution obeys very restrictive rules

  10. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  11. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  12. Diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, V.V.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1966-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in yttrium were determined from the rate at which the hydrogen was released from yttrium samples under a vacuum at temperatures of 450 to 850 0 C and from the quantity of hydrogen retained by yttrium at hydrogen pressures below 5 x 10 - 4 mm Hg in the same temperature range

  13. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  14. Hydrogen and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, D.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study examines the influence that the market demand for hydrogen might have on the development of world nuclear capacity over the next few decades. In a nuclear economy, hydrogen appears to be the preferred energy carrier over electricity for most purposes, due to its ready substitution and usage for all energy needs, as well as its low transmission costs. The economic factors upon which any transition to hydrogen fuelling will be largely based are seen to be strongly dependent on the form of future energy demand, the energy resource base, and on the status of technology. Accordingly, the world energy economy is examined to identify the factors which might affect the future demand price structure for energy, and a survey of current estimates of world energy resources, particularly oil, gas, nuclear, and solar, is presented. Current and projected technologies for production and utilization of hydrogen are reviewed, together with rudimentary cost estimates. The relative economics are seen to favour production of hydrogen from fossil fuels far into the foreseeable future, and a clear case emerges for high temperature nuclear reactors in such process heat applications. An expanding industrial market for hydrogen, and near term uses in steelmaking and aircraft fuelling are foreseen, which would justify an important development effort towards nuclear penetration of that market. (author)

  15. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  16. Metallic hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm 3 and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures

  17. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 505 0 C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  18. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  19. Measurement and Analysis of the Diffusible Hydrogen in Underwater Wet Welding Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffusible hydrogen in steel weldments is one of the main reasons that led to hydrogen assisted cracking. In this paper, the results of literatures survey and preliminary tests of the diffusible hydrogen in underwater wet welding joint were presented. A fluid-discharge method of for measuring the diffusible hydrogen in weldment was introduced in detail. Two kinds of underwater welding electrode diffusible hydrogen are 26.5 mL/100g and 35.5 mL/100g by fluid-discharge method, which are high levels. The diffusible hydrogen of underwater welding is higher than atmospheric welding, and the result is closely related to welding material. The best way to control the diffusible hydrogen is adjusting welding material and improving fluidity of slag.

  20. Interactions of atomic hydrogen with amorphous SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunliang; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yuqi; Song, Yu; Zuo, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Dozens of models are investigated by the first-principles calculations to simulate the interactions of an atomic hydrogen with a defect-free random network of amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) and oxygen vacancies. A wide variety of stable configurations are discovered due to the disorder of a-SiO2, and their structures, charges, magnetic moments, spin densities, and density of states are calculated. The atomic hydrogen interacts with the defect-free a-SiO2 in positively or negatively charged state, and produces the structures absent in crystalline SiO2. It passivates the neutral oxygen vacancies and generates two neutral hydrogenated E‧ centers with different Si dangling bond projections. Electron spin resonance parameters, including Fermi contacts, and g-tensors, are calculated for these centers. The atomic hydrogen interacts with the positive oxygen vacancies in dimer configuration, and generate four different positive hydrogenated defects, two of which are puckered like the Eγ‧ centers. This research helps to understand the interactions between an atomic hydrogen, and defect-free a-SiO2 and oxygen vacancies, which may generate the hydrogen-complexed defects that play a key role in the degeneration of silicon/silica-based microelectronic devices.