WorldWideScience

Sample records for resolved laser studies

  1. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  2. Time-resolved FTIR [Fourier transform infrared] emission studies of laser photofragmentation and chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress is described resulting from the past three years of DOE support for studies of combustion-related photofragmentation dynamics, energy transfer, and reaction processes using a time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission technique. The FTIR is coupled to a high repetition rate excimer laser which produces radicals by photolysis to obtain novel, high resolution measurements on vibrational and rotational state dynamics. The results are important for the study of numerous radical species relevant to combustion processes. The method has been applied to the detailed study of photofragmentation dynamics in systems such as acetylene, which produces C 2 H; chlorofluoroethylene to study the HF product channel; vinyl chloride and dichloroethylene, which produce HCl; acetone, which produces CO and CH 3 ; and ammonia, which produces NH 2 . In addition, we have recently demonstrated use of the FTIR technique for preliminary studies of energy transfer events under near single collision conditions, radical-radical reactions, and laser-initiated chain reaction processes

  3. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-15

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to {sigma} <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at

  4. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-01

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to σ <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at least

  5. Rovibronically selected and resolved two-color laser photoionization and photoelectron study of cobalt carbide cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Chang, Yih Chung; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Lam, Chow-Shing; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, C Y

    2013-03-07

    We have conducted a two-color visible-ultraviolet (VIS-UV) resonance-enhanced laser photoionization efficiency and pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) study of gaseous cobalt carbide (CoC) near its ionization onset in the total energy range of 61,200-64,510 cm(-1). The cold gaseous CoC sample was prepared by a laser ablation supersonically cooled beam source. By exciting CoC molecules thus generated to single N' rotational levels of the intermediate CoC∗((2)Σ(+); v') state using a VIS dye laser prior to UV laser photoionization, we have obtained N(+) rotationally resolved PFI-PE spectra for the CoC(+)(X(1)Σ(+); v(+) = 0 and 1) ion vibrational bands free from interference by impurity species except Co atoms produced in the ablation source. The rotationally selected and resolved PFI-PE spectra have made possible unambiguous rotational assignments, yielding accurate values for the adiabatic ionization energy of CoC(X(2)Σ(+)), IE(CoC) = 62,384.3 ± 0.6 cm(-1) (7.73467 ± 0.00007 eV), the vibrational frequency ωe (+) = 985.6 ± 0.6 cm(-1), the anharmonicity constant ωe (+)χe (+) = 6.3 ± 0.6 cm(-1), the rotational constants (Be (+) = 0.7196 ± 0.0005 cm(-1), αe (+) = 0.0056 ± 0.0008 cm(-1)), and the equilibrium bond length re (+) = 1.534 Å for CoC(+)(X(1)Σ(+)). The observation of the N(+) = 0 level in the PFI-PE measurement indicates that the CoC(+) ground state is of (1)Σ(+) symmetry. Large ΔN(+) = N(+) - N' changes up to 6 are observed for the photoionization transitions CoC(+)(X(1)Σ(+); v(+) = 0-2; N(+)) ← CoC∗((2)Σ(+); v'; N' = 6, 7, 8, and 9). The highly precise energetic and spectroscopic data obtained in the present study have served as a benchmark for testing theoretical predictions based on state-of-the-art ab initio quantum calculations at the CCSDTQ∕CBS level of theory as presented in the companion article.

  6. NO kinetics in pulsed low-pressure nitrogen plasmas studied by time resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Guaitella, O.; Lazzaroni, C.; Pintassilgo, C.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy at 1897 cm-1 (5.27 µm) has been applied to study the NO(X) kinetics on the micro- and millisecond time scale in pulsed low-pressure N2/NO dc discharges. Experiments have been performed under flowing and static gas conditions to infer the

  7. Time-resolved study of absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of Trichoderma longibrachiatum conidia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopp, B [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Barna, N [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Vass, Cs [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Antal, Zs [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Microbiological Research Group, PO Box 533, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Kredics, L [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Microbiological Research Group, PO Box 533, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Chrisey, D [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2005-03-21

    We have characterized the absorbing film assisted transfer of Trichoderma longibrachiatum conidia using a synchronized laser for illumination. The transfer laser used was a KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, FWHM = 30 ns) and the ejected material was illuminated parallel to the quartz plate by a nitrogen laser pumped Coumarine 153 dye laser beam ({lambda} = 453 nm, FWHM 1 ns) electronically delayed relative to the transfer UV pulse. Our time-resolved investigations determined that the ejection velocity front of the conidia plume from the donor surface during the transfer procedure was 1150 m s{sup -1} at 355 mJ cm{sup -2} applied laser fluence. On the basis of the measured data, the acceleration of the emitted conidia at the plume front was approximately 10{sup 9} x g. The conidia survived the absorbing film assisted forward transfer and associated mechanical shear without significant damages suggesting that the technique might be applicable to other more fragile types of biological objects and applications.

  8. Time-resolved study of absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of Trichoderma longibrachiatum conidia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopp, B; Smausz, T; Barna, N; Vass, Cs; Antal, Zs; Kredics, L; Chrisey, D

    2005-01-01

    We have characterized the absorbing film assisted transfer of Trichoderma longibrachiatum conidia using a synchronized laser for illumination. The transfer laser used was a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, FWHM = 30 ns) and the ejected material was illuminated parallel to the quartz plate by a nitrogen laser pumped Coumarine 153 dye laser beam (λ = 453 nm, FWHM 1 ns) electronically delayed relative to the transfer UV pulse. Our time-resolved investigations determined that the ejection velocity front of the conidia plume from the donor surface during the transfer procedure was 1150 m s -1 at 355 mJ cm -2 applied laser fluence. On the basis of the measured data, the acceleration of the emitted conidia at the plume front was approximately 10 9 x g. The conidia survived the absorbing film assisted forward transfer and associated mechanical shear without significant damages suggesting that the technique might be applicable to other more fragile types of biological objects and applications

  9. Time-Resolved Emission Spectroscopic Study of Laser-Induced Steel Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M. L.; Pulhani, A. K.; Suri, B. M.; Gupta, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced steel plasma is generated by focusing a Q-switched Nd:YAG visible laser (532 nm wavelength) with an irradiance of ∼ 1 × 10 9 W/cm 2 on a steel sample in air at atmospheric pressure. An Echelle spectrograph coupled with a gateable intensified charge-coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions. Using time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of the plasma emissions, the temperature and electron number density of the steel plasma are determined for many times of the detector delay. The validity of the assumption by the spectroscopic methods that the laser-induced plasma (LIP) is optically thin and is also in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) has been evaluated for many delay times. From the temporal evolution of the intensity ratio of two Fe I lines and matching it with its theoretical value, the delay times where the plasma is optically thin and is also in LTE are found to be 800 ns, 900 ns and 1000 ns.

  10. Time-resolved studies of ultrarapid solidification of highly undercooled molten silicon formed by pulsed laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Wood, R.F.; Carpenter, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports new results of nanosecond-resolution time-resolved optical reflectivity measurements, during pulsed excimer (KrF, 248 nm) laser irradiation of Si-implanted amorphous (a) silicon layers, which, together with model calculations and post-irradiation TEM measurements, have allowed us to study both the transformation of a-Si to a highly undercooled liquid (l) phase and the subsequent ultrarapid solidification process

  11. Time-Resolved Studies of Laser-Induced Phase Transitions in Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Yakir

    This thesis describes a series of time-resolved experiments of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs during laser-induced phase transitions. The first set of experiments consists of a direct determination of the behavior of the linear dielectric constant at photon energies of 2.2 eV and 4.4 eV following excitation of the sample with 1.9-eV, 70-fs laser pulses spanning a fluence range from 0 to 2.5 kJ/m^2. The results from this set of experiments were used to extract the behavior of the second-order optical susceptibility from second-harmonic generation measurements made under identical excitation conditions. These experiments are unique because they provide explicit information on the behavior of intrinsic material properties--the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities--during laser-induced phase transitions in semiconductors without the ambiguities in interpretation that are generally inherent in reflectivity and second-harmonic generation measurements. The dielectric constant data indicate a drop in the average bonding-antibonding splitting of GaAs following the laser pulse excitation. This behavior leads to a collapse of the band-gap on a picosecond time scale for excitation at fluences near the damage threshold of 1.0 kJ/m ^2 and even faster at higher excitation fluences. The changes in the electronic band structure result from a combination of electronic screening by the excited free carriers and structural deformation of the lattice caused by the destabilization of the covalent bonds. The behavior of the second-order susceptibility shows that the material loses long-range order before the average bonding-antibonding splitting, which is more sensitive to short-range structure, changes significantly. Loss of long-range order and a drop of more than 2 eV in the average bonding-antibonding splitting are seen even at fluences below the damage threshold, a regime in which the laser-induced changes are reversible.

  12. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  13. Time resolved studies of H{sub 2}{sup +} dissociation with phase-stabilized laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Bettina

    2010-06-23

    In the course of this thesis, experimental studies on the dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +}(H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}p+H) in ultrashort laser pulses with a stabilized carrier-envelope phase (CEP) were carried out. In single-pulse measurements, the ability to control the emission direction of low energetic protons, i.e. the localization of the bound electron at one of the nuclei after dissociation, by the CEP was demonstrated. The coincident detection of the emitted protons and electrons and the measurement of their three-dimensional momentum vectors with a reaction microscope allowed to clarify the localization mechanism. Further control was achieved by a pump-control scheme with two timedelayed CEP-stabilized laser pulses. Here the neutral H{sub 2} molecule was ionized in the first pulse and dissociation was induced by the second pulse. Electron localization was shown to depend on the properties of the bound nuclear wave packet in H{sub 2}{sup +} at the time the control pulse is applied, demonstrating the ability to use the shape and dynamics of the nuclear wave packet as control parameters. Wave packet simulations were performed reproducing qualitatively the experimental results of the single and the two-pulse measurements. For both control schemes, intuitive models are presented, which qualitatively explain the main features of the obtained results. (orig.)

  14. Time resolved studies of H2+ dissociation with phase-stabilized laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    In the course of this thesis, experimental studies on the dissociation of H 2 + (H 2 + →p+H) in ultrashort laser pulses with a stabilized carrier-envelope phase (CEP) were carried out. In single-pulse measurements, the ability to control the emission direction of low energetic protons, i.e. the localization of the bound electron at one of the nuclei after dissociation, by the CEP was demonstrated. The coincident detection of the emitted protons and electrons and the measurement of their three-dimensional momentum vectors with a reaction microscope allowed to clarify the localization mechanism. Further control was achieved by a pump-control scheme with two timedelayed CEP-stabilized laser pulses. Here the neutral H 2 molecule was ionized in the first pulse and dissociation was induced by the second pulse. Electron localization was shown to depend on the properties of the bound nuclear wave packet in H 2 + at the time the control pulse is applied, demonstrating the ability to use the shape and dynamics of the nuclear wave packet as control parameters. Wave packet simulations were performed reproducing qualitatively the experimental results of the single and the two-pulse measurements. For both control schemes, intuitive models are presented, which qualitatively explain the main features of the obtained results. (orig.)

  15. Time resolved Raman studies of laser induced damage in TiO2 optical coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exarhos, G.J.; Morse, P.L.

    1984-10-01

    Molecular information available from Raman scattering measurements of sputter deposited TiO 2 on silica substrates has been used to characterize crystalline phases, thickness, and surface homogeneity. A two laser technique is described for investigating transient molecular changes in both coating and substrate which result from pulsed 532 nm laser irradiation. Single layer and multilayer coatings of both anatase and rutile phases of TiO 2 have been probed by Raman spectroscopy immediately following the damage pulse (nanoseconds) and at longer times. Transient measurements are designed to follow surface transformation/relaxation phenomena; measurements at longer times characterize the equilibrium damage state

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology, Babes National Institute, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: lilianajradu@yahoo.fr; Mihailescu, I. [Department of Lasers, Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Radu, S. [Department of Computer Science, Polytechnics University, Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Department of Biophysics, Bucharest University (Romania)

    2007-09-21

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m{sup 2} was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy

  18. Study of Short-Pulsed Laser Retinal Injury Mechanisms By Time-Resolved Imaging of Photomechanical Transients in RPE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Charles

    2000-01-01

    We studied RPE cell damage mechanism for laser duration from 100 femtosec to 5 microsec, and we have investigated the dependence of threshold fluence for cell damage on the laser spot size on the RPE...

  19. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  20. Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

  1. Experimental studies of the propagation of electrostatic ion perturbations by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachet, G.; Skiff, F.; Doveil, F.; Stern, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects induced by the propagation of several kinds of electrostatic perturbation in a low-density collisionless argon plasma are observed with space, time, and velocity-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The propagation of strong self-organized ion structures is observed and the associated electric field is determined. Snap shots of the ion phase space with a time resolution of 2 μs can be reconstructed from the experimental data. All the terms of the kinetic equation can also be determined from the data. A one-dimensional (1D) numerical simulation reproduces qualitatively the experimentally observed ion phase space behavior

  2. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 μg/cm 2 ) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-μm laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10 14 W/cm 2 and 1 x 10 15 W/cm 2

  3. Time-resolved SFG study of formate on a Ni( 1 1 1 ) surface under irradiation of picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H.; Okada, T.; Onda, K.; Kano, S. S.; Wada, A.; Domen, K.

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved sum-frequency generation spectroscopy was carried out on a deuterated formate (DCOO) adsorbed on Ni(1 1 1) surface to investigate the surface reaction dynamics under instantaneous surface temperature jump induced by the irradiation by picosecond laser pulses. The irradiation of pump pulse (800 nm) caused the rapid intensity decrease of both CD and OCO stretching modes of bridged formate on Ni(1 1 1). Different temporal behaviors of intensity recovery between these two vibrational modes were observed, i.e., CD stretching mode recovered faster than OCO. This is the first result to show that the dynamics of adsorbates on metals strongly depends on the observed vibrational mode. From the results of temperature and pump fluence dependence, we concluded that the observed intensity change was not due to the decomposition or desorption, but was induced by a non-thermal process.

  4. Time-resolved emission from laser-ablated uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffels, E.; Mullen, J. van der; Weijer, P. van de

    1991-01-01

    Time-resolved emission spectra from the plasma, induced by laser ablation of uranium samples have been studied. The dependence of the emission intensity on time is strongly affected by the nature and pressure of the buffer gas. Air and argon have been used in the pressure range 0.002 to 5 mbar. The emission intensity as a function of time displays three maxima, indicating that three different processes within the expanding plasma plume are involved. On basis of the time-resolved spectra we propose a model that explains qualitatively the phenomena that are responsible for this time behaviour. (author)

  5. Time-resolved study of a pulsed dc discharge using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy : NO and gas temperature kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Gatilova, L.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a pulsed dc discharge of an Ar–N2 mixture containing 0.91% of NO the kinetics of the destruction of NO has been studied under static and flowing conditions, i.e. in a closed and open discharge tube (p = 266 Pa). For this purpose quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the

  6. Time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    When new or more powerful probes become available that offer both shorter data-collection times and the opportunity to apply innovative approaches to established techniques, it is natural that investigators consider the feasibility of exploring the kinetics of time-evolving systems. This stimulating area of research not only can lead to insights into the metastable or excited states that a system may populate on its way to a ground state, but can also lead to a better understanding of that final state. Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers just such a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Widebandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the open-quote parallel data collectionclose quotes method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in the data-collection time

  7. Time resolved study of the emission enhancement mechanisms in orthogonal double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanginés, R., E-mail: roberto.sangines@ccadet.unam.mx; Sobral, H.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of laser induced ablation plume on aluminum targets has been investigated in orthogonal pre-ablation double pulse scheme at atmospheric pressure from the earliest stages of plasma evolution. Time-resolved emission spectra from neutrals, singly- and doubly-ionized species obtained with the double pulse experiment have been compared with those from the single pulse configuration. Signal-to-noise enhancement reaches values of up to 15 depending on the analyzed species; and the lower the charge state the later its maximum signal-to-noise ratio is reached. Ablation plume dynamics was monitored from 10 ns after the plasma onset via shadowgraphy and fast-photography with narrow interference filters to follow the evolution of individual species. Results show that ionic species from the target are located at the plasma core while nitrogen from the background air is found at the plume peripheral. Initially both configurations exhibit similar ablation plume sizes and their expansions were successfully fitted with the strong explosion model for the first 500 ns. At later times a good agreement was obtained by using the drag model, which predicts that the plume expansion eventually stops due to interaction with the background gas particles. The emission enhancement measured in the double pulse scheme is discussed in terms of the models describing the plume dynamics. - Highlights: • Production of 2 + ions at the earliest stages of plasma evolution • The higher the charge state the inner the location within the ablation plume. • The expansion rate of the second (ablation) plume was measured. • Shock and drag models successfully fit the ablation shock front expansion.

  8. Time-resolved and steady-state studies of biologically and chemically relevant systems using laser, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Charles Ashley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    In Chapter 2 several experimental and data analysis methods used in this thesis are described. In Chapter 3 steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, in the feces of animals and it was found that their levels far exceed those reported to be inhibitory to efflux pumps. In Chapter 4 the solvation dynamics of 6-Propionyl-2-(N,Ndimethyl) aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) was studied in reverse micelles. The two fluorescent states of PRODAN solvate on different time scales and as such care must be exercised in solvation dynamic studies involving it and its analogs. In Chapter 5 we studied the experimental and theoretical solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in wild-type (WT) and modified myoglobins. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence studies, we have concluded that it is important to thoroughly characterize the structure of a protein and probe system before comparing the theoretical and experimental results. In Chapter 6 the photophysical and spectral properties of a derivative of the medically relevant compound curcumin called cyclocurcumin was studied. Based on NMR, fluorescence, and absorption studies, the ground- and excited-states of cyclocurcumin are complicated by the existence of multiple structural isomers. In Chapter 7 the hydrolysis of cellulose by a pure form of cellulase in an ionic liquid, HEMA, and its aqueous mixtures at various temperatures were studied with the goal of increasing the cellulose to glucose conversion for biofuel production. It was found that HEMA imparts an additional stability to cellulase and can allow for faster conversion of cellulose to glucose using a pre-treatment step in comparison to only buffer.

  9. On the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) for speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.

    2003-01-01

    Time-resolved laser induced fluorescence (TRLIF) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) are used for speciation studies. While the former has been used for long time, the latter is rather new in the field of speciation. These two techniques have different advantages such as sensitivity (especially for TRLIF), selectivity and multielement capabilities (in case of ES-MS). Examples obtained from studies carried out within the CEA are presented. Concerning TRLIF, emphasis is put on uranyl ion speciation in nitric acid to phosphoric acid going through hydroxo complexes. Concerning ES-MS, humic substances identification as well as speciation of cesium, zirconium, thorium and uranyl ions in various complexing media are presented. Comparisons of TRLIF and ES-MS results are made in the case of uranyl hydroxo complexes and favourably compared with OECD data. Trends for these two techniques are also discussed. (orig.)

  10. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Er, Ali Oguz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States); Tang, Jau, E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Research Center for Applied Sciences Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rentzepis, Peter M., E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  11. Time-resolved imaging and immobilization study of biomaterials on hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces by means of laser-induced forward transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutopoulos, Christos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Zergioti, Ioanna; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present the generation of high velocity liquid jets of a photosynthetic biomaterial in buffer solution (i.e. thylakoid membranes) and a test solution, using the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. The high impact pressure of the collision of the jets on solid substrates, ranging from 0.045 MPa–35 MPa, resulted in strong physical immobilization of the photosynthetic biomaterial on superhydrophobic (SH) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces and hydrophobic gold surfaces. The immobilization efficiency was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, while time-resolved imaging of the LIFT process was carried out to study the corresponding LIFT dynamics. The results show that this simple, direct and chemical-linkers-free immobilization technique is valuable for several biosensors and microfluidic applications since it can be applied to a variety of hydrophobic and SH substrates, leading to the selective immobilization of the biomaterials, due to the high spatial printing resolution of the LIFT technique. (letter)

  12. Single molecule manipulation at low temperature and laser scanning tunnelling photo-induced processes analysis through time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, Damien

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes, firstly, the statistical analysis used to determine the processes that occur during the manipulation of a single molecule through electronically induced excitations with a low temperature (5 K) scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Various molecular operation examples are described and the ability to probe the ensuing molecular manipulation dynamics is discussed within the excitation context. It is, in particular, shown that such studies can reveal reversible manipulation for tuning dynamics through variation of the excitation energy. Secondly, the photo-induced process arising from the irradiation of the STM junction is also studied through feedback loop dynamics analysis, allowing us to distinguish between photo-thermally and photo-electronically induced signals.

  13. Time-resolved x-ray laser induced photoelectron spectroscopy of isochoric heated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Dunn, J.; Hunter, J.; Widmann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the nonsteady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultrathin (50 nm) copper. A metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500x700 μm 2 spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8x10 12 W cm -2 intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra are presented showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These picosecond x-ray laser induced time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultrathin Cu foil show dynamic changes in the electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials

  14. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and laser doppler anemometry study of the turbulent flow field of bileaflet mechanical mitral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Toshinosuke; Fukuda, Takamasa

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic particle image velocimetry (PIV) was applied to the study of the flow field associated with prosthetic heart valves. The results were compared with those of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Anatomically and antianatomically oriented Jyros (JR) and St. Jude Medical (SJM) valves were compared in the mitral position to study the effects of valve design on the downstream flow field. The experimental program used a dynamic PIV system utilizing high-speed, high-resolution video to map the true time-resolved velocity field inside the simulated ventricle. This system was complemented by a study using the more traditional LDA system for comparison. Based on the experimental data, the following general conclusions can be made. High-resolution dynamic PIV can capture true chronological changes in the velocity and turbulence fields. It also produces very detailed velocity and turbulence information comparable to the LDA results. In the vertical measuring plane that passes both the center of the aortic and mitral valves (A-A section), the two valves (the SJM and the JR) show distinct circulatory flow patterns when the valve is installed in the antianatomical orientation. Small differences in valve design can generate noticeable differences, particularly during the accelerating flow phase. The SJM valve maintains a relatively high velocity through the central orifice; the curved leaflets of the JR valve generate higher velocities with a divergent flow during the accelerating and peak flow phases. In the velocity field directly below the mitral valve and normal to the previous measuring plane (B-B section), where characteristic differences in valve design will be visible, symmetrical twin circulations were observed because of the divergent nature of the flow generated by the two inclined half-disks installed in the antianatomical orientation. The SJM valve, with a central downward flow near the valve, is contrasted with the JR valve, which has a peripheral downward

  15. Time-resolved explosion of intense-laser-heated clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K Y; Alexeev, I; Parra, E; Milchberg, H M

    2003-01-17

    We investigate the femtosecond explosive dynamics of intense laser-heated argon clusters by measuring the cluster complex transient polarizability. The time evolution of the polarizability is characteristic of competition in the optical response between supercritical and subcritical density regions of the expanding cluster. The results are consistent with time-resolved Rayleigh scattering measurements, and bear out the predictions of a recent laser-cluster interaction model [H. M. Milchberg, S. J. McNaught, and E. Parra, Phys. Rev. E 64, 056402 (2001)

  16. Time-resolved explosion of intense-laser-heated clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Alexeev, I.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the femtosecond explosive dynamics of intense laser-heated argon clusters by measuring the cluster complex transient polarizability. The time evolution of the polarizability is characteristic of competition in the optical response between supercritical and subcritical density regions of the expanding cluster. The results are consistent with time-resolved Rayleigh scattering measurements, and bear out the predictions of a recent laser-cluster interaction model [H. M. Milchberg, S. J. McNaught, and E. Parra, Phys. Rev. E 64, 056402 (2001)

  17. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Part 2: Investigation of MO+ ions, effect of sample morphology, transport gas, and binding agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-01-01

    Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO + ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO + spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

  18. Ionic classification of Xe laser lines: A new approach through time resolved spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinca, D.; Duchowicz, R.; Gallardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Visible and UV laser emission from a highly ionized pulsed Xe plasma was studied in relation to the ionic assignment of the laser lines. Time-resolved spectroscopy was used to determine the ionic origin of the studied lines. The results are in agreement with an intensity versus pressure analysis performed over the same wavelength range. From the temporal behaviour of the spontaneous emission, a probable classification can be obtained. (author). 7 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  19. Time-resolved studies of free radicals and laser-initiated chain reactions: Final report, 1 April 1979-31 March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, S.R.

    1988-03-01

    Pulsed lasers were used in this work to photofragment molecules or to initiate chain reactions. One of the major advances was the availability of high-powered rare gas halide excimer lasers. In addition, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers and dye lasers were used throughout. Results include: generalized kinetic formulations of the problem of laser-initiated chain reactions. Several studies were carried out to explore the details of chain combustion phenomena, slow chain reactions, chain branching behavior, and vibrational temperatures of combusting mixtures. A method to determine the rotational temperature of nitrogen molecules by laser multiphoton ionization was shown. The chain reaction methodology was applied to complex polyatomic systems, in which complete infrared spectra of the emitting species were obtained. Systems studied included, chlorine + HBr, HI, methane, hydrogen, ethane, propane, butane, cyclopropane, and cyclohexane. Photofragmentation studies involved the production and analysis of radical species, such as methyl, CH 2 I, and CCH. Molecules studied included methylene iodide, methyl iodide, dimethyl mercury, acetone, acetylene, vinyl chloride, dichloroethylene, and fluorochloroethylene. The first infrared characterization of a highly vibrationally excited radical was shown. Reactions of methyl radicals were studied in detail, in which a new method for obtaining absolute values of the methyl radical reaction rates were obtained

  20. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, H.

    1991-10-01

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C 2 . The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  1. Speciation of actinides in aqueous solution by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takaumi; Kato, Yoshiharu; Meinrath, G.; Yoshida, Zenko; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) as a sensitive and selective method has been applied to the speciation of actinides in aqueous solution. Studies on hydrolysis and carbonate complexation of U(VI) and on determination of hydration number of Cm(III) are reported. (author)

  2. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, F. J.; De la Rosa, J.; Gallegos, F. J.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence methods are being used increasingly in the measurement of species concentrations in gases, liquids and solids. Laser induced fluorescence is spontaneous emission from atoms or molecules that have been excited by laser radiation. Here we present a time resolved fluorescence instrument that consists of a 5 μJ Nitrogen laser (337.1 nm), a sample holder, a quartz optical fiber, a spectrometer, a PMT and a PC that allows the measurement of visible fluorescence spectra (350-750 nm). Time response of the system is approximately 5 ns. The instrument has been used in the measurement of colored bond paper, antifreeze, diesel, cochineal pigment and malignant tissues. The data acquisition was achieved through computer control of a digital oscilloscope (using General Purpose Interface Bus GPIB) and the spectrometer via serial (RS232). The instrument software provides a graphic interface that lets make some data acquisition tasks like finding fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes. The software was developed using the Lab-View 6i graphic programming package and can be easily managed in order to add more functions to it.

  3. Reaction-time-resolved measurements of laser-induced fluorescence in a shock tube with a single laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabeti, S.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2017-11-01

    Shock tubes allow for the study of ultra-fast gas-phase reactions on the microsecond time scale. Because the repetition rate of the experiments is low, it is crucial to gain as much information as possible from each individual measurement. While reaction-time-resolved species concentration and temperature measurements with fast absorption methods are established, conventional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements with pulsed lasers provide data only at a single reaction time. Therefore, fluorescence methods have rarely been used in shock-tube diagnostics. In this paper, a novel experimental concept is presented that allows reaction-time-resolved LIF measurements with one single laser pulse using a test section that is equipped with several optical ports. After the passage of the shock wave, the reactive mixture is excited along the center of the tube with a 266-nm laser beam directed through a window in the end wall of the shock tube. The emitted LIF signal is collected through elongated sidewall windows and focused onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an intensified CCD camera. The one-dimensional spatial resolution of the measurement translates into a reaction-time-resolved measurement while the species information can be gained from the spectral axis of the detected two-dimensional image. Anisole pyrolysis was selected as the benchmark reaction to demonstrate the new apparatus.

  4. Time-resolved analysis of nonlinear optical limiting for laser synthesized carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. X.; Hong, M. H.

    2010-11-01

    Nonlinear optical limiting materials have attracted much research interest in recent years. Carbon nanoparticles suspended in liquids show a strong nonlinear optical limiting function. It is important to investigate the nonlinear optical limiting process of carbon nanoparticles for further improving their nonlinear optical limiting performance. In this study, carbon nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation of a carbon target in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Optical limiting properties of the samples were studied with 532-nm laser light, which is in the most sensitive wavelength band for human eyes. The shape of the laser pulse plays an important role for initializing the nonlinear optical limiting effect. Time-resolved analysis of laser pulses discovered 3 fluence stages of optical limiting. Theoretical simulation indicates that the optical limiting is initialized by a near-field optical enhancement effect.

  5. Time-resolved protein nano-crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; White, Thomas A.; Caleman, Carl; DePonte, Daniel P.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Gumprecht, Lars; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Schulz, Joachim; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Barty, Anton; Andreasson, Jakob; Davidsson, Jan; Hajdu, Janos; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda; Malmerberg, Erik; Neutze, Richard; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Graafsma, Heinz; Hirsemann, Helmut; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barends, Thomas R.M.; Foucar, Lutz; Krasniqi, Faton; Lomb, Lukas; Rolles, Daniel; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond; Starodub, Dmitri; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Bottin, Herve

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photo-activated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nano-crystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 μs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. (authors)

  6. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy of cross-beam pulsed laser ablation on graphite targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangines, R.; Sanchez Ake, C.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-beam pulsed laser ablation with two delayed lasers is performed on two perpendicular graphite targets. The time delay between lasers is varied by up to 5 μs, and physical changes on the second plasma, due to the interaction with the first generated one, are determined by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy

  7. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  8. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond UV laser and a VUV free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S. Y.; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Takao; Nishizawa, Kiyoshi; Horio, Takuya; Mizuno, Tomoya; Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    A time-resolved photoelectron imaging using a femtosecond ultraviolet (UV) laser and a vacuum UV freeelectron laser is presented. Ultrafast internal conversion and intersystem crossing in pyrazine in a supersonic molecular beam were clearly observed in the time profiles of photoioinzation intensity and time-dependent photoelectron images.

  9. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation: Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C Y; Mao, X L; Greif, R; Russo, R E

    2007-01-01

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume

  10. Radially resolved simulation of a high-gain free electron laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, W.M.; Prosnitz, D.; Doss, S.; Gelinas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a two-dimensional simulation of a high-gain free electron laser (FEL) amplifier is presented. The simulation solves the inhomogeneous paraxial wave equation. The source term is radially resolved and is obtained by tracking the interaction of the laser field with localized macroparticles

  11. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  12. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone, K.V.; Dunn, J.; Baldis, H.A.; May, M.J.; Purvis, M.A.; Scott, H.A.; Schneider, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  13. Spectrally resolved modal characteristics of leaky-wave-coupled quantum cascade phase-locked laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, Chris; Gibson, Ricky; Boyle, Colin; Kirch, Jeremy D.; Lindberg, Donald; Earles, Thomas; Botez, Dan; Mawst, Luke J.; Bedford, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The modal characteristics of nonresonant five-element phase-locked arrays of 4.7-μm emitting quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been studied using spectrally resolved near- and far-field measurements and correlated with results of device simulation. Devices are fabricated by a two-step metal-organic chemical vapor deposition process and operate predominantly in an in-phase array mode near threshold, although become multimode at higher drive levels. The wide spectral bandwidth of the QCL's core region is found to be a factor in promoting multispatial-mode operation at high drive levels above threshold. An optimized resonant-array design is identified to allow sole in-phase array-mode operation to high drive levels above threshold, and indicates that for phase-locked laser arrays full spatial coherence to high output powers does not require full temporal coherence.

  14. Depth-resolved phase retardation measurements for laser-assisted non-ablative cartilage reshaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Jong-In [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Vargas, Gracie [Center for Bioengineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Wong, Brian J F [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Milner, Thomas E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2005-05-07

    Since polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is emerging as a new technique for determining phase retardation in biological materials, we measured phase retardation changes in cartilage during local laser heating for application to laser-assisted cartilage reshaping. Thermally-induced changes in phase retardation of nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG laser irradiation were investigated using a PS-OCT system. A PS-OCT system and infrared imaging radiometer were used to record, respectively, depth-resolved images of the Stokes parameters of light backscattered from ex vivo porcine nasal septal cartilage and radiometric temperature changes following laser irradiation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded before (control), during and after laser irradiation. From the measured Stokes parameters (I, Q, U and V), an estimate of the relative phase retardation between two orthogonal polarizations was computed to determine birefringence in cartilage. Phase retardation images of light backscattered from cartilage show significant changes in retardation following laser irradiation. To investigate the origin of retardation changes in response to local heat generation, we differentiated two possible mechanisms: dehydration and thermal denaturation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded after dehydration in glycerol and thermal denaturation in heated physiological saline. In our experiments, observed retardation changes in cartilage are primarily due to dehydration. Since dehydration is a principal source for retardation changes in cartilage over the range of heating profiles investigated, our studies suggest that the use of PS-OCT as a feedback control methodology for non-ablative cartilage reshaping requires further investigation.

  15. Depth-resolved phase retardation measurements for laser-assisted non-ablative cartilage reshaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Jong-In; Vargas, Gracie; Wong, Brian J F; Milner, Thomas E

    2005-01-01

    Since polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is emerging as a new technique for determining phase retardation in biological materials, we measured phase retardation changes in cartilage during local laser heating for application to laser-assisted cartilage reshaping. Thermally-induced changes in phase retardation of nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG laser irradiation were investigated using a PS-OCT system. A PS-OCT system and infrared imaging radiometer were used to record, respectively, depth-resolved images of the Stokes parameters of light backscattered from ex vivo porcine nasal septal cartilage and radiometric temperature changes following laser irradiation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded before (control), during and after laser irradiation. From the measured Stokes parameters (I, Q, U and V), an estimate of the relative phase retardation between two orthogonal polarizations was computed to determine birefringence in cartilage. Phase retardation images of light backscattered from cartilage show significant changes in retardation following laser irradiation. To investigate the origin of retardation changes in response to local heat generation, we differentiated two possible mechanisms: dehydration and thermal denaturation. PS-OCT images of cartilage were recorded after dehydration in glycerol and thermal denaturation in heated physiological saline. In our experiments, observed retardation changes in cartilage are primarily due to dehydration. Since dehydration is a principal source for retardation changes in cartilage over the range of heating profiles investigated, our studies suggest that the use of PS-OCT as a feedback control methodology for non-ablative cartilage reshaping requires further investigation

  16. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  17. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume

  18. Time resolved measurement of laser-ablated particles by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Murakami, Kouichi

    1999-01-01

    The time- and spatially-resolved properties of laser ablated carbon, boron and silicon particles were measured by LAPXAS (Laser Plasma Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy). The maximum speed of positively charged ions is higher than those of neutral atoms and negatively charged ions. The spatial distributions of the laser-ablated particles in the localized rare gas environment were measured. In helium gas environment, by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume depressed the ablation plume. There is no formation of silicon clusters till 15 μs after laser ablation in the argon gas environment. (author)

  19. Time-resolved diode laser infrared absorption spectroscopy of the nascent HCl in the infrared laser chemistry of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, George

    1990-04-01

    The IR multiphoton excitation and the frequency, fluence and intensity dependence of the IR-laser chemical yields of CF 2ClCH 2Cl have been studied in the fluence range of 1 to 10 J cm -2 yielding a steady-state constant k(st)/ I=0.74×10 6 s -1 MW -1 cm 2 which is approximately independent of intensity. Time-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy with diode laser sources has been used to observe the nascent HCl during the first few 100 ns indicating a population inversion between the levels ν=1, J=4 and ν=2, J=5. At low reactant pressures ( p⩽10 Pa) the time-resolved measurement gives a steady-state rate constant consistent with the theoretical result adjusted to the static yield measurements. The capability of state-selective and time-resolved IR spectroscopy is thus demonstrated, giving real-time determinations of rate constants.

  20. Uptake Of Trivalent Actinides (Cm(III)) And Lanthanides (Eu(III)) By Cement-Type Minerals: A Wet Chemistry And Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tits, J.; Stumpf, T; Wieland, E.; Fanghaenel, T

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of the two chemical homologues Cm (III) and Eu(III) with calcium silicate hydrates at pH 13.3 has been investigated in batch-type sorption studies using Eu(III), and complemented with time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy using Cm(III). The sorption data for Eu(III) reveal fast sorption kinetics, and a strong uptake by CSH phases, with distribution ratios of 6({+-}3)*105 L kg-1. Three different types of sorbed Cm(III) species have been identified: a non-fluorescing species, which was identified as Cm cluster present either as surface precipitate or as Cm(III) colloid in solution, and two sorbed fluorescing species. The sorbed fluorescing species have characteristic emission spectra (main peak maxima at 618.9 nm and 620.9 nm) and fluorescence emission lifetimes (289 {+-} 11 ms and 1482{+-} 200 ms). From the fluorescence lifetimes, it appears that the two fluorescing Cm(III) species have, respectively, one to two or no water molecules left in their first coordination sphere, suggesting that these species are incorporated into the CSH structure. A structural model for Cm(III) and Eu(III) incorporation into CSH phases is proposed based on the substitution of Ca at two different types of sites in the CSH structure. (author)

  1. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, A., E-mail: aurelian.marcu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Avotina, L. [Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda 4, LV 1010 Riga (Latvia); Porosnicu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Marin, A. [Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, 202 Splaiul Independentei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Grigorescu, C.E.A. [National Institute R& D for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Ursescu, D. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lungu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics Atomistilor Str., 105 bis, 077125, Magurele (Romania); Demitri, N. [Hard X-ray Beamline and Structural Biology, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 - km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza TS Italy (Italy); Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp{sup 3}% increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp{sup 3}% is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp{sup 3} bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp{sup 3} percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  2. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Porosnicu, C.; Marin, A.; Grigorescu, C.E.A.; Ursescu, D.; Lungu, M.; Demitri, N.; Lungu, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp 3 % increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp 3 % is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp 3 bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp 3 percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  3. Time-resolved studies. Ch. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Dennis M.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Wide-bandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the 'parallel data collection' method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in data-collection time. Perhaps the most exciting advances in time-resolved X-ray studies will be made by those methods that exploit the pulsed nature of the radiation emitted from storage rings. Pulsed techniques have had an enormous impact in the study of the temporal evolution of transient phenomena. The extension from continuous to modulated sources for use in time-resolved work has been carried over in a host of fields that use both pulsed particle and pulsed electro-magnetic beams. In this chapter the new experimental techniques are reviewed and illustrated with some experiments. (author). 98 refs.; 20 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of the uranium including calcium. Time resolved measurement spectroscopic analysis (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaoka, Katsuaki; Maruyama, Youichiro; Oba, Masaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Otobe, Haruyoshi; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2010-05-01

    For the remote analysis of low DF TRU (Decontamination Factor Transuranic) fuel, Laser Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to uranium oxide including a small amount of calcium oxide. The characteristics, such as spectrum intensity and plasma excitation temperature, were measured using time-resolved spectroscopy. As a result, in order to obtain the stable intensity of calcium spectrum for the uranium spectrum, it was found out that the optimum observation delay time of spectrum is 4 microseconds or more after laser irradiation. (author)

  5. Optimization of experimental conditions in uranium trace determination using laser time-resolved fluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baly, L.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    At the present paper a new sample excitation geometry is presented for the uranium trace determination in aqueous solutions by the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence. This new design introduces the laser radiation through the top side of the cell allowing the use of cells with two quartz sides, less expensive than commonly used at this experimental set. Optimization of the excitation conditions, temporal discrimination and spectral selection are presented

  6. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  7. Comb-Resolved Dual-Comb Spectroscopy Stabilized by Free-Running Continuous-Wave Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Naoya; Ozawa, Akira; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate dual-comb spectroscopy with relatively phase-locked two frequency combs, instead of frequency combs firmly fixed to the absolute frequency references. By stabilizing two beat frequencies between two mode-locked lasers at different wavelengths observed via free-running continuous-wave (CW) lasers, two combs are tightly phase locked to each other. The frequency noise of the CW lasers barely affects the performance of dual-comb spectroscopy because of the extremely fast common-mode noise rejection. Transform-limited comb-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy with a 6 Hz radio frequency linewidth is demonstrated by the use of Yb-fiber oscillators.

  8. On the use of time resolved laser-induced spectrofluorometry in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.; Decambox, P.; Mauchien, P.; Davin, T.; Pradel, B.

    1991-01-01

    Time Resolved Laser-Induced Spectrofluorometry (TRLIS) has been used for actinides trace analysis and complexation analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle. Results obtained in the different fields such as in geology, in the Purex process, in the environment, in the medical and in waste storage assessment are presented. 4 figs., 6 refs

  9. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzkes, J.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schramm, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden–Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Sobiella, M.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden–Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Karsch, L. [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  10. Kinetics and branching ratios of the reactions NH2+NO2->N2O+H2O and NH2+NO2->H2NO+NO studied by pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Sillesen, A.

    1996-01-01

    studied by monitoring the decay of NH2 and the simultaneous formation of N2O and NO by time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy. The decay rate of NH2 was studied as a function of NO2 concentration to obtain an overall rate constant k(NH2 + NO2) = (1.35 +/- 0.15) X 10(-11) molecule(-1) cm(3) s(-1...

  11. Spatially resolved δ13C analysis using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Riha, K. M.; Nims, M. K.; Linley, T. J.; Hess, N. J.; Nico, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Inherent geochemical, organic matter, and microbial heterogeneity over small spatial scales can complicate studies of carbon dynamics through soils. Stable isotope analysis has a strong history of helping track substrate turnover, delineate rhizosphere activity zones, and identifying transitions in vegetation cover, but most traditional isotope approaches are limited in spatial resolution by a combination of physical separation techniques (manual dissection) and IRMS instrument sensitivity. We coupled laser ablation sampling with isotope measurement via IRMS to enable spatially resolved analysis over solid surfaces. Once a targeted sample region is ablated the resulting particulates are entrained in a helium carrier gas and passed through a combustion reactor where carbon is converted to CO2. Cyrotrapping of the resulting CO2 enables a reduction in carrier gas flow which improves overall measurement sensitivity versus traditional, high flow sample introduction. Currently we are performing sample analysis at 50 μm resolution, require 65 ng C per analysis, and achieve measurement precision consistent with other continuous flow techniques. We will discuss applications of the laser ablation IRMS (LA-IRMS) system to microbial communities and fish ecology studies to demonstrate the merits of this technique and how similar analytical approaches can be transitioned to soil systems. Preliminary efforts at analyzing soil samples will be used to highlight strengths and limitations of the LA-IRMS approach, paying particular attention to sample preparation requirements, spatial resolution, sample analysis time, and the types of questions most conducive to analysis via LA-IRMS.

  12. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong.

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub α//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub γ//He/sub β/'' and ''He/sub δ//He/sub β/'' helium-like resonance line intensity ratios

  13. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub ..cap alpha..//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub ..gamma..//He/sub ..beta../'' and ''He/sub delta

  14. Time-resolved laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry with a fiber-optic probe and ICCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystol, Adam J.; Campiglia, Andres D.; Gillispie, Gregory D.

    2000-01-01

    Improved methodology for chemical analysis via laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry is reported. The complications of traditional methodology for measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature are avoided by freezing the distal end of a bifurcated fiber-optic probe directly into the sample matrix. Emission wavelength-time matrices were rapidly collected by automatically incrementing the gate delay of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera relative to the laser excitation pulse. The excitation source is a compact frequency-doubled tunable dye laser whose bandwidth (<0.03 nm) is well matched for Shpol'skii spectroscopy. Data reproducibility for quantitative analysis purposes and analytical figures of merit are demonstrated for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 77 K. Although not attempted in this study, time-resolved excitation-emission matrices could easily be collected with this instrumental system. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  15. Time-resolved x-ray spectra of laser irradiated high-Z targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Attwood, D.T.; Boyle, M.J.; Campbell, E.M.; Coleman, L.C.; Kornblum, H.N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results obtained by using the Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera to record x-ray emission from laser-irradiated high-z targets in the 1-20 keV range are reported. Nine to eleven K-edge filter channels were used for the measurements. In the lower energy channels, a dynamic range of x-ray emission intensity of better than three orders of magnitude have been recorded. Data will be presented which describe temporally and spectrally resolved x-ray spectra of gold disk targets irradiated by laser pulses from the Argus facility, including the temporal evolution of the superthermal x-ray tail

  16. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    Even at moderate fluence (0.6 -2.4 J/cm2) laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ions emitted from the surface. The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. We have irradiated silver...... in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...

  17. Sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of quantum-cascade laser active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Patriarche, Gilles; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Sagnes, Isabelle; Pegolotti, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Calvar, Ariane; Amanti, Maria; Sirtori, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    A procedure that produces sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum cascade lasers is presented. The chemical mappings reveal that, although the structure is lattice-matched to InP, the InAlAs barriers do not attain the nominal aluminum content—48%—and are, in fact, InGaAlAs quaternaries. This information is used to adjust the aluminum precursor flow and fine-tune the composition of the barriers, resulting in a significant improvement of the fabricated lasers. (paper)

  18. Subcycle interference dynamics of time-resolved photoelectron holography with midinfrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Xuebin; Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, Andre D.; Huismans, Y.; Smirnova, O.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron holography from atoms using midinfrared laser pulses is investigated by solving the corresponding time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) and a classical model, respectively. The numerical simulation of the photoelectron angular distribution of Xe irradiated with a low-frequency free-electron laser source agrees well with the experimental results. Different types of subcycle interferometric structures are predicted by the classical model. Furthermore with the TDSE model it is demonstrated that the holographic pattern is sensitive to the shape of the atomic orbitals. This is a step toward imaging by means of photoelectron holography.

  19. Laser-time resolved fluorimetric determination of trace of boron in U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongyuan; Wang Yulong; Wang Qin

    1988-01-01

    In this work, a laser-time resolved fluorimetric determinatin of trace of boron in U 3 O 8 had been developed. The boron complex with dibenzoyl methane (DBM) in a suitable medium is excited by a small nitrogen laser and emits the delay fluorescence with lifetime of 2 ms which is much longer than that of the fluorescence of uranium. Since the fluorescence of uranium doesn't interfere with determination of boron in the time resolved fluorimetric method boron need not be separated from uranium in advance. Thus the determination is very rapid and simple. The limit of determination is 0.02 ngB/ml. When 10 mgU is taken, 0.01 ppm of boron in uranium can be determined. Several samples of U 3 O 8 with boron content from 0.04 to 0.5 ppm have been determined by using this method. The results of determination have been accordant with other methods

  20. Time-resolved measurements with intense ultrashort laser pulses: a 'molecular movie' in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, A; Ergler, Th; Feuerstein, B; Zrost, K; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the high-resolution multidimensional real-time mapping of H 2 + and D 2 + nuclear wave packets performed employing time-resolved three-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging with intense laser pulses. Exploiting a combination of a 'reaction microscope' spectrometer and a pump-probe setup with two intense 6-7 fs laser pulses, we simultaneously visualize both vibrational and rotational motion of the molecule, and obtain a sequence of snapshots of the squared ro-vibrational wave function with time-step resolution of ∼ 0.3 fs, allowing us to reconstruct a real-time movie of the ultrafast molecular motion. We observe fast dephasing, or 'collapse' of the vibrational wave packet and its subsequent revival, as well as signatures of rotational excitation. For D 2 + we resolve also the fractional revivals resulting from the interference between the counter-propagating parts of the wave packet

  1. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.; Matthews, D.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lee, R.W.

    1982-11-01

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers, whose Z's range from 13 to 22, are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasms is changed from SiO 2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  2. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.; Matthews, D.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lee, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers whose Z's range from 13 to 22 are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasma is changed from SiO 2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  3. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.; Decambox, P.; Mauchien, P.; Petit, A.

    1995-01-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) is a very sensitive and selective method that has been used for actinides and lanthanides analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle. This technique has been used in different fields such as in geology, in the Purex process, in the environment, in the medical and in waste storage assessment. Spectroscopic data, limits of detection and results obtained in previously quoted fields are presented. (author)

  4. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limitin...

  5. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Čada, Martin; Kment, Š.; Hubička, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 14 (2013), s. 2428-2430 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12045; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA MŠk LD12002; GA MŠk LH12043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode laser s * plasma diagnostics * absorption spectroscopy * time resolved Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  6. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a

  7. Intra- and intercycle interference of angle-resolved electron emission in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; López, S. D.; Arbó, D. G.

    2018-03-01

    A theoretical study of ionization of the hydrogen atom due to an XUV pulse in the presence of an infrared (IR) laser is presented. Well-established theories are usually used to describe the laser-assisted photoelectron effect: the well-known soft-photon approximation firstly posed by Maquet et al (2007 J. Mod. Opt. 54 1847) and Kazansky’s theory in (2010 Phys. Rev. A 82, 033420). However, these theories completely fail to predict the electron emission perpendicularly to the polarization direction. Making use of a semiclassical model (SCM), we study the angle-resolved energy distribution of PEs for the case that both fields are linearly polarized in the same direction. We thoroughly analyze and characterize two different emission regions in the angle-energy domain: (i) the parallel-like region with contribution of two classical trajectories per optical cycle and (ii) the perpendicular-like region with contribution of four classical trajectories per optical cycle. We show that our SCM is able to assess the interference patterns of the angle-resolved PE spectrum in the two different mentioned regions. Electron trajectories stemming from different optical laser cycles give rise to angle-independent intercycle interferences known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by an angle-dependent coarse-grained structure coming from the intracycle interference of the electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We show the accuracy of our SCM as a function of the time delay between the IR and the XUV pulses and also as a function of the laser intensity by comparing the semiclassical predictions of the angle-resolved PE spectrum with the continuum-distorted wave strong field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  8. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  9. Time-resolved ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for organic material analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Boueri, Myriam [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Yu Jin [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: jin.yu@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr; Mao, Samuel S; Piscitelli, Vincent; Xianglei, Mao; Russo, Richard E [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Ultraviolet pulses (266 nm) delivered by a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser were used to analyze organic samples with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We present characteristics of the spectra obtained from organic samples with special attentions on the emissions of organic elements, O and N, and molecular bonds CN. The choice of these atomic or molecular species is justified on one hand, by the importance of these species to specify organic or biological materials; and on the other hand by the possible interferences with ambient air when laser ablation takes place in the atmosphere. Time-resolved LIBS was used to determine the time-evolution of line intensity emitted from these species. We demonstrate different kinetic behaviors corresponding to different origins of emitters: native atomic or molecular species directly vaporized from the sample or those generated through dissociation or recombination due to interaction between laser-induced plasma and air molecules. Our results show the ability of time-resolved UV-LIBS for detection and identification of native atomic or molecular species from an organic sample.

  10. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser Pulses using a Low-dispersion Frequency Resolved Optical Grating Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelock, Hope; Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    A low dispersion frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) spectrometer was designed to characterize ultrashort (non-colinear optical parametric amplifier. This instrument splits a laser pulse into two replicas with a 90:10 intensity ratio using a thin pellicle beam-splitter and then recombines the pulses in a birefringent medium. The instrument detects a wavelength-sensitive change in polarization of the weak probe pulse in the presence of the stronger pump pulse inside the birefringent medium. Scanning the time delay between the two pulses and acquiring spectra allows for characterization of the frequency and time content of ultrafast laser pulses, that is needed for interpretation of experimental results obtained from these ultrafast laser systems. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray spectra from laser-generated high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiel, U.; Eidmann, Klaus; Witte, Klaus-Juergen

    2001-04-01

    We focused frequency doubled ultra short laser pulses on solid C, F, Na and Al targets, K-shell emission was systematically investigated by time resolved spectroscopy using a sub-ps streak camera. A large number of laser shots can be accumulated when triggering the camera with an Auston switch system at very high temporal precision. The system provides an outstanding time resolution of 1.7ps accumulating thousands of laser shots. The time duration of the He-(alpha) K-shell resonance lines was observed in the range of (2-4)ps and shows a decrease with the atomic number. The experimental results are well reproduced by hydro code simulations post processed with an atomic kinetics code.

  12. Time-resolved imaging of flyer dynamics for femtosecond laser-induced backward transfer of solid polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinaeugle, M., E-mail: m.feinaeugle@utwente.nl [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gregorčič, P. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 6, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Heath, D.J. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Mills, B., E-mail: bm602@orc.soton.ac.uk [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Eason, R.W. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Laser-induced backward transfer was investigated by time-resolved shadowgraphy. • Flyer velocity was a function of carrier, donor thickness, delay and fluence. • We investigated the fluence window for intact transfer and the role of the receiver. • Donor-crater profile variation was studied for different ejection regimes. • Conditions for intact and fragmented flyers were determined. - Abstract: We have studied the transfer regimes and dynamics of polymer flyers from laser-induced backward transfer (LIBT) via time-resolved shadowgraphy. Imaging of the flyer ejection phase of LIBT of 3.8 μm and 6.4 μm thick SU-8 polymer films on germanium and silicon carrier substrates was performed over a time delay range of 1.4–16.4 μs after arrival of the laser pulse. The experiments were carried out with 150 fs, 800 nm pulses spatially shaped using a digital micromirror device, and laser fluences of up to 3.5 J/cm{sup 2} while images were recorded via a CCD camera and a spark discharge lamp. Velocities of flyers found in the range of 6–20 m/s, and the intact and fragmented ejection regimes, were a function of donor thickness, carrier and laser fluence. The crater profile of the donor after transfer and the resulting flyer profile indicated different flyer ejection modes for Si carriers and high fluences. The results contribute to better understanding of the LIBT process, and help to determine experimental parameters for successful LIBT of intact deposits.

  13. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  14. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of organic ligands by europium: Fluorescence quenching and lifetime properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Hajjoul, H.; Redon, R.; Gagné, J. P.; Mounier, S.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) has proved its usefulness in the fields of biophysics, life science and geochemistry to characterize the fluorescence probe molecule with its chemical environment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of this powerful technique combined with Steady-State (S-S) measurements. A multi-mode factor analysis, in particular CP/PARAFAC, was used to analyze the interaction between Europium (Eu) and Humic substances (HSs) extracted from Saint Lawrence Estuary in Canada. The Saint Lawrence system is a semi-enclosed water stream with connections to the Atlantic Ocean and is an excellent natural laboratory. CP/PARAFAC applied to fluorescence S-S data allows introspecting ligands-metal interactions and the one-site 1:1 modeling gives information about the stability constants. From the spectral signatures and decay lifetimes data given by TRLFS, one can deduce the fluorescence quenching which modifies the fluorescence and discuss its mechanisms. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between europium and humic substances samples (Log K value varies from 3.38 to 5.08 at pH 7.00). Using the Stern-Volmer plot, it has been concluded that static and dynamic quenching takes places in the case of salicylic acid and europium interaction while for HSs interaction only a static quenching is observed.

  15. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeromin, A; Schaffarczyk, A P; Puczylowski, J; Peinke, J; Hölling, M

    2014-01-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales

  16. Meso-scale defect evaluation of selective laser melting using spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M; Catchpole-Smith, S; Patel, R; Marrow, P; Li, Wenqi; Tuck, C; Sharples, S D; Clare, A T

    2017-09-01

    Developments in additive manufacturing technology are serving to expand the potential applications. Critical developments are required in the supporting areas of measurement and in process inspection to achieve this. CM247LC is a nickel superalloy that is of interest for use in aerospace and civil power plants. However, it is difficult to process via selective laser melting (SLM) as it suffers from cracking during rapid cooling and solidification. This limits the viability of CM247LC parts created using SLM. To quantify part integrity, spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) has been identified as a viable non-destructive evaluation technique. In this study, a combination of optical microscopy and SRAS was used to identify and classify the surface defects present in SLM-produced parts. By analysing the datasets and scan trajectories, it is possible to correlate morphological information with process parameters. Image processing was used to quantify porosity and cracking for bulk density measurement. Analysis of surface acoustic wave data showed that an error in manufacture in the form of an overscan occurred. Comparing areas affected by overscan with a bulk material, a change in defect density from 1.17% in the bulk material to 5.32% in the overscan regions was observed, highlighting the need to reduce overscan areas in manufacture.

  17. Meso-scale defect evaluation of selective laser melting using spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M.; Catchpole-Smith, S.; Patel, R.; Marrow, P.; Li, Wenqi; Tuck, C.; Sharples, S. D.; Clare, A. T.

    2017-09-01

    Developments in additive manufacturing technology are serving to expand the potential applications. Critical developments are required in the supporting areas of measurement and in process inspection to achieve this. CM247LC is a nickel superalloy that is of interest for use in aerospace and civil power plants. However, it is difficult to process via selective laser melting (SLM) as it suffers from cracking during rapid cooling and solidification. This limits the viability of CM247LC parts created using SLM. To quantify part integrity, spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) has been identified as a viable non-destructive evaluation technique. In this study, a combination of optical microscopy and SRAS was used to identify and classify the surface defects present in SLM-produced parts. By analysing the datasets and scan trajectories, it is possible to correlate morphological information with process parameters. Image processing was used to quantify porosity and cracking for bulk density measurement. Analysis of surface acoustic wave data showed that an error in manufacture in the form of an overscan occurred. Comparing areas affected by overscan with a bulk material, a change in defect density from 1.17% in the bulk material to 5.32% in the overscan regions was observed, highlighting the need to reduce overscan areas in manufacture.

  18. Space-resolved analysis of trace elements in fresh vegetables using ultraviolet nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juve, Vincent; Portelli, Richard; Boueri, Myriam; Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to analyze trace elements contained in fresh vegetables. A quadrupled Nd:YAG laser is used in the experiments for ablation. Analyzed samples come from local markets and represent frequently consumed vegetables. For a typical root vegetable, such as potato, spectral analysis of the plasma emission reveals more than 400 lines emitted by 27 elements and 2 molecules, C 2 and CN. Among these species, one can find trace as well as ultra-trace elements. A space-resolved analysis of several trace elements with strong emissions is then applied to typical root, stem and fruit vegetables. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of an interesting tool for botanical and agricultural studies as well for food quality/safety and environment pollution assessment and control

  19. Time resolved emission spectroscopy investigations of pulsed laser ablated plasmas of ZrO2 and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadoko, A D; Lee, P S; Lee, P; Mohanty, S R; Rawat, R S

    2006-01-01

    With the rising trend of synthesizing ultra thin films and/or quantum-confined materials using laser ablation, optimization of deposition parameters plays an essential role in obtaining desired film characteristics. This paper presents the initial step of plasma optimization study by examining temporal distribution of the plasma formation by pulsed laser ablation of materials. The emitted spectra of ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 are obtained ∼3mm above the ablated target to derive the ablated plasma characteristics. The plasma temperature is estimated to be at around 2.35 eV, with electron density of 1.14 x 10 16 (cm -3 ). Emission spectra with different gate delay time (40-270 ns) are captured to study the time resolved plume characteristics. Transitory elemental species are identified

  20. Complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with 2,6-bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine and 2-bromohexanoic acid studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, A.; Panak, P.J.; Heidelberg Univ.; Geist, A.

    2013-01-01

    The complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with 2,6-bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (C5-BPP) and 2-bromohexanoic acid as lipophilic anion has been investigated by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. Upon increasing ligand concentration three different Cm(III)-C5-BPP species with emission bands at 604.1 nm, 607.9 nm and 611.4 nm, respectively, are found and attributed to complexes with one, two and three C5-BPP molecules in the inner coordination sphere. Comparison with results of TRLFS experiments without 2-bromohexanoic acid shows that the C5-BPP ligand is able to completely displace the lipophilic anion from the inner coordination sphere, forming [Cm(C5-BPP) 3 ] 3+ complexes. This complex is also found in the organic phase of an extraction experiment performed with Cm(III), demonstrating that the lipophilic anion required for the extraction is not directly coordinated to the metal ion in the species formed during extraction. In case of Eu(III) the number of different species formed cannot be determined accurately. Nevertheless, the formation of the complex [EU(C5-BPP) 3 ] 3+ in the presence of 2-bromohexanoic acid is confirmed. (orig.)

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  2. Simultaneously time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charatis, G.; Young, B.K.F.; Busch, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The CHROMA laser facility at KMS Fusion has been used to irradiate a variety of microdot targets. These include aluminum dots and mixed bromine dots doped with K-shell (magnesium) emitters. Simultaneously time- and space-resolved K-shell and L-shell spectra have been measured and compared to dynamic model predictions. The electron density profiles are measured using holographic interferometry. Temperatures, densities, and ionization distributions are determined using K-shell and L-shell spectral techniques. Time and spatial gradients are resolved simultaneously using three diagnostics: a framing crystal x-ray spectrometer, an x-ray streaked crystal spectrometer with a spatial imaging slit, and a 4-frame holographic interferometer. Significant differences have been found between the interferometric and the model-dependent spectral measurements of plasma density. Predictions by new non-stationary L-shell models currently being developed are also presented. 14 refs., 10 figs

  3. Time-resolved photoemission micro-spectrometer using higher-order harmonics of Ti:sapphire laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, J.; Kamada, M.; Kondo, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A new photoemission spectrometer is under construction for the photoemission microscopy and the time-resolved pump- probe experiment. The higher order harmonics of the Ti:sapphire laser is used as the light source of the VUV region in this system. Because the fundamental laser is focused tightly into the rare gas jet to generate the higher order harmonics, the spot size of the laser, in other words, the spot size of the VUV light source is smaller than a few tens of micrometer. This smallness of the spot size has advantage for the microscopy. In order to compensate the low flux of the laser harmonics, a multilayer-coated schwaltzshild optics was designed. The multilayers play also as the monochromatic filter. The spatial resolution of this schwaltzshild system is found to be less than 1 micrometer by the ray-tracing calculations. A main chamber of the system is equipped with a time-of-flight energy analyzer to improve the efficiency of the electron detection. The main chamber and the gas chamber are separated by a differential pumping chamber and a thin Al foil. The system is designed for the study of the clean surface. It will be capable to perform the sub-micron photoemission microscopy and the femto-second pump-probe photoemission study for the various photo-excited dynamics on clean surfaces

  4. Time-resolved output spectrum from a hydrogen fluoride laser using mixtures of SF6 and HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    The time-resolved spectrum from a transverse-discharge hydrogen fluoride (HF) laser using a mixture of SF 6 and HI is reported. Because this spectrum matches that from a high-pressure H 2 -F 2 laser, and because the SF 6 -HI mixture is chemically stable, this laser should be a suitable and convenient source for probing H 2 -F 2 amplifiers

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopy of laser-induced breakdown in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert J.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1996-05-01

    Laser pulses of 60-ps and 80-ps at a wavelength of 532-nm and 1064-nm respectively were used to produce laser induced breakdown in triple-distilled water. The resulting luminescent flash from the plasma was captured with an imaging spectrograph coupled to a streak camera with a 5-ps time resolution. The wavelength range was 350 to 900-nm. We present the resulting experimental data which gives plasma duration and time-resolved spectral information. Plasma temperature is also computed from the data. All parameters are presented at a pulse energy of 1-mJ and are compared with time-integrated spectra at the same pulse duration and at 5 to 7-ns pulse duration in a similar energy range.

  6. Spatially and temporally resolved x-ray emission from imploding laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.; Coleman, L.W.; Boyle, M.J.; Phillion, D.W.; Swain, J.E.; Manes, K.R.; Larsen, J.T.

    1976-09-01

    The Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera has been used in conjunction with 6 μm diameter pinholes to record well resolved implosion histories of DT filled laser fusion targets. The space-time compression data provide clearly identified implosion velocities, typically 3 x 10 7 cm/sec for two-sided clamshell irradiation of a 70 μm/sup D/, .5 μm wall DT filled glass microshell. Single-sided irradiation results show hydrodynamic convergence at the target center, followed by an asymmetric but two-sided target disassembly. These experiments were performed at the two arm Janus Laser facility, which typically delivered a total of 0.4 TW in a 70 psec pulse for these experiments

  7. Time-resolved spectroscopy of nonequilibrium ionization in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjoribanks, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The highly transient ionization characteristic of laser-produced plasmas at high energy densities has been investigated experimentally, using x-ray spectroscopy with time resolution of less than 20 ps. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma density and temperature were used, including line ratios, line profile broadening and continuum emission, to characterize the plasma conditions without relying immediately on ionization modeling. The experimentally measured plasma parameters were used as independent variables, driving an ionization code, as a test of ionization modeling, divorced from hydrodynamic calculations. Several state-of-the-art streak spectrographs, each recording a fiducial of the laser peak along with the time-resolved spectrum, characterized the laser heating of thin signature layers of different atomic numbers imbedded in plastic targets. A novel design of crystal spectrograph, with a conically curved crystal, was developed. Coupled with a streak camera, it provided high resolution (λ/ΔΛ > 1000) and a collection efficiency roughly 20-50 times that of planar crystal spectrographs, affording improved spectra for quantitative reduction and greater sensitivity for the diagnosis of weak emitters. Experimental results were compared to hydrocode and ionization code simulations, with poor agreement. The conclusions question the appropriateness of describing electron velocity distributions by a temperature parameter during the time of laser illumination and emphasis the importance of characterizing the distribution more generally

  8. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.

    1995-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  9. Study on sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems. As a result of consideration, the followings were found. (1) In general, solutions to some kinds of questions can be deduced from basic laws using some theories or methodologies in the field of the natural science or engineering. The approach to resolve maintenance related social problems is similar to the approach in the natural science or engineering. (2) The points of view based on fundamental human rights, market principles and community principles, and so on, are very important in resolving maintenance related social problems and can be placed as theories or tools for resolution. (3) If such theories or tools for resolving maintenance related social problems as described above are systematically prepared, it is estimated that it becomes very much easier to resolve maintenance related social problems. (author)

  10. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Studies of Gallium-Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew Bruce

    This thesis concerns the study of ultrafast phenomena in GaAs using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). The thesis consists of five chapters. Chapter one is an introduction, which discusses the study of ultrafast phenomena in semiconductors. Chapter two is a description of the colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) ring dye laser, which is at the heart of the experimental apparatus used in this thesis. Chapter three presents a detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of photoluminescence excitation correlation spectroscopy (PECS), the novel technique which is used to time-resolve ultrafast PL phenomena. Chapters 4 and 5 discuss two applications of the PECS technique. In Chapter 4 the variation of PL intensity in In-alloyed GaAs substrate material is studied, while Chapter 5 discusses the variation of carrier lifetimes in ion-damaged GaAs used in photo-conductive circuit elements (PCEs). PECS is a pulse-probe technique that measures the cross correlation of photo-excited carrier populations. The theoretical model employed in this thesis is based upon the rate equation for a simple three-level system consisting of valence and conduction bands and a single trap level. In the limit of radiative band-to-band dominated recombination, no PECS signal should be observed; while in the capture -dominated recombination limit, the PECS signal from the band-to-band PL measures the cross correlation of the excited electron and hole populations and thus, the electron and hole lifetimes. PECS is experimentally investigated using a case study of PL in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs and In -alloyed GaAs. At 77 K, the PECS signal is characteristic of a capture-dominated system, yielding an electron-hole lifetime of about 200 ps. However, at 5 K the behavior is more complicated and shows saturation effects due to the C acceptor level, which is un-ionized at 5 K. As a first application, PECS is used to investigate the large band-to-band PL contrast observed near dislocations in In

  11. Dual time-resolved temperature-jump fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy for the study of fast protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caitlin M; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2017-05-05

    Time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) coupled with fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for monitoring protein dynamics. Although IR spectroscopy of the polypeptide amide I mode is more technically challenging, it offers complementary information because it directly probes changes in the protein backbone, whereas, fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive to the environment of specific side chains. With the advent of widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) it is possible to efficiently probe multiple IR frequencies with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here we describe a dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectrometer and its application to study protein folding dynamics. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser provides the T-jump source for both time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, which are probed by a QCL and Ti:Sapphire laser, respectively. The Ho:YAG laser simultaneously pumps the time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectrometers. The instrument has high sensitivity, with an IR absorbance detection limit of jump induced difference spectrum from 50ns to 0.5ms. This study demonstrates the power of the dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectroscopy to resolve complex folding mechanisms by complementary IR absorbance and fluorescence measurements of protein dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Time-resolved plasma spectroscopy of thin foils heated by a relativistic-intensity short-pulse laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, P.; Gauthier, J.-C.; Shepherd, R.; Fournier, K.B.; Price, D.; Lee, R.W.; Springer, P.; Peyrusse, O.; Klein, L.

    2002-01-01

    Time-resolved K-shell x-ray spectra are recorded from sub-100 nm aluminum foils irradiated by 150-fs laser pulses at relativistic intensities of Iλ 2 =2x10 18 W μm 2 /cm 2 . The thermal penetration depth is greater than the foil thickness in these targets so that uniform heating takes place at constant density before hydrodynamic motion occurs. The high-contrast, high-intensity laser pulse, broad spectral band, and short time resolution utilized in this experiment permit a simplified interpretation of the dynamical evolution of the radiating matter. The observed spectrum displays two distinct phases. At early time, ≤500 fs after detecting target emission, a broad quasicontinuous spectral feature with strong satellite emission from multiply excited levels is seen. At a later time, the He-like resonance line emission is dominant. The time-integrated data is in accord with previous studies with time resolution greater than 1 ps. The early time satellite emission is shown to be a signature of an initial large area, high density, low-temperature plasma created in the foil by fast electrons accelerated by the intense radiation field in the laser spot. We conclude that, because of this early time phenomenon and contrary to previous predictions, a short, high-intensity laser pulse incident on a thin foil does not create a uniform hot and dense plasma. The heating mechanism has been studied as a function of foil thickness, laser pulse length, and intensity. In addition, the spectra are found to be in broad agreement with a hydrodynamic expansion code postprocessed by a collisional-radiative model based on superconfiguration average rates and on the unresolved transition array formalism

  13. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  14. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  15. Time-resolved UV spectroscopy on ammonia excited by a pulsed CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holbach, H.

    1980-07-01

    This work investigates the excitation of ammonia by a pulsed CO 2 laser, in particular the processes associated with collisions with argon. It was prompted by two previous observations: the previously reported infrared multiphoton dissociation of NH 3 under nearly collisionless conditions, and the ill understood excitation mechanism of apparently nonresonant low vibrational levels in the presence of Ar. Based on recent spectroscopic data, all vibrational-rotational levels were determined which are simultaneously excited by different CO 2 laser lines. Transitions between the 1 + and 2 - vibrational levels were also taken into account. The linewidth in these calculations was dominated by power broadening, which generates a half width at half maximum of 0.36 cm -1 at the typical power density of 10 MW/cm 2 . In order to reproduce published experimental absorption data, it proved necessary to take account all transitions within a distance of 20 cm -1 from the laser line. This fact implies in most cases the simultaneous population of a large number of vibrational-rotational levels. The population of levels by absorption or by subsequent collisional processes was probed by time-resolved absorption measurement of vibrational bands and their rotational envelope in the near UV. Time resolution (5...10) was sufficient to observe rotational relaxation within individual vibrational levels. Characteristic differences were found for the various excitation lines. (orig.) [de

  16. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liu, Zhongkai [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zong, Alfred [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J. [Lumeras LLC, 207 McPherson St, Santa Cruz, California 95060 (United States); Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  17. Spatially resolved chemical analysis of cicada wings using laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Jessica K; Walsh, Callee M; Oh, Junho; Dana, Catherine E; Hong, Sungmin; Jo, Kyoo D; Alleyne, Marianne; Miljkovic, Nenad; Cropek, Donald M

    2018-03-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool for direct imaging and analysis of biological tissues. Performing ionization in an ambient environment, this technique requires little sample preparation and no additional matrix, and can be performed on natural, uneven surfaces. When combined with optical microscopy, the investigation of biological samples by LAESI allows for spatially resolved compositional analysis. We demonstrate here the applicability of LAESI-IMS for the chemical analysis of thin, desiccated biological samples, specifically Neotibicen pruinosus cicada wings. Positive-ion LAESI-IMS accurate ion-map data was acquired from several wing cells and superimposed onto optical images allowing for compositional comparisons across areas of the wing. Various putative chemical identifications were made indicating the presence of hydrocarbons, lipids/esters, amines/amides, and sulfonated/phosphorylated compounds. With the spatial resolution capability, surprising chemical distribution patterns were observed across the cicada wing, which may assist in correlating trends in surface properties with chemical distribution. Observed ions were either (1) equally dispersed across the wing, (2) more concentrated closer to the body of the insect (proximal end), or (3) more concentrated toward the tip of the wing (distal end). These findings demonstrate LAESI-IMS as a tool for the acquisition of spatially resolved chemical information from fragile, dried insect wings. This LAESI-IMS technique has important implications for the study of functional biomaterials, where understanding the correlation between chemical composition, physical structure, and biological function is critical. Graphical abstract Positive-ion laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with optical imaging provides a powerful tool for the spatially resolved chemical analysis of cicada wings.

  18. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oloff, L.-P., E-mail: oloff@physik.uni-kiel.de; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K., E-mail: rossnagel@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-14

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  19. Space- and time-resolved diagnostics of soft x-ray emission from laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Chen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of soft x-ray emission from plasmas created by intense short-wavelength laser radiation can provide much useful information on the density, temperature and ionization distribution of the plasma. Until recently, limitations of sensitivity and the availability of suitable x-ray optical elements have restricted studies of soft x-ray emission from laser plasmas. In this paper, the authors describe novel instrumentation which provides high sensitivity in the soft x-ray spectrum with spatial and temporal resolution in the micron and picosecond ranges respectively. These systems exploit advances made in soft x-ray optic and electro-optic technology. Their application in current studies of laser fusion, x-ray lasers, and high density atomic physics are discussed

  20. A novel multiplex absorption spectrometer for time-resolved studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Thomas; Heard, Dwayne E.; Blitz, Mark A.

    2018-02-01

    A Time-Resolved Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Absorption Spectrometer (TRUVAS) has been developed that can simultaneously monitor absorption at all wavelengths between 200 and 800 nm with millisecond time resolution. A pulsed photolysis laser (KrF 248 nm) is used to initiate chemical reactions that create the target species. The absorption signals from these species evolve as the composition of the gas in the photolysis region changes over time. The instrument can operate at pressures over the range ˜10-800 Torr and can measure time-resolved absorbances systems (in particular the Herriott cell), there are fundamental differences, most notably the ability to adjust each mirror to maximise the overlap between the probe beam and the photolysis laser. Another feature which aids the sensitivity and versatility of the system is the use of 2 high-throughput spectrographs coupled with sensitive line-array CCDs, which can measure absorbance from ˜200 to 800 nm simultaneously. The capability of the instrument is demonstrated via measurements of the absorption spectrum of the peroxy radical, HOCH2CH2O2, and its self-reaction kinetics.

  1. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus’kov, S.Yu.; Dudžák, Roman; Chodukowski, T.; Dostál, Jan; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kalal, M.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Borodziuk, S.; Krouský, Eduard; Ullschmied, Jiří; Hřebíček, Jan; Medřík, Tomáš; Golasowski, Jiří; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2015), č. článku 102706. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA ČR GPP205/11/P712 Grant - others:FP7(XE) 284464 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) * Laser System Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics); Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.207, year: 2015 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/22/10/10.1063/1.4933364

  2. Laser-induced time-resolved spectrofluorometry and thermal lensing: applications in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decambox, P.; Delorme, N.; Mauchien, P.; Moulin, C.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitive spectroscopic methods for the determination of actinides and lanthanides in various media are required in the nuclear industry. Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectrofluorometry (LITRS) for several actinides and lanthanides at very low levels and thermal lensing (TL) for oxidation state characterization allow these determinations. The set-up of LITRS is presented. Spectra, limit of detections and lifetimes obtained for U, Cm, Am, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ce, Sm, Tm are shown. Detection limit as low as 5.10 -12 M can be achieved. Examples of matrices encountered for the determination of uranium are given as well as comparison with mass spectrometry and alpha counting. The set-up of TL and performances obtained on plutonium as well as future developments are presented

  3. An iterative method for unfolding time-resolved soft x-ray spectra of laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yongjian; Shen Kexi; Xu Hepin

    1991-01-01

    Dante-recorded temporal waveforms have been unfolded by using Fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and the inverted convolution theorem of Fourier analysis. The conversion of the signals to time-dependent soft x-ray spectra is accomplished on the IBM-PC/XT-286 microcomputer system with the code DTSP including SAND II reported by W.N.Mcelory et al.. An amplitude-limited iterative and periodic smoothing technique has been developed in the code DTSP. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra with sixteen time-cell, and time-dependent radiation, [T R (t)], have been obtained for hohlraum targets irradiated with laser beams (λ = 1.06 μm) on LF-12 in 1989

  4. Time-resolved probing of electron thermal conduction in femtosecond-laser-pulse-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vue, B.T.V.

    1993-06-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of reflectivity, transmissivity and frequency shifts of probe light interacting with the rear of a disk-like plasma produced by irradiation of a transparent solid target with 0.1ps FWHM laser pulses at peak intensity 5 x 10 l4 W/CM 2 . Experimental results show a large increase in reflection, revealing rapid formation of a steep gradient and overdense surface plasma layer during the first picosecond after irradiation. Frequency shifts due to a moving ionization created by thermal conduction into the solid target are recorded. Calculations using a nonlinear thermal heat wave model show good agreement with the measured frequency shifts, further confining the strong thermal transport effect

  5. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Song, Kyu Seok; Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Chul Joong; Han, Phil Soon

    1992-01-01

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  6. Spatially resolved x-ray laser spectra and demonstration of gain in nickel-like systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, D.A.; Keane, C.J.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Trebes, J.E.; Eckart, M.J.

    1987-09-25

    A recent series of experiments have provided spatially resolved near field images of several candidate x-ray lasing transition in neon-like, nickel-like, and hydrogen-like ions from laser-produced plasmas. From these time-gated, spatially, and spectrally resolved measurements the source size for the J = 0 - 1 and the J = 2 - 1 transitions in Ne-like selenium have been determined. Source regions as small as 50 ..mu..m have been observed on transitions with gain-length products >9. In addition, we have obtained the first experimental evidence for the amplification of spontaneous emission in the nickel-like ions of europium and ytterbium. Gains of order 1 cm/sup -1/ and gain-length products of up to 3.8 are observed on the J = 0 - 1, 4d-4p transitions in Eu + 35 at 65.26 and 71.00 A. Analogous transitions in Yb = +42 have been identified and some evidence for ASE has been observed. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Kalman filter approach for uncertainty quantification in time-resolved laser-induced incandescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwin, Paul J; Sipkens, Timothy A; Thomson, Kevin A; Liu, Fengshan; Daun, Kyle J

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) data can be used to infer spatially and temporally resolved volume fractions and primary particle size distributions of soot-laden aerosols, but these estimates are corrupted by measurement noise as well as uncertainties in the spectroscopic and heat transfer submodels used to interpret the data. Estimates of the temperature, concentration, and size distribution of soot primary particles within a sample aerosol are typically made by nonlinear regression of modeled spectral incandescence decay, or effective temperature decay, to experimental data. In this work, we employ nonstationary Bayesian estimation techniques to infer aerosol properties from simulated and experimental LII signals, specifically the extended Kalman filter and Schmidt-Kalman filter. These techniques exploit the time-varying nature of both the measurements and the models, and they reveal how uncertainty in the estimates computed from TiRe-LII data evolves over time. Both techniques perform better when compared with standard deterministic estimates; however, we demonstrate that the Schmidt-Kalman filter produces more realistic uncertainty estimates.

  8. Spatially resolved X-ray laser spectra and demonstration of gain in nickel-like systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, D.A.; Keane, C.J.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Trebes, J.E.; Eckart, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A recent series of experiments have provided spatially resolved near field images of several candidate x-ray lasing transition in neon-like, nickel-like, and hydrogen-like ions from laser-produced plasmas. From these time-gated, spatially, and spectrally resolved measurements the source size for the J=0-1 and the J=2-1 transitions in Ne-like selenium have been determined. Source regions as small as 50 μm have been observed on transitions with gain-length products >9. In addition, the authors have obtained the first experimental evidence for the amplification of spontaneous emission in the nickel-like ions of europium and ytterbium. Gains of order 1 cm/sup -1/ and gain-length products of up to 3.8 are observed on the J=0-1,4d-4p transitions in Eu/sup +35/ at 65.83 and 71.00A. Analogous transitions in Yb/sup +42/ have been identified and some evidence for ASE has been observed

  9. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast glob...

  10. Airborne detection of oceanic turbidity cell structure using depth-resolved laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne laser-induced, depth-resolved water Raman backscatter is useful in the detection and mapping of water optical transmission variations. This test, together with other field experiments, has identified the need for additional field experiments to resolve the degree of the contribution to the depth-resolved, Raman-backscattered signal waveform that is due to (1) sea surface height or elevation probability density; (2) off-nadir laser beam angle relative to the mean sea surface; and (3) the Gelbstoff fluorescence background, and the analytical techniques required to remove it. When converted to along-track profiles, the waveforms obtained reveal cells of a decreased Raman backscatter superimposed on an overall trend of monotonically decreasing water column optical transmission.

  11. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Dongfeng; Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chen, Songyan

    2016-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  12. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Dongfeng [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Grigoropoulos, Costas P., E-mail: cgrigoro@berkeley.edu [Laser Thermal Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1740 (United States); Chen, Songyan [Semiconductor Photonics Research Center, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-05-23

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  13. A Polarization-Adjustable Picosecond Deep-Ultraviolet Laser for Spin- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun; Zhang Jing-Yuan; Xu Zu-Yan; Wang Xiao-Yang; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a polarization-adjustable picosecond deep-ultraviolet (DUV) laser at 177.3 nm. The DUV laser was produced by second harmonic generation from a mode-locked laser at 355 nm in nonlinear optical crystal KBBF. The laser delivered a maximum average output power of 1.1 mW at 177.3 nm. The polarization of the 177.3 nm beam was adjusted with linear and circular polarization by means of λ/4 and λ/2 wave plates. To the best of our knowledge, the laser has been employed as the circularly polarized and linearly polarized DUV light source for a spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high resolution for the first time. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  14. Time-resolved photoluminescence for evaluating laser-induced damage during dielectric stack ablation in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, Stéphanie [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Blanc-Pélissier, Danièle, E-mail: daniele.blanc@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Barbos, Corina; Le Coz, Marine [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France); Poulain, Gilles [TOTAL MS—New Energies, R& D Division, La Défense (France); Lemiti, Mustapha [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69621 (France)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Ablation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} on Si substrates was performed with a nanosecond UV laser. • Ablation thresholds were found in good agreement with COMSOL simulation, around 0.85 and 0.95 J cm{sup −2} for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub X}, respectively. • Laser-induced damage was evaluated at room temperature by time-resolved photoluminescence decay with a single photon counting detector. • Minority carrier lifetime in silicon as a function of the ablation fluence was derived from the photoluminescence decay and related to the thickness of the heat affected zone. • Quantitative measurements of laser-induced damage can be used to evaluate laser ablation of dielectrics in photovoltaics. - Abstract: Selective laser ablation of dielectric layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and bi-layers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub X}:H with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.4 to 2 J cm{sup −2}. Ablation threshold was correlated to the simulated temperature at the interface between the dielectric coatings and the silicon substrate. Laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate was evaluated by time-resolved photoluminescence. The minority carrier lifetime deduced from time-resolved photoluminescence was related to the depth of the heat affected zone in the substrate.

  15. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  16. Portable double-sided pulsed laser heating system for time-resolved geoscience and materials science applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilis, G; Strohm, C; Kupenko, I; Linhardt, S; Laskin, A; Vasiukov, D M; Cerantola, V; Koemets, E G; McCammon, C; Kurnosov, A; Chumakov, A I; Rüffer, R; Dubrovinskaia, N; Dubrovinsky, L

    2017-08-01

    A portable double-sided pulsed laser heating system for diamond anvil cells has been developed that is able to stably produce laser pulses as short as a few microseconds with repetition frequencies up to 100 kHz. In situ temperature determination is possible by collecting and fitting the thermal radiation spectrum for a specific wavelength range (particularly, between 650 nm and 850 nm) to the Planck radiation function. Surface temperature information can also be time-resolved by using a gated detector that is synchronized with the laser pulse modulation and space-resolved with the implementation of a multi-point thermal radiation collection technique. The system can be easily coupled with equipment at synchrotron facilities, particularly for nuclear resonance spectroscopy experiments. Examples of applications include investigations of high-pressure high-temperature behavior of iron oxides, both in house and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using the synchrotron Mössbauer source and nuclear inelastic scattering.

  17. Simultaneous time-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements of dielectrics excited with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Haahr-Lillevang, L.; Siegel, J.; Balling, P.; Guizard, S.; Solis, J.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous time-and-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements over a temporal span of 300 ps have been performed in fused silica and sapphire samples excited with 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses at energies slightly and well above the ablation threshold. The experimental results have been simulated in the frame of a multiple-rate equation model including light propagation. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the reflectivity and the interferometric measurements at 400 nm clearly shows that the two techniques interrogate different material volumes during the course of the process. While the former is sensitive to the evolution of the plasma density in a very thin ablating layer at the surface, the second yields an averaged plasma density over a larger volume. It is shown that self-trapped excitons do not appreciably contribute to carrier relaxation in fused silica at fluences above the ablation threshold, most likely due to Coulomb screening effects at large excited carrier densities. For both materials, at fluences well above the ablation threshold, the maximum measured plasma reflectivity shows a saturation behavior consistent with a scattering rate proportional to the plasma density in this fluence regime. Moreover, for both materials and for pulse energies above the ablation threshold and delays in the few tens of picoseconds range, a simultaneous "low reflectivity" and "low transmission" behavior is observed. Although this behavior has been identified in the past as a signature of femtosecond laser-induced ablation, its origin is alternatively discussed in terms of the optical properties of a material undergoing strong isochoric heating, before having time to substantially expand or exchange energy with the surrounding media.

  18. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  19. Time-Resolved K-shell Photoabsorption Edge Measurement in a Strongly Coupled Matter Driven by Laser-converted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Jia-Min; Zhang, Ji-Yan; Yang, Guo-Hong; Xiong, Gang; Wei, Min-Xi; Song, Tian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Yu

    2013-06-01

    A time-resolved K edge absorption measurement of warm dense KCl was performed on Shenguang II laser facility. The x-ray radiation driven shocks were adopted to take colliding shocks compression. By using Dog bone hohlraum the CH/KCl/CH sample was shielded from the laser hitting point to suppress the M band preheating and enhance the compressibility. Thus, an unexplored and extreme region of the plasma state with the maximum 5 times solid density and temperature lower than 3 eV (with coupling constant Γii around 100) was first obtained. The photoabsorption spectra of chlorine near the K-shell edge have been measured with a crystal spectrometer using a short x-ray backlighter. The K edge red shift up to 11.7 eV and broadening of 15.2 eV were obtained for the maximum compression. The electron temperature, inferred by Fermi-Dirac fit of the measured K-edge broadening, was consistent with the hydrodynamic predictions. The comparison of the K edge shift with a plasma model, in which the ionization effect, continuum lowering and partial degeneracy are considered, shows that more improvements are desired to describe in details the variation of K edge shift. This work might extend future study of WDM in extreme conditions of high compression.

  20. Time-resolved Thomson scattering on high-intensity laser-produced hot dense helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, P; Liseykina, T; Bauer, D; Redmer, R

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of brilliant free-electron lasers enables new pump–probe experiments to characterize warm and hot dense matter states, i.e. systems at solid-like densities and temperatures of one to several hundred eV. Such extreme conditions are relevant for high-energy density studies such as, e.g., in planetary physics and inertial confinement fusion. We consider here a liquid helium jet pumped with a high-intensity optical short-pulse laser that is subsequently probed with brilliant soft x-ray radiation. The optical short-pulse laser generates a strongly inhomogeneous helium plasma which is characterized with particle-in-cell simulations. We derive the respective Thomson scattering spectrum based on the Born–Mermin approximation for the dynamic structure factor considering the full density and temperature-dependent Thomson scattering cross section throughout the target. We observe plasmon modes that are generated in the interior of the target and study their temporal evolution. Such pump–probe experiments are promising tools to measure the important plasma parameters density and temperature. The method described here can be applied to various pump–probe scenarios by combining optical lasers, soft x-rays and hard x-ray sources. (paper)

  1. An x-ray detector for time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Brizard, C.; Clarke, R.; Lowe, W.

    1992-01-01

    The development of ultrahigh-brightness x-ray sources makes time-resolved x-ray studies more and more feasible. Improvements in x-ray optics components are also critical for obtaining the appropriate beam for a particular type of experiment. Moreover, fast parallel detectors will be essential in order to exploit the combination of high intensity x-ray sources and novel optics for time-resolved experiments. A CCD detector with a time resolution of microseconds has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This detector is fully programmable using CAMAC electronics and a Micro Vax computer. The techniques of time-resolved x-ray studies, which include scattering, microradiography, microtomography, stroboscopy, etc., can be applied to a range of phenomena (including rapid thermal annealing, surface ordering, crystallization, and the kinetics of phase transition) in order to understand these time-dependent microscopic processes. Some of these applications will be illustrated by recent results performed at synchrotrons. New powerful x-ray sources now under construction offer the opportunity to apply innovative approaches in time-resolved work

  2. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy study of transformed zones in magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davskardt, R.H.; Veirs, D.K.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Raman vibrational spectroscopy provides an effective phase characterization technique in materials systems containing particle dispersions of the tetragonal and monoclinic polymorphs of zirconia, each of which yields a unique Raman spectrum. An investigation is reported to assess a novel, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy system in the study of transformed zones surrounding cracks in partially stabilized MgO-ZrO 2 (PSZ). The experimental arrangement uses an imaging (two-dimensional) photomultiplier tube to produce a one-dimensional Raman profile of phase compositions along a slitlike laser beam without translation of either the sample or the laser beam and without scanning the spectrometer. Results from phase characterization studies of the size, frontal morphology, and extent of transformation of transformation zones surrounding cracks produced under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions are presented

  3. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzkes, J.; Kraft, S. D.; Sobiella, M.; Stiller, N.; Zeil, K.; Schramm, U.; Karsch, L.; Schürer, M.; Pawelke, J.; Richter, C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (∼10 Hz), high power (∼100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ∼1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  4. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J; Karsch, L; Kraft, S D; Pawelke, J; Richter, C; Schürer, M; Sobiella, M; Stiller, N; Zeil, K; Schramm, U

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (~10 Hz), high power (~100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ~1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  5. Ultra-fast Movies Resolve Ultra-short Pulse Laser Ablation and Bump Formation on Thin Molybdenum Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Huber, Heinz

    For the monolithic serial interconnection of CIS thin film solar cells, 470 nm molybdenum films on glass substrates must be separated galvanically. The single pulse ablation with a 660 fs laser at a wavelength of 1053 nm is investigated in a fluence regime from 0.5 to 5.0 J/cm2. At fluences above 2.0 J/cm2 bump and jet formation can be observed that could be used for creating microstructures. For the investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the laser ablation process itself as well as of the bump or jet formation, pump probe microscopy is utilized to resolve the transient ablation behavior.

  6. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6-7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  7. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6–7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  8. Strategies for Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction of Phase Transitions with Laser Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Eggert, J. H.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Palmer, N.; Petre, R. B.; Rygg, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a program to document kinetics of phase transitions under laser-driven dynamic compression, we are designing a platform to make multiple x-ray diffraction measurements during a single laser experiment. Our plans include experimental development at Omega-EP and eventual implementation at NIF. We will present our strategy for designing a robust platform that can effectively document a wide variety of phase transformations by utilizing both streaked and multiple-frame imaging detectors. Preliminary designs utilize a novel CMOS detector designed by Sandia National Lab. Our initial experiments include scoping studies that will focus on photometrics and shielding requirements in the high EMP environment close to the target. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, LLNL-ABS-734470.

  9. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Petr; Olejníček, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Čada, Martin; Kment, Štěpán; Kohout, Michal; Do, H.T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 023105. ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TF01000084; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00863S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma diagnostics * HiPIMS * time resolved measurement * laser absorption spectroscopy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016

  10. A Spatially Resolved Study of the GRB 020903 Host Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Mallory D.; Levesque, Emily M.

    2018-03-01

    GRB 020903 is a long-duration gamma-ray burst with a host galaxy close enough and extended enough for spatially resolved observations, making it one of less than a dozen GRBs where such host studies are possible. GRB 020903 lies in a galaxy host complex that appears to consist of four interacting components. Here we present the results of spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the GRB 020903 host. By taking observations at two different position angles, we were able to obtain optical spectra (3600–9000 Å) of multiple regions in the galaxy. We confirm redshifts for three regions of the host galaxy that match that of GRB 020903. We measure the metallicity of these regions, and find that the explosion site and the nearby star-forming regions both have comparable subsolar metallicities. We conclude that, in agreement with past spatially resolved studies of GRBs, the GRB explosion site is representative of the host galaxy as a whole rather than localized in a metal-poor region of the galaxy.

  11. Highly Resolved Studies of Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Sandeep

    We use measurements of dispersed fluorescence from electronically excited photoions to study fundamental aspects of intramolecular dynamics. Our experimental innovations make it possible to obtain highly resolved photoionization data that offer qualitative insights into molecular scattering. In particular, we obtain vibrationally resolved data to probe coupling between the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom by studying the distribution of vibrational energy among photoions. Vibrationally resolved branching ratios are measured over a broad spectral range of excitation energy and their non-Franck-Condon behavior is used as a tool to investigate two diverse aspects of shape resonant photoionization. First, vibrational branching ratios are obtained for the SiF_4 5a _1^{-1} and CS_2 5sigma_{rm u} ^{-1} photoionization channels to help elucidate the microscopic aspects of shape resonant wavefunction for polyatomic molecules. It is shown that in such molecules the shape resonant wavefunction is not necessarily attributable to a specific bond in the molecule. Second, the multichannel aspect of shape resonant photoionization dynamics, reflected in continuum channel coupling, is investigated by obtaining vibrational branching ratios for the 2 sigma_{rm u}^{ -1} and 4sigma^{ -1} photoionization of the isoelectronic molecules N_2 and CO, respectively. These data indicate that effects of continuum coupling may be widespread. We also present the first set of rotationally resolved data over a wide energy range for the 2 sigma_{rm u}^{ -1} photoionization of N_2. These data probe the partitioning of the angular momentum between the photoelectron and photoion, and highlight the multicenter nature of the molecular potential. These case studies illustrate the utility of dispersed fluorescence measurements as a complement to photoelectron spectroscopy for obtaining highly resolved data for molecular photoionization. These measurements makes it possible to probe intrinsically

  12. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm -1 have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable 3 P 1, 2 and 1 D 2 levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  13. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen [College of Physics, Jilin University and Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, Changchun 130021 (China); Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile, E-mail: dai@jlu.edu.c [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2010-10-28

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm{sup -1} have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable {sup 3}P{sub 1,} {sub 2} and {sup 1}D{sub 2} levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  14. Spatial-Resolved Measurement and Analysis of Extreme-Ultraviolet Emission Spectra from Laser-Produced Al Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Shi-Quan; Su Mao-Gen; Sun Dui-Xiong; Min Qi; Dong Chen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-produced Al plasma is experimentally and theoretically investigated. Spatial-evolution emission spectra are measured by using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. Based on the assumptions of a normalized Boltzmann distribution among the excited states and a steady-state collisional-radiative model, we succeed in reproducing the spectra at different detection positions, which are in good agreement with experiments. The decay curves about the electron temperature and electron density, as well as the fractions of individual Al ions and average ionization stage with increasing the detection distance are obtained by comparison with the experimental measurements. These parameters are critical points for deeply understanding the expanding and cooling of laser produced plasmas in vacuum. (paper)

  15. Diagnostics for studies of novel laser ion acceleration mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senje, Lovisa; Aurand, Bastian; Wahlström, Claes-Göran [Department of Physics, Lund University, P. O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Yeung, Mark; Kuschel, Stephan; Rödel, Christian [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Wagner, Florian; Roth, Markus [Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Li, Kun; Neumayer, Paul [ExtreMe Matter Institut, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Dromey, Brendan; Jung, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bagnoud, Vincent [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Zepf, Matthew [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kuehl, Thomas [ExtreMe Matter Institut, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Diagnostic for investigating and distinguishing different laser ion acceleration mechanisms has been developed and successfully tested. An ion separation wide angle spectrometer can simultaneously investigate three important aspects of the laser plasma interaction: (1) acquire angularly resolved energy spectra for two ion species, (2) obtain ion energy spectra for multiple species, separated according to their charge to mass ratio, along selected axes, and (3) collect laser radiation reflected from and transmitted through the target and propagating in the same direction as the ion beam. Thus, the presented diagnostic constitutes a highly adaptable tool for accurately studying novel acceleration mechanisms in terms of their angular energy distribution, conversion efficiency, and plasma density evolution.

  16. Diagnostics for studies of novel laser ion acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senje, Lovisa; Aurand, Bastian; Wahlström, Claes-Göran; Yeung, Mark; Kuschel, Stephan; Rödel, Christian; Wagner, Florian; Roth, Markus; Li, Kun; Neumayer, Paul; Dromey, Brendan; Jung, Daniel; Bagnoud, Vincent; Zepf, Matthew; Kuehl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic for investigating and distinguishing different laser ion acceleration mechanisms has been developed and successfully tested. An ion separation wide angle spectrometer can simultaneously investigate three important aspects of the laser plasma interaction: (1) acquire angularly resolved energy spectra for two ion species, (2) obtain ion energy spectra for multiple species, separated according to their charge to mass ratio, along selected axes, and (3) collect laser radiation reflected from and transmitted through the target and propagating in the same direction as the ion beam. Thus, the presented diagnostic constitutes a highly adaptable tool for accurately studying novel acceleration mechanisms in terms of their angular energy distribution, conversion efficiency, and plasma density evolution

  17. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  18. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy in the UV/VUV spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes ranging from 3 to 500 ns were measured on various states of Ag, N, Se, Te and As, by recording the fluorescence light decay after excitation by a laser pulse. Ag was supplied by a collimated atomic beam while Se, Te and As were contained in quartz cells. Pulsed laser radiation, with a wavelength down to 185 nm, was generated by different set-ups, using Nd-YAG pumped dye lasers combined with non-linear crystals and Raman shifting. Short laser pulses were produced by a nitrogen laser or a distributed feedback dye laser. Two-photon processes and stepwise excitation were used to populate high-lying levels. Depletion spectroscopy, quantum-beat spectroscopy and optical double resonance spectroscopy were also performed

  19. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Emission of electric spark dissociation of CH 3 I is similar to its fs LIBS. • We use fs laser induced breakdown as a simulation for electric spark dissociation. • The I 2 molecule formation is directly observed in the time-resolved LIBS. • Bimolecular collision of I ∗ and CH 3 I is responsible for the formation of I 2 . - Abstract: The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH 3 I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I + , CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, H, and I 2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I 2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I 2 ∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I 2 ∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I ∗ ( 4 P) and CH 3 I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH 3 I

  20. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  1. Time-resolved analysis of DNA-protein interactions in living cells by UV laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Angela; Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria; Carafa, Vincenzo; De Bellis, Floriana; Shaik, Jani; Matarese, Filomena; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Gesuele, Felice; Velotta, Raffaele; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Altucci, Carlo; Altucci, Lucia

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between DNA and proteins are mainly studied through chemical procedures involving bi-functional reagents, mostly formaldehyde. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is used to identify the binding between transcription factors (TFs) and chromatin, and to evaluate the occurrence and impact of histone/DNA modifications. The current bottleneck in probing DNA-protein interactions using these approaches is caused by the fact that chemical crosslinkers do not discriminate direct and indirect bindings or short-lived chromatin occupancy. Here, we describe a novel application of UV laser-induced (L-) crosslinking and demonstrate that a combination of chemical and L-crosslinking is able to distinguish between direct and indirect DNA-protein interactions in a small number of living cells. The spatial and temporal dynamics of TF bindings to chromatin and their role in gene expression regulation may thus be assessed. The combination of chemical and L-crosslinking offers an exciting and unprecedented tool for biomedical applications.

  2. Resolving fringe ambiguities of a wide-field Michelson interferometer using visibility measurements of a noncollimated laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2009-09-10

    An actively stabilized interferometer with a constant optical path difference is a key element in long-term astronomical observation, and resolving interference fringe ambiguities is important to produce high-precision results for the long term. We report a simple and reliable method of resolving fringe ambiguities of a wide-field Michelson interferometer by measuring the interference visibility of a noncollimated single-frequency laser beam. Theoretical analysis shows that the interference visibility is sensitive to a subfringe phase shift, and a wide range of beam arrangements is suitable for real implementation. In an experimental demonstration, a Michelson interferometer has an optical path difference of 7 mm and a converging monitoring beam has a numerical aperture of 0.045 with an incidental angle of 17 degrees. The resolution of visibility measurements corresponds to approximately 1/16 fringe in the interferometer phase shift. The fringe ambiguity-free region is extended over a range of approximately 100 fringes.

  3. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  4. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G.; Sharples, Steve D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  5. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  6. Study on Laser Welding Process Monitoring Method

    OpenAIRE

    Knag , Heeshin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a study of quality monitoring technology for the laser welding was conducted. The laser welding and the industrial robotic systems were used with robot-based laser welding systems. The laser system used in this study was 1.6 kW fiber laser, while the robot system was Industrial robot (pay-load : 130 kg). The robot-based laser welding system was equipped with a laser scanner system for remote laser welding. The welding joints of steel plate and steel plat...

  7. Study on Laser Welding Process Monitoring Method

    OpenAIRE

    Heeshin Knag

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a study of quality monitoring technology for the laser welding was conducted. The laser welding and the industrial robotic systems were used with robot-based laser welding systems. The laser system used in this study was 1.6 kW fiber laser, while the robot system was Industrial robot (pay-load : 130 kg). The robot-based laser welding system was equipped with a laser scanner system for remote laser welding. The welding joints of steel plate and steel plate coated with zinc were ...

  8. Pulsed-laser time-resolved thermal mirror technique in low-absorbance homogeneous linear elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Astrath, Nelson G C; Malacarne, Luis C; Herculano, Leandro S; Zanuto, Vitor S; Baesso, Mauro L; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2013-10-01

    A theoretical model for a time-resolved photothermal mirror technique using pulsed-laser excitation was developed for low absorption samples. Analytical solutions to the temperature and thermoelastic deformation equations are found for three characteristic pulse profiles and are compared to finite element analysis methods results for finite samples. An analytical expression for the intensity of the center of a continuous probe laser at the detector plane is derived using the Fresnel diffraction theory, which allows modeling of experimental results. Experiments are performed in optical glasses, and the models are fitted to the data. The parameters of the fit are in good agreement with previous literature data for absorption, thermal diffusion, and thermal expansion of the materials tested. The combined modeling and experimental techniques are shown to be useful for quantitative determination of the physical properties of low absorption homogeneous linear elastic material samples.

  9. Application of a high-repetition-rate laser diagnostic system for single-cycle-resolved imaging in internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Johan; Richter, Mattias; Nygren, Jenny; Aldén, Marcus; Hultqvist, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    2002-08-20

    High-repetition-rate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel and OH concentrations in internal combustion engines are demonstrated. Series of as many as eight fluorescence images, with a temporal resolution ranging from 10 micros to 1 ms, are acquired within one engine cycle. A multiple-laser system in combination with a multiple-CCD camera is used for cycle-resolved imaging in spark-ignition, direct-injection stratified-charge, and homogeneous-charge compression-ignition engines. The recorded data reveal unique information on cycle-to-cycle variations in fuel transport and combustion. Moreover, the imaging system in combination with a scanning mirror is used to perform instantaneous three-dimensional fuel-concentration measurements.

  10. Computed tomography with energy-resolved detection: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2008-03-01

    The feasibility of computed tomography (CT) with energy-resolved x-ray detection has been investigated. A breast CT design with multi slit multi slice (MSMS) data acquisition was used for this study. The MSMS CT includes linear arrays of photon counting detectors separated by gaps. This CT configuration allows for efficient scatter rejection and 3D data acquisition. The energy-resolved CT images were simulated using a digital breast phantom and the design parameters of the proposed MSMS CT. The phantom had 14 cm diameter and 50/50 adipose/glandular composition, and included carcinoma, adipose, blood, iodine and CaCO3 as contrast elements. The x-ray technique was 90 kVp tube voltage with 660 mR skin exposure. Photon counting, charge (energy) integrating and photon energy weighting CT images were generated. The contrast-to-noise (CNR) improvement with photon energy weighting was quantified. The dual energy subtracted images of CaCO3 and iodine were generated using a single CT scan at a fixed x-ray tube voltage. The x-ray spectrum was electronically split into low- and high-energy parts by a photon counting detector. The CNR of the energy weighting CT images of carcinoma, blood, adipose, iodine, and CaCO3 was higher by a factor of 1.16, 1.20, 1.21, 1.36 and 1.35, respectively, as compared to CT with a conventional charge (energy) integrating detector. Photon energy weighting was applied to CT projections prior to dual energy subtraction and reconstruction. Photon energy weighting improved the CNR in dual energy subtracted CT images of CaCO3 and iodine by a factor of 1.35 and 1.33, respectively. The combination of CNR improvements due to scatter rejection and energy weighting was in the range of 1.71-2 depending on the type of the contrast element. The tilted angle CZT detector was considered as the detector of choice. Experiments were performed to test the effect of the tilting angle on the energy spectrum. Using the CZT detector with 20° tilting angle decreased the

  11. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H2 (D2) in and with ultra-short laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergler, T.

    2006-01-01

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H 2 (D 2 ) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 10 15 W/cm 2 were focused onto a H 2 (D 2 ) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H + 2 (D + 2 ) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D 2 molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H + 2 molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  12. Aqueous complexes of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) with the carbonate and sulphate ions. Thermodynamic study by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and electro-spray-ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vercouter, Th.

    2005-03-01

    The prediction of the environmental impact of a possible geological disposal of radioactive wastes is supported by the thermodynamic modelling of the radionuclides behaviour in the groundwater. In this framework, the analogy between lanthanides and actinides(III) is confirmed by a critical analysis of the literature and the comparison with experimental results obtained here. The limiting complex, Eu(CO 3 ) 3 3- , is identified by solubility measurements in Na 2 CO 3 solutions. Then the formation constants of the complexes Eu(CO 3 ) i 3-2i (i=1-3) and Eu(SO 4 ) i 3-2i (i=1-2) are measured by TRLFS. The formation of aqueous LaSO 4 + is studied by ESI-MS and is in good agreement with the expected speciation. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction Cm(CO 3 ) 2 - + CO 3 2- ↔ Cm(CO 3 ) 3 3- are deduced from TRLFS measurements of the equilibrium constant between 10 and 70 C. The ionic strength effect is calculated using the SIT formula. (author)

  13. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalupka, C., E-mail: christian.kalupka@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Finger, J. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Reininghaus, M. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen 52074 (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  14. New techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubereau, A.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of spectroscopic applications of ultrashort laser pulses. This paper examines two approaches toward studying ultrafast relaxation processes in condensed matter: an IR technique which complements coherent Raman scattering; and a Fourier Raman method with high frequency resolution. The time domain IR spectroscopy technique has been applied to various vibration-rotation transitions of pure HCl gas and in mixtures with Ar buffer gas. The advantage of the time domain measurements instead of frequency spectroscopy is readily visualized when one recalls that a frequency resolution of 10 -3 cm -1 corresponds to time observations over 10 -8 , which are readily feasible. As a first demonstration of the FT-Raman technique the author presents experimental data on the Q-branch of the v 1 -vibrational mode of methane. An example for the experimental data obtained approximately 2 mm behind the nozzle is presented; the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal is plotted versus delay time. A complicated beating structure and the decay of the signal envelope are readily seen. The desired spectroscopic information is obtained by numerical Fourier transformation of the experimental points presented

  15. Compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for time-resolved studies of electron spin transport in microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, P. J.; Pugzlys, A.; Liu, J.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; van der Wal, C. H.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Pugžlys, A.

    2008-01-01

    A compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for operation in the small volume of high-field magnets is described. It is suited for measurements both in Voigt and Faraday configurations. Coupled with a pulsed laser source, the microscope is used to measure the time-resolved Kerr rotation response of

  16. Time resolved x-ray pinhole photography of compressed laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.

    1976-01-01

    Use of the Livermore x-ray streak camera to temporally record x-ray pinhole images of laser compressed targets is described. Use is made of specially fabricated composite x-ray pinholes which are near diffraction limited for 6 A x-rays, but easily aligned with a He--Ne laser of 6328 A wavelength. With a 6 μm x-ray pinhole, the overall system can be aligned to 5 μm accuracy and provides implosion characteristics with space--time resolutions of approximately 6 μm and 15 psec. Acceptable criteria for pinhole alignment, requisite x-ray flux, and filter characteristics are discussed. Implosion characteristics are presented from our present experiments with 68 μm diameter glass microshell targets and 0.45 terawatt, 70 psec Nd laser pulses. Final implosion velocities in excess of 3 x 10 7 cm/sec are evident

  17. A picosecond widely tunable deep-ultraviolet laser for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Feng-Feng; Yang Feng; Zhang Shen-Jin; Xu Zhi; Wang Zhi-Min; Xu Feng-Liang; Peng Qin-Jun; Zhang Jing-Yuan; Xu Zu-Yan; Wang Xiao-Yang; Chen Chuang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    We develop a picosecond widely tunable laser in a deep-ultraviolet region from 175 nm to 210 nm, generated by two stages of frequency doubling of a 80-MHz mode-locked picosecond Ti:sapphire laser. A β-BaB 2 O 4 walk-off compensation configuration and a KBe 2 BO 3 F 2 prism-coupled device are adopted for the generation of second harmonic and fourth harmonics, respectively. The highest power is 3.72 mW at 193 nm, and the fluctuation at 2.85 mW in 130 min is less than ±2%

  18. Measurements of spatially resolved high resolution spectra of laser-produced plasmas. FY 83 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, U.

    1984-01-01

    A high resolution grazing incidence spectrograph, provided by the Naval Research Laboratory and the Goddard Space Flight Center, has been installed on the Omega laser facility of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This 3 meter instrument, with a 1200 lines/mm grating blazed at 2 0 35', has produced extremely high quality spectra in the wavelength region 10 A to 100 A. Spectra have been obtained from glass microballoon targets that are coated with a variety of high-Z materials. Transitions from the Na-like and Ne-like ionization stages of Fe, Ni, Cu, and Kr have been identified

  19. Position- and time-resolved Stark broadening diagnostics of a non-thermal laser-induced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Stark-broadened line shapes of silicon ions in a laser-induced plasma using a model constructed, without assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), using a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The method is applied to temporally and spatially resolved measurements of Si 2+ and Si 3+ emissions from a transient plasma expanding into vacuum, produced by 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a Si (1 0 0) target. The best-fitting simulated line shapes and the corresponding electron number densities and temperatures (or equivalently, Druyvesteyn average energies) are compared with those returned assuming LTE (i.e. for a Maxwellian EEDF). Non-thermal behavior is found to dominate at all but the very earliest stages of expansion close to the target surface, consistent with McWhirter’s criterion for the establishment of LTE. The Druyvesteyn EEDF always yields an equivalent or better model of the experimental measurements, and the observed increasingly strong departure from the Maxwellian case with time and distance from the ablation event highlights the essential invalidity of the LTE assumption for moderate-power, nanosecond laser-induced plasma expanding in vacuo. (paper)

  20. Kinetics of the reaction F+NO+M->FNO+M studied by pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved IR and UV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Sillesen, A.; Jodkowski, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The title reaction was initiated by pulse radiolysis of SF6/NO gas mixtures, and the formation of FNO was studied by time-resolved IR and UV spectroscopy. At SF6 pressures of 10-320 mbar at 298 K, the formation of FNO was studied by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at 1857.324 cm(-1). Comparative...

  1. Spectral and time-resolved studies on ocular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Jentsch, S.; Schenke, S.; Hammer, M.; Biskup, C.; Gaillard, E.

    2007-07-01

    Measurements of endogeous fluorophores open the possibility for evaluation of metabolic state at the eye. For interpretation of 2-dimensional measurements of time-resolved auto fluorescence in 2 separate spectral ranges at the human eye, comparing measurements were performed on porcine eyes. Determining excitation and emission spectra, attention was drawn of proof of coenzymes NADH and FAD in isolated anatomical structures cornea, aqueous humor, lens, vitreous, neuronal retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choroid, and sclera. All these structures exhibit auto fluorescence, highest in lens. Excitation at 350 nm results in local fluorescence maxima at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH, in all structures. This short-wave excitation allows metabolic studies only at the anterior eye, because of the limited transmission of the ocular media. During excitation at 446 nm the existence of FAD is expressed by local fluorescence maxima at 530 nm. The composition fluorescence spectra allow no discrimination between single ocular structures. Approximating the dynamic fluorescence by a double exponential function, the shortest lifetimes were detected in RPE and neuronal retina. The histograms of mean lifetime t M cover each other on lens with cornea and also on sclera with choroid. Despite the lifetimes are close between RPE and neuronal retina, the relative contributions Q I are wide different. The gradient of trend lines in cluster diagrams of amplitudes α II vs. α I allows a discrimination of ocular structures.

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  4. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  5. Role of diagnostic testing in identifying and resolving dimensional-stability problems in electroplated laser mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, R.L.; Hogan, B.

    1982-01-01

    The metal mirrors which are the subject of this discussion are to be used in the Antares inertial fusion laser system. Antares is a high-power (40 TW), high-energy (35 to 40 kJ), pulsed CO 2 laser system for the investigation of inertial confinement fusion. The system contains more than four hundred small and large diamond-turned and conventionally polished mirrors. The largest mirrors are trapezoidal in shape with the longest dimension being 16 to 18 inches. The substrates are type 2124 aluminum for most large mirrors, and aluminum bronze, oxygen-free copper or a copper-zirconium alloy for most of the smaller mirrors. The optical surface is electro-deposited copper 20 to 40 mils thick. After nondestructive testing and rough machining, the electroplated surface is single-point diamond machined or conventionally polished

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with

  8. Angularly resolved characterization of ion beams from laser-ultrathin foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, C.; Doria, D.; Romagnani, L.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Ettlinger, O. C.; Gray, R. J.; Green, J.; Hicks, G. S.; Jung, D.; Naughton, K.; Padda, H.; Poder, K.; Scott, G. G.; Symes, D. R.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Neely, D.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Methods and techniques used to capture and analyze beam profiles produced from the interaction of intense, ultrashort laser pulses and ultrathin foil targets using stacks of Radiochromic Film (RCF) and Columbia Resin #39 (CR-39) are presented. The identification of structure in the beam is particularly important in this regime, as it may be indicative of the dominance of specific acceleration mechanisms. Additionally, RCF can be used to deconvolve proton spectra with coarse energy resolution while mantaining angular information across the whole beam.

  9. Angularly resolved characterization of ion beams from laser-ultrathin foil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scullion, C.; Doria, D.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Naughton, K.; Kar, S.; Zepf, M.; Romagnani, L.; Ettlinger, O.C.; Hicks, G.S.; Poder, K.; Najmudin, Z.; Gray, R.J.; Padda, H.; McKenna, P.; Green, J.; Scott, G.G.; Symes, D.R.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Methods and techniques used to capture and analyze beam profiles produced from the interaction of intense, ultrashort laser pulses and ultrathin foil targets using stacks of Radiochromic Film (RCF) and Columbia Resin #39 (CR-39) are presented. The identification of structure in the beam is particularly important in this regime, as it may be indicative of the dominance of specific acceleration mechanisms. Additionally, RCF can be used to deconvolve proton spectra with coarse energy resolution while mantaining angular information across the whole beam.

  10. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  11. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, P. J.; Gerber, R. A.; Gerardo, J. B.

    1982-09-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2×1015 cm-2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift.

  12. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannon, P.J.; Gerber, R.A.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach--Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2 x 10 15 cm -2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift

  13. Non-thermal effects on femtosecond laser ablation of polymers extracted from the oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki, E-mail: kumada.takayuki@jaea.go.jp; Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Atsushi [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of transparent polymers were examined using time-resolved reflectivity. When these polymers were irradiated by a pump pulse with fluence above the ablation threshold of 0.8–2.0 J/cm{sup 2}, we observed the oscillation of the reflectivity caused by the interference between the reflected probe pulses from the sample surface and the thin layer due to the non-thermal photomechanical effects of spallation. As the fluence of the pump pulse increased, the separation velocity of the thin layer increased from 6 km/s to the asymptotic value of 11 km/s. It is suggested that the velocities are determined by shock-wave velocities of the photo-excited layer.

  14. Broadband time-resolved elliptical crystal spectrometer for X-ray spectroscopic measurements in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rui-Rong; Jia Guo; Fang Zhi-Heng; Wang Wei; Meng Xiang-Fu; Xie Zhi-Yong; Zhang Fan

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray spectrometer used in high-energy-density plasma experiments generally requires both broad X-ray energy coverage and high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions for overcoming the difficulties imposed by the X-ray background, debris, and mechanical shocks. By using an elliptical crystal together with a streak camera, we resolve this issue at the SG-II laser facility. The carefully designed elliptical crystal has a broad spectral coverage with high resolution, strong rejection of the diffuse and/or fluorescent background radiation, and negligible source broadening for extended sources. The spectra that are Bragg reflected (23° < θ < 38°) from the crystal are focused onto a streak camera slit 18 mm long and about 80 μm wide, to obtain a time-resolved spectrum. With experimental measurements, we demonstrate that the quartz(1011) elliptical analyzer at the SG-II laser facility has a single-shot spectral range of (4.64–6.45) keV, a typical spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 560, and an enhanced focusing power in the spectral dimension. For titanium (Ti) data, the lines of interest show a distribution as a function of time and the temporal variations of the He-α and Li-like Ti satellite lines and their spatial profiles show intensity peak red shifts. The spectrometer sensitivity is illustrated with a temporal resolution of better than 25 ps, which satisfies the near-term requirements of high-energy-density physics experiments. (atomic and molecular physics)

  15. Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence from multiwalled carbon nanotubes in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrani, J. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA

    2015-01-26

    We observed temporal laser-induced incandescence (LII) signals from multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) suspended in ambient air. Unlike previous LII experiments with soot particles, which showed that primary particles with larger diameters cool at slower timescales relative to smaller particles, we observed that thicker MWCNTs with larger outer diameters (ODs) cool at faster timescales relative to thinner MWCNTs with smaller ODs. We suggested a simple explanation of this effect, based on the solution of one-dimensional nonstationary heat conduction equation for the initial non-uniform heating of MWCNTs with ODs greater than the skin depth.

  16. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Quantitative, depth-resolved determination of particle motion using multi-exposure, spatial frequency domain laser speckle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Tyler B; Kwan, Elliott; Hayakawa, Carole K; Durkin, Anthony J; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) is a simple, noninvasive technique for rapid imaging of particle motion in scattering media such as biological tissue. LSI is generally used to derive a qualitative index of relative blood flow due to unknown impact from several variables that affect speckle contrast. These variables may include optical absorption and scattering coefficients, multi-layer dynamics including static, non-ergodic regions, and systematic effects such as laser coherence length. In order to account for these effects and move toward quantitative, depth-resolved LSI, we have developed a method that combines Monte Carlo modeling, multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI), spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), and careful instrument calibration. Monte Carlo models were used to generate total and layer-specific fractional momentum transfer distributions. This information was used to predict speckle contrast as a function of exposure time, spatial frequency, layer thickness, and layer dynamics. To verify with experimental data, controlled phantom experiments with characteristic tissue optical properties were performed using a structured light speckle imaging system. Three main geometries were explored: 1) diffusive dynamic layer beneath a static layer, 2) static layer beneath a diffuse dynamic layer, and 3) directed flow (tube) submerged in a dynamic scattering layer. Data fits were performed using the Monte Carlo model, which accurately reconstructed the type of particle flow (diffusive or directed) in each layer, the layer thickness, and absolute flow speeds to within 15% or better.

  18. Study on guided waves in semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudensi, M.A.A.

    1980-01-01

    In This work we studied the guided waves in semiconductor lasers. In the first part we carried on the experimental measurements on lasers with stripe nonorthogonal to the mirrors. In the second part we developed a matrix method for the study of propagation and reflection of guided waves in lasers. (author) [pt

  19. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    and Berns. Mi. W. User pitotora- 26. Kestel. D.. And Chou. T. C. Tumer -localizing components of the ptirph% rin diation therapy of cancer following... cancer , (2) laser tissue interactions for the study of atherosclerosis, (3) pulsed laser effects on the eye, (4) laser application in genetic...these studies. Please refer to the appropriate article/abstract for further detail. 1. Dye plus laser photosensitization of cancer . Significant

  20. Theoretical study of the femtosecond-resolved photoelectron spectrum of the NO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Qingtian; Yang Guanghui; Sun Hailin; Han Keli; Lou Nanquan

    2003-01-01

    The effect of laser fields on the NO interaction potentials is obtained by the calculation of time-resolved photoelectron spectrum (TRPES) using the time-dependent wave-packet method. The calculation not only shows that the overlap of the pump-probe pulses makes some NO molecular 'invisible' states visible, but also that the coupling strength and the positions of relevant curves change on increasing the laser intensity. These changed potentials affect their dynamical behavior and influence the shape and position of each peak in TRPES. That the coupling strength of relevant potentials can be changed by the field-matter interaction is consistent with our ab initio calculations

  1. Semiconductor optical amplifier-based heterodyning detection for resolving optical terahertz beat-tone signals from passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latkowski, Sylwester; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramon; Carney, Kevin; Parra-Cetina, Josue; Philippe, Severine; Landais, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    An all-optical heterodyne approach based on a room-temperature controlled semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) for measuring the frequency and linewidth of the terahertz beat-tone signal from a passively mode-locked laser is proposed. Under the injection of two external cavity lasers, the SOA acts as a local oscillator at their detuning frequency and also as an optical frequency mixer whose inputs are the self-modulated spectrum of the device under test and the two laser beams. Frequency and linewidth of the intermediate frequency signal (and therefore, the beat-tone signal) are resolved by using a photodiode and an electrical spectrum analyzer.

  2. Three component particle velocimetry using laser sheets for cycle-resolved, in-cylinder measurements; Laser sheet ho ni yoru cylinder nai nagare no sanjigen sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K.; Urata, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Ono, T. [Honda Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    Analysis of the cycle-by-cycle variation of combustion in an internal combustion engine can be aided by the cycle-resolved measurement of the in-cylinder gas velocity. This paper describes the principle and operation of, and results obtained from, a particle coded-pulse velocimeter (PCPV) which measured the three components of velocity within normal planes to the axis of cylinder. The PCPV was applied to a 1.5 litre lean-burn engine in order to record the flow pattern. The intake air was seeded with light microcapsules of approximately 50{mu}m diameter which scattered light from a system of up to two sets of three plane laser sheets, distinguished by colour and thickness and pulsed by acousto-optic modulators, illuminating planes in the bore of the engine. The magnitudes of the axial and cross bore components of the velocity vector were found from the measured lengths and the duration of the particle tracks. The results from the PCPV measurements are time-resolved and instantaneously three-dimensional and thus the PCPV is capable of identifying the transition from a disordered flow, such as the intake process, to well-ordered flows such as occur during a compression process. The derived swirl and tumble ratios were relatively in good agreement with those measured by an impulse swirl meter. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. Method for spectrochemical analysis using time-resolved laser-induced breakdown. [Patent application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loree, T.R.; Radziemski, L.J.

    1982-01-26

    A method for real-time elemental analysis using laser-induced breakdown of the material under investigation and spectroscopic analysis of the light emitted from the plasma consequently formed is described. By delaying the observation of the emitted radiation, the unwanted background continuum and line spectra from excited ionic species can be rendered unimportant relative to the excited atomic line spectra, thereby producing sharp, well-defined characteristic identifying atomic spectral features. These features provide the indicia for detailed elemental analyses of substances. The method is quite general in that it applies to gases, surfaces, and particulates entrained in gases. It requires no electrodes and can excite atomic species like fluorine and chlorine which are difficult to observe by more conventional analytical procedures.

  4. Studies of Minerals, Organic and Biogenic Materials through Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Ismail, Syed; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Nyugen, Trac; Elsayed-Ali, hani

    2009-01-01

    A compact remote Raman spectroscopy system was developed at NASA Langley Research center and was previously demonstrated for its ability to identify chemical composition of various rocks and minerals. In this study, the Raman sensor was utilized to perform time-resolved Raman studies of various samples such as minerals and rocks, Azalea leaves and a few fossil samples. The Raman sensor utilizes a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser as excitation source, a 4-inch telescope to collect the Raman-scattered signal from a sample several meters away, a spectrograph equipped with a holographic grating, and a gated intensified CCD (ICCD) camera system. Time resolved Raman measurements were carried out by varying the gate delay with fixed short gate width of the ICCD camera, allowing measurement of both Raman signals and fluorescence signals. Rocks and mineral samples were characterized including marble, which contain CaCO3. Analysis of the results reveals the short (approx.10-13 s) lifetime of the Raman process, and shows that Raman spectra of some mineral samples contain fluorescence emission due to organic impurities. Also analyzed were a green (pristine) and a yellow (decayed) sample of Gardenia leaves. It was observed that the fluorescence signals from the green and yellow leaf samples showed stronger signals compared to the Raman lines. Moreover, it was also observed that the fluorescence of the green leaf was more intense and had a shorter lifetime than that of the yellow leaf. For the fossil samples, Raman shifted lines could not be observed due the presence of very strong short-lived fluorescence.

  5. Comparisons of angularly and spectrally resolved Bremsstrahlung measurements to two-dimensional multi-stage simulations of short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. D.; Kemp, A. J.; Pérez, F.; Link, A.; Key, M. H.; McLean, H.; Ping, Y.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Sorokovikova, A.; Westover, B. [University of California, San Diego (United States); Morace, A. [University of Milan (Italy); Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics (United States); Streeter, M. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    A 2-D multi-stage simulation model incorporating realistic laser conditions and a fully resolved electron distribution handoff has been developed and compared to angularly and spectrally resolved Bremsstrahlung measurements from high-Z planar targets. For near-normal incidence and 0.5-1 × 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} intensity, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict the existence of a high energy electron component consistently directed away from the laser axis, in contrast with previous expectations for oblique irradiation. Measurements of the angular distribution are consistent with a high energy component when directed along the PIC predicted direction, as opposed to between the target normal and laser axis as previously measured.

  6. Time-resolved dynamics of nanosecond laser-induced phase explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porneala, Cristian; Willis, David A

    2009-01-01

    Visualization of Nd : YAG laser ablation of aluminium targets was performed by a shadowgraph apparatus capable of imaging the dynamics of ablation with nanosecond time resolution. Direct observations of vaporization, explosive phase change and shock waves were obtained. The influence of vaporization and phase explosion on shock wave velocity was directly measured. A significant increase in the shock wave velocity was observed at the onset of phase explosion. However, the shock wave behaviour followed the form of a Taylor-Sedov spherical shock below and above the explosive phase change threshold. The jump in the shock wave velocity above phase explosion threshold is attributed to the release of stored enthalpy in the superheated liquid surface. The energy released during phase explosion was estimated by fitting the transient shock wave position to the Taylor scaling rules. Results of temperature calculations indicate that the vapour temperature at the phase explosion threshold is slightly higher than the critical temperature at the early stages of the shock wave formation. The shock wave pressure nearly doubled when transitioning from normal vaporization to phase explosion.

  7. Time-resolved measurements of laser-induced diffusion of CO molecules on stepped Pt(111)-surfaces; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchung der laser-induzierten Diffusion von CO-Molekuelen auf gestuften Pt(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrenz, M.

    2007-10-30

    In the present work the dynamics of CO-molecules on a stepped Pt(111)-surface induced by fs-laser pulses at low temperatures was studied by using laser spectroscopy. In the first part of the work, the laser-induced diffusion for the CO/Pt(111)-system could be demonstrated and modelled successfully for step diffusion. At first, the diffusion of CO-molecules from the step sites to the terrace sites on the surface was traced. The experimentally discovered energy transfer time of 500 fs for this process confirms the assumption of an electronically induced process. In the following it was explained how the experimental results were modelled. A friction coefficient which depends on the electron temperature yields a consistent model, whereas for the understanding of the fluence dependence and time-resolved measurements parallel the same set of parameters was used. Furthermore, the analysis was extended to the CO-terrace diffusion. Small coverages of CO were adsorbed to the terraces and the diffusion was detected as the temporal evolution of the occupation of the step sites acting as traps for the diffusing molecules. The additional performed two-pulse correlation measurements also indicate an electronically induced process. At the substrate temperature of 40 K the cross-correlation - where an energy transfer time of 1.8 ps was extracted - suggests also an electronically induced energy transfer mechanism. Diffusion experiments were performed for different substrate temperatures. (orig.)

  8. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  9. Studying electron distributions using the time-resolved free-bound spectra from coronal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lee, R.W.

    1982-11-01

    Absorption of laser light in a plasma by inverse bremsstrahlung, I.B., can lead to a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution provided the electron-elecron collision frequency is too low to equilibrate the velocity distribution in the coronal plasma region of a laser heated aluminum disk by measuring the radiation recombination continuum. The experiments are performed using lambda/sub L/ = 0.532 μm laser light at intensities of approx. 10 16 W/cm 2 . Such parameters are predicted to produce conditions suitable for a non-thermal electron distribution. The shape of the K-shell recombination radiation has been measured using a time-resolved x-ray spectrograph. The electron distribution can be determined from deconvolution of the recombination continuum shape

  10. Rare Earth Elements as Potential Biosignatures on Mars in SuperCam Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, A.; Beyssac, O.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Clegg, S. M.; Gauthier, M.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Lanza, N.

    2017-12-01

    The rare earth elements (REE, La to Lu) are a group of elements with similar chemical properties that are generally present in geologic materials at trace concentrations. REEs may be concentrated via processes such as igneous fractional crystallization in accessory minerals, e.g. apatite, zircon, and titanite. Additionally, however, concentrations of REE may serve to identify regions of high astrobiological interest. For example, Fe-oxyhydroxide deposits in hydrothermal vent systems and biologically related manganese nodules may be enriched in REEs. REEs have not been measured in situ on Mars, therefore their prevalence and distribution on Mars is as yet unknown, except as observed in martian meteorites. SuperCam is a survey instrument that will analyze materials around the Mars 2020 rover using a variety of spectral techniques including laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Raman, VIS-IR, and time-resolved laser fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopy. Recently, the SuperCam Engineering Development Unit was tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for its capabilities to detect REEs in minerals using TRLF spectroscopy. While this instrument was not designed to precisely replicate the flight model, the spectral resolution and light transmission was sufficient to obtain TRLF spectra on a number of minerals demonstrating a variety of REE luminescent centers. These include apatite (Sm3+, Nd3+, Eu3+, Dy3+), fluorite (Ho3+, Sm3+, Dy3+, Nd3+), and zircon (Er3+, Pr3+, Nd3+). Future work includes expanding this suite to include minerals associated with biological activities, for example Mn-oxides (desert varnish and manganese nodules), hydrothermal Fe-oxides, and stromatolite-associated carbonates. In this way and in combination with its other techniques, SuperCam may direct the rover team to perform further analyses of similar samples by the in situ chemical and mineralogical suite of instruments, or aid in prioritization for sample return.

  11. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Otani, K.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ng, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ∼1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ∼24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10{sup −5}. Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum.

  12. Depth-resolved multilayer pigment identification in paintings: combined use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszewska, Ewa A; Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Marczak, Jan; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Szmit-Naud, Elżbieta; Anglos, Demetrios; Targowski, Piotr

    2013-08-01

    A detailed feasibility study on the combined use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with optical coherence tomography (LIBS/OCT), aiming at a realistic depth-resolved elemental analysis of multilayer stratigraphies in paintings, is presented. Merging a high spectral resolution LIBS system with a high spatial resolution spectral OCT instrument significantly enhances the quality and accuracy of stratigraphic analysis. First, OCT mapping is employed prior to LIBS analysis in order to assist the selection of specific areas of interest on the painting surface to be examined in detail. Then, intertwined with LIBS, the OCT instrument is used as a precise profilometer for the online determination of the depth of the ablation crater formed by individual laser pulses during LIBS depth-profile analysis. This approach is novel and enables (i) the precise in-depth scaling of elemental concentration profiles, and (ii) the recognition of layer boundaries by estimating the corresponding differences in material ablation rate. Additionally, the latter is supported, within the transparency of the object, by analysis of the OCT cross-sectional views. The potential of this method is illustrated by presenting results on the detailed analysis of the structure of an historic painting on canvas performed to aid planned restoration of the artwork.

  13. Time-resolved pulse-counting lock-in detection of laser induced fluorescence in the presence of a strong background emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelissier, B.; Sadeghi, N.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a time-resolved pulse-counting system well adapted for the detection of continuous laser induced fluorescence (LIF) signals in repetitive phenomena, when a strong background emission is present. It consists of 256 channels coupled to a first in first out memory and interfaced to a 486 DX 33 PC, for data storage. It accepts time-averaged count rates up to 450 kcount/s. Time between channels can be set from 12.5 ns to several μs and the dead time between two consecutive cycles of the physical phenomena is less than 20 ns. In phase with a chopper, which modulates the laser beam, it adds the observed photon signal to the channel memories when the beam is on and substracts it when the beam is stopped, acting like a lock-in amplifier which detect only the modulated part of the signal. The minimum detectivity on the LIF signal is only limited by the shot noise of the plasma induced emission signal. As an application, we studied the time variation of the Ar + *( 2 G 9/2 ) metastable ions, detected by LIF, in two types of plasmas. Their radiative lifetime and collisional quenching frequencies were deduced from their decay rate in the afterglow of a pulsed Helicon reactor. We also observed the evolution of their density in a 455 kHz capacitively coupled argon discharge. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Time-resolved pulse-counting lock-in detection of laser induced fluorescence in the presence of a strong background emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier, B.; Sadeghi, N.

    1996-10-01

    We describe a time-resolved pulse-counting system well adapted for the detection of continuous laser induced fluorescence (LIF) signals in repetitive phenomena, when a strong background emission is present. It consists of 256 channels coupled to a first in first out memory and interfaced to a 486 DX 33 PC, for data storage. It accepts time-averaged count rates up to 450 kcount/s. Time between channels can be set from 12.5 ns to several μs and the dead time between two consecutive cycles of the physical phenomena is less than 20 ns. In phase with a chopper, which modulates the laser beam, it adds the observed photon signal to the channel memories when the beam is on and substracts it when the beam is stopped, acting like a lock-in amplifier which detect only the modulated part of the signal. The minimum detectivity on the LIF signal is only limited by the shot noise of the plasma induced emission signal. As an application, we studied the time variation of the Ar+*(2G9/2) metastable ions, detected by LIF, in two types of plasmas. Their radiative lifetime and collisional quenching frequencies were deduced from their decay rate in the afterglow of a pulsed Helicon reactor. We also observed the evolution of their density in a 455 kHz capacitively coupled argon discharge.

  15. Studying antimatter with laser precision

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The next generation of antihydrogen trapping devices, ALPHA-2, is moving into CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD) hall. This brand-new experiment will allow the ALPHA collaboration to conduct studies of antimatter with greater precision. ALPHA spokesperson Jeffrey Hangst was recently awarded a grant by the Carlsberg Foundation, which will be used to purchase equipment for the new experiment.   A 3-D view of the new magnet (in blue) and cryostat. The red lines show the paths of laser beams. LHC-type current leads for the superconducting magnets are visible on the top-right of the image. The ALPHA collaboration has been working to trap and study antihydrogen since 2006. Using antiprotons provided by CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD), ALPHA was the first experiment to trap antihydrogen and to hold it long enough to study its properties. “The new ALPHA-2 experiment will use integrated lasers to probe the trapped antihydrogen,” explains Jeffrey Hangst, ALP...

  16. Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, K.; Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Lanzara, A.; Jozwiak, C.

    2013-09-01

    A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-EF spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

  17. Femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoemission study of organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, A.; Tohoku University; University of Rochester, NY; Yan, L.; Watkins, N.J.; Gao, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Organic semiconductors are recently attracting much interest from the viewpoints of both device and fundamental physics. These organic semiconductors are considered to be important constituents of the future devices, such as organic light-emitting diode, organic field effect transistor, and organic solid-state injection laser. In order to elucidate their detailed physical properties and to develop the future devices, it is indispensable to understand their excited-state dynamics as well as their electronic structures. The femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is attracting much interest because of its capability to observe the energy-resolved excited electron dynamics. In this work, we have carried out a TR-2PPE study of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film. Furthermore, we have investigated the detailed electronic structure of CuPc film using the photoemission (PES) and inverse photoemission (IPES) spectroscopies. From the simultaneous PES and IPES measurements for CuPc film with a thickness of 100 nm, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), highest occupied molecular orbital, and ionization potential of CuPc film have been directly determined. The observed two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectrum of the present CuPc film, measured with photon energy of about hv=3.3 eV, exhibits a broad feature. From the energy diagram of CuPc film determined by the PES and IPES measurements, the intermediate state observed in the present 2PPE spectrum of CuPc film corresponds to the energy region between about 0.4 and 1.7 eV above the LUMO energy. From the time-resolved pump-probe measurements, it is found that the relaxation lifetimes of excited states in the present CuPc films are very short (all below 50 fs) and monotonously become faster with increasing excitation energy. We attribute this extremely fast relaxation process of photoexcitation to a rapid internal conversion process. From these results

  18. Theoretical studies of solar pumped lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Wynford L.

    1990-01-01

    One concept for collecting solar energy is to use large solar collectors and then use lasers as energy converters whose output beams act as transmission lines to deliver the energy to a destination. The efficiency of the process would be improved if the conversion could be done directly using solar pumped lasers, and the possibility of making such lasers is studied. There are many applications for such lasers, and these are examined. By including the applications first, the requirements for the lasers will be more evident. They are especially applicable to the Space program, and include cases where no other methods of delivering power seem possible. Using the lasers for conveying information and surveillance is also discussed. Many difficulties confront the designer of an efficient system for power conversion. These involve the nature of the solar spectrum, the method of absorbing the energy, the transfer of power into laser beams, and finally, the far field patterns of the beams. The requirements of the lasers are discussed. Specific laser configurations are discussed. The thrust is into gas laser systems, because for space applications, the laser could be large, and also the medium would be uniform and not subject to thermal stresses. Dye and solid lasers are treated briefly. For gas lasers, a chart of the various possibilities is shown, and the various families of gas lasers divided according to the mechanisms of absorbing solar radiation and of lasing. Several specific models are analyzed and evaluated. Overall conclusions for the program are summarized, and the performances of the lasers related to the requirements of various applications.

  19. Photolysis of Br2 in CCl4 studied by time-resolved X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingyu; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lo Russo, Manuela; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lorenc, Maciej; Cammarata, Marco; Bratos, Savo; Buslaps, Thomas; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Wulff, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A time-resolved X-ray solution scattering study of bromine molecules in CCl(4) is presented as an example of how to track atomic motions in a simple chemical reaction. The structures of the photoproducts are tracked during the recombination process, geminate and non-geminate, from 100 ps to 10 micros after dissociation. The relaxation of hot Br(2)(*) molecules heats the solvent. At early times, from 0.1 to 10 ns, an adiabatic temperature rise is observed, which leads to a pressure gradient that forces the sample to expand. The expansion starts after about 10 ns with the laser beam sizes used here. When thermal artefacts are removed by suitable scaling of the transient solvent response, the excited-state solute structures can be obtained with high fidelity. The analysis shows that 30% of Br(2)(*) molecules recombine directly along the X potential, 60% are trapped in the A/A' state with a lifetime of 5.5 ns, and 10% recombine non-geminately via diffusive motion in about 25 ns. The Br-Br distance distribution in the A/A' state peaks at 3.0 A.

  20. Time resolved LIF measurements for the study of NO removal: influence of H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresnet, F.; Baravian, G.; Magne, L.; Pasquiers, S.; Postel, C.; Puech, V.; Rousseau, A.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic of the NO-removal in a pre-ionized homogeneous discharge, i.e. without density nor temperature gradients, using the photo-triggering technique. This technique allows to measure specie densities in the temporal post-discharge after one homogeneous pulsed excitation, so that experimental results can be more confidently compared to predictions of a 0D-model, i.e. a model which have a spatially homogeneous kinetic description of the cleaning process. This model is fully self-consistent and describe both kinetics during the discharge and the post-discharge. We first reported the influence of electrical parameters (energy and reduced electric field) on the NO removal efficiency in the N 2 /NO mixture. Then, the influence of hydrocarbon (C 2 H 4 ) addition was determined. We showed that dissociation of NO through collision with the metastable state N 2 (a '1 Σ u - ) play the main part in the NO-removal process in homogeneously excited N 2 /NO mixture, and, that a de-excitation process of N 2 (a '1 Σ u - ) by C 2 H 4 explains that the NO-removal efficiency decreases when ethene is added to the mixture. Estimation for the rate coefficient value of this reaction, closed to the known value for methane, was also deduced from our results. In this study, the influence of water is investigated on the NO removal efficiency

  1. Spectral and spatial resolving of photoelectric property of femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSb(1-x)Bi(x).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C B; Zha, F X; Song, Y X; Shao, J; Dai, Y; Chen, X R; Ye, J Y; Wang, S M

    2015-07-15

    Femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSbBi were characterized by the joint measurements of photoconductivity (PC) spectroscopy and laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping. The excitation light in PC was focused down to 60 μm presenting the spectral information of local electronic property of individual holes. A redshift of energy band edge of about 6-8 meV was observed by the PC measurement when the excitation light irradiated on the laser drilled holes. The spatial resolving of photoelectric property was achieved by the LBIC mapping which shows "pseudo-holes" with much larger dimensions than the geometric sizes of the holes. The reduced LBIC current with the pseudo-holes is associated with the redshift effect indicating that the electronic property of the rim areas of the holes is modified by the femtosecond laser drilling.

  2. Polarization-Resolved Study of High Harmonics from Bulk Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshima, Keisuke; Shinohara, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Kengo; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Imasaka, Kotaro; Kaji, Tomohiro; Ashihara, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Itatani, Jiro

    2018-06-01

    The polarization property of high harmonics from gallium selenide is investigated using linearly polarized midinfrared laser pulses. With a high electric field, the perpendicular polarization component of the odd harmonics emerges, which is not present with a low electric field and cannot be explained by the perturbative nonlinear optics. A two-dimensional single-band model is developed to show that the anisotropic curvature of an energy band of solids, which is pronounced in an outer part of the Brillouin zone, induces the generation of the perpendicular odd harmonics. This model is validated by three-dimensional quantum mechanical simulations, which reproduce the orientation dependence of the odd-order harmonics. The quantum mechanical simulations also reveal that the odd- and even-order harmonics are produced predominantly by the intraband current and interband polarization, respectively. These experimental and theoretical demonstrations clearly show a strong link between the band structure of a solid and the polarization property of the odd-order harmonics.

  3. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of excited argon and ground-state titanium atoms in pulsed magnetron discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sushkov, V.; Do, H.T.; Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk; Hippler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), 1-10 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA ČR GAP108/12/2104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : absorption spectroscopy * diode laser * magnetron * argon metastable * HiPIMS * titanium * time-resolved Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/22/1/015002/

  4. Laser-driven hydrothermal process studied with excimer laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Raymond; Rubenchik, Alexander; Fong, Erika; Norton, Mary; Hollingsworth, William; Clarkson, James; Johnsen, Howard; Osborn, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Previously, we discovered [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)] that modest-fluence/modest-intensity 351-nm laser pulses, with insufficient fluence/intensity to ablate rock, mineral, or concrete samples via surface vaporization, still removed the surface material from water-submerged target samples with confinement of the removed material, and then dispersed at least some of the removed material into the water as a long-lived suspension of nanoparticles. We called this new process, which appears to include the generation of larger colorless particles, "laser-driven hydrothermal processing" (LDHP) [Mariella et al., J. Appl. Phys. 114, 014904 (2013)]. We, now, report that we have studied this process using 248-nm and 193-nm laser light on submerged concrete, quartzite, and obsidian, and, even though light at these wavelengths is more strongly absorbed than at 351 nm, we found that the overall efficiency of LDHP, in terms of the mass of the target removed per Joule of laser-pulse energy, is lower with 248-nm and 193-nm laser pulses than with 351-nm laser pulses. Given that stronger absorption creates higher peak surface temperatures for comparable laser fluence and intensity, it was surprising to observe reduced efficiencies for material removal. We also measured the nascent particle-size distributions that LDHP creates in the submerging water and found that they do not display the long tail towards larger particle sizes that we had observed when there had been a multi-week delay between experiments and the date of measuring the size distributions. This is consistent with transient dissolution of the solid surface, followed by diffusion-limited kinetics of nucleation and growth of particles from the resulting thin layer of supersaturated solution at the sample surface.

  5. Time-resolved diffraction studies of muscle using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harford, Jeffrey; Squire, John

    1997-01-01

    details the practical methods involved in recording time-resolved x-ray diffraction patterns from active muscles and the theoretical approaches that are being used to interpret the diffraction patterns that are obtained. The ultimate aim is to produce a series of time-sliced images of the changing molecular arrangements and shapes in the muscle as force is produced; together these images will form 'Muscle - The Movie'. (author)

  6. Design study of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Shoyama, Hidetoshi; Kanda, Yukinori

    1991-01-01

    A design study was made on a rocket powered by laser fusion. Dependence of its flight performance on target gain, driver repetition rate and fuel composition was analyzed to obtain optimal design parameters of the laser fusion rocket. The results indicate that the laser fusion rocket fueled with DT or D 3 He has the potential advantages over other propulsion systems such as fission rocket for interplanetary travel. (author)

  7. Laser ablation of an indium target: time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectra of In I in the 700–7700 cm−1 range

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Kubelík, Petr; Ferus, Martin; Chernov, Vladislav E.; Zanozina, Ekaterina M.; Juha, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 12 (2014), s. 2275-2283 ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14115; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : time-resolved fluorescence * Fourier transform infra reds * Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.466, year: 2014

  8. Spatially and spectrally resolved filamentary structures in the (3/2)omega 0 emission from laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Willi, O.; Rumsby, P.T.

    This study was conducted to explore the problem of filamentation of laser light in the underdense plasma corona surrounding ablatively imploded spherical targets, a phenomenon which may prevent the realization of laser-driven fusion schemes. Preliminary observations were made of filamentary structures in the (3/2)(omega sub o) emission from microballoon targets irradiated in the ablative mode. Time integrated spectroscopy showed double and single peaked (3/2)(omega sub o) emission spectra. A simple model for the growth and collapse of filaments was based on the movement of the density contours at the bottom of the filament with large velocity. Here the laser intensity was high and various decay instabilities and scattering processes took place. In particular the two plasmon decay instability occurred where the electron density was nc/4, a region of (3/2)(omega sub o) emission. The model was consistent with the experimentally observed spectra and predicted the type of omega sub o and 2 omega sub o that should be observed in future experiments

  9. Proposed ultraviolet free-electron laser at Brookhaven National Laboratory: A source for time-resolved biochemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.D.; Sutherland, J.C.; Laws, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is designing an ultraviolet free- electron laser (UV-FEL) user facility that will provide pico-second and sub-picosecond pulses of coherent ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths from 300 to 75 nm. Pulse width will be variable from abut 7 ps to ∼ 200 fs, with repetition rates as high as 10 4 Hz, single pulse energies > 1 mJ and hence peak pulse power >200 MW and average beam power > 10 W. The facility will be capable of ''pump-probe'' experiments utilizing the FEL radiation with: (1) synchronized auxiliary lasers, (2) a second, independently tunable FEL beam, or (3) broad-spectrum, high-intensity x-rays from the adjacent National Synchrotron Light Source. The UV-FEL consists of a high repetition rate recirculating superconducting linear accelerator which feeds pulses of electrons to two magnetic wigglers. Within these two devices, photons from tunable ''conventional'' laser would be frequency multiplied and amplified. By synchronously tuning the seed laser and modulating the energy of the electron beam, tuning of as much as 60% in wavelength is possible between alternating pulses supplied to different experimental stations, with Fourier transform limited resolution. Thus, up to four independent experiments may operate at one time, each with independent control of the wavelength and pulse duration. The UV-FEL will make possible new avenues of inquiry in time studies of diverse field including chemical, surface, and solid state physics, biology and materials science. The experimental area is scheduled to include a station dedicated to biological research. The complement of experimental and support facilities required by the biology station will be determined by the interests of the user community. 7 refs., 5 figs

  10. Multilinear analysis of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra of U(VI containing natural water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višňák Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural waters’ uranium level monitoring is of great importance for health and environmental protection. One possible detection method is the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS, which offers the possibility to distinguish different uranium species. The analytical identification of aqueous uranium species in natural water samples is of distinct importance since individual species differ significantly in sorption properties and mobility in the environment. Samples originate from former uranium mine sites and have been provided by Wismut GmbH, Germany. They have been characterized by total elemental concentrations and TRLFS spectra. Uranium in the samples is supposed to be in form of uranyl(VI complexes mostly with carbonate (CO32− and bicarbonate (HCO3− and to lesser extend with sulphate (SO42− , arsenate (AsO43− , hydroxo (OH− , nitrate (NO3− and other ligands. Presence of alkaline earth metal dications (M = Ca2+ , Mg2+ , Sr2+ will cause most of uranyl to prefer ternary complex species, e.g. Mn(UO2(CO332n-4 (n ∊ {1; 2}. From species quenching the luminescence, Cl− and Fe2+ should be mentioned. Measurement has been done under cryogenic conditions to increase the luminescence signal. Data analysis has been based on Singular Value Decomposition and monoexponential fit of corresponding loadings (for separate TRLFS spectra, the “Factor analysis of Time Series” (FATS method and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC, all data analysed simultaneously. From individual component spectra, excitation energies T00, uranyl symmetric mode vibrational frequencies ωgs and excitation driven U-Oyl bond elongation ΔR have been determined and compared with quasirelativistic (TDDFT/B3LYP theoretical predictions to cross -check experimental data interpretation.

  11. Multilinear analysis of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectra of U(VI) containing natural water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Višňák, Jakub; Steudtner, Robin; Kassahun, Andrea; Hoth, Nils

    2017-09-01

    Natural waters' uranium level monitoring is of great importance for health and environmental protection. One possible detection method is the Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), which offers the possibility to distinguish different uranium species. The analytical identification of aqueous uranium species in natural water samples is of distinct importance since individual species differ significantly in sorption properties and mobility in the environment. Samples originate from former uranium mine sites and have been provided by Wismut GmbH, Germany. They have been characterized by total elemental concentrations and TRLFS spectra. Uranium in the samples is supposed to be in form of uranyl(VI) complexes mostly with carbonate (CO32- ) and bicarbonate (HCO3- ) and to lesser extend with sulphate (SO42- ), arsenate (AsO43- ), hydroxo (OH- ), nitrate (NO3- ) and other ligands. Presence of alkaline earth metal dications (M = Ca2+ , Mg2+ , Sr2+ ) will cause most of uranyl to prefer ternary complex species, e.g. Mn(UO2)(CO3)32n-4 (n ɛ {1; 2}). From species quenching the luminescence, Cl- and Fe2+ should be mentioned. Measurement has been done under cryogenic conditions to increase the luminescence signal. Data analysis has been based on Singular Value Decomposition and monoexponential fit of corresponding loadings (for separate TRLFS spectra, the "Factor analysis of Time Series" (FATS) method) and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC, all data analysed simultaneously). From individual component spectra, excitation energies T00, uranyl symmetric mode vibrational frequencies ωgs and excitation driven U-Oyl bond elongation ΔR have been determined and compared with quasirelativistic (TD)DFT/B3LYP theoretical predictions to cross -check experimental data interpretation. Note to the reader: Several errors have been produced in the initial version of this article. This new version published on 23 October 2017 contains all the corrections.

  12. Time-resolved study of formate on Ni( 1 1 1 ) by picosecond SFG spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusafuka, K.; Noguchi, H.; Onda, K.; Kubota, J.; Domen, K.; Hirose, C.; Wada, A.

    2002-04-01

    Time-resolved vibrational measurements were carried out on formate (HCOO) adsorbed on Ni(1 1 1) surface by combining the sum-frequency generation method and picosecond laser system (time resolution of 6 ps). Rapid intensity decrease (within the time resolution) followed by intensity recovery (time constant of several tens of ps) of CH stretching signal was observed when picosecond 800 nm pulse was irradiated on the sample surface. From the results of temperature and pump fluence dependences of temporal behaviour of signal intensity, we concluded that the observed intensity change was induced by non-thermal process. Mechanism of the temporal intensity change was discussed.

  13. Study of liquid deposition during laser printing of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duocastella, M.; Patrascioiu, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dinca, V. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor No. 409, PO Box MG 16, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Fernandez-Pradas, J.M.; Morenza, J.L. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serra, P., E-mail: pserra@ub.edu [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which can be used to successfully print various complex and sensitive materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. However, the optimization of its performances requires a deep understanding of the LIFT dynamics. Such understanding should allow correlating the phenomena underlying the liquid transfer process with the morphology of the obtained deposits. To this end, in this work it is presented a study related to two aspects: first, the correlation of the morphological characteristics of the transferred droplets with the variation of the film thickness combined with laser fluence; and second, a correlation of the dependences observed with the dynamics of the transfer process. The work is focused on the understanding of the observed dependences for which the information provided by time-resolved analysis on liquid transfer dynamics has proved to be crucial.

  14. Study of liquid deposition during laser printing of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duocastella, M.; Patrascioiu, A.; Dinca, V.; Fernandez-Pradas, J.M.; Morenza, J.L.; Serra, P.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which can be used to successfully print various complex and sensitive materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. However, the optimization of its performances requires a deep understanding of the LIFT dynamics. Such understanding should allow correlating the phenomena underlying the liquid transfer process with the morphology of the obtained deposits. To this end, in this work it is presented a study related to two aspects: first, the correlation of the morphological characteristics of the transferred droplets with the variation of the film thickness combined with laser fluence; and second, a correlation of the dependences observed with the dynamics of the transfer process. The work is focused on the understanding of the observed dependences for which the information provided by time-resolved analysis on liquid transfer dynamics has proved to be crucial.

  15. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang, E-mail: yxweng@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Xianyou [Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, Qingxu [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2, Linggong Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  16. PLEIADES: A picosecond Compton scattering x-ray source for advanced backlighting and time-resolved material studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, David J.; Anderson, Scott G.; Barty, Christopher P.J.; Betts, Shawn M.; Booth, Rex; Brown, Winthrop J.; Crane, John K.; Cross, Robert R.; Fittinghoff, David N.; Hartemann, Fred V.; Kuba, Jaroslav; Le Sage, Gregory P.; Slaughter, Dennis R.; Tremaine, Aaron M.; Wootton, Alan J.; Hartouni, Edward P.; Springer, Paul T.; Rosenzweig, James B.

    2004-01-01

    The PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamical Evaluation of Structures) facility has produced first light at 70 keV. This milestone offers a new opportunity to develop laser-driven, compact, tunable x-ray sources for critical applications such as diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility and time-resolved material studies. The electron beam was focused to 50 μm rms, at 57 MeV, with 260 pC of charge, a relative energy spread of 0.2%, and a normalized emittance of 5 mm mrad horizontally and 13 mm mrad vertically. The scattered 820 nm laser pulse had an energy of 180 mJ and a duration of 54 fs. Initial x rays were captured with a cooled charge-coupled device using a cesium iodide scintillator; the peak photon energy was approximately 78 keV, with a total x-ray flux of 1.3x10 6 photons/shot, and the observed angular distribution found to agree very well with three-dimensional codes. Simple K-edge radiography of a tantalum foil showed good agreement with the theoretical divergence-angle dependence of the x-ray energy. Optimization of the x-ray dose is currently under way, with the goal of reaching 10 8 photons/shot and a peak brightness approaching 10 20 photons/mm 2 /mrad 2 /s/0.1% bandwidth

  17. Diagnostics for studies of novel laser ion acceleration mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Senje, Lovisa; Yeung, Mark; Aurand, Bastian; Kuschel, Stephan; Rödel, Christian; Wagner, Florian; Li, Kun; Dromey, Brendan; Bagnoud, Vincent; Neumayer, Paul; Roth, Markus; Wahlström, Claes-Göran; Zepf, Matthew; Kuehl, Thomas; Jung, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic for investigating and distinguishing different laser ion acceleration mechanisms has been developed and successfully tested. An ion separation wide angle spectrometer can simultaneously investigate three important aspects of the laser plasma interaction: (1) acquire angularly resolved energy spectra for two ion species, (2) obtain ion energy spectra for multiple species, separated according to their charge to mass ratio, along selected axes, and (3) collect laser radiation reflecte...

  18. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  19. Grid studies for the simulation of resolved structures in an Eulerian two-fluid framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauss, Friederike, E-mail: f.gauss@hzdr.de; Lucas, Dirk; Krepper, Eckhard

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Elaborated Eulerian two-fluid methods may predict multiphase flow with large differences in interfacial length scales. • A study on the grid requirements of resolved structures in such two-fluid methods is presented. • The two-fluid results are only little dependent on the grid size. • The results justify the resolved treatment of flow structures covering only few grid cells. • A grid-dependent limit between resolved an modeled structures may be established. - Abstract: The influence of the grid size on the rise velocity of a single bubble simulated with an Eulerian two-fluid method is investigated. This study is part of the development of an elaborated Eulerian two-fluid framework, which is able to predict complex flow phenomena as arising in nuclear reactor safety research issues. Such flow phenomena cover a wide range of interfacial length scales. An important aspect of the simulation method is the distinction into small flow structures, which are modeled, and large structures, which are resolved. To investigate the requirements on the numerical grid for the simulation of such resolved structures the velocity of rising gas bubbles is a good example since theoretical values are available. It is well known that the rise velocity of resolved bubbles is clearly underestimated in a one-fluid approach if they span over only few numerical cells. In the present paper it is shown that in the case of the two-fluid model the bubble rise velocity depends only slightly on the grid size. This is explained with the use of models for the gas–liquid interfacial forces. Good approximations of the rise velocity and the bubble shape are obtained with only few grid points per bubble diameter. This result justifies the resolved treatment of flow structures, which cover only few grid cells. Thus, a limit for the distinction into resolved and modeled structures in the two-fluid context may be established.

  20. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  1. Study of the photon remnant in resolved photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-01-01

    Photoproduction at HERA is studied in ep collisions, with the ZEUS detector, for γp centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130-270 GeV. A sample of events with two high-p T jets (p T >6 GeV, η T with respect to the beam axis is measured to be 2.1±0.2 GeV, which demonstrates substantial mean transverse momenta for the photon remnant. (orig.)

  2. Time-resolved infrared studies of protein conformational dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Causgrove, T.P.; Dyer, R.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Callender, R.H. [Univ. of New York, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    We have demonstrated that TRIR in the amide I region gives structural information regarding protein conformational changes in realtime, both on processes involved in the development of the functional structure (protein folding) and on protein structural changes that accompany the functional dynamics of the native structure. Assignment of many of the amide I peaks to specific amide or sidechain structures will require much additional effort. Specifically, the congestion and complexity of the protein vibrational spectra dictate that isotope studies are an absolute requirement for more than a qualitative notion of the structural interpretation of these measurements. It is clear, however, that enormous potential exists for elucidating structural relaxation dynamics and energetics with a high degree of structural specificity using this approach.

  3. Correlation between native bonds in a polymeric material and molecular emissions from the laser-induced plasma observed with space and time resolved imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, S. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Institut Charles Sadron, CNRS and University of Strasbourg, 23 rue de Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Motto-Ros, V.; Ma, Q.L.; Lei, W.Q.; Wang, X.C. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Pelascini, F.; Surma, F. [CRITT Materiaux Alsace, 19 rue de St Junien, 67300 Schiltigheim (France); Detalle, V., E-mail: vincent.detalle@culture.gouv.fr [Laboratoire de Recherche des Monuments Historiques, 29 rue de Paris, 77420 Champs-sur-Marne (France); Yu, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France)

    2012-08-15

    Emissions from C{sub 2} molecules and CN radicals in laser-induced plasmas on polymeric materials were observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging. More precisely, differential imaging with a pair of narrowband filters (one centered on the emission line and another out of the line) was used to extract emission images of interested molecules or radicals. The correlation between the molecular emission image of the plasma and the molecular structure of the polymer to be analyzed was studied for four different types of materials: polyamide (PA) with native CN bonds, polyethylene (PE) with simple CC bonds, polystyrene (PS) with delocalized double CC bonds, and polyoxymethylene (POM) which neither contains CC nor CN bonds. A clear correlation is demonstrated between emission and molecular structure of the material, allowing the identification of several organic compounds by differential spectroscopic imaging. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma imaging method to discriminate different type of polymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular emissions (CN and C{sub 2}) are spatially and temporally correlated to native bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several formation processes of molecular fragments are observed.

  4. Aqueous complexes of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III) with the carbonate and sulphate ions. Thermodynamic study by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and electro-spray-ionisation mass spectrometry; Complexes aqueux de lanthanides (3) et actinides (3) avec les ions carbonate et sulfate. Etude thermodynamique par spectrofluorimetrie laser resolue en temps et spectrometrie de masse a ionisation electrospray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercouter, Th

    2005-03-15

    The prediction of the environmental impact of a possible geological disposal of radioactive wastes is supported by the thermodynamic modelling of the radionuclides behaviour in the groundwater. In this framework, the analogy between lanthanides and actinides(III) is confirmed by a critical analysis of the literature and the comparison with experimental results obtained here. The limiting complex, Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}, is identified by solubility measurements in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. Then the formation constants of the complexes Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-3) and Eu(SO{sub 4}){sub i}{sup 3-2i} (i=1-2) are measured by TRLFS. The formation of aqueous LaSO{sub 4}{sup +} is studied by ESI-MS and is in good agreement with the expected speciation. The enthalpy and entropy of the reaction Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup -} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {r_reversible} Cm(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} are deduced from TRLFS measurements of the equilibrium constant between 10 and 70 C. The ionic strength effect is calculated using the SIT formula. (author)

  5. Time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for the study of interfacial charge dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neppl, Stefan, E-mail: sneppl@lbl.gov; Gessner, Oliver

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Ultrafast interfacial charge transfer is probed with atomic site specificity. • Femtosecond X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using a free electron laser. • Efficient and flexible picosecond X-ray photoelectron pump–probe scheme using synchrotron radiation. - Abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the most powerful techniques to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces in a non-destructive fashion. Extending this technique into the time domain has the exciting potential to shed new light on electronic and chemical dynamics at surfaces by revealing transient charge configurations with element- and site-specificity. Here, we describe prospects and challenges that are associated with the implementation of picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at third-generation synchrotrons and X-ray free-electron lasers, respectively. In particular, we discuss a series of laser-pump/X-ray-probe photoemission experiments performed on semiconductor surfaces, molecule-semiconductor interfaces, and films of semiconductor nanoparticles that demonstrate the high sensitivity of time-resolved XPS to light-induced charge carrier generation, diffusion and recombination within the space charge layers of these materials. Employing the showcase example of photo-induced electronic dynamics in a dye-sensitized semiconductor system, we highlight the unique possibility to probe heterogeneous charge transfer dynamics from both sides of an interface, i.e., from the perspective of the molecular electron donor and the semiconductor acceptor, simultaneously. Such capabilities will be crucial to improve our microscopic understanding of interfacial charge redistribution and associated chemical dynamics, which are at the heart of emerging energy conversion, solar fuel generation, and energy storage technologies.

  6. Time-Resolved Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Pulsed Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes Containing BCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Norbert; Hempel, Frank; Strämke, Siegfried; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    In situ measurements are reported giving insight into the plasma chemical conversion of the precursor BCl3 in industrial applications of boriding plasmas. For the online monitoring of its ground state concentration, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the mid-infrared spectral range was applied in a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) reactor. A compact quantum cascade laser measurement and control system (Q-MACS) was developed to allow a flexible and completely dust-sealed optical coupling to the reactor chamber of an industrial plasma surface modification system. The process under the study was a pulsed DC plasma with periodically injected BCl3 at 200 Pa. A synchronization of the Q-MACS with the process control unit enabled an insight into individual process cycles with a sensitivity of 10-6 cm-1·Hz-1/2. Different fragmentation rates of the precursor were found during an individual process cycle. The detected BCl3 concentrations were in the order of 1014 molecules·cm-3. The reported results of in situ monitoring with QCLAS demonstrate the potential for effective optimization procedures in industrial PACVD processes.

  7. Two-color pump-probe laser spectroscopy instrument with picosecond time-resolved electronic delay and extended scan range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anchi; Ye, Xiong; Ionascu, Dan; Cao, Wenxiang; Champion, Paul M.

    2005-11-01

    An electronically delayed two-color pump-probe instrument was developed using two synchronized laser systems. The instrument has picosecond time resolution and can perform scans over hundreds of nanoseconds without the beam divergence and walk-off effects that occur using standard spatial delay systems. A unique picosecond Ti :sapphire regenerative amplifier was also constructed without the need for pulse stretching and compressing optics. The picosecond regenerative amplifier has a broad wavelength tuning range, which suggests that it will make a significant contribution to two-color pump-probe experiments. To test this instrument we studied the rotational correlation relaxation of myoglobin (τr=8.2±0.5ns) in water as well as the geminate rebinding kinetics of oxygen to myoglobin (kg1=1.7×1011s-1, kg2=3.4×107s-1). The results are consistent with, and improve upon, previous studies.

  8. The measurement of the urinary excretion of uranium by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavadore, D.; Poirey, B.; Comba, J.B.; Minaud, G.; Ballet, D.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid direct measurements of the urinary excretion of uranium are often disturbed by metabolic uncertainties and analytical interferences. One consequence of these phenomena is detection limits or uncertainties that are too high. The technique proposed here associates rapid processing of the sample with an optimised measurement system. The objectives of the study - rapidity of response, accuracy and precision lower than 10% and ease of operation - are attained by using a solid power laser as excitation source in conjunction with a modified commercial fluorimeter. We describe the analytical stages for the two methods used (direct measurement and measurement after mineralisation of the sample). The experimental results achieved with 120 measurements are compared with the results obtained by extraction chromatography. The advantages and drawbacks of the TRLIF technique are discussed. Finally, the values of the natural urinary excretion of uranium among 80 non-exposed workers from the Marcoule region are presented as a function of the analytical technique selected. (authors)

  9. Small Sub-micron-Particle Position-Resolving Laser-Doppler Velocimeter for High-Speed Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objectives of this proposed work are to develop and prove the use of LDV and CompLDV for particle-position-resolving and flow velocity profile...

  10. Space-resolved XUV spectra of CVI and BV lines from a 10 ps KrF laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, E.J.; Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.; Scott, H.

    1999-01-01

    We produced a plasma using highly focused ∼50 mJ, 10 ps pulses from a KrF laser on graphite and boron-carbide targets. We measured space-resolved (along the plasma axis) line profiles of Hydrogen-like and Helium-like Carbon and Boron resonance lines, using a crossed-slit, 1 m grazing-incidence spectrometer, with a spatial resolution ∼50 μm. Synthetic spectra generated with the atomic postprocessor CRETIN provided preliminary estimates of the plasma electron temperature and density. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. Time-resolved dynamics of two-channel molecular systems in cw laser fields: Wave-packet construction in the Floquet formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, T.T.; Chateauneuf, F.; Atabek, O.; He, X.

    1995-01-01

    The description of the wave-packet time-resolved dynamics in a two-channel molecular system driven by a cw laser field is considered within the time-independent Floquet representation. It is shown that, at high field intensity, the wave-packet motions are governed solely by the pair of adiabatic dressed potential-energy surfaces (PES's) associated with a single Brillouin zone. The same expressions of the wave-packet motions in terms of the adiabatic PES's are obtained within a short-time approximation, thereby furnishing a new numerical algorithm for the wave-packet propagation in a laser-driven two-channel system at any intensity. Numerical tests of this algorithm are presented. The numerical results establish unambiguously the adiabaticity of nuclear motions at high field intensities

  12. Laser isotope separation studies in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisawa, Takashi; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1986-01-01

    For uranium enrichment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been studying atomic vapor laser isotope separation since 1976, in addition to such separation methods as gas diffusion, chemical exchange and gas-dynamic techniques. Studies carried out to date in JAERI is briefly summarized in the first part of the report. Then, some major separation techniques which have been studied in JAERI are outlined, and typical results obtained are presented. A large part is devoted to the multiple-photon photoionization technique, which is commonly known as the atomic laser isotope separation method for uranium enrichment. It has such advantages as 1) very high spectral selectivity for the relevant isotope and 2) highly improved photoionizing effect by means of two- and three-step resonance photoionization processes. Here, the atomic laser isotope separation method is discussed in detail with respect to the evaporation process, energy levels, photoionization, selectivity, photoionization schemes, ion recovery, separation in macroscopic amounts, and separation of trace amounts of isotopes. Typical observed and claculated results related to these subjects are shown. In addition, the report briefly describes some other separation processes including laser induced chemical reaction, multiple photo-dissociation, multiple-photo excitation and UV dissociation, laser induced thermal diffusion, and laser centrifugation. (Nogami, K.)

  13. QED studies using high-power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattias Marklund

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The event of extreme lasers, which intensities above 10 22 W/cm 2 will be reached on a routine basis, will give us opportunities to probe new aspects of quantum electrodynamics. In particular, the non-trivial properties of the quantum vacuum can be investigated as we reach previously unattainable laser intensities. Effects such as vacuum birefringence and pair production in strong fields could thus be probed. The prospects of obtaining new insights regarding the non-perturbative structure of quantum field theories shows that the next generation laser facilities can be important tool for fundamental physical studies. Here we aim at giving a brief overview of such aspects of high-power laser physics.

  14. Femtosecond study of laser dyes soluble in water: coumarins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassara, Laurence

    1996-01-01

    Coumarins build up one of the great families of laser dyes, and this research thesis addresses the study of four water-soluble coumarins (ATC, DMATC, DATC, and CHOS) which are analogue to conventional coumarins (C120, C311, C1, and C102). These molecules are made water-soluble by substitution of the methyl group in position 4 by a polyether group. Mechanisms of deactivation are studied by means of time-resolved fluorescence and transient adsorption methods which allow the reaction dynamics of coumarins after light excitation to be studied. Several time scales, from femto- to nano-second, have been reached and allowed various processes to be studied: relaxation, solvation dynamics, solute orientation diffusion, process of deactivation of radiative and non-radiative relaxation in various solvents [fr

  15. Observation of a rainbow of visible colors in a near infrared cascaded Raman fiber laser and its novel application as a diagnostic tool for length resolved spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparanji, Santosh; Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we report and analyse the surprising observation of a rainbow of visible colors, spanning 390nm to 620nm, in silica-based, Near Infrared, continuous-wave, cascaded Raman fiber lasers. The cascaded Raman laser is pumped at 1117nm at around 200W and at full power we obtain 100 W at 1480nm. With increasing pump power at 1117nm, the fiber constituting the Raman laser glows in various hues along its length. From spectroscopic analysis of the emitted visible light, it was identified to be harmonic and sum-frequency components of various locally propagating wavelength components. In addition to third harmonic components, surprisingly, even 2nd harmonic components were observed. Despite being a continuous-wave laser, we expect the phase-matching occurring between the core-propagating NIR light with the cladding-propagating visible wavelengths and the intensity fluctuations characteristic of Raman lasers to have played a major role in generation of visible light. In addition, this surprising generation of visible light provides us a powerful non-contact method to deduce the spectrum of light propagating in the fiber. Using static images of the fiber captured by a standard visible camera such as a DSLR, we demonstrate novel, image-processing based techniques to deduce the wavelength component propagating in the fiber at any given spatial location. This provides a powerful diagnostic tool for both length and power resolved spectral analysis in Raman fiber lasers. This helps accurate prediction of the optimal length of fiber required for complete and efficient conversion to a given Stokes wavelength.

  16. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  17. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubaiey, Najem A.; Walsh, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Silylenes (silanediyls) have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2) are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas) at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using Lindemann

  18. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Rubaiey Najem A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silylenes (silanediyls have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2 are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using

  19. Introducing a standard method for experimental determination of the solvent response in laser pump, x-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kehres, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In time-resolved laser pump, X-ray probe wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution the structural response of the system is accompanied by a solvent response. The solvent response is caused by reorganization of the bulk solvent following the laser pump event, and in order...... response-the solvent term-experimentally when applying laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering. The solvent term describes difference scattering arising from the structural response of the solvent to changes in the hydrodynamic parameters: pressure, temperature and density. We...... is demonstrated to exhibit first order behaviour with respect to the amount of energy deposited in the solution. We introduce a standardized method for recording solvent responses in laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray wide-angle scattering experiments by using dye mediated solvent heating. Furthermore...

  20. A study of the reaction Li+HCl by the technique of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of Li (2 2PJ-2 2S1/2, λ=670.7 nm) between 700 and 1000 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.; Saltzman, Eric S.

    1987-10-01

    A kinetic study is presented of the reaction between lithium atoms and hydrogen chloride over the temperature range 700-1000 K. Li atoms are produced in an excess of HCl and He bath gas by pulsed photolysis of LiCl vapor. The concentration of the metal atoms is then monitored in real time by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence of Li atoms at λ=670.7 nm using a pulsed nitrogen-pumped dye laser and box-car integration of the fluorescence signal. Absolute second-order rate constants for this reaction have been measured at T=700, 750, 800, and 900 K. At T=1000 K the reverse reaction is sufficiently fast that equilibrium is rapidly established on the time scale of the experiment. A fit of the data between 700 and 900 K to the Arrhenius form, with 2σ errors calculated from the absolute errors in the rate constants, yields k(T)=(3.8±1.1)×10-10 exp[-(883±218)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1. This result is interpreted through a modified form of collision theory which is constrained to take account of the conservation of total angular momentum during the reaction. Thereby we obtain an estimate for the reaction energy threshold, E0=8.2±1.4 kJ mol-1 (where the error arises from uncertainty in the exothermicity of the reaction), in very good agreement with a crossed molecular beam study of the title reaction, and substantially lower than estimates of E0 from both semiempirical and ab initio calculations of the potential energy surface.

  1. Late-Emerging and Resolving Dyslexia : A Follow-Up Study from Age 3 to 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torppa, Minna; Eklund, Kenneth; van Bergen, Elsje; Lyytinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the stability of dyslexia status from Grade 2 to Grade 8 in four groups: (a) no dyslexia in either grade (no-dyslexia, n = 127); (b) no dyslexia in Grade 2 but dyslexia in Grade 8 (late-emerging, n = 18); (c) dyslexia in Grade 2 but not in Grade 8 (resolving, n = 15); and (d)

  2. Study of resolved high-psub(T) neutral pions at the CERN ISR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Resvanis, L.K.; Voulgaris, G.; Filippas, T.A.; Fokitis, E.; Fabjan, C.W.; Fields, T.; Lissauer, D.; Mannelli, I.; Mouzourakis, P.; Nakamura, K.; Nappi, A.; Willis, W.J.; Goldberg, M.; Lankford, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The inclusive production of π 0 at large values of psub(T) in pp collisions at the ISR has been studied. In this experiment the two photons are resolved and separately measured for psub(T) values of up to 6 GeV/c, giving confidence that the desired signal has been separated from various backgrounds. (Auth.)

  3. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for laser-ablated silicon particles in xenon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Sakuramoto, Tamaki; Murakami, Kouichi

    1996-01-01

    We developed a laboratory-scale in situ apparatus for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a time resolution of 10 ns and a space resolution of 100 μm. Utilizing this spectrometer, we have investigated the dynamics of silicon atoms formed by laser ablation in xenon gas. It was found that 4d-electrons in the xenon atoms are excited through collision with electrons in the laser-generated silicon plasma. (author)

  4. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0±0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be γ e / γ i = (0.5±0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A 1g mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase and its development for excitations close to the

  5. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  6. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, F; Njiki-Menga, G-H; Witschger, O

    2013-01-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  7. Liquid film characterization in horizontal, annular, two-phase, gas-liquid flow using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, P.S.C.; Martins, F.J.W.A.; Azevedo, L.F.A. [PUC-Rio, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Sampaio, L.E.B. [LMTA/PGMEC, UFF, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Laboratory of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Serfaty, R. [Petrobras R and D Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    A non-intrusive optical technique was developed to provide time-resolved longitudinal and cross-sectional images of the liquid film in horizontal annular pipe flow of air and water, revealing the interfacial wave behavior. Quantitative information on the liquid film dynamics was extracted from the time-resolved images. The planar laser-induced fluorescence technique was utilized to allow for optical separation of the light emitted by the film from that scattered by the air-water interface. The visualization test section was fabricated from a tube presenting nearly the same refractive index as water, which allowed the visualization of the liquid film at regions very close to the pipe wall. Longitudinal images of the liquid film were captured using a high-frame-rate digital video camera synchronized with a high-repetition-rate laser. An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically detect the position of the air-water interface in each image frame. The thickness of the liquid film was measured at two axial stations in each processed image frame, providing time history records of the film thickness at two different positions. Wave frequency information was obtained by analyzing the time-dependent signals of film thickness for each of the two axial positions recorded. Wave velocities were measured by cross-correlating the amplitude signals from the two axial positions. For the film cross-section observations, two high-speed digital video cameras were used in a stereoscopic arrangement. Comparisons with results from different techniques available in literature indicate that the technique developed presents equivalent accuracy in measuring the liquid film properties. Time-resolved images of longitudinal and cross-section views of the film were recorded, which constitute valuable information provided by the technique implemented. (orig.)

  8. Theoretical studies of solar-pumped lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Possible types of lasers were surveyed for solar power conversion. The types considered were (1) liquid dye lasers, (2) vapor dye lasers, and (3) nondissociative molecular lasers. These are discussed.

  9. Absolutely calibrated, time-resolved measurements of soft x rays using transmission grating spectrometers at the Nike Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.L.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.F.; Holland, G.; Serlin, V.; Klapisch, M.; Columbant, D.; Mostovych, A.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate simulation of pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion requires benchmarking the codes with experimental data. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has begun to measure the absolute intensity of radiation from laser irradiated targets to provide critical information for the radiatively preheated pellet designs developed by the Nike laser group. Two main diagnostics for this effort are two spectrometers incorporating three detection systems. While both spectrometers use 2500 lines/mm transmission gratings, one instrument is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera and the other is coupled to both an absolutely calibrated Si photodiode array and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Absolute calibration of spectrometer components has been undertaken at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratories. Currently, the system has been used to measure the spatially integrated soft x-ray flux as a function of target material, laser power, and laser spot size. A comparison between measured and calculated flux for Au and CH targets shows reasonable agreement to one-dimensional modeling for two laser power densities

  10. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, J.M., E-mail: j.m.palomares-linares@tue.nl; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hübner, S.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der, E-mail: jjamvandermullen@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas. - Highlights: • Time resolved laser induced fluorescence at high repetition rate • Decay times as function of pressure, electron density and temperature • Measurement of total electron atom depopulation rates • Reasonable agreement of electron total rates with hard sphere approximations.

  11. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  13. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... from a silver target irradiated by a laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum was measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes. The time-of-flight spectra in all directions, as well as the total angular yield were determined. The angular distribution peaks strongly in forward direction...

  14. Dynamical study of a laser with a saturable absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignowity, D; RamIrez, R [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    The study of a laser including a saturable absorber is presented. The non-linear system describing the complex dynamics of the laser is presented. The laser is shown to operate in several regimes depending on the parameters used. It is also shown how the control of the laser is possible depending on the operating regime parameters.

  15. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed as a hy...

  16. Molecular dynamics study of lubricant depletion by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Woo; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Talke, Frank E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to numerically investigate the effect of pulsed laser heating on lubricant depletion. The maximum temperature, the lubricant depletion width, the number of evaporated lubricant beads and the number of fragmented lubricant chains were studied as a function of laser peak power, pulse duration and repetition rate. A continuous-wave laser and a square pulse laser were simulated and compared to a Gaussian pulse laser. With increasing repetition rate, pulsed laser heating was found to approach continuous-wave laser heating.

  17. Real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium, at OSHA limit levels, by time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Real-time detection of beryllium particulate is being investigated by the new technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For beryllium detection we monitor the 313.1-nm feature of once ionized beryllium (Be II). Numerous publications describe the technique, our beryllium results, and other applications. Here we summarize the important points and describe our experiments with beryllium

  18. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm

  19. Studies on corrosion protection of laser hybrid welded AISI 316 by laser remelting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L welds. Welding and laser treatment parameters were varied. General corrosion behaviour of the weld and laser treated surface was characterised using a gel visualization test. The local electrochemistry of the weld and laser......Unlike in autogenous laser welding, hybrid laser welding of stainless steel could introduce grain boundary carbides due to low cooling rates. Formation of grain boundary carbides leads to reduced corrosion properties. Studies have initially been carried out on hybrid laser welding and subsequent...... treated surface was investigated using a novel micro electrochemical technique with a tip resolution of ~1 mm. Results show that hybrid laser welding of 316L has increased corrosion susceptibility probably as a result of grain boundary carbide formation. However a suitable post laser treatment could...

  20. Time-resolved X-ray studies using third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.

    1991-10-01

    The third generation, high-brilliance, hard x-ray, synchrotron radiation (SR) sources currently under construction (ESRF at Grenoble, France; APS at Argonne, Illinois; and SPring-8 at Harima, Japan) will usher in a new era of x-ray experimentation for both physical and biological sciences. One of the most exciting areas of experimentation will be the extension of x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques to the study of transient or time-evolving systems. The high repetition rate, short-pulse duration, high brilliance, and variable spectral bandwidth of these sources make them ideal for x-ray time-resolved studies. The temporal properties (bunch length, interpulse period, etc.) of these new sources will be summarized. Finally, the scientific potential and the technological challenges of time-resolved x-ray scattering from these new sources will be described. 13 refs., 4 figs

  1. Laser fusion system design study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The following studies were completed: (1) The synthesis of a pointing/control system compatible with existing and advanced laser opto-mechanical configurations. (2) Attainment of the required pointing angle, longitudinal focus, and differential pathlength accuracies. (3) Maximum modularization of the sensor and gimbal assemblies to provide the required accuracies at minimum cost. Detailed information is given on each. (MOW)

  2. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  3. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10 4 -10 6 K) and high density plasmas (10 22 -10 24 cm -3 ) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10 13 - 10 15 W/cm 2 ) and subpicosecond (10 -12 -10 -13 s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (∼40eV) super-critical density (∼10 23 /cm 3 ) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (∼10 18 /cm 3 ) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films

  4. Spin-resolved magnetic studies of focused ion beam etched nano-sized magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jian; Rau, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis (SIMPA) is used to study the spin-resolved surface magnetic structure of nano-sized magnetic systems. SIMPA is utilized for in situ topographic and spin-resolved magnetic domain imaging as well as for focused ion beam (FIB) etching of desired structures in magnetic or non-magnetic systems. Ultra-thin Co films are deposited on surfaces of Si(1 0 0) substrates, and ultra-thin, tri-layered, bct Fe(1 0 0)/Mn/bct Fe(1 0 0) wedged magnetic structures are deposited on fcc Pd(1 0 0) substrates. SIMPA experiments clearly show that ion-induced electrons emitted from magnetic surfaces exhibit non-zero electron spin polarization (ESP), whereas electrons emitted from non-magnetic surfaces such as Si and Pd exhibit zero ESP, which can be used to calibrate sputtering rates in situ. We report on new, spin-resolved magnetic microstructures, such as magnetic 'C' states and magnetic vortices, found at surfaces of FIB patterned magnetic elements. It is found that FIB milling has a negligible effect on surface magnetic domain and domain wall structures. It is demonstrated that SIMPA can evolve into an important and efficient tool to study magnetic domain, domain wall and other structures as well as to perform magnetic depth profiling of magnetic nano-systems to be used in ultra-high density magnetic recording and in magnetic sensors

  5. Predicting the heat of vaporization of iron at high temperatures using time-resolved laser-induced incandescence and Bayesian model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipkens, Timothy A.; Hadwin, Paul J.; Grauer, Samuel J.; Daun, Kyle J.

    2018-03-01

    Competing theories have been proposed to account for how the latent heat of vaporization of liquid iron varies with temperature, but experimental confirmation remains elusive, particularly at high temperatures. We propose time-resolved laser-induced incandescence measurements on iron nanoparticles combined with Bayesian model plausibility, as a novel method for evaluating these relationships. Our approach scores the explanatory power of candidate models, accounting for parameter uncertainty, model complexity, measurement noise, and goodness-of-fit. The approach is first validated with simulated data and then applied to experimental data for iron nanoparticles in argon. Our results justify the use of Román's equation to account for the temperature dependence of the latent heat of vaporization of liquid iron.

  6. Depth-resolved sample composition analysis using laser-induced ablation-quadrupole mass spectrometry and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmann, J.; Gierse, N.; Li, C.; Brezinsek, S.; Zlobinski, M.; Turan, B.; Haas, S.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2018-06-01

    Monitoring a sample's material composition became more and more important over the last years for both - industrial process control as well as for post mortem analysis in research and industrial development. Although material composition identification as well as a comparison with standard samples works fine, there is a lack of diagnostics which can provide quantitative information with depth resolution without any standard samples. We present a novel method utilizing a residual gas analysis with quadrupole mass spectrometry after picosecond laser-induced ablation and release of volatile species. In the present experiment, well characterized multilayer thin film solar cells (μc-Si:H and a-Si:D as p-i-n-junctions on ZnO:Al electrodes) are used as a set of well characterized material samples to demonstrate the capabilities of the new method. The linearity of the spectrometer signal to gas pressure simplifies its calibration and reduces its uncertainties in comparison with other analysis techniques, although high vacuum conditions (10-6 hPa to 10-7 hPa) are required to reach high sensitivity better than the percent-range. Moreover, the laser-ablation based sample analysis requires no preparation of the sample and is flexible regarding ablation rates. The application of a picosecond laser pulse ensures that the thermal penetration depth of the laser is in the same order of magnitude as the ablation rate, which enables to achieve depth resolutions in the order of 100 nm and avoids matrix mixing effects at the edge of the laser-induced crater in the sample.

  7. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  8. Study of Laser Reflectivity on Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oidor-Garcia, J. J. J.; Trevino-Palacios, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The response to the light on the skin can be manifested as temperature increase or creation of biochemical byproducts, in which further studies are required to asset the light effect. This response changes the average response over time and can produce discrepancies between similar studies. In this work we present a Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) study with feedback. We study the time response reflectivity of a 980 nm laser diode of 25 mW modulated at frequencies close to 40 kHz and detect the reflected light on a silicon photodiode, finding no direct correlation between different test points or individuals, while finding reproducible responses within the same individual and test point

  9. Analysis of time- and space-resolved Na-, Ne-, and F-like emission from a laser-produced bromine plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, W.H.; Young, B.K.F.; Osterheld, A.L.; Stewart, R.E.; Walling, R.S.; Bar-Shalom, A.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in the efficiency and accuracy of computational atomic physics and collisional radiative modeling promise to place the analysis and diagnostic application of L-shell emission on a par with the simpler K-shell regime. Coincident improvements in spectroscopic plasma measurements yield optically thin emission spectra from small, homogeneous regions of plasma, localized both in space and time. Together, these developments can severely test models for high-density, high-temperature plasma formation and evolution, and non-LTE atomic kinetics. In this paper we present highly resolved measurements of n=3 to n=2 X-ray line emission from a laser-produced bromine micro plasma. The emission is both space- and time-resolved, allowing us to apply simple, steady-state, 0-dimensional spectroscopic models to the analysis. These relativistic, multi-configurational, distorted wave collisional-radiative models were created using the HULLAC atomic physics package. Using these models, we have analyzed the F-like, Ne-like and Na-like (satellite) spectra with respect to temperature, density and charge-state distribution. This procedure leads to a full characterization of the plasma conditions. 9 refs., 3 figs

  10. Development of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics for the free electron density of laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, M.; Frank, A.; Pelka, A.; Schaumann, G.; Schoekel, A.; Schumacher, D.; Roth, M.; Fils, J.; Blazevic, A.; Hessling, T.; Basko, M. M.; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the development and set-up of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics of the free electron density in laser-generated plasma. The interferometer allows the recording of a series of 4 images within 6 ns of a single laser-plasma interaction. For the setup presented here, the minimal accessible free electron density is 5 x 10 18 cm -3 , the maximal one is 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . Furthermore, it provides a resolution of the electron density in space of 50 μm and in time of 0.5 ns for one image with a customizable magnification in space for each of the 4 images. The electron density was evaluated from the interferograms using an Abel inversion algorithm. The functionality of the system was proven during first experiments and the experimental results are presented and discussed. A ray tracing procedure was realized to verify the interferometry pictures taken. In particular, the experimental results are compared to simulations and show excellent agreement, providing a conclusive picture of the evolution of the electron density distribution.

  11. Development of a method for the in situ measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.; Weissbach, A.; Koenig, F.; Paul, T.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in water on the basis of time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The detection of the sum of PAH in ground- and surfacewater is possible with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence of other substances like chlorophyll or dissolved organic matter is suppressed by a special choice of spectral and temporal windows. The method works without any sample preparation and gives the results in a very short time. On the basis of this method a first device was built with a sensitivity of 0,1 μg/1 PAH in water. The measuring time was less than one minute. The on site use of this prototype is possible because of the use of a battery driven nitrogen laser together with a notebook computer for system control The application of fiberoptic cables up to 30 meter length makes it possible to use the system for screening and monitoring of polluted areas both in existing wells and without any well by using geological probe techniques. (orig.) [de

  12. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with optimized high-harmonic pulses using frequency-doubled Ti:Sapphire lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, S.; Stange, A.; Carr, A.V.; Urbancic, J.; Popmintchev, T.; Wiesenmayer, M.; Jansen, K.; Ruffing, A.; Jakobs, S.; Rohwer, T.; Hellmann, S.; Chen, C.; Matyba, P.; Kipp, L.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.; Murnane, M.M.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Mathias, S.; Aeschlimann, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a scheme to generate high intensity XUV pulses from HHG with variable time-bandwidth product. • Shorter-wavelength driven high-harmonic XUV trARPES provides higher photon flux and increased energy resolution. • High-quality high-harmonic XUV trARPES data with sub 150 meV energy and sub 30 fs time resolution is presented. - Abstract: Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet high harmonics has recently emerged as a powerful tool for investigating ultrafast quasiparticle dynamics in correlated-electron materials. However, the full potential of this approach has not yet been achieved because, to date, high harmonics generated by 800 nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire lasers required a trade-off between photon flux, energy and time resolution. Photoemission spectroscopy requires a quasi-monochromatic output, but dispersive optical elements that select a single harmonic can significantly reduce the photon flux and time resolution. Here we show that 400 nm driven high harmonic extreme-ultraviolet trARPES is superior to using 800 nm laser drivers since it eliminates the need for any spectral selection, thereby increasing photon flux and energy resolution to <150 meV while preserving excellent time resolution of about 30 fs

  13. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline........ The capability of the gated PILATUS detector to selectively detect the signal from a given X-ray pulse in 24 bunch mode at the APS storage ring is demonstrated. A test experiment performed on polycrystalline organic thin films of [alpha]-perylene illustrates the possibility of reaching an X-ray pulse duration...

  14. Properties of laser-produced GaAs plasmas measured from highly resolved X-ray line shapes and ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, J. F.; Fein, J.; Manuel, M.; Keiter, P.; Drake, P.; Kuranz, C.; Belancourt, Patrick; Ralchenko, Yu.; Hudson, L.; Feldman, U.

    2018-03-01

    The properties of hot, dense plasmas generated by the irradiation of GaAs targets by the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were determined by the analysis of high resolution K shell spectra in the 9 keV to 11 keV range. The laser parameters, such as relatively long pulse duration and large focal spot, were chosen to produce a steady-state plasma with minimal edge gradients, and the time-integrated spectra were compared to non-LTE steady state spectrum simulations using the FLYCHK and NOMAD codes. The bulk plasma streaming velocity was measured from the energy shifts of the Ga He-like transitions and Li-like dielectronic satellites. The electron density and the electron energy distribution, both the thermal and the hot non-thermal components, were determined from the spectral line ratios. After accounting for the spectral line broadening contributions, the plasma turbulent motion was measured from the residual line widths. The ionization balance was determined from the ratios of the He-like through F-like spectral features. The detailed comparison of the experimental Ga spectrum and the spectrum simulated by the FLYCHK code indicates two significant discrepancies, the transition energy of a Li-like dielectronic satellite (designated t) and the calculated intensity of a He-like line (x), that should lead to improvements in the kinetics codes used to simulate the X-ray spectra from highly-charged ions.

  15. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies of Nd:glass laser materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseberg, L.A.; Brecher, C.

    The increasing importance of Nd glass lasers in laser fusion technology has emphasized the inadequacy in the understanding of the optical properties of rare earth ions in glasses. Indeed, it has been difficult to generate models for the performance of these devices, and the selection of host glasses could be done by little more than a trial-and-error approach. The technique of laser-induced fluorescence line-narrowing developed within the last few years provides a new and powerful tool for the study of these systems. In this technique, a laser excites within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands a selected subgroup of the ions in the system, namely those whose absorption energy is resonant with the laser. If the excitation does not migrate among the entire collection of ions prior to fluorescence, the fluorescence that is observed is only from the group that was excited and is narrowed. This permits the selective study of classes of ion sites within the ensemble. The concept is indicated schematically. By the use of a tunable laser, such as a dye laser, it is possible to vary the class of sites, defined by energy, that is excited and thereby study the important spectroscopic properties and their variations, unclouded by the averaging that occurs under excitation of the entire system. Furthermore, it is then possible to use the spectroscopic information to infer a description of the variation of the microscopic environment, and a rationalization of the effects of compositional changes. Use of a pulsed dye laser and time-resolved detection permits the study of the dynamics, including, for example, the energy transfer among ions of different energies within the inhomogeneously-broadened spectrum. The goal of this project has been to apply such studies to glasses of interest to glass laser technology, providing information for device modeling, and establishing design criteria for glass selection

  16. Laser fusion study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The following appendices are included: (1) sensor performance calculation techniques, (2) focus sensing, (3) purchased item data, (4) pointing and focusing configuration tradeoff studies, (5) false start centering sensor, (6) RCA application notes on quad delection, (7) elliptical flex pivot analysis, (8) servo mirrors cross coupling, (9) optical misalignment analysis, (10) stress induced birefrigent quarter-wave retarder, (11) data bulletin on incramute damping alloy, (12) the utilization of stepping motors, and (13) computer program listing for stepper motor load simulation

  17. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  18. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  19. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G. [National Medical Laser Centre, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Meyerstein Inst. of Oncology

    1997-03-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author).

  20. Radiotherapy enhances laser palliation of malignant dysphagia: a randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargeant, I.R.; Thorpe, S.; Glover, J.R.; Bown, S.G.; Tobias, J.S.; Blackman, G.

    1997-01-01

    A major drawback of laser endoscopy in the palliation of malignant dysphagia is the need for repeated treatments. This study was designed to test whether external beam radiotherapy would reduce the necessity for repeated laser therapy. (author)

  1. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  2. Flame propagation in two-dimensional solids: Particle-resolved studies with complex plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, S. O.; Yakovlev, E. V.; Couëdel, L.; Kryuchkov, N. P.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Kislov, A. Yu.; Ovcharov, P. V.; Zaytsev, K. I.; Vorob'ev, E. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Using two-dimensional (2D) complex plasmas as an experimental model system, particle-resolved studies of flame propagation in classical 2D solids are carried out. Combining experiments, theory, and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the mode-coupling instability operating in 2D complex plasmas reveals all essential features of combustion, such as an activated heat release, two-zone structure of the self-similar temperature profile ("flame front"), as well as thermal expansion of the medium and temperature saturation behind the front. The presented results are of relevance for various fields ranging from combustion and thermochemistry, to chemical physics and synthesis of materials.

  3. Unfolding of Ubiquitin Studied by Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence of the Tyrosine Residue

    OpenAIRE

    Noronha, Melinda; Lima, João C.; Bastos, Margarida; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L.

    2004-01-01

    The photophysics of the single tyrosine in bovine ubiquitin (UBQ) was studied by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of pH and along thermal and chemical unfolding, with the following results: First, at room temperature (25°C) and below pH 1.5, native UBQ shows single-exponential decays. From pH 2 to 7, triple-exponential decays were observed and the three decay times were attributed to the presence of tyrosine, a tyrosine-carboxylate hydrogen-bonded complex, and...

  4. Time-resolved circular dichroism: Application to the study of conformal changes in biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hache, F.

    2010-06-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is known to be a very sensitive probe of the conformation of molecules and biomolecules. It is therefore tempting to implement CD in a pump-probe experiment in order to measure ultrarapid conformational changes which occur in photochemical processes. We present two technical developments of such time-resolved CD experiments. The first one relies on the modulation of the probe polarization from left to right circular whereas the second one measures the pump-induced ellipticity of the probe with a Babinet-Soleil compensator. Some applications are described and extension of these techniques towards the study of elementary protein folding processes is discussed.

  5. Time-resolved circular dichroism: Application to the study of conformal changes in biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hache F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Circular dichroism (CD is known to be a very sensitive probe of the conformation of molecules and biomolecules. It is therefore tempting to implement CD in a pump-probe experiment in order to measure ultrarapid conformational changes which occur in photochemical processes. We present two technical developments of such time-resolved CD experiments. The first one relies on the modulation of the probe polarization from left to right circular whereas the second one measures the pump-induced ellipticity of the probe with a Babinet-Soleil compensator. Some applications are described and extension of these techniques towards the study of elementary protein folding processes is discussed.

  6. Exploratory laser-driven shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.

    1977-11-01

    We show the results of a feasibility study for investigating shock structure and for measuring equation-of-state parameters using high-energy, short-pulse lasers. We discuss the temporal and spatial structure of the luminosity from laser-driven shock unloading in aluminum foils. We demonstrate that shock velocity can be measured by observing the time interval between shock emergence across two thicknesses and show data for shocks of 1.3 and 2.1 Mbar. The fact that we observe shock fronts cleanly breaking through steps as small as 3 μm indicates that the shock front thickness is very small in the few megabar region; this is the first experimental verification that these fronts are not more than a few micrometers thick. We present approximate measurements of free-surface velocity. Finally, we speculate on the use of these techniques to obtain detailed equation-of-state data

  7. Laser fusion hybrid reactor systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The work was performed in three phases. The first phase included a review of the many possible laser-reactor-blanket combinations and resulted in the selection of a ''demonstration size'' 500 MWe plant for further study. A number of fast fission blankets using uranium metal, uranium-molybdenum alloy, and uranium carbide as fuel were investigated. The second phase included design of the reactor vessel and internals, heat transfer system, tritium processing system, and the balance of plant, excluding the laser building and equipment. A fuel management scheme was developed, safety considerations were reviewed, and capital and operating costs were estimated. Costs developed during the second phase were unexpectedly high, and a thorough review indicated considerable unit cost savings could be obtained by scaling the plant to a larger size. Accordingly, a third phase was added to the original scope, encompassing the redesign and scaling of the plant from 500 MWe to 1200 MWe

  8. Time-resolved hard x-ray studies using third-generation synchrotron radiation sources (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The third-generation, high-brilliance, synchrotron radiation sources currently under construction will usher in a new era of x-ray research in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. One of the most exciting areas of experimentation will be the extension of static x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques to the study of transient or time-evolving systems. The high repetition rate, short-pulse duration, high-brilliance, variable spectral bandwidth, and large particle beam energies of these sources make them ideal for hard x-ray, time-resolved studies. The primary focus of this presentation will be on the novel instrumentation required for time-resolved studies such as optics which can increase the flux on the sample or disperse the x-ray beam, detectors and electronics for parallel data collection, and methods for altering the natural time structure of the radiation. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, BES-Materials Science, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38

  9. X-ray laser studies at LLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T.; Audebert, P.; Epstein, R.; Boswell, B.; Richardson, M.C.; Soures, J.M.; Shvarts, D.

    1988-01-01

    New target geometries for collisional excitation X-ray laser experiments (in nickel) were proposed, analyzed, and experimentally studied on the GDL laser. Experiments using a short line focus lens with new target geometries showed general agreement with predictions. The new geometries are designed to yield a higher gain and reduced refraction due to 1) a higher plasma density, 2) a wider lateral density profile, and 3) a concave lateral density profile. These new geometries were a) two parallel exploding (thin) foils, irradiated from one side only, b) two ablating (thick) foils, one of which is irradiated on its inner face, and c) an exploding foil in front of an ablating foil, irradiated by a single laser beam incident on the thin foil. The experiments with a long line focus are in progress. The intensity ratio of Ne-like and F-like Ni lines is used to deduce the temperature, and these results together with the absolute intensity yields the density profile. The results show improvement achieved with the new target geometries: the density is higher (leading to a higher gain), and the concave density profile results in collimation rather than divergence of the X-ray laser beam. Theoretical developments included development of a ray-tracing code for an amplifying medium of varying (e.g., collimating) lateral density profile (results using this code are shown for convex as well as concave lateral density profiles) and prediction of high gain on new type transitions in neonlike ions, involving the excitation of an inner (2s) electron

  10. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, Ulf; Fletcher, Luke B; Förster, Eckhart; Galtier, Eric Ch; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Heimann, Philipp; Marschner, Heike; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Wehrhan, Ortrud; Lee, Hae Ja

    2014-09-01

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ΔE/E = 1.1 × 10(-4) and wave-number resolution of Δk/k = 3 × 10(-3), allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5 μm agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  12. Combination of lasers and synchrotron radiation in studies of atomic photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments using the combination of conventional lasers and synchrotron radiation are presented and discussed. The controlled laser-manipulation of atoms prior to ionization by the synchrotron radiation provides an ideal experimental basis for detailed investigations of atomic photoionization. Due to the recent advances in high-resolution electron spectroscopy, it has become possible to analyze the J-resolved fine structure of the final ionic states in the photoionization of laser-excited atoms enabling thereby the determination of the specific influence of the outer electron to the ionization from inner subshells. Especially, the analysis of photoemission satellites and their relative intensities bring out directly the importance of electron correlations. Furthermore, it is shown through some examples of experiments using linearly and circularly polarized radiations, how the study of magnetic dichroisms in the photoionization opens the access to a complete description of the photoionization process, in particular to the determination of partial photoionization cross-sections.

  13. Study of laser radar system using the differential absorption method for detection of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inomata, H; Igarashi, T

    1975-11-01

    A laser radar system using the differential absorption method for remote measurement of atmospheric NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ is studied. A simultaneous two-wavelength dye laser for the transmitter and a simultaneous two-wavelength signal processer for the receiver are developed. In using this technique, one laser shot allows the determination of NO/sub 2/ concentrations with an uncertainty equivalent to 44 ppM times the range interval (in meters). It seems that the technique is most promising for a range-resolved measurement of ambient molecular pollutants, since it has the advantage of canceling the effect of atmospheric variation in a measurement when atmospheric aerosols are used as a distributed reflector.

  14. A spatially resolved radio spectral index study of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Jonathan; Brinks, Elias; Hindson, Luke; Beswick, Robert; Heesen, Volker

    2018-04-01

    We study the resolved radio continuum spectral energy distribution of the dwarf irregular galaxy, NGC 1569, on a beam-by-beam basis to isolate and study its spatially resolved radio emission characteristics. Utilizing high-quality NRAO Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations that densely sample the 1-34 GHz frequency range, we adopt a Bayesian fitting procedure, where we use H α emission that has not been corrected for extinction as a prior, to produce maps of how the separated thermal emission, non-thermal emission, and non-thermal spectral index vary across NGC 1569's main disc. We find a higher thermal fraction at 1 GHz than is found in spiral galaxies (26^{+2}_{-3} {per cent}) and find an average non-thermal spectral index α = -0.53 ± 0.02, suggesting that a young population of cosmic ray electrons is responsible for the observed non-thermal emission. By comparing our recovered map of the thermal radio emission with literature H α maps, we estimate the total reddening along the line of sight to NGC 1569 to be E(B - V) = 0.49 ± 0.05, which is in good agreement with other literature measurements. Spatial variations in the reddening indicate that a significant portion of the total reddening is due to internal extinction within NGC 1569.

  15. A Virtual Study of Grid Resolution on Experiments of a Highly-Resolved Turbulent Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Pietro M. F.; Marshall, Andre W.; Gollner, Michael J.; Fire Protection Engineering Department Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    An accurate representation of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing is critical for modeling fire plumes and smoke transport. In this study, PLIF and PIV diagnostics are used with the saltwater modeling technique to provide highly-resolved instantaneous field measurements in unconfined turbulent plumes useful for statistical analysis, physical insight, and model validation. The effect of resolution was investigated employing a virtual interrogation window (of varying size) applied to the high-resolution field measurements. Motivated by LES low-pass filtering concepts, the high-resolution experimental data in this study can be analyzed within the interrogation windows (i.e. statistics at the sub-grid scale) and on interrogation windows (i.e. statistics at the resolved scale). A dimensionless resolution threshold (L/D*) criterion was determined to achieve converged statistics on the filtered measurements. Such a criterion was then used to establish the relative importance between large and small-scale turbulence phenomena while investigating specific scales for the turbulent flow. First order data sets start to collapse at a resolution of 0.3D*, while for second and higher order statistical moments the interrogation window size drops down to 0.2D*.

  16. Study Of Soot Growth And Nucleation By A Time-Resolved Synchrotron Radiation Based X-Ray Absorption Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Judith I

    2001-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Rennes I as follows: The contractor will perform a study of soot growth and nucleation by a time-resolved synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption method...

  17. Time-resolved electron beam phase space tomography at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Röhrs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs in the ultraviolet and x-ray regime put stringent demands on the peak current, transverse emittance, and energy spread of the driving electron beam. At the soft x-ray FEL FLASH, a transverse deflecting microwave structure (TDS has been installed to determine these parameters for the longitudinally compressed bunches, which are characterized by a narrow leading peak of high charge density and a long tail. The rapidly varying electromagnetic field in the TDS deflects the electrons vertically and transforms the time profile into a streak on an observation screen. The bunch current profile was measured single shot with an unprecedented resolution of 27 fs under FEL operating conditions. A precise single-shot measurement of the energy distribution along a bunch was accomplished by using the TDS in combination with an energy spectrometer. Variation of quadrupole strengths allowed for a determination of the horizontal emittance as a function of the longitudinal position within a bunch, the so-called slice emittance. In the bunch tail, a normalized slice emittance of about 2  μm was found, in agreement with expectations. In the leading spike, however, surprisingly large emittance values were observed, in apparent contradiction with the low emittance deduced from the measured FEL gain. By applying three-dimensional phase space tomography, we were able to show that the bunch head contains a central core of low emittance and high local current density, which is presumably the lasing part of the bunch.

  18. Measurement of spatially resolved gas-phase plasma temperatures by optical emission and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.P.; Gottscho, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distributions of particles in glow discharges is crucial to the understanding and modeling of plasma reactors used in microelectronic manufacturing. Reaction rates, available product channels, and transport phenomena all depend upon the partitioning of energy in the discharge. Because of the nonequilibrium nature of glow discharges, however, the distribution of energy among different species and among different degrees of freedom cannot be characterized simply by one temperature. The extent to which different temperatures are needed for each degree of freedom and for each species is not known completely. How plasma operating conditions affect these energy distributions is also an unanswered question. We have investigated the temperatures of radicals, ions, and neutrals in CCl 4 , CCl 4 /N 2 (2%), and N 2 discharges. In the CCl 4 systems, we probed the CCl rotational and vibrational energy distributions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The rotational distribution always appeared to be thermal but under identical operating conditions was found to be roughly-equal400 K colder than the vibrational distribution. The rotational temperature at any point in the discharge was strongly dependent upon both applied power and surface temperature. Thermal gradients as large as 10 2 K mm -1 were observed near electrode surfaces but the bulk plasmas were isothermal. When 2% N 2 was added to a CCl 4 discharge, N 2 second positive emission was observed and used to estimate the N 2 rotational temperature. The results suggest that emission from molecular actinometers can be used to measure plasma temperatures, providing such measurements are not made in close proximity to surfaces

  19. Time-resolved x-ray line emission studies of thermal transport in multiple beam uv-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Henke, B.L.; Delettrez, J.; Richardson, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal transport in spherical targets irradiated with multiple, nanosecond duration laser beams, has been a topic of much discussion recently. Different inferences on the level of thermal flux inhibition have been drawn from plasma velocity and x-ray spectroscopic diagnostics. We present new measurements of thermal transport on spherical targets made through time-resolved x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the progress of the ablation surface through thin layers of material on the surface of the target. These measurements, made with 6 and 12 uv (351 nm) nanosecond beams from OMEGA, will be compared to previous thermal transport measurements. Transparencies of the conference presentation are given

  20. Resolving the Strategy Paradox Applying the Strategic Flexibility: A Case Study of PT BNI Life Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Widati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Over decades, the business environment has changed dramatically as it has been affected by the changing of environmental needs and demand. The difference level of environmental turbulence characteristics will create new business competitive landscape for all companies in any industries. Environmental turbulence is also marked by dynamics, complexity and unpredictability business environment. In such a situation, a company will be difficult to adapt the environmental changes. In a turbulent environment, a company is demanded to be able to adapt. Many researchers argue that in a turbulent environment, a company is not only demanded for having adaptive ability but also flexible ability either structural, operational or strategic. The fast pace of environmental changes provide managers unpredictable outcomes of their strategic alternative or strategic commitment. This collision of strategic commitment and strategic uncertainty is causing what Raynor (2007 named as the strategy paradox. Every company can be a victim of the strategy paradox if they cannot align their strategy with the environmental changes. Raynor (2007 pointed out that one of the ways to resolve strategy paradox is implementing strategic flexibility in term of ex ante action (proactive actions. One of the industries in Indonesia that also experiences the turbulent environment is insurance industry. This study examines and investigates the strategic flexibility as a way to resolve strategy paradox at PT BNI Life Insurance.

  1. Study of Laser Created Metal Vapor Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-16

    Leventhal(1 indicate a value closer to 10-1 cm. might be expected. In the case of’ laser induced penniinf, ionization., wec -,;4-,rit LIP 32 LIP L J where...modified Kramer’s formulae.(25) In figure 11 we demonstrate the impact of associative ionization and laser induced penning ionization upon the temporal...34Laser Induced Fluorescence and Environmental Sensing", Invited paper for Optical Society of America, Topical Mcetixg on "Applications of Laser

  2. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  3. a Study on SODIUM(110) and Other Nearly Free Electron Metals Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyo, In-Whan

    Electronic properties of the epitaxially grown Na(110) film have been studied using angle resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as the light source. Na provides an ideal ground to study the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions in metals, because of its simple Fermi surface and small pseudopotential. The absolute band structure of Na(110) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been mapped out using the extrema searching method. The advantage of this approach is that the usual assumption of the unoccupied state dispersion is not required. We have found that the dispersion of Na(1l0) is very close to the parabolic band with the effective mass 1.21 M_{rm e} at 90 K. Self-consistent calculations of the self-energy for the homogeneous electron gas have been performed using the Green's function technique within the framework of the GW approximation, in the hope of understanding the narrowing mechanism of the bandwidth observed for all the nearly-free-electron (NFE) metals. Good agreements between the experimental data and our calculated self-energy were obtained not only for our data on k-dependency from Na(l10), but also for the total bandwidth corrections for other NFE metals, only if dielectric functions beyond the random phase approximation were used. Our findings emphasize the importance of the screening by long wavelength plasmons. Off-normal spectra of angle resolved photoemission from Na(110) show strong asymmetry of the bulk peak intensity for the wide range of photon energies. Using a simple analysis, we show this asymmetry has an origin in the interference of the surface Umklapp electrons with the normal electrons. We have also performed the detailed experimental studies of the anomalous Fermi level structure observed in the forbidden gap region of Na. This was claimed by A. W. Overhauser as the evidence of the charge density wave in the alkali metal. The possibility of this hypothesis is

  4. Investigation on the role of air in the dynamical evolution and thermodynamic state of a laser-induced aluminium plasma by spatial- and time-resolved spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristoforetti, G., E-mail: gabriele.cristoforetti@cnr.i [National Institute of Optics, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G.Moruzzi, 1 - 56124 Pisa (Italy); Lorenzetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V. [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G.Moruzzi, 1 - 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    The amount and the spatial distribution of air atoms and ions in a laser-induced plasma in ambient air provide important information about the formation of the plasma and its successive evolution history. For this reason, in the present work, the air mixing in a laser-induced plasma in air at atmospheric pressure and its influence on its thermodynamic evolution were studied. Information about spatial distributions of atoms and ions from Al, N and O were achieved by Abel-inverted spectra in the plume. The occurrence of LTE in the plume was also assessed by the utilization of theoretical criteria, and by the analysis of experimental spectra. Aluminium atoms and ions were found to be in LTE, while nitrogen and oxygen were not because of their longer times of relaxation toward equilibrium. Nitrogen was found to be over-ionized with respect to Saha-Eggert equilibrium, indicating that the plasma is recombining. Experimental observations suggest that the concentration of air species in the plasma is larger than that of aluminium, even in the region closer to the target, where the aluminium lines are stronger. In the front part of the plume only emission lines from air species were observed. The results suggest that a Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD) regime occurs during the trailing part of the laser pulse, resulting in the strong inclusion into the plasma of air elements. In this scenario, also the thermodynamic history of the plume is affected by the predominance of air species.

  5. Theoretcial studies of solar-pumped lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.; Fong, Z. S.

    1984-01-01

    A method of pumping a COhZ laser by a hot cavity was demonstrated. The cavity, heated by solar radiation, should increase the efficiency of solar pumped lasers used for energy conversion. Kinetic modeling is used to examine the behavior of such a COhZ laser. The kinetic equations are solved numerically vs. time and, in addition, steady state solutions are obtained analytically. The effect of gas heating filling the lower laser level is included. The output power and laser efficiency are obtained as functions of black body temperature and gas ratios (COhZ-He-Ar) and pressures. The values are compared with experimental results.

  6. Laser ablation studies in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Edric; Forbes, A.; Turner, G. R.; Michaelis, Max M.

    2000-08-01

    With the launch of the South African National Laser Centre, new programs will need to be defined. Medical, environmental and industrial laser applications must obviously take top priority -- as opposed to the uranium isotope separation and military applications of the past. We argue however, that a small effort in laser ablation for space propulsion is justifiable, since a few very large CO2 lasers are available and since two tentative propulsion experiments have already been conducted in South Africa. We attempt to give LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) an equatorial and a Southern dimension.

  7. Solid-phase nano-extraction and laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiyong; Yu, Shenjiang; Campiglia, Andres D

    2009-02-15

    A unique method for screening polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in drinking water samples is reported. Water samples (500 microl) are mixed and centrifuged with 950 microl of a commercial solution of 20 nm gold nanoparticles for pollutants extraction. The precipitate is treated with 2 microl of 1-pentanethiol and 48 microl of n-octane, and the supernatant is then analyzed via laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy. Fifteen priority pollutants are directly determined at liquid helium temperature (4.2 K) with the aid of a cryogenic fiber-optic probe. Unambiguous pollutant determination is carried out via spectral and lifetime analysis. Limits of detection are at the parts-per-trillion level. Analytical recoveries are similar to those obtained via high-performance liquid chromatography. The simplicity of the experimental procedure, use of microliters of organic solvent, short analysis time, selectivity, and excellent analytical figures of merit demonstrate the advantages of this environmentally friendly approach for routine analysis of numerous samples.

  8. Time-resolved imaging of filamentary damage on the exit surface of fused silica induced by 1064 nm nanosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Shen; Xiang’ai, Cheng; Tian, Jiang; Zhiwu, Zhu; Yifan, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced damage on the exit surface of fused silica with a filament was observed. The filament has a central hollow core surrounded by molten materials and no obvious cracks could be observed. The critical intensity for the transition from pure surface damage (SD) to filamentary damage (FD) was measured. Time-resolved shadowgraphic microscopy with nanosecond time resolution was employed to compare the propagation of shock wave and material response in the SD and FD process. The main different features during the material response process include: (i) thermoelastic shock waves launched in FD were multiple and a column envelope was observed in the lateral direction; (ii) more energy is deposited in the bulk for FD resulting to a lower speed of shock wave in air; (iii) the overall time for establishing the main character of the damage site for FD was shorter because of the absence of crack expansion. Self-focusing and temperature-activated optical absorption enhancement of the bulk material are discussed to explain the morphology difference between SD and FD and the evolution of filament length under different incident intensities. (paper)

  9. Time-resolved optical studies of wide-gap II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong

    ZnSe and ZnSe-based quantum well and superlattice structures are potential candidates for light emitting devices and other optical devices such as switches and modulators working in the blue-green wavelength range. Carrier dynamics studies of these structures are important in evaluating device performance as well as understanding the underlying physical processes. In this thesis, a carrier dynamics investigation is conducted for temperature from 77K to 295K on CdZnSSe/ZnSSe single quantum well structure (SQW) and ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two experimental techniques with femtosecond time resolution are used in this work: up-conversion technique for time- resolved photoluminescence (PL) and pump-probe technique for time-resolved differential absorption studies. For both heterostructures, the radiative recombination is dominated by exciton transition due to the large exciton binding energy as a result of quantum confinement effect. The measured decay time of free exciton PL in CdZnSSe/ZnSSe SQW increases linearly with increasing temperature which agrees with the theoretical prediction by considering the conservation of momentum requirement for radiative recombination. However, the recombination of free carriers is also observed in CdZnSSe/ZnSSe SQW for the whole temperature range studied. On the other hand, in ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice structures, the non- radiative recombination processes are non-negligible even at 77K and become more important in higher temperature range. The relaxation processes such as spectral hole burning, carrier thermalization and hot-carrier cooling are observed in ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattices at room temperature (295K) by the femtosecond pump-probe measurements. A rapid cooling of the thermalized hot- carrier from 763K to 450K within 4ps is deduced. A large optical nonlinearity (i.e., the induced absorption change) around the heavy-hole exciton energy is also obtained.

  10. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  11. Resolving Properties of Polymers and Nanoparticle Assembly through Coarse-Grained Computational Studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Coupled length and time scales determine the dynamic behavior of polymers and polymer nanocomposites and underlie their unique properties. To resolve the properties over large time and length scales it is imperative to develop coarse grained models which retain the atomistic specificity. Here we probe the degree of coarse graining required to simultaneously retain significant atomistic details a nd access large length and time scales. The degree of coarse graining in turn sets the minimum length scale instrumental in defining polymer properties and dynamics. Using polyethylene as a model system, we probe how the coarse - graining scale affects the measured dynamics with different number methylene group s per coarse - grained beads. Using these models we simulate polyethylene melts for times over 500 ms to study the viscoelastic properties of well - entangled polymer melts and large nanoparticle assembly as the nanoparticles are driven close enough to form nanostructures.

  12. Spatially-resolved EEL studies of plasmons in silver filled carbon nanotubes using a dedicated STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, U; Harvey, A J; Seepujak, A

    2008-01-01

    Using a dedicated FEG STEM, we present highly spatially-resolved electron energy-loss (EEL) studies of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), each with the inner cavity possessing regions completely filled with silver. The transmission and attenuation of graphite π-collective mode E-fields through the MWCNT walls are established. Noticeable changes in the graphite π-surface mode are witnessed, concomitant with coupling of the silver Mie mode and the graphite π-surface mode. The resulting collective mode is significantly red-shifted to below 5 eV, with considerable intensity in the visible frequency regime. It appears that silver retains its ability to enhance E-fields when surrounded by a MWCNT. Present observations lead to the possibility of collective modes propagating on graphene monolayers being tuned in frequency by the presence of a metal.

  13. Spin-resolved tunneling studies of the exchange field in EuS/Al bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y M; Stadler, S; Adams, P W; Catelani, G

    2011-06-17

    We use spin-resolved electron tunneling to study the exchange field in the Al component of EuS/Al bilayers, in both the superconducting and normal-state phases of the Al. Contrary to expectation, we show that the exchange field H(ex) is a nonlinear function of applied field, even in applied fields that are well beyond the EuS coercive field. Furthermore, the magnitude H(ex) is unaffected by the superconducting phase. In addition, H(ex) decreases significantly with increasing temperature in the temperature range of 0.1-1 K. We discuss these results in the context of recent theories of generalized spin-dependent boundary conditions at a superconductor-ferromagnet interface.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence study of exciplex formation in diastereomeric naproxen-pyrrolidine dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramtsova, Ekaterina A; Plyusnin, Viktor F; Magin, Ilya M; Kruppa, Alexander I; Polyakov, Nikolay E; Leshina, Tatyana V; Nuin, Edurne; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2013-12-19

    The influence of chirality on the elementary processes triggered by excitation of the (S,S)- and (R,S)- diastereoisomers of naproxen-pyrrolidine (NPX-Pyr) dyads has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence in acetonitrile-benzene mixtures. In these systems, the quenching of the (1)NPX*-Pyr singlet excited state occurs through electron transfer and exciplex formation. Fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields revealed a significant difference (around 20%) between the (S,S)- and (R,S)- diastereomers. In addition, the quantum yields of exciplexes differed by a factor of 2 regardless of solvent polarity. This allows us to suggest a similar influence of the chiral centers on the local charge transfer resulting in exciplex and full charge separation that leads to ion-biradicals. A simplified scheme is proposed to estimate a set of rate constant values (k1-k5) for the elementary stages in each solvent system.

  15. Development of Micron-Resolved Electron Spectroscopy to Study Organic Thin Films in Real Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-H.; Fan, L.-J.; Yang, Y.-W.; Su, J.-W.; Chan, S.-W.; Chen, M.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward application of an electron energy analyzer equipped with an image detector to micron-resolved electron spectroscopic studies of organic thin film devices is reported. The electron spectroscopies implemented include synchrotron-based UPS, XPS, and Auger yield NEXAFS. Along the non-energy-dispersion direction of the analyzer, a spatial resolution of ∼40 μm is obtained through the employment of entrance slits, electrostatic lenses and segmented CCD detector. One significant benefit offered by the technique is that the electronic transport and electronic structure of the same micron-sized sample can be directly examined. The example illustrated is a top-contact organic field effect transistor (OFET) fabricated from semiconducting triethylsilylethynyl anthradithiophene and gold electrodes. It is found that an extensive out-diffusion of gold atoms to adjacent conduction channels takes place, presumably due to the inability of soft organic materials in dissipating the excess energy with which gaseous Au atoms possess.

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  17. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Gilio, A.; Gennaro, G. de; Dambruoso, P.; Ventrella, G.

    2015-01-01

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st–20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM 2.5 and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive framework

  18. Studying the potential of point detectors in time-resolved dose verification of dynamic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beierholm, A.R.; Behrens, C.F.; Andersen, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern megavoltage x-ray radiotherapy with high spatial and temporal dose gradients puts high demands on the entire delivery system, including not just the linear accelerator and the multi-leaf collimator, but also algorithms used for optimization and dose calculations, and detectors used for quality assurance and dose verification. In this context, traceable in-phantom dosimetry using a well-characterized point detector is often an important supplement to 2D-based quality assurance methods based on radiochromic film or detector arrays. In this study, an in-house developed dosimetry system based on fiber-coupled plastic scintillator detectors was evaluated and compared with a Farmer-type ionization chamber and a small-volume ionization chamber. An important feature of scintillator detectors is that the sensitive volume of the detector can easily be scaled, and five scintillator detectors of different scintillator length were thus employed to quantify volume averaging effects by direct measurement. The dosimetric evaluation comprised several complex-shape static fields as well as simplified dynamic deliveries using RapidArc, a volumetric-modulated arc therapy modality often used at the participating clinic. The static field experiments showed that the smallest scintillator detectors were in the best agreement with dose calculations, while needing the smallest volume averaging corrections. Concerning total dose measured during RapidArc, all detectors agreed with dose calculations within 1.1 ± 0.7% when positioned in regions of high homogenous dose. Larger differences were observed for high dose gradient and organ at risk locations, were differences between measured and calculated dose were as large as 8.0 ± 5.5%. The smallest differences were generally seen for the small-volume ionization chamber and the smallest scintillators. The time-resolved RapidArc dose profiles revealed volume-dependent discrepancies between scintillator and ionization chamber response

  19. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gilio, A. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gennaro, G. de, E-mail: gianluigi.degennaro@uniba.it [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dambruoso, P. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); ARPA PUGLIA, Corso Trieste, 27, 70126 Bari (Italy); Ventrella, G. [Chemistry Department, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st–20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM{sub 2.5} and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive

  20. Experimental and Modeling Study of Liquid-Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining of Smart Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Parmar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart ceramic materials are next generation materials with the inherent intelligence to adapt to change in the external environment. These materials are destined to play an essential role in several critical engineering applications. Machining these materials using traditional machining processes is a challenge. The laser beam micromachining (LBMM process has the potential to machine such smart materials. However, laser machining when performed in air induces high thermal stress on the surface, often leading to crack formation, recast and re-deposition of ablated material, and large heat-affected zones (HAZ. Performing laser beam machining in the presence of a liquid medium could potentially resolve these issues. This research investigates the possibility of using a Liquid Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining (LA-LBMM process for micromachining smart ceramic materials. Experimental studies are performed to compare the machining quality of laser beam machining process in air and in a liquid medium. The study reveals that the presence of liquid medium helps in controlling the heat-affected zone and the taper angle of the cavity drilled, thereby enhancing the machining quality. Analytical modeling is developed for the prediction of HAZ and cavity diameter both in air and underwater conditions, and the model is capable of predicting the experimental results to within 10% error.

  1. Experimental study of a laser-heated solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the interaction of an intense CO 2 laser beam with a column of initially uv-ionized hydrogen immersed in a steady magnetic field of up to 100 kG. Under the intense laser radiation, the gas becomes ionized and heated to temperatures as high as 150 eV (1.6 x 10 6 0 K). The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the properties of the dense, hot plasma formed in this manner. Time and space resolved measurements of the plasma electron density were made using holographic interferometry along the axis and Mach--Zehnder interferometry across the column. The temperature was determined by measuring the decay rate of a line from CV in the quartz uv. These measurements were supplemented by streak photography to provide data on the development of the luminosity of the plasma column, radially and axially, as a function of time. From these various diagnostic techniques, it was possible to determine that a density minimum is formed on-axis within a few tens of nanoseconds after initiation of the laser pulse. This effectively produces a light pipe which traps the beam, and suggests that long columns can be formed by laser irradiation. The beam energy was efficiently absorbed and plasma loss rates appeared to be those expected from classical MHD modelling. While a completely unambiguous answer as to the mode of laser discharge propagation occurring in the experiment was not obtained, the bulk of the evidence suggests a ''bleaching wave'' rather than a laser driven detonator. In summary, the experiment was successful in demonstrating the creation of dense, slender columns by laser breakdown, in support of the ''laser-heated solenoid'' fusion concept

  2. Experimental study of laser-plasma interaction physics with short laser wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, C.; Amiranoff, F.; Fabre, E.; Matthieussent, G.; Rousseaux, C.; Baton, S.

    1989-01-01

    Many non-linear processes can affect laser-plasma coupling in fusion experiments. The interaction processes of interest involve three or more waves, including the incident electromagnetic wave and various selections of electromagnetic, electrostatic and accoustic waves. Whenever plasma waves are involved (stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay instability, parametric decay instability and others), energetic electrons are created through the various damping processes of these waves: these energetic electrons in turn deleteriously affect the compression phase in laser fusion experiments through pre-heating of the fuel core. Some parametric processes lead primarily to loss of incident laser energy (stimulated Brillouin scattering) while others, such as filamentation, lead to strongly enhanced local laser intensities through the focusing of part (or all) of the laser beam into filaments of very small dimensions with a concomitant expulsion of the plasma out of these regions. So filamentation destroys the uniformity of energy deposition in the plasma and prevents high compression efficiency of the target. These interaction effects are typically of parametric nature, with their thresholds and growth rates depending critically on plasma scale lengths. Since these scale lengths increase with available laser energy and since millimeter sized plasmas are expected from reactor targets which will be used in direct drive implosion experiments, a good understanding of these processes and their saturation mechanisms becomes imperative. We report here the results on absolute energy measurements and time-resolved spectra of SRS and SBS obtained in various types of plasmas where the major changes were the inhomogeneity scale lengths. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs

  3. Plasma interpenetration study on the Omega laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Divol, Laurent; Ross, Steven; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Huser, Gael; Moody, John; MacKinnon, Andy; Meezan, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The Near Vacuum Campaign on the National Ignition Facility has sparked an interest on the nature of the gold/carbon interface at high velocity, high electron temperature, low-electron density. Indeed radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been unable to accurately reproduce the experimental shape of the hot spot resulting from implosion driven in Near Vacuum Holhraum. The experimental data are suggesting that the inner beams are freely propagating to the waist of the hohlraum when simulations predict that a density ridge at the gold/carbon interface blocks the inner beams. The discrepancy between experimental data and simulation might be explained by the fluid description of the plasma interface in a rad-hydro code which is probably not valid in when two plasma at high velocity, high temperature are meeting. To test our assumption, we went to the Omega laser facility to study gold/carbon interface in the relevant regime. Time resolved images of the self-emission as well as Thomson scattering data will be presented. For the first time, a transition from a multifluid to a single fluid is observed as plasmas are interacting. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Studies into laser ignition of confined pyrotechnics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.R.; Russell, D.A. [Centre for Applied Laser Spectroscopy, DASSR, Defence Academy, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Ignition tests were carried out on three different pyrotechnics using laser energy from the multimode output from an Ar-Ion laser (av) at 500 nm and a near-IR diode laser pigtailed to a fibre optic cable and operating at 808 nm. The pyrotechnics investigated were: G20 black powder, SR44 and SR371C. The confined ignition tests were conducted in a specially designed ignition chamber. Pyrotechnics were ignited by a free space beam entering the chamber through an industrial sapphire window in the case of the Ar-ion laser. For the NIR diode laser, fibre was ducted through a block into direct contact with the pyrotechnic. The Ar-Ion laser was chosen as this was found to ignite all three pyrotechnics in the unconfined condition. It also allowed for a direct comparison of confined/unconfined results to be made. The threshold laser flux densities to initiate reproducible ignitions at this wavelength were found to be between {proportional_to}12.7 and {proportional_to}0.16 kW cm{sup -2}. Plotted on the ignition maps are the laser flux densities versus the start of ignition times for the three confined pyrotechnics. It was found from these maps that the times for confined ignition were substantially lower than those obtained for unconfined ignition under similar experimental conditions. For the NIR diode laser flux densities varied between {proportional_to}6.8 and {proportional_to}0.2 kW cm{sup -2}. The minimum ignition times for the NIR diode laser for SR371C ({proportional_to}11.2 ms) and G20 ({proportional_to}17.1 ms) were faster than those achieved by the use of the Ar-ion laser. However, the minimum ignition time was shorter ({proportional_to}11.7 ms) with the Ar-ion laser for SR44. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd 3+ lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho 3+ was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb 3+ to Yb 3+ was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar + laser, Kr + laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc

  6. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  7. A comparative study of the laser induce breakdown spectroscopy in single- and double-pulse laser geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Duixiong; Su Maogen; Dong Chenzhong; Wen Guanhong; Cao Xiangnian

    2013-01-01

    A time resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique (LIBS) was used for the investigation of emission signal enhancement on double-pulse LIBS. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at 1064 nm wavelength have been employed to generate laser-induced plasma on aluminium-based alloys. The plasma emission signals were recorded by spectrometer with ICCD detector. Spectral response calibration was performed by using deuterium and tungsten halogen lamps. Time evolution of the plasma temperature and electron density was investigated in SP and DP experiments. Based on the investigation of plasma parameters, the enhancements of emission line intensities were investigated, and the mechanisms of it were discussed. (author)

  8. P 8: Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by soft X-ray from a laser induced plasma source and/or UV-VIS laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruza, P.; Fidler, V.; Nikl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The design and use of a novel, table-top UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer with two excitation sources is described: a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of about 4 ns duration, and a conventional N 2 pulse laser excitation at 337 nm (or any other UV-VIS pulse laser excitation). The XUV plasma source generates photons of either quasi-monochromatic (N target, E = 430 eV) or wide (Ar target, E = 200 ∼ 600 eV) spectral range. A combination of both X-ray/XUV and UV-VIS excitation in one experimental apparatus allows to perform comparative luminescence spectra and kinetics measurements under the same experimental conditions. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of doped Ce 3+ ions was studied under XUV 430 eV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3,68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d transition of Ce 3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, LuAG:Ce single crystals and single crystalline films luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed. (authors)

  9. A study of optical design and optimization of laser optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.-M.; Fang, Yi-Chin

    2013-09-01

    This paper propose a study of optical design of laser beam shaping optics with aspheric surface and application of genetic algorithm (GA) to find the optimal results. Nd: YAG 355 waveband laser flat-top optical system, this study employed the Light tools LDS (least damped square) and the GA of artificial intelligence optimization method to determine the optimal aspheric coefficient and obtain the optimal solution. This study applied the aspheric lens with GA for the flattening of laser beams using collimated laser beam light, aspheric lenses in order to achieve best results.

  10. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruza, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil; Nikl, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N 2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce 3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d 2 transition of Ce 3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  11. Study and design on USB wireless laser communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihua; Zheng, Jiansheng; Ai, Yong

    2004-04-01

    We give the definition of USB wireless laser communication system (WLCS) and the brief introduction to the protocol of USB, the standard of hardware is also given. The paper analyses the hardware and software of USB WLCS. Wireless laser communication part and USB interface circuit part are discussed in detail. We also give the periphery design of the chip AN2131Q, the control circuit to realize the transformation from parallel port to serial bus, and the circuit of laser sending and receiving of laser communication part, which are simply, cheap and workable. And then the four part of software are analyzed as followed. We have consummated the ISR in the firmware frame to develop the periphery device of USB. We have debugged and consummated the 'ezload,' and the GPD of the drivers. Windows application performs functions and schedules the corresponding API functions to let the interface practical and beautiful. The system can realize USB wireless laser communication between computers, which distance is farther than 50 meters, and top speed can be bigger than 8 Mbps. The system is of great practical sense to resolve the issues of high-speed communication among increasing districts without fiber trunk network.

  12. Airborne laser: a tool to study landscape surface features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, J.C.; Jackson, T.J.; Everitt, J.H.; Escobar, D.E.; Murphey, J.B.; Grissinger, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Landscape surface features related to erosion and hydrology were measured using an airborne laser profiler. The airborne laser profiler made 4,000 measurements per second with a recording accuracy of 5 cm (1.9 inches) on a single measurement. Digital data from the laser are recorded and analyzed with a personal computer. These airborne laser profiles provide information on surface landscape features. Topography and canopy heights, cover, and distribution of natural vegetation were determined in studies in South Texas. Laser measurements of shrub cover along flightlines were highly correlated (R 2 = 0.98) with ground measurements made with line-intercept methods. Stream channel cross sections on Goodwin Creek in Mississippi were measured quickly and accurately with airborne laser data. Airborne laser profile data were used to measure small gullies in a level fallow field and in field with mature soybeans. While conventional ground-based techniques can be used to make these measurements, airborne laser profiler techniques allow data to be collected quickly, at a high density, and in areas that are essentially inaccessible for ground surveys. Airborne laser profiler data can quantify landscape features related to erosion and runoff, and the laser proler has the potential to be a useful tool for providing other data for studying and managing natural resources

  13. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning studies of hexamethylcyclopentadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom.......Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom....

  14. Formation of complexes between functionalized chitosan membranes and copper: A study by angle resolved XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-López, Belén [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Vieira, Rodrigo Silveira [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rabelo, Rodrigo Balloni; Beppu, Marisa Masumi [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Casado, Juan [Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique, E-mail: castellon@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with potential applications in various fields. Recently, it has been used for heavy metals removal like copper, due to the presence of amino and hydroxyl groups in its structure. Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents, such as iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. These membranes were used for copper adsorption and the formed complexes were characterized. Thermal and crystalline properties of chitosan membranes were studied by TG-DCS and X-ray diffraction. Raman, XPS and FT-IR data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups. The oxidation state of copper-chitosan membranes were also studied by angle resolved XPS, and by UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents. • The chelating agent were iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. • The functionalized membranes were used for copper adsorption and studied by ARXPS, Raman, TG-DCS, FT-IR and XRD. • Spectroscopic data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups.

  15. Reduced Arteriovenous Shunting Capacity After Local Heating and Redistribution of Baseline Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Assessed With Velocity-Resolved Quantitative Laser Doppler Flowmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Nyström, Fredrik H.; Länne, Toste; Östgren, Carl J.; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the microcirculatory velocity distribution in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects at baseline and after local heating. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The skin blood flow response to local heating (44°C for 20 min) was assessed in 28 diabetic patients and 29 control subjects using a new velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry technique (qLDF). The qLDF estimates erythrocyte (RBC) perfusion (velocity × concentration), in a physiologically relevant unit (grams RBC per 100 g tissue × millimeters per second) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions: v 10 mm/s. RESULTS The increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity >1 mm/s. A significantly lower response in qLDF total perfusion was found in diabetic patients than in control subjects after heat provocation because of less high-velocity blood flow (v >10 mm/s). The RBC concentration in diabetic patients increased sevenfold for v between 1 and 10 mm/s, and 15-fold for v >10 mm/s, whereas no significant increase was found for v <1 mm/s. The mean velocity increased from 0.94 to 7.3 mm/s in diabetic patients and from 0.83 to 9.7 mm/s in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS The perfusion increase occurs in larger shunting vessels and not as an increase in capillary flow. Baseline diabetic patient data indicated a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions, associated with longer duration of diabetes. A lower perfusion was associated with a higher BMI and a lower toe-to-brachial systolic blood pressure ratio. PMID:20393143

  16. KrF laser kinetics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, A.; Klimek, D.; Parks, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A series of measurements characterizing an e beam pumped KrF* laser was carried out using a 200-nsec e-beam pulse having a rise time of 25 nsec at current densities up to 50 A/cm 2 . These pump conditions are relevent for inertial confinement fusion laser drivers. The measurements include fluorescence efficiency, sidelight suppression of the fluorescence during lasing, and laser energy output over a wide range of laser parameters including: total density 0.5--2.0 amagats, temperature 300--400 K, fluorine density 0.15%--0.5%, current density 38--50 A/cm 2 and various mirror transmissions. This data was used to verify and refine a model of KrF* kinetics which was then used to estimate the performance of an angular multiplexed power amplifier suitable for laser fusion applications

  17. Electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The discovery of quantum Hall e ect has motivated the use of topology instead of broken symmetry to classify the states of matter. Quantum spin Hall e ect has been proposed to have a separation of spin currents as an analogue of the charge currents separation in quantum Hall e ect, leading us to the era of topological insulators. Three-dimensional analogue of the Dirac state in graphene has brought us the three-dimensional Dirac states. Materials with three-dimensional Dirac states could potentially be the parent compounds for Weyl semimetals and topological insulators when time-reversal or space inversion symmetry is broken. In addition to the single Dirac point linking the two dispersion cones in the Dirac/Weyl semimetals, Dirac points can form a line in the momentum space, resulting in a topological node line semimetal. These fascinating novel topological quantum materials could provide us platforms for studying the relativistic physics in condensed matter systems and potentially lead to design of new electronic devices that run faster and consume less power than traditional, silicon based transistors. In this thesis, we present the electronic properties of novel topological quantum materials studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES).

  18. An integrated approach using high time-resolved tools to study the origin of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gilio, A; de Gennaro, G; Dambruoso, P; Ventrella, G

    2015-10-15

    Long-range transport of natural and/or anthropogenic particles can contribute significantly to PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations and some European cities often fail to comply with PM daily limit values due to the additional impact of particles from remote sources. For this reason, reliable methodologies to identify long-range transport (LRT) events would be useful to better understand air pollution phenomena and support proper decision-making. This study explores the potential of an integrated and high time-resolved monitoring approach for the identification and characterization of local, regional and long-range transport events of high PM. In particular, the goal of this work was also the identification of time-limited event. For this purpose, a high time-resolved monitoring campaign was carried out at an urban background site in Bari (southern Italy) for about 20 days (1st-20th October 2011). The integration of collected data as the hourly measurements of inorganic ions in PM2.5 and their gas precursors and of the natural radioactivity, in addition to the analyses of aerosol maps and hourly back trajectories (BT), provided useful information for the identification and chemical characterization of local sources and trans-boundary intrusions. Non-sea salt (nss) sulfate levels were found to increase when air masses came from northeastern Europe and higher dispersive conditions of the atmosphere were detected. Instead, higher nitrate and lower nss-sulfate concentrations were registered in correspondence with air mass stagnation and attributed to local traffic source. In some cases, combinations of local and trans-boundary sources were observed. Finally, statistical investigations such as the principal component analysis (PCA) applied on hourly ion concentrations and the cluster analyses, the Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and the Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) models computed on hourly back-trajectories enabled to complete a cognitive framework

  19. Studies of nanostructures using time-resolved x-ray excited optical luminescence*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Shenoy, G.K.; Smita, S.; Burda, C.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text:The scientific community is currently investing a great deal of effort into understanding the physics and chemistry of nanoscale structures. Synchrotron radiation techniques are being used to study the physical, electronic, and magnetic structure of nanosystems, albeit at a relatively large size (greater than 30 nm). A major challenge facing researchers is finding methods that can probe structures of the smallest scale (less than 10 nm). Optical luminescence has been shown to be directly sensitive to structures in this size range due to quantum confinement phenomena. X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL) provides the capability to chemically map the sites responsible for producing low-energy (1-6 eV) fluorescence. By taking advantage of the time structure of the x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (70 ps wide, 153 ns separation), it also possible to determine the dynamic behavior of the states involved in the luminescence. In this paper we will present results of time-resolved XEOL experiments on various nanostructures including porous silicon, silicon nanowires, and CdSe nanodots

  20. Time-resolved studies of direct effects of radiation on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielden, E.M.; O'Neill, P.; Al-Kazwini, A.

    1987-01-01

    The biological changes induced by ionising radiation are a consequence of radiation-induced chemical events taking place at times <1s. These events are strongly influenced by the presence of chemical modifiers. Since DNA is a principle target for radiation-induced cell killing, DNA-free radicals are generated by direct ionisation of DNA moieties (direct effect) and by reaction with hydroxyl radicals formed by radiolysis of the water which is in the vicinity of the DNA (indirect effect). In order to study the 'direct' effects of radiation on DNA the following model approaches are discussed:- 1) Use of the technique of pulse radiolysis to investigate in aqueous solution the interactions of deoxynucleosides with SO/sub 4//sup .-/ whereby one-electron oxidised species of the bases are generated; and 2) time resolved, radiation-induced changes to solid DNA and related macromolecules (e.g. radiation-induced luminescence) in order to obtain an understanding of charge/energy migration as a result of ionisation of DNA. The influence of chemical modifiers and of environment is discussed in terms of the properties of the radiation-induced species produced. Since the properties of base radicals produced by SO/sub 4//sup .-/ are similar to those of the base OH-adducts oxidising properties, potential similarities between the 'direct' and 'indirect' effects of radiation are presented

  1. Time-resolved luminescence studies in hydrogen uranyl phosphate intercalated with amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novo, Joao Batista Marques [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba-PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: jbmnovo@quimica.ufpr.br; Batista, Fabio Roberto [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Cunha, Carlos Jorge da [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Dias, Lauro Camargo Jr. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, CP 19081, 81531-990 Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Teixeira Pessine, Francisco Benedito [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13084-971 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    Time-resolved luminescence decays of intercalated compounds of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) with p-toluidinium (HUPPT), benzylaminium (HUPBZ), {alpha}-methylbenzylaminium (HUPMBZ) and hydroxylaminium (HUPHAM) were studied. The prepared compounds belong to the tetragonal P4/ncc space group and showed 00 l reflections shifted to lower angles relative to HUP, indicating that the intercalation increases the c parameter of the unit cell. The luminescence decays of the compounds with 100% of intercalation ratio (HUPHAM and HUPBZ) were analyzed by Global Analysis, assuming Lianos' stretched exponential as the model function, which can be applied to compounds with restricted geometry and mobile donor and quencher molecules. It was remarkable that the luminescence decays showed that the quenching of the emission of the uranyl ions by the intercalated protonated amines is not restricted by low dimensionality of the host uranyl phosphate, and that a diffusion mechanism occurs. Benzylaminium cation efficiently quenches the excited energy of the uranyl ions at close distance, but the long-range and long-lifetime quenching is hindered. A different situation is found in the case of the small hydroxylaminium cation, where the long distance diffusion of the species is fast, playing an important role in the quenching of the excited uranyl ions at longer times.

  2. Time-resolved luminescence studies in hydrogen uranyl phosphate intercalated with amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novo, Joao Batista Marques; Batista, Fabio Roberto; Cunha, Carlos Jorge da; Dias, Lauro Camargo Jr.; Teixeira Pessine, Francisco Benedito

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence decays of intercalated compounds of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) with p-toluidinium (HUPPT), benzylaminium (HUPBZ), α-methylbenzylaminium (HUPMBZ) and hydroxylaminium (HUPHAM) were studied. The prepared compounds belong to the tetragonal P4/ncc space group and showed 00 l reflections shifted to lower angles relative to HUP, indicating that the intercalation increases the c parameter of the unit cell. The luminescence decays of the compounds with 100% of intercalation ratio (HUPHAM and HUPBZ) were analyzed by Global Analysis, assuming Lianos' stretched exponential as the model function, which can be applied to compounds with restricted geometry and mobile donor and quencher molecules. It was remarkable that the luminescence decays showed that the quenching of the emission of the uranyl ions by the intercalated protonated amines is not restricted by low dimensionality of the host uranyl phosphate, and that a diffusion mechanism occurs. Benzylaminium cation efficiently quenches the excited energy of the uranyl ions at close distance, but the long-range and long-lifetime quenching is hindered. A different situation is found in the case of the small hydroxylaminium cation, where the long distance diffusion of the species is fast, playing an important role in the quenching of the excited uranyl ions at longer times

  3. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J; Wokaun, A [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  5. Spin-resolved x-ray photoemission studies of ferromagnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebanoff, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent spin-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SRXPS) studies of ferromagnetic metals are reviewed. SRXPS studies of metallic Fe, Co, Co 66 Fe 4 Ni 1 B 14 Si 15 , and Ni demonstrate that core-level photoemission, and the itinerant electron response to core-hole creation, are highly spin-dependent. The exchange splitting of the Fe 2p 3/2 level is found to be 0.48±0.05 eV. Lifetime broadening results for the Fe 2p 3/2 N↑ (majority spin) and N↓ (minority spin) components indicate conservation of spin in core-hole filling processes involving the valence band. SRXPS study of the Fe 2p 3/2 peak asymmetry α reveals a dependence of electron endash hole excitation on the spin of the core hole. Spin analysis of the Fe 3s XPS line shape shows it to be a three-component spectrum, rather than the two-component line shape assumed previously. A photon energy dependence of one of the Fe 3s components explains disagreement among previous Fe 3s XPS results. Comparisons of SRXPS from Co metal and Co 66 Fe 4 Ni 1 B 14 Si 15 directly demonstrate the effect of a reduced atomic magnetic moment on the spin dependence of core-level XPS. The behavior of lifetime broadenings for the N↑ and N↓ Co 2p 3/2 components show that the reduced Co magnetic moment found in the Co 66 Fe 4 Ni 1 B 14 Si 15 amorphous glass is due to the transfer of ↑-spin valence electron density to the ↓-spin valence band upon glass formation. SRXPS also allows investigation of spin-dependent core-hole screening processes and satellite production, as demonstrated in SRXPS studies of ferromagnetic Ni. Future directions of SRXPS are also explored. copyright 1996 American Vacuum Society

  6. Temporally resolved characterization of shock-heated foam target with Al absorption spectroscopy for fast electron transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Anderson, K.; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hund, J.; Paguio, R. R.; Saito, K. M.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The CH foam plasma produced by a laser-driven shock wave has been characterized by a temporally resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy technique. A 200 mg/cm{sup 3} foam target with Al dopant was developed for this experiment, which used an OMEGA EP [D. D. Meyerhofer et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032010 (2010)] long pulse beam with an energy of 1.2 kJ and 3.5 ns pulselength. The plasma temperatures were inferred with the accuracy of 5 eV from the fits to the measurements using an atomic physics code. The results show that the inferred temperature is sustained at 40-45 eV between 6 and 7 ns and decreases to 25 eV at 8 ns. 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulations show a good agreement with the measurements. Application of the shock-heated foam plasma platform toward fast electron transport experiments is discussed.

  7. Time Resolved Studies of Carrier Dynamics in III -v Heterojunction Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Duncan James

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Picosecond time-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study transient processes in Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As/InP multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and in bulk Ga_{.47}In _{.53}As and GaSb. To facilitate the experimental studies, apparatus was constructed to allow the detection of transient luminescence with 3ps time resolution. A frequency upconversion technique was employed. Relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As by optic phonons has been investigated, and, at carrier densities ~3 times 10^{18}cm ^{-3} is found to be a considerably slower process than simple theory predicts. The discrepancy is resolved by the inclusion of a non-equilibrium population of longitudinal optic phonons in the theoretical description. Slow energy loss is also observed in a 154A MQW under similar conditions, but carriers are found to relax more quickly in a 14A MQW with a comparable repeat period. The theory of non-equilibrium mode occupation is modified to describe the case of a MQW and is found to agree with experiment. Carrier relaxation in GaSb is studied and the importance of occupation of the L _6 conduction band valley in this material is demonstrated. The ambipolar diffusion of a photoexcited carrier plasma through an InP capping layer was investigated using an optical time-of-flight technique. This experiment also enables the efficiency of carrier capture by a Ga _{.47}In_{.53 }As quantum well to be determined. A capture time of 4ps was found.

  8. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Mark Alan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  9. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  10. Thermo-oxidative degradation study of melt-processed polyethylene and its blend with polyamide using time-resolved rheometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salehiyan, Reza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved mechanical spectroscopy (TRMS) was conducted to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples with different thermal histories and their blends with a polyamide (PA6) in the melt state. Neat...

  11. Spatially-resolved studies of charge-density-wave phase slip and dynamics in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemay, S.G.; Adelman, T.L.; Zaitsev-Zotov, S.V.; Thorne, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    We review our spatially and temporally resolved studies of charge-density-wave (CDW) phase slip and dynamics in NbSe 3 . Measurements of the steady-state CDW current, phase slip and strain profiles and their transient evolutions in response to a change in current direction provide a detailed picture of the interplay between elastic deformations and plasticity in this material. (orig.)

  12. Rotationally resolved state-to-state photoionization and the photoelectron study of vanadium monocarbide and its cations (VC/VC(+)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yih Chung; Luo, Zhihong; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Zheng; Song, Ying-Nan; Kuang, Sophie Yajin; Yin, Qing Zhu; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, C Y

    2015-04-21

    By employing two-color visible (VIS)-ultraviolet (UV) laser photoionization and pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) techniques, we have obtained highly rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra for vanadium monocarbide cations (VC(+)). The state-to-state VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra thus obtained allow unambiguous assignments for the photoionization rotational transitions, resulting in a highly precise value for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of vanadium monocarbide (VC), IE(VC) = 57512.0 ± 0.8 cm(-1) (7.13058 ± 0.00010 eV), which is defined as the energy of the VC(+)(X(3)Δ1; v(+) = 0; J(+) = 1) ← VC(X(2)Δ3/2; v'' = 0; J'' = 3/2) photoionization transition. The spectroscopic constants for VC(+)(X(3)Δ1) determined in the present study include the harmonic vibrational frequency ωe(+) = 896.4 ± 0.8 cm(-1), the anharmonicity constant ωe(+)xe(+) = 5.7 ± 0.8 cm(-1), the rotational constants Be(+) = 0.6338 ± 0.0025 cm(-1) and αe(+) = 0.0033 ± 0.0007 cm(-1), the equilibrium bond length re(+) = 1.6549 ± 0.0003 Å, and the spin-orbit coupling constant A = 75.2 ± 0.8 cm(-1) for VC(+)(X(3)Δ1,2,3). These highly precise energetic and spectroscopic data are used to benchmark state-of-the-art CCSDTQ/CBS calculations. In general, good agreement is found between the theoretical predictions and experimental results. The theoretical calculations yield the values, IE(VC) = 7.126 eV; the 0 K bond dissociation energies: D0(V-C) = 4.023 eV and D0(V(+)-C) = 3.663 eV; and heats of formation: ΔH°(f0)(VC) = 835.2, ΔH°(f298)(VC) = 840.4, ΔH°(f0)(VC(+)) = 1522.8, and ΔH°(f298)(VC(+)) = 1528.0 kJ mol(-1).

  13. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  14. RESOLVING NEIGHBORHOOD-SCALE AIR TOXICS MODELING: A CASE STUDY IN WILMINGTON, CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality modeling is useful for characterizing exposures to air pollutants. While models typically provide results on regional scales, there is a need for refined modeling approaches capable of resolving concentrations on the scale of tens of meters, across modeling domains 1...

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission study of NiO and CoO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z.X.; Lindberg, P.A.P.; Shih, C.K.; Spicer, W.E.; Lindau, I.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report an angle-resolved photoemission investigation of the electronic structures of NiO and CoO. The lattice effects on the photoemission spectra of these highly correlated materials are important. The magnitudes of dispersions of the oxygen bands agree with band calculations, but the experimental data of the localized 3d bands do not agree with the band calculations

  16. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is therefore crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. The probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Study into penetration speed during laser cutting of brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Z; Sami, M; Patiroglu, T

    1998-01-01

    The applications of CO2 continuous-wave lasers in neurosurgery have become important in recent years. Theoretical considerations of laser applicability in medicine are subsequently confirmed experimentally. To obtain precision operation in the laser cutting process, further theoretical developments and experimental studies need to be conducted. Consequently, in the present study, the heat transfer mechanism taking place during laser-tissue interaction is introduced using Fourier theory. The results obtained from the theoretical model are compared with the experimental results. In connection with this, an experiment is designed to measure the penetration speed during the laser cutting process. The measurement is carried out using an optical method. It is found that both results for the penetration speed obtained from the theory and experiment are in a good agreement.

  18. Time-resolved homo-FRET studies of biotin-streptavidin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Nardo, Luca; Rigler, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching that is notably useful for characterizing properties of biomolecules and/or their interactions. Here we study water-solutions of Biotin-Streptavidin complexes, in which Biotin is labeled with a rigidly-bound fluorophore that can interact by Förster resonance energy transfer with the fluorophores labeling the other, up to three, Biotins of the same complex. The fluorophore, Atto550, is a Rhodamine analogue. We detect the time-resolved fluorescence decay of the fluorophores with an apparatus endowed with single-photon sensitivity and temporal resolution of ~30ps. The decay profiles we observe for samples containing constant Biotin-Atto550 conjugates and varying Streptavidin concentrations are multi-exponential. Each decay component can be associated with the rate of quenching exerted on each donor by each of the acceptors that label the other Biotin molecules, depending on the binding site they occupy. The main features that lead to this result are that (i) the transition dipole moments of the up-to-four Atto550 fluorophores that label the complexes are fixed as to both relative positions and mutual orientations; (ii) the fluorophores are identical and the role of donor in each Biotin-Streptavidin complex is randomly attributed to the one that has absorbed the excitation light (homo-FRET). Obviously the high-temporal resolution of the excitation-detection apparatus is necessary to discriminate among the fluorescence decay components. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  20. Comparative study on Pulsed Laser Deposition and Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of urease thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smausz, Tomi; Megyeri, Gabor; Kekesi, Renata; Vass, Csaba; Gyoergy, Eniko; Sima, Felix; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Hopp, Bela

    2009-01-01

    Urease thin films were produced by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) and Pulsed Laser Deposition from two types of targets: frozen water solutions of urease with different concentrations (1-10% m/v) and pure urease pellets. The fluence of the ablating KrF excimer laser was varied between 300 and 2200 mJ/cm 2 . Fourier transform infrared spectra of the deposited films showed no difference as compared to the original urease. Morphologic studies proved that the films consist of a smooth 'base' layer with embedded micrometer-sized droplets. Absorption-coefficient measurements contradicted the traditional 'absorptive matrix' model for MAPLE deposition. The laser energy was absorbed by urease clusters leading to a local heating-up and evaporation of the frozen matrix from the uppermost layer accompanied by the release of dissolved urease molecules. Significant enzymatic activity of urease was preserved only during matrix assisted transfer.

  1. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54–230°C with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS standard aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%·K−1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA, oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA, and biomass-burning OA (BBOA separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. A new technique using the AMS background signal was demonstrated to quantify the fraction of species up to four orders-of-magnitude less volatile than those detectable in the MS mode, which for OA represent ~5% of the non-refractory (NR OA signal. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered

  2. Experimental study of mechanical response of artificial tissue models irradiated with Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    Nanosecond long laser pulses are used in medical applications where precise tissue ablation with minimal thermal and mechanical collateral damage is required. When a laser pulse is incident on a material, optical energy will be absorbed by a combination of linear and nonlinear absorption according to both: laser light irradiance and material properties. In the case of water or gels, the first results in heat generation and thermoelastic expansion; while the second results in an expanding plasma formation that launches a shock wave and a cavitation/boiling bubble. Plasma formation due to nonlinear absorption of nanosecond laser pulses is originated by a combination of multiphoton ionization and thermionic emission of free electrons, which is enhanced when the material has high linear absorption coefficient. In this work, we present three experimental approaches to study pressure transients originated when 6 ns laser pulses are incident on agar gels and water with varying linear absorption coefficient, using laser radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation: (a) PVDF sensors, (b) Time-resolved shadowgraphy and (c) Time-resolved interferometry. The underlying hypothesis is that pressure transients are composed of the superposition of both: shock wave originated by hot expanding plasma resulting from nonlinear absorption of optical energy and, thermoelastic expansion originated by heat generation due to linear absorption of optical energy. The objective of this study is to carry out a comprehensive experimental analysis of the mechanical effects that result when tissue models are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses to elucidate the relative contribution of linear and nonlinear absorption to bubble formation. Furthermore, we investigate cavitation bubble formation with temperature increments as low as 3 °C.

  3. Direct solar pumping of semiconductor lasers: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neal G.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes results of NASA Grant NAG-1-1148, entitled Direct Solar Pumping of Semiconductor Lasers: A Feasibility Study. The goals of this study were to provide a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of pumping semiconductor lasers in space with directly focused sunlight and to identify semiconductor laser structures expected to operate at the lowest possible focusing intensities. It should be emphasized that the structures under consideration would provide direct optical-to-optical conversion of sunlight into laser light in a single crystal, in contrast to a configuration consisting of a solar cell or storage battery electrically pumping a current injection laser. With external modulation, such lasers could perhaps be efficient sources for intersatellite communications. We proposed specifically to develop a theoretical model of semiconductor quantum-well lasers photopumped by a broadband source, test it against existing experimental data where possible, and apply it to estimating solar pumping requirements and identifying optimum structures for operation at low pump intensities. These tasks have been accomplished, as described in this report of our completed project. The report is organized as follows: Some general considerations relevant to the solar-pumped semiconductor laser problem are discussed in Section 2, and the types of structures chosen for specific investigation are described. The details of the laser model we developed for this work are then outlined in Section 3. In Section 4, results of our study are presented, including designs for optimum lattice-matched and strained-layer solar-pumped quantum-well lasers and threshold pumping estimates for these structures. It was hoped at the outset of this work that structures could be identified which could be expected to operate continuously at solar photoexcitation intensities of several thousand suns, and this indeed turned out to be the case as described in this section. Our project is

  4. Synchronization and Characterization of an Ultra-Short Laser for Photoemission and Electron-Beam Diagnostics Studies at a Radio Frequency Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy; Ruan, Jinhao; Piot, Philippe; Lumpkin, Alex

    2012-03-01

    A commercially-available titanium-sapphire laser system has recently been installed at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory in support of photoemission and electron beam diagnostics studies. The laser system is synchronized to both the 1.3-GHz master oscillator and a 1-Hz signal use to trigger the radiofrequency system and instrumentation acquisition. The synchronization scheme and performance are detailed. Long-term temporal and intensity drifts are identified and actively suppressed to within 1 ps and 1.5%, respectively. Measurement and optimization of the laser's temporal profile are accomplished using frequency-resolved optical gating.

  5. Laser-welded ureteral anastomoses: experimental studies with three techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürpinar, T; Gürer, S; Kattan, M W; Wang, L; Griffith, D P

    1996-01-01

    Tissue welding with laser energy is a new technique for reconstructive surgery. The potential advantages of laser welding are (a) lack of foreign body reaction, (b) decreased operative time, (c) less tissue manipulation, and (d) effective union of tissues equivalent to sutured anastomoses. We have performed ureteral anastomoses in adult mongrel dogs using a KTP 532 nm laser at an intensity of 1.4 W. Multiple "spot welds" of 1-s duration were utilized in a single layer anastomosis. Laser-welded anastomoses were performed with and without protein solder (33% and 50% human albumin) and were compared to sutured anastomoses. The laser-welded anastomoses required less operative time and provided bursting pressure levels similar to those of traditional sutured anastomoses. There was no advantage or disadvantage to the addition of human albumin as a solder in these experimental studies.

  6. Study on process of laser cladded nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang

    2000-01-01

    The microstructure and performances of the Co-base alloy coatings that are formed by laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc surfacing on the nuclear valve-sealing surface have been studied and compared. The combination costs of laser cladding, plasma spurt welding and arc, surfacing have been analyzed and compared. The results showed that the laser cladding processing has the advantages of high efficiency, low energy cost, a little machining allowance, high rate of finished products and low combination cost, compared with plasma spurt welding processing and arc surfacing processing. The laser cladding technology can improve the qualities of nuclear valve parts and increase their service life. Therefore, the laser cladding processing is a new technology with developing potential

  7. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 18 cm -3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The density distribution of the helium gas is measured with a time-resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer to search for the optimum laser focus position and timing in the gas-jet. The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency, which is useful for ultrahigh gradient particle acceleration in a compact system. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results are compared with a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI and the anomalous blueshift will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D PIC simulation we obtain the results of high quality intense electron beam acceleration. These results illuminate the possibility of a high energy and a high quality electron beam acceleration. (author)

  8. Status of fiber lasers study of on ytterbium doped fiber laser and laser spectroscopy of doped fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, S.

    1994-07-01

    This work shows all the advantages and drawbacks of the rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and fiber optical amplifiers, pointing out their potential use for instrumentation and optical fiber sensor technology. The theory of light propagation in optical fibers is presented in order to understand the manufacturing methods. A comparative study of preform surface and concentration analysis is performed. The gain behaviour is also thoroughly examined. A synthesis of all technological parameters of the fiber laser is then established and all technologies of the constituting integrated components are reviewed and compared. The experimental techniques mainly involve: site selective excitation tunability, cooperative luminescence, oxidation state changes induced by gamma irradiation, ytterbium-doped mono-mode continuous wave tunable three-level fiber laser. (TEC). 622 refs., 176 figs

  9. A synchrotron radiation camera and data acquisition system for time resolved x-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordas, J.; Koch, M.H.J.; Clout, P.N.; Dorrington, E.; Boulin, C.; Gabriel, A.

    1980-01-01

    Until recently, time resolved measurements of x-ray scattering patterns have not been feasible because laboratory x-ray sources were too weak and detectors unavailable. Recent developments in both these fields have changed the situation, and it is now possible to follow changes in x-ray scattering patterns with a time resolution of a few ms. The apparatus used to achieve this is described and some examples from recent biological experiments are given. (author)

  10. Charge transport in nanostructured materials for solar energy conversion studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr; Sundström, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 215, 2-3 (2010), s. 123-139 ISSN 1010-6030 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P099; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100902; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy * ultrafast dynamics * bulk heterojunction * semiconductor nanostructures * transport * mobility Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.243, year: 2010

  11. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering study on soap-free emulsion polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motokawa, Ryuhei [Research Group of Soft Matter and Neutron Scattering, Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Koizumi, Satoshi [Research Group of Soft Matter and Neutron Scattering, Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: koizumi@neutrons.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Hashimoto, Takeji [Research Group of Soft Matter and Neutron Scattering, Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakahira, Takayuki [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biotechnology, Chiba University, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Annaka, Masahiko [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    We investigated an aqueous soap-free emulsion polymerization process of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) by ultra-small-angle and time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering methods. The results indicate that the compartmentalization of chain end radicals into solid-like micelle cores crucially leads to the quasi-living behavior of the radical polymerization by prohibiting recombination process.

  12. Electronic structure of Sr2RuO4 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Hase, I.; Ikeda, S.I.; Bando, H.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of the monolayer strontium ruthenate Sr 2 RuO 4 was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We present photon-energy (hν) dependence of the electronic structure near the Fermi level along the ΓM line. The hν dependence has shown a strong spectral weight modulation of the Ru 4d xy and 4d zx bands

  13. Two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectral study of two bromobenzene glutathione conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, J.A.; Highet, R.J.; Pohl, L.R.; Monks, T.J.; Hinson, J.A.

    1985-09-01

    The application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the structure of two bile metabolites isolated from rats injected interperitoneally with bromobenzene is described. The structures of the two molecules are obtained unambiguously from the proton-proton spin coupling constants. The paper discusses the fundamentals of the technique and demonstrates the resolution of small long-range coupling constants.

  14. Disentangling detector data in XFEL studies of temporally resolved solution state chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Biasin, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    With the arrival of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs), 2D area detectors with a large dynamic range for detection of hard X-rays with fast readout rates are required for many types of experiments. Extracting the desired information from these detectors has been challenging due to unpredicted flu...

  15. Experimental study on concrete cutting by CO2 laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutsumizu, Akira; Tomura, Hidemasa; Wakizaka, Tatsuya; Hishikawa, Kyoichi; Moriya, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    Methods for dismantling nuclear reactor facilities must meet particularly exacting requirements imposed by heavily reinforced and radioactivated reactor shield walls. Conventional methods do not meet all such requirements, however. Intrigued by excellent characteristics of the laser cutting method relative to nuclear facility demolition, we carried out an experimental study to make a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics, especially for deep cutting, with success in identifying main factors affecting the cutting depth of a laser and characterizing its cutting behavior. The study results indicate that a 50 kW class CO 2 laser has a potential to provide a practicable cutting speed and depth. (author)

  16. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  17. Preparation and study of laser plasma diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, C.B.; Davanloo, F.; Juengerman, E.M.; Jander, D.R.; Lee, T.J. (Center for Quantum Electronics, Univ. of Texas, Dallas (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Films of diamond-like material can be deposited with a laser plasma source of carbon ions in an ultrahigh vacuum environment without involving hydrogen in the growth mechanism. These films are distinguished by transparency at visible wavelengths which is a result of a high percentage of sp{sup 3} bonds. They resemble materials first quenched from ion beams at very slow deposition rates. In our method an Nd:YAG laser was focused on a graphite feedstock in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber at intensities in excess of 5x10{sup 11} W cm{sup -2}. A high current discharge confined to the path of the laser-ignited plasma provided further heat and aided processing of the ion flux. At a laser repetition rate of 10 Hz, a deposition rate of 0.5 {mu}m h{sup -1} over a 100 cm{sup 2} area was attainable with no measurable substrate heating. The substrates required no special preparation or seeding and materials including silicon, fused silica, glass, gold, copper, germanium, InP, ZnS, and polycarbonate and polyimide plastics were readily coated. Complex shapes could be accommodated and spheres of 440C stainless steel were covered successfully. Over 1000 samples were prepared to a variety of specifications with thicknesses reaching 5 {mu}m and hardness exceeding 37 GPa. (orig.).

  18. Time-resolved EPR study of singlet oxygen in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzi, Marco; Sartori, Elena; Moscatelli, Alberto; Khudyakov, Igor V; Turro, Nicholas J

    2013-06-27

    X-band EPR spectra of singlet O2((1)Δg) and triplet O2((3)Σg(-)) were observed in the gas phase under low molecular-oxygen pressures PO2 = 0.175-0.625 Torr, T = 293-323 K. O2((1)Δg) was produced by quenching of photogenerated triplet sensitizers naphthalene C8H10, perdeuterated naphthalene, and perfluoronaphthalene in the gas phase. The EPR spectrum of O2((1)Δg) was also observed under microwave discharge. Integrated intensities and line widths of individual components of the EPR spectrum of O2((3)Σg(-)) were used as internal standards for estimating the concentration of O2 species and PO2 in the EPR cavity. Time-resolved (TR) EPR experiments of C8H10 were the main focus of this Article. Pulsed irradiation of C8H10 in the presence of O2((3)Σg(-)) allowed us to determine the kinetics of formation and decay for each of the four components of the O2((1)Δg) EPR signal, which lasted for only a few seconds. We found that the kinetics of EPR-component decay fit nicely to a biexponential kinetics law. The TR EPR 2D spectrum of the third component of the O2((1)Δg) EPR spectrum was examined in experiments using C8H10. This spectrum vividly presents the time evolution of an EPR component. The largest EPR signal and the longest lifetime of O2((1)Δg), τ = 0.4 s, were observed at medium pressure PO2 = 0.4 Torr, T = 293 K. The mechanism of O2((1)Δg) decay in the presence of photosensitizers is discussed. EPR spectra of O2((1)Δg) evidence that the spin-rotational states of O2((1)Δg) are populated according to Boltzmann distribution in the studied time range of 10-100 ms. We believe that this is the first report dealing with the dependence of O2((1)Δg) EPR line width on PO2 and T.

  19. Kinetic and Diagnostic Studies of Molecular Plasmas Using Laser Absorption Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welzel, S; Rousseau, A; Davies, P B; Roepcke, J

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade mid infrared absorption spectroscopy between 3 and 20 μm, known as Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IRLAS) and based on tuneable semiconductor lasers, namely lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode lasers (TDL), and quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry of molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, organo-silicon and boron compounds has lead to further applications of IRLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. IRLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetics. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from IRLAS measurements. A variety of free radicals and molecular ions have been detected, especially using TDLs. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of infrared spectroscopic techniques to industrial requirements. The recent development of QCLs offers an attractive new option for the monitoring and control of industrial plasma processes as well as for highly time-resolved studies on the kinetics of plasma processes. The aim of the present article is threefold: (i) to review recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas (ii) to report on selected studies of the spectroscopic properties and kinetic behaviour of radicals, and (iii) to describe the current status of advanced instrumentation for TDLAS in the mid infrared

  20. Biological Studies with Laser-Polarized ^129Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. H.; Oteiza, E. R.; Wong, G. A.; Walsworth, R. L.; Albert, M. S.; Nascimben, L.; Peled, S.; Sakai, K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1996-05-01

    We have studied several biological systems using laser-polarized ^129Xe. In certain tissues magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using inhaled laser-polarized noble gases may provide images superior to those from conventional proton MRI. High resolution laser-polarized ^3He images of air spaces in the human lung were recently obtained by the Princeton/Duke group. However, ^3He is not very soluble in tissue. Therefore, we are using laser polarized ^129Xe (tissue-soluble), with the long term goal of biomedical functional imaging. We have investigated multi-echo and multi-excitation magnetic resonance detection schemes to exploit the highly non-thermal ^129Xe magnetization produced by the laser polarization technique. We have inhalated live rats with laser-polarized ^129Xe gas and measured three distinct ^129Xe tissue resonances that last 20 to 40 sec. As a demonstration, we obtained a laser polarized ^129Xe image of the human oral cavity. Currently we are measuring the polarization lifetime of ^129Xe dissolved in human blood, the biological transporting medium. These studies and other recent developments will be reported.

  1. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang [Institute of Photonic Technology, Laser Diagnostics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity, University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian [Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM{sub 00}) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  2. LPI studies with grazing incidence irradiation at the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Schmitt, A.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R.; Seely, J.

    2013-10-01

    Studies of laser plasma instabilities (LPI) at the Nike laser facility at NRL have previously concentrated on planar targets irradiated with their surface normal aligned to the central axis of the laser. Shots with planar targets rotated up 60° to the laser have shown changes in thresholds for the two-plasmon decay instability and stimulated Raman scattering near the quarter critical region. In the case of rotated low-Z targets, spectra were observed to shift to lower wavelength and were substantially stronger in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges. The low-Z target data show growth at an incident intensity slightly below (~30%) the threshold values observed at normal incidence. A rapid rise in signal level over the same laser intensities was also observed in the hard x-ray data which serve as an overall indicator of LPI activity. Shots with rotated planar high-Z targets showed that the visible and ultraviolet emissions dropped significantly when compared to low-Z targets in the same geometry. This presentation will include results from upcoming experiments to determine the LPI signal for low-Z, high-Z, and high-Z coated targets at lower laser intensities for several angles of target rotation. Shots with widely separated laser beams are also planned to explore cross beam energy transport at Nike. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  3. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWRs) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario increases by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  4. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWR's) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario is insensitive to the capital cost of the hybrid, increasing by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Moreira Jr, Paulo F.; Tcacenco, Celize M.; Quina, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation numbers (N Ag) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40º C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles (γ = 0.11-0.15, where γ is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Yaq] and [Yaq] is the sodium counter...

  6. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better

  7. Studying the potential of point detectors in time-resolved dose verification of dynamic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Behrens, C. F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2015-01-01

    based on fiber-coupled plastic scintillator detectors was evaluated and compared with a Farmer-type ionization chamber and a small-volume ionization chamber. An important feature of scintillator detectors is that the sensitive volume of the detector can easily be scaled, and five scintillator detectors......-volume ionization chamber and the smallest scintillators. The time-resolved RapidArc dose profiles revealed volume-dependent discrepancies between scintillator and ionization chamber response, which confirmed that correction factors for ionization chambers in high temporal and spatial dose gradients are dominated...

  8. Studies of intense-laser plasma instabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Láska, Leoš; Krása, Josef; Badziak, J.; Jungwirth, Karel; Krouský, Eduard; Margarone, Daniele; Parys, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), 94-98 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR IAA100100715 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser plasma instabilities * self-generated magnetic field * longitudinal structure of the expanding plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  9. Comprehensive study on the pressure dependence of shock wave plasma generation under TEA CO2 laser bombardment on metal sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marpaung, A.M.; Kurniawan, H.; Tjia, M.O.; Kagawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the dynamical process taking place in the plasma generated by a TEA CO 2 laser (400 mJ, 100 ns) on a zinc target when surrounded by helium gas of pressure ranging from 2 Torr to 1 atm. Plasma characteristics were examined in detail on the emission lines of Zn I 481.0 nm and He I 587.6 nm by means of an unique time-resolved spatial distribution technique in addition to an ordinary time-resolved emission measurement technique. The results reveal, for the first time, persistent shock wave characteristics in all cases throughout the entire pressure range considered. Further analysis of the data has clarified the distinct characteristics of laser plasmas generated in different ranges of gas pressure. It is concluded that three types of shock wave plasma can be identified; namely, a target shock wave plasma in the pressure range from 2 Torr to around 50 Torr; a coupling shock wave plasma in the pressure range from around 50 Torr to 200 Torr and a gas breakdown shock wave plasma in the pressure range from around 200 Torr to 1 atm. These distinct characteristics are found to be ascribable to the different extents of the gas breakdown process taking place at the different gas pressures. These results, obtained for a TEA CO 2 laser, will provide a useful basis for the analyses of plasmas induced by other lasers. (author)

  10. Interferometric studies of laser-created plasmas using compact soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Moon, S; Keenan, R; Jankowska, E; Maconi, M C; Hammarsten, E C; Filevich, J; Hunter, J R; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J J

    2003-01-01

    We summarize results of several successful dense plasma diagnostics experiments realized by combining two different kinds of table-top soft x-ray lasers with an amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction grating beam splitters. In the first set of experiments this robust high throughput diffraction grating interferometer (DGI) was used with a 46.9 nm portable capillary discharge laser to study the dynamics of line focus and point focus laser-created plasmas. The measured electron density profiles, which differ significantly from those expected from a classical expansion, unveil important two-dimensional effects of the dynamics of these plasmas. A second DGI customized to operate in combination with a 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd transient gain laser was used to perform interferometry of line focus laser-created plasmas with picosecond time resolution. These measurements provide valuable new benchmarks for complex hydrodynamic codes and help bring new understanding of the dynamics of dense plasmas. The instrumentation and methodology we describe is scalable to significantly shorter wavelengths, and constitutes a promising scheme for extending interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas such as those investigated for inertial confinement fusion

  11. Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  12. Experimental study and numerical simulations of the spectral properties of XUV lasers pumped by collisional excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, L.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the knowledge of the spectral and temporal properties of plasma-based XUV lasers is an important issue for the ongoing development of these sources towards significantly higher peak power. The spectral properties of the XUV laser line actually control several physical quantities that are important for applications, such as the minimum duration that can be achieved (Fourier-transform limit). The shortest duration experimentally achieved to-date is ∼1 picosecond. The demonstrated technique of seeding XUV laser plasmas with a coherent femtosecond pulse of high-order harmonic radiation opens new and promising prospects to reduce the duration to a few 100 fs, provided that the gain bandwidth can be kept large enough.XUV lasers pumped by collisional excitation of Ni-like and Ne-like ions have been developed worldwide in hot plasmas created either by fast electrical discharge, or by various types of high-power lasers. This leads to a variety of XUV laser sources with distinct output properties, but also markedly different plasma parameters (density, temperature) in the amplification zone. Hence different spectral properties are expected. The purpose of our work was then to investigate the spectral behaviour of the different types of existing collisional excitation XUV lasers, and to evaluate their potential to support amplification of pulses with duration below 1 ps in a seeded mode.The spectral characterization of plasma-based XUV lasers is challenging because the extremely narrow bandwidth (typically Δλ/λ ∼10 -5 ) lies beyond the resolution limit of existing spectrometers in this spectral range. In our work the narrow linewidth was resolved using a wavefront-division interferometer specifically designed to measure temporal coherence, from which the spectral linewidth is inferred. We have characterized three types of collisional XUV lasers, developed in three different laboratories: transient pumping in Ni-like Mo, capillary discharge pumping in Ne

  13. Spin resolved electronic transport through N@C20 fullerene molecule between Au electrodes: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Serkan

    2018-05-01

    Using first principles study, through Density Functional Theory combined with Non Equilibrium Green's Function Formalism, electronic properties of endohedral N@C20 fullerene molecule joining Au electrodes (Au-N@C20) was addressed in the presence of spin property. The electronic transport behavior across the Au-N@C20 molecular junction was investigated by spin resolved transmission, density of states, molecular orbitals, differential conductance and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Spin asymmetric variation was clearly observed in the results due to single N atom encapsulated in the C20 fullerene cage, where the N atom played an essential role in the electronic behavior of Au-N@C20. This N@C20 based molecular bridge, exhibiting a spin dependent I-V variation, revealed a metallic behavior within the bias range from -1 V to 1 V. The induced magnetic moment, spin polarization and other relevant quantities associated with the spin resolved transport were elucidated.

  14. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy

  15. Laser damage studies on MgF2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protopapa, Maria Lucia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Perrone, Maria Rita; Piegari, Angela; Masetti, Enrico; Ristau, Detlev; Quesnel, Etienne; Duparre, Angela

    2001-01-01

    The results of laser damage studies performed at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) on MgF 2 thin films deposited by different techniques (electron-beam evaporation, thermal boat evaporation, and ion-beam sputtering) on fused silica and CaF 2 substrates are presented. We find that the films deposited on CaF 2 substrates by the electron-beam evaporation technique present the highest damage threshold fluence (9 J/cm2). The photoacoustic (PA) beam deflection technique was employed, in addition to microscopical inspection, to determine laser damage fluences. We confirm, by scanning electron microscopy analysis of the damaged spots, the capability of the PA technique to provide information on the mechanisms leading to damage. The dependence of both laser damage fluence and damage morphology on the film deposition technique, as well as on the film substrate, is discussed

  16. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  17. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of the superconducting gap symmetry in Fe-based superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-B. Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting gap is the fundamental parameter that characterizes the superconducting state, and its symmetry is a direct consequence of the mechanism responsible for Cooper pairing. Here we discuss about angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting gap in the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. We show that the superconducting gap is Fermi surface dependent and nodeless with small anisotropy, or more precisely, a function of the momentum location in the Brillouin zone. We show that while this observation seems inconsistent with weak coupling approaches for superconductivity in these materials, it is well supported by strong coupling models and global superconducting gaps. We also suggest that a smaller lifetime of the superconducting Cooper pairs induced by the momentum dependent interband scattering inherent to these materials could affect the residual density of states at low energies, which is critical for a proper evaluation of the superconducting gap.

  18. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  19. Thin film growth studies using time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Thin-film growth is important for novel functional materials and new generations of devices. The non-equilibrium growth physics involved is very challenging, because the energy landscape for atomic scale processes is determined by many parameters, such as the diffusion and Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers. We review the in situ real-time techniques of x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray growth oscillations and diffuse x-ray scattering (GISAXS) for the determination of structure and morphology on length scales from Å to µm. We give examples of time resolved growth experiments mainly from molecular thin film growth, but also highlight growth of inorganic materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and electrochemical deposition from liquids. We discuss how scaling parameters of rate equation models and fundamental energy barriers in kinetic Monte Carlo methods can be determined from fits of the real-time x-ray data.

  20. Scanning mass spectrometer setup for spatially resolved reactivity studies on model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Matthias; Schirling, Christian; Kielbassa, Stefan; Bansmann, Joachim; Behm, Juergen [Institut fuer Oberflaechenchemie und Katalyse, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A scanning mass spectrometer with micrometer-scale resolution was developed for investigations on the catalytic activity of microstructured planar model catalysts. Products of local surface reactions can be detected via a fine capillary orifice in a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer. The position of the sample with respect to the capillary is controlled by three piezo-driven translators. The surface reactivity of a resistive heated sample can be depicted in a spatially resolved topogram, taking into account the influence of the distance between sample and capillary on the magnitude of the QMS signal and the lateral resolution. Photolithographic structured reactive patterns on top of an inactive substrate enable investigations of mesoscopic transport effects such as coupling between catalytically active areas and of (reverse) spillover phenomena on one sample by varying the size and the distances of the active areas.

  1. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  2. Time resolved photoluminescence studies of long lived emissive specie in F8BT:PFB blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélinas, Simon; Howard, Ian; Friend, Richard; Silva, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Type-II heterojunctions play a crucial role in organic optoelectronic devices. We use donor-acceptor polyfluorene blends as a model system to understand excited-state dynamics at heterojunctions. These interfacial excitations are intrachain singlet and triplet excitons, geminate polaron pairs, and exciplexes (interfacial charge-transfer excitons). Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectra were taken at 10,and room temperature to investigate the interconversion dynamics of these species. We observe delayed PL with sub-linear excitation fluence dependence. This implies that delayed singlet exciton generation involves a bimolecular annihilation mechanism. By means of kinetic modeling, we propose triplet-triplet exciton annihilation as a regeneration route to singlet excitons, and subsequently to exciplexes. This points to a significant (<15,%) yield of triplet excitons after interfacial charge separation, and to the central role of these species on the interfacial dynamics.

  3. Metalation of positively charged water soluble mesoporphyrins studied via time-resolved SERRS spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházka, Marek; Hanzliková, Jana; Štěpánek, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimir

    1997-06-01

    Time-resolved SERRS spectra of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]21 H,23 H-porphine (TMAP) were recorded (using a multichannel Raman spectrometer) in various SERS-active Ag colloid/porphyrin systems. Data treatment based on a factor analysis was used to decompose all the SERRS spectra into two main components: SERRS spectrum of the free base TMAP and that of its Ag metalated form. The metalation kinetics obtained in this way was found to be highly dependent on the presence of phosphate anions, citrate and/or Triton X-100 in the colloidal system. The results are analogous to those previously obtained for 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)21 H,23 H-porphine, a porphyrin with a substantially stronger tendency towards metalation.

  4. Evolution of a Rippled Membrane during Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Studied by Time-Resolved AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for lipid membrane curvature is explored by monitoring, through time-resolved atomic force microscopy, the hydrolysis of supported double bilayers in the ripple phase. The ripple phase presents a corrugated morphology. PLA2 is shown to have higher activity...... toward the ripple phase compared to the gel phase in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes, indicating its preference for this highly curved membrane morphology. Hydrolysis of the stable and metastable ripple structures is monitored for equimolar DMPC/1,2-distearoyl- sn-glycero-3....... This is reflected in an increase in ripple spacing, followed by a sudden flattening of the lipid membrane during hydrolysis. Hydrolysis of the ripple phase results in anisotropic holes running parallel to the ripples, suggesting that the ripple phase has strip regions of higher sensitivity to enzymatic attack. Bulk...

  5. SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Cooper, G.W.; Howard, J.; Magelssen, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual laser fusion reactor for electric power, SOLASE, has been designed. The SOLASE design utilizes a 1 MJ, 6.7% efficient laser to implode 20 fusion targets per second. The target gain is 150 and produces a net electrical power of 1000 MW. The reactor cavity is spherical with a 6 m radius. The first wall is graphite and has a neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m 2 . It is protected from the target debris by low pressure xenon gas that is introduced into the cavity. The blanket structure is a honeycombed graphite composite. The tritium breeding and heat transport medium is Li 2 O in the form of pellets that flow through the blanket. The tritium breeding ration is 1.34. Temperature decoupling of the graphite structure and the Li 2 O coolant enables the structure to operate at temperatures that minimize radiation damage effects. The graphite blanket is replaced every year but exhibits low levels of radioactivity so that limited hands on maintenance is possible two weeks after shutdown, thus facilitating rapid replacement

  6. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν/ν˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (δν˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (δν˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  7. Time-resolved characterization of InAs/InGaAs quantum dot gain material for 1.3 µm lasers on gallium arsenide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiore, Andrea; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    The time-resolved optical characterization of InAs/InGaAs quantum dots emitting at 1.3 ìm is presented. A photoluminescence decay time of 1.8 ns and a fast rise time of 10ps are measured close to room temperature....

  8. Super-resolved linear fluorescence localization microscopy using photostable fluorophores: A virtual microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Udo; Szczurek, Aleksander; Cremer, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Current approaches to overcome the conventional limit of the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), often suffer from non-linear effects, which render the quantification of the image intensities in the reconstructions difficult, and also affect the quantification of the biological structure under investigation. As an attempt to face these difficulties, we discuss a particular method of localization microscopy which is based on photostable fluorescent dyes. The proposed method can potentially be implemented as a fast alternative for quantitative localization microscopy, circumventing the need for the acquisition of thousands of image frames and complex, highly dye-specific imaging buffers. Although the need for calibration remains in order to extract quantitative data (such as the number of emitters), multispectral approaches are largely facilitated due to the much less stringent requirements on imaging buffers. Furthermore, multispectral acquisitions can be readily obtained using commercial instrumentation such as e.g. the conventional confocal laser scanning microscope.

  9. Study of the mechanisms of matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuelli, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of some aspects of a complex mechanism: the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The author first proposes a comparative analysis of results obtained by time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry and by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. He reports the study of the matrix role (notably a polymeric matrix) as a matter submitted to laser desorption. In this respect, the influence of the incident wavelength has been studied. The author also reports a comparative of ions produced by matrix laser desorption (study performed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry) and of neutral molecules (study performed by flash pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and with mass spectrometry). Finally, results obtained on derivatives and complexes based on beta-cyclodextrins highlight benefits as well as limitations of this technique [fr

  10. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  11. Energy-resolved photoemission studies of Be-containing surfaces for fusion; Energievariierte Photoemissionsstudien an berylliumhaltigen Oberflaechen fuer die Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeppen, Martin

    2013-02-04

    . Oxygen diffusion is observed and attributed to diffusion of BeO. Further, the influence of a BeO-interlayer on the carbidisation in the system C-W is investigated. Already at RT small amounts of carbidised W are visible. At 1280 K further carbidisation of W is observed. No reaction between BeO and W is visible. Carbidisation of W shows, that BeO does not serve as a diffusion barrier for C, even at RT. Using energy-resolved XPS and the newly developed quantitative model allows detailed studies of multi-component surface reactions considering the evolution of the depth distribution.

  12. Formation of 238U16O and 238U18O observed by time-resolved emission spectroscopy subsequent to laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, David G.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.; Rose, Timothy P.; Koroglu, Batikan; Radousky, Harry B.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Isselhardt, Brett H.; Savina, Michael R.; Azer, Magdi; Finko, Mikhail S.; Curreli, Davide

    2017-07-01

    We have measured vibronic emission spectra of an oxide of uranium formed after laser ablation of the metal in gaseous oxygen. Specifically, we have measured the time-dependent relative intensity of a band located at approximately 593.6 nm in 16O2. This band grew in intensity relative to neighboring atomic features as a function time in an oxygen environment but was relatively invariant with time in argon. In addition, we have measured the spectral shift of this band in an 18O2 atmosphere. Based on this shift, and by comparison with earlier results obtained from free-jet expansion and laser excitation, we can confirm that the oxide in question is UO, consistent with recent reports based on laser ablation in 16O2 only.

  13. He-Ne laser effects on blood microcirculation. An in vivo study through laser doppler flowmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, Silvia Cristina

    2002-01-01

    Blood microcirculation performs an important function in tissue repair process, as well as in pain control, allowing for greater oxygenation of the tissues and the accelerated expulsion of metabolic products, that may be contributing to pain. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) is widely used to promote healing, and there is an assumption that it is mechanism of action may be due to an enhancement of blood supply. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), the stated effects caused by radiation emitted by a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8 nm) on blood microcirculation during tissue repair. To this end, 15 male mice were selected and received a liquid nitrogen provoked lesion, above the dorsal region, and blood flow was measured periodically, during 21 days. Due to radiation emission by the LDF equipment, a control group was established to evaluate possible effects caused by this radiation on microcirculation. To evaluate the He-Ne laser effects, a 1.15 J/cm 2 dose was utilized, with an intensity of 6 mW/cm 2 . The results obtained demonstrate flow alterations, provoked by the lesion, and subsequent inflammatory response. There was no statistical difference between the studied groups. As per the analysis of the results there is no immediate effect due the radiation emitted by a He Ne laser on microcirculation, although a percentage increase was observed in day 7 on medium blood flow rate in irradiated specimens. New studies are necessary to validate the use of this wavelength, in order to promote beneficial alterations in blood supply in radiated areas. (author)

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Quina, Frank H.; Moreira Junior, Paulo F.; Tcacenco, Celize M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation numbers (N Ag ) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40 deg C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles (γ = 0.11-0.15, where γ is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Y aq ] and [Y aq ] is the sodium counterion concentration free in the intermicellar aqueous phase) is found to be significantly lower than that of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles (γ ca. 0.25), a difference attributed to the larger headgroup size of SLES. The I 1 /I 3 vibronic intensity ratio and the rate constant for intramicellar quenching of pyrene show that the pyrene solubilization microenvironment and the intramicellar microviscosity are insensitive to micelle size or the presence of added salt. (author)

  15. Studies of the reactions of hydrogen atoms by time-resolved E. S. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, R W; Verma, N C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    Time-resolved e.s.r. spectroscopy has been used to follow directly the reactions of H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of acid solutions. Detailed analysis of the time profile of the e.s.r. signal was carried out by means of modified Bloch equations. The increased signal found when a scavenger for OH such as t-butyl alcohol is present is shown to be mainly the result of slower H atom decay by radical-radical reaction. The reaction H + OH does not appear to produce any signal polarization. The decay curves observed in the presence of solute are readily accounted for by the treatment, and good plots of pseudo first-order rate constant against solute concentration are obtained. The absolute rate constants for reaction with H atoms are for methanol 2.5 x10/sup 6/, for ethanol 2.1 X 10/sup 7/, for isopropanol 6.8 x 10/sup 7/, and for succinic acid 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/s/sup -1/. These values are in good agreement with the earlier chemical measurements.

  16. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H{sub 2}O and 102 ± 8 fs in D{sub 2}O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  17. Study of combustion properties of a solid propellant by highly time-resolved passive FTIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yan; Liu, Bingping; Wang, Junde [Laboratory of Advanced Spectroscopy, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210014 (China)

    2006-10-15

    With a time resolution of 0.125 s and a spectral resolution of 4 cm{sup -1}, emission spectra of the combustion process of a solid propellant were recorded by highly time-resolved passive FTIR. Some gaseous combustion products, such as H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and HCl, were distinguished by the characteristic emission band of each molecule. The equation for flame temperature calculation based on the diatomic molecule emission fine structure theory was improved through judicious utilization of the spectral running number 'm' which makes the temperature measurement simpler and faster. Some combustion information of the solid propellant had been given including the characteristic spectral profile, the distribution of the absolute spectral energy, the distribution of the combustion flame temperature, and the concentration distributions of HCl and NO versus burning time. The results will provide theoretical and experimental bases for improving the formula and raising combustion efficiency of solid propellant, and developing the design of rocket motor, infrared guidance and antiguidance systems. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Quina, Frank H., E-mail: quina@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Moreira Junior, Paulo F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tcacenco, Celize M. [Fundacao Instituto de Ensino para Osasco (FIEO/UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil). Centro Universitario FIEO. Centro de Estudos Quimicos

    2013-02-15

    Aggregation numbers (N{sub Ag}) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40 deg C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles ({gamma} = 0.11-0.15, where {gamma} is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Y{sub aq}] and [Y{sub aq}] is the sodium counterion concentration free in the intermicellar aqueous phase) is found to be significantly lower than that of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles ({gamma} ca. 0.25), a difference attributed to the larger headgroup size of SLES. The I{sub 1}/I{sub 3} vibronic intensity ratio and the rate constant for intramicellar quenching of pyrene show that the pyrene solubilization microenvironment and the intramicellar microviscosity are insensitive to micelle size or the presence of added salt. (author)

  19. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  20. Preliminary cutting and drilling studies using new generation lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, D.D.; Sze, J.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hargrove, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    High power and radiance dye lasers developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show promise for material processing tanks. Evaluation using welding heat flow models suggest significant increases in precision and speed are expected. We developed tooling and instrumentation to diagnose important parameters including spot geometry and optical train quality. We started processing studies to determine the viability of these lasers of cutting and drilling. We used titanium alloys first in the studies due to the availability of comparable parametric studies in the technical literature. Results show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye lasers. The high radiance beam produces low distortion and small heat-affected zones. We have accomplished very high aspect ratios and micron scale kerfs and holes. Through continued system improvement and process optimization, we believe that submicron levels will be achieved

  1. Prospective study on laser-assisted laparascopic partial nephrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Hennig, Georg; Zilinberg, Katja; Khoder, Wael Y.

    2012-02-01

    rinsing. Conclusion: This prospective in-vivo feasibility study shows that laser assisted partial nephrectomy seems to be a safe and promising medical technique which could be provided either during open surgery as well as laparascopically. This application showed good haemostasis and minimal parenchymal damage. Further investigations and development are needed for on-line detection of the remain coagulation margin. An optimised treatment equipment will support the applicability of laser assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

  2. Studies on mechanisms of the laser particle acceleration; Untersuchungen zu Mechanismen der Laser-Teilchenbeschleunigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurand, Bastian

    2012-06-20

    Within the last decade, many developments towards higher energies and particle numbers paved the way of particle acceleration performed by high intensity laser systems. Up to now, the process of a field-induced acceleration process (Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration (TNSA)) is investigated the most. Acceleration occurs as a consequence of separation of charges on a surface potential. Here, the broad energy spectrum is a problem not yet overcome although many improvements were achieved. Calculations for intensities higher than 10{sup 20..21} W/cm{sup 2} give hint that Radiation-Pressure-Acceleration (RPA) may lead to a sharper, monoenergetic energy spectrum. Within the framework of this thesis, the investigation of the acceleration mechanism is studied experimentally in the intensity range of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Suitable targets were developed and applied for patent. A broad range of parameters was scanned by means of high repetition rates together with an adequate laser system to provide high statistics of several thousands of shots, and the dependence of target material, intensity, laser polarisation and pre plasma-conditions was verified. Comparisons with 2-d numeric simulations lead to a model of the acceleration process which was analyzed by several diagnostic methods, giving clear evidence for a new, not field-induced acceleration process. In addition, a system for a continuous variation of the polarization based on reflective optics was developed in order to overcome the disadvantages of retardation plates, and their practicability of high laser energies can be achieved.

  3. Feasibility Study of Laser Cutting for Fabrication of Tensile Specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y. G.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, G. S.; Heo, G. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Ahn, S. B.; Chun, Y. B.

    2015-01-01

    The specimen fabrication technique was established to machine the specimen from the irradiated materials. The wire cut EDM(electric discharge machine) was modified to fabricate the mechanical testing specimens from irradiated components and fuel claddings. The oxide layer removal system was also developed because the oxide layer on the surface of the irradiated components and claddings interrupted the applying the electric current during the processing. However, zirconium oxide is protective against further corrosion as well as beneficial to mechanical strength for the tensile deformation of the cladding. Thus, it is important to fabricate the irradiated specimens without removal of oxide layer on the surface of the irradiated structural components and claddings. In the present study, laser cutting system was introduced to fabricate the various mechanical testing specimens from the unirradiated fuel cladding and the feasibility of the laser cutting system was studied for the fabrication of various types of irradiated specimens in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. Laser beam machining system was introduced to fabricate the various mechanical testing specimens from the unirradiated fuel cladding and the dimensions were compared for the feasibility of the laser cutting system. The effect of surface oxide layer was also investigated for machining process of the zircaloy-4 fuel cladding and it was found that laser beam machining could be a useful tool to fabricate the specimens with surface oxide layer

  4. Feasibility Study of Laser Cutting for Fabrication of Tensile Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y. G.; Baik, S. J.; Kim, G. S.; Heo, G. S.; Yoo, B. O.; Ahn, S. B.; Chun, Y. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The specimen fabrication technique was established to machine the specimen from the irradiated materials. The wire cut EDM(electric discharge machine) was modified to fabricate the mechanical testing specimens from irradiated components and fuel claddings. The oxide layer removal system was also developed because the oxide layer on the surface of the irradiated components and claddings interrupted the applying the electric current during the processing. However, zirconium oxide is protective against further corrosion as well as beneficial to mechanical strength for the tensile deformation of the cladding. Thus, it is important to fabricate the irradiated specimens without removal of oxide layer on the surface of the irradiated structural components and claddings. In the present study, laser cutting system was introduced to fabricate the various mechanical testing specimens from the unirradiated fuel cladding and the feasibility of the laser cutting system was studied for the fabrication of various types of irradiated specimens in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. Laser beam machining system was introduced to fabricate the various mechanical testing specimens from the unirradiated fuel cladding and the dimensions were compared for the feasibility of the laser cutting system. The effect of surface oxide layer was also investigated for machining process of the zircaloy-4 fuel cladding and it was found that laser beam machining could be a useful tool to fabricate the specimens with surface oxide layer.

  5. Laser Correction of Delayed Posthypoxic Encephalopathies (Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study whether posthypoxic brain dysfunctions may be corrected by low-intensity laser irradiation an hour after hypovolemic hypotension at late postresuscitation stages (following 30 days. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out on high-anxious male albino rats weighing 280—300 g. The study model was one-hour hypovolemic hypotension (blood pressure 40 mm Hg, followed by blood reinfusion. The integrative brain function was evaluated from the indices of the rat orientative-trying behavior in the elevated cross labyrinth test. The depressive component of the rats’ behavior was examined in the forced swimming test. Plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Laser irradiation was performed 30 days after blood reinfusion. Results. Laser irradiation used at late postresuscitation stages leads to the normalization of plasma norepinephrine levels, the reduction of anxiety in the rats, and their improved orientative-trying behavior. Conclusion. The positive impact of laser irradiation on the rat orientative-trying behavior is associated with its anxiolytic effect, in which the recovery of autonomic homeostasis plays a considerable role. Key words: blood loss, postresuscitative period, behavior, laser, posthypoxic encephalopathy, norepinephrine.

  6. Cutting and drilling studies using high power visible lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, D.D.; Dragon, E.P.; Werve, M.E.; Hargrove, R.S.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory such as copper-vapor and dye lasers show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant increases in welding, cutting, and drilling capabilities, as well as applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper lasers currently operate at 1.8 kW output at approximately three times the diffraction limit and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratios (> 60:1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. The paper gives a description of the equipment; discusses cutting theory; and gives experimental results of cutting and drilling studies on Ti-6Al-4V and 304 stainless steel

  7. Diagnostics of laser ablated plasma plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, S.; Toftmann, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The effect of an ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of laser ablated plasmas has been studied for two systems by exploiting different diagnostic techniques. First, the dynamics of a MgB2 laser produced plasma plume in an Ar atmosphere has been investigated by space-and time-resolved optical...... of the laser ablated plasma plume propagation in a background gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved....

  8. Nuclear fuel safety studies by laser pulse heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanadham, C.S.; Kumar, Santosh; Dey, G.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun; Jathar, V.P.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of nuclear fuels under transient heating conditions is vital to nuclear safety. A laser pulse based heating system to simulate the transient heating conditions experienced by the fuel during reactor accidents like LOCA and RIA is under development at BARC, Mumbai. Some of the concepts used in this system are under testing in pilot studies. This paper describes the results of some pilot studies carried out on unirradiated UO 2 specimens by laser pulse heating, followed by metallography and X-ray diffraction measurements. (author)

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission study and first-principles calculation of the electronic structure of LaSb2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acatrinei, Alice I; Browne, D; Losovyj, Y B; Young, D P; Moldovan, M; Chan, Julia Y; Sprunger, P T; Kurtz, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present valence band studies of LaSb 2 using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and compare these data with band structure calculations. Valence band spectra reveal that Sb 5p states are dominant near the Fermi level and are hybridized with the La 5d states just below. The calculations show a fair agreement with the experimentally determined valence band spectra, allowing an identification of the observed features. We measured some dispersion for kbar, especially for Sb 5p states; no significant dispersion was found for k || . (letter to the editor)

  10. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjærgaard, Christina

    2010-01-01

    electron concentration in the conduction band. In this study, TR-OSE and time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) were measured for the first time using quartz, K-feldspar and NaCl by stimulating the samples using pulsed blue LEDs at different temperatures between 50 and 250 °C after beta...... irradiation and preheating to 280 °C. The majority of TR-OSE signals from all the samples decayed much faster than TR-OSL signals irrespective of the stimulation temperatures. This suggests that the lifetime of OSL in these dosimeters arises mainly from the relaxation of an excited state of the recombination...

  11. Time-dependent first-principles study of angle-resolved secondary electron emission from atomic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    Angle-resolved secondary electron emission (ARSEE) spectra were analyzed for two-dimensional atomic sheets using a time-dependent first-principles simulation of electron scattering. We demonstrate that the calculated ARSEE spectra capture the unoccupied band structure of the atomic sheets. The excitation dynamics that lead to SEE have also been revealed by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham decomposition scheme. In the present study, the mechanism for the experimentally observed ARSEE from atomic sheets is elucidated with respect to both energetics and the dynamical aspects of SEE.

  12. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely related......In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...... to the welding speed, (2) the larger laser power leads to the bigger maximum allowable gap width and (3) the focal point position has very little influence on the maximum gap width....

  13. Study of multicharged ions in the laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegle, P.; Carillon, A.; Jamelot, G.; Wehenkel, C.; Sureau, A.; Guennou, H.

    1980-01-01

    With respect to hot plasmas, laser induced plasmas have an especially high density, with a steep partial gradient and a fast temporal variation of temperature and density. The study of multicharged ion radiation, wich is necessary to perform diagnostics of plasma parameters, opens a new field for atomic physics investigations, including identification of peculiar lines, which are not observed in other conditions, large changes in line profiles due to radiative transfer and to both shift and broadening by Stark effect. Departure from population equilibrium takes place in these plasmas, going possibly so far as population inversion between ionic levels in an energy range covering EUV and soft X-rays. Experimental and theoretical study of these phenomena are in progress and needs to find solutions for complicated problems. Here, recent works performed with the laser of the GRECO 'Interaction Laser-Matiere' are briefly presented [fr

  14. Two-dimensional time-resolved X-ray diffraction study of directional solidification in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The high intensity heat source used for fusion welding creates steep thermal gradients of 100 degree C/s from 1800 degree Celsius. Further, the influence of a preferred orientation is serious for observation of a directional solidification that follows the dendrite growth along the direction toward the moving heat source. Therefore, we observed the rapid solidification of weld metal at a time resolution of 0.01∼0.1seconds by the Two-Dimensional Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction (2DTRXRD) system for real welding. The diffraction ring was dynamically observed by 2DTRXRD during arc-passing over the irradiation area of X-ray with synchrotron energy of 18 KeV. The arc power output was 10 V - 150 A, and a scan speed of the arc was 1.0 mm/s. The temperature rise of instruments was suppressed by the water-cooled copper plate under the sample. Further, the temperature distribution of the weld metal was measured by the thermocouple and related to the diffraction patterns. Consequently, solidification and solid phase transformation of low carbon steels and stainless steels were observed during rapid cooling by 2DTRXRD. In the low-carbon steel, the microstructure is formed in the 2 step process; (i) formation of crystallites and (ii) increase of crystallinity. In the stainless steel, the irregular interface layer of σ/y in the quenched metal after solidification is expected that it is easy for dendrites to move at the lower temperature. In the carbide precipitation stainless steel, it is easy for NbC to grow on σ phase with a little under cooling. Further, a mist-like pattern, which differs from the halo-pattern, in the fusion zone gave some indication of the possibilities to observe the nucleation and the early solidification by 2DTRXRD. (author)

  15. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: a time-resolved EPR study - Part I. Alkyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved EPR was applied to detect short-lived alkyl radicals in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. Two problems were addressed: (i) the mechanism of radical formation and (ii) the mechanism of chemically-induced spin polarization in these radicals. (i) The ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation was found to be ≅ 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the proton transfer reaction involving excited radical cations must be a prevailing route of radical generation. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. (ii) The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals gain the emissive polarization in spur reactions. This initial polarization increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. We suggest that the origin of this polarization is the ST mechanism operating in the pairs of alkyl radicals and hydrogen atoms generated in dissociation of excited alkane molecules. It is also found that a long-chain structure of alkyl radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate (up to 30 times). That suggests prominent steric effects in recombination or the occurrence of through-chain electron exchange. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. (Author)

  16. Preliminary Study on J-Resolved NMR Method Usability for Toxic Kidney's Injury Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskocz, Marek; Marchewka, Zofia; Jeż, Magdalena; Passowicz-Muszyńska, Ewa; Długosz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques are tested for metabolomic urine profile in order to detect early damage of kidney. The purpose of this investigation was the initial assessment of two-dimensional J-resolved NMR urine spectra analysis usability for early kidney injuries detection. The amino acids (AA) and acids profile change after the exposure to nephrotoxic agent (the cisplatin infusion) was examined. The material was the urine of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, treated with cisplatin in Pulmonology and Lung Cancers Clinic in Wrocław. The urine of healthy volunteers was also examined. The identification of metabolites in urine was based on two-dimensional JRES signals in spectra, described in Human Metabolites Database (HMD). The molar concentration of metabolites was calculated from the volume under the signals. The analysis was focused on amino acids and organic acids (lactid acid and pyruvic acid) profiles. Any specific amino acids were identified after cisplatin infusion in comparison to the state before infusion. However, the differences in concentration were observed over 2-fold increase in valine, isoleucine and leucine, over 3-fold in alanine. Also, the concentration of pyruvic and lactic acids increased significantly (p≤0.05, p≤0.01). There were no specific amino acids identified in response to the infusion of cisplatin; however, some changes in the concentrations of amino acids and other small molecules were found. The analysis of two-dimensional JRES spectra showed an increase of alanine, leucine, isoleucine and valine concentration after the application of cisplatin. It seems that it is worth developing the JRES method based on special computer program.

  17. Studies of the confinement at laser-induced backside dry etching using infrared nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Han, B.; Zimmer, K.

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, laser-induced backside etching of SiO2 at an interface to an organic material using laser pulses with a wavelength of λ = 1064 nm and a pulse length of τ = 7 ns have been performed in order to investigate selected processes involved in etching of the SiO2 at confined ablation conditions with wavelengths well below the band gap of SiO2. Therefore, in between the utilized metallic absorber layer and the SiO2 surface, a polymer interlayer with a thickness between 20 nm to 150 nm was placed with the aim, to separate the laser absorption process in the metallic absorber layer from the etching process of the SiO2 surface due to the provided organic interlayer. The influence of the confinement of the backside etching process was analyzed by the deposition of different thick polymer layers on top of the metallic absorber layer. In particular, it was found that the SiO2 etching depth decreases with higher polymer interlayer thickness. However, the etching depth increases with increasing the confinement layer thickness. SEM images of the laser processed areas show that the absorber and confinement layers are ruptured from the sample surface without showing melting, and suggesting a lift off process of these films. The driving force for the layers lift off and the etching of the SiO2 is probably the generated laser-induce plasma from the confined ablation that provides the pressure for lift off, the high temperatures and reactive organic species that can chemically attack the SiO2 surface at these conditions.

  18. Laser study of phase changes in the surface layer of porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtatowicz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents some aspects of the use of interference patterns observed upon reflection of laser radiation from the surface of a porous solid (laser speckles) for the study of moisture condensation in the near-surface layer. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. The study on laser photochemical process of Diazonaphthoquinon-Cresol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jie; Huang Yu Li; Wang Wenke

    1999-01-01

    The kinetic process of laser photochemical reaction of diazonaphthoquinon-cresol system was studied by using laser spectrophotofluorimetry and laser induced fluorescence attenuation method. The nonlinear relationship between photodecomposition rate of the sensitizer and laser power, exposure time and concentration of solutions was discussed in detail

  20. Study of laser bending of a preloaded Titanium alloy sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser bending of sheet metals with preload offers some attractive characteristics/merits, comparing to laser free bending without prestressing on the metals. The study reported in this paper was focused on a Titanium alloy which finds widespread applications in aerospace manufacturing. FE simulation of laser bending with prestressing on the Titanium alloy sheet was conducted for the analysis of the bending process and experiment carried out to verify the model and the result. It was shown that the simulation result is close to that measured in the experiment. Based on the computed result, the load-displacement curve was analysed and transmission efficiency of the elastic energy defined to evaluate the bending effect. These enhanced understanding of the mechanism of laser bending with a preload. A method for the optimization on technological parameters was further proposed. Referring to the deformation targeted, the preload value was determined through the FE simulation. The result showed that, on the premise that the specimen surface can be prevented from damaging, transmission efficiency of the elastic energy could reach to the maximum value through adjusting technological parameters of the laser system and deformation accuracy of the specimen could also be improved through this approach. The work presented in this paper may find its application in the manufacture of Titanium alloy sheets with a more cost-effective and a more precise way.

  1. Studies on widely tunable ultra-short laser pulses using energy transfer distributed feedback dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamed, M.B.; Ramalingam, A.; Palanisamy, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and experimental study of the characteristics of Nd: YAG laser pumped energy transfer distributed feedback dye laser (ETDFDL). Using theoretical model proposed, the behavior of ETDFDL such as the characteristics of donor DFDL, the acceptor DFDL, the dependence of their pulse width and output power on donor-acceptor concentrations and pump power are studied for dye mixture Rhodamine 6G and Cresyl Violet in detail. Experimentally using prism-dye cell configuration, the ETDFDL output is obtained and the output energy of DFDL is measured at the emission peaks of donor and acceptor dyes for different pump powers and donor-acceptor concentrations. In addition, the DFDL linewidth measurement has been carried out at the lasing wavelengths of the donor and acceptor dyes using Fabry-Perot etalon and the tunability of DFDL is measured to be in the wavelength range of 545-680 nm

  2. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadag, Shiva

    economical, because the micromachining rates are much higher than in the case of the ultra-short pulsed lasers. Hence, studying the mechanisms of micromachining by nanosecond pulsed laser of semiconductor silicon, transparent dielectric glass and quartz is undertaken for this research work. Laser drilling of an array of miniaturized micro holes is termed as laser micro via. A study of the effect of laser wavelengths, frequency, and energy of the pulses on the depth and diameter of craters and micro via are carried out using high resolution optical microscopy and a nano via 3D profiler. Analytical equations correlating depth and volume of the crater in terms of the optical absorption coefficient and ratio of peak applied to the threshold fluence for ablation of the silicon are derived. The depth of crater is scaled in terms of optical penetration depth times the ratio of crater diameter to the beam diameter. The shorter UV wavelengths are found to be more suitable for ablation of Si and SiO2 than longer IR wavelengths from the study of the absorption coefficient of Si varying with wavelength. Hence, the UV lasers (266 nm or 355 nm) are used for micromachining of Si and SiO2 involving cutting, cleaning, drilling and dicing, micro-milling and texturing of submicron size vertically oriented silicon wires for photovoltaic applications. The high density vertical wires are useful to grab a greater density of solar energy to generate more environmentally-friendly green power. The laser drilling of micro via can be typically of two types: (1) percussion drilling using a stationary laser beam with single or multiple pulses of the laser or (2) trepanned drilling of micro via by the circular motion of laser. Numerical simulation of dynamic drilling of laser micro via of silicon is performed, using control volume (FV) Fluent code in a Cartesian co-ordinate system. Total enthalpy formulation is used to simulate the phase change taking place during the laser ablation process from melting

  3. Performance of a high repetition pulse rate laser system for in-gas-jet laser ionization studies with the Leuven laser ion source LISOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, R.; Sonnenschein, V.T.; Bastin, B.; Franchoo, S.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Kron, T.; Lecesne, N.; Moore, I.D.; Osmond, B.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rens, L.

    2012-01-01

    The laser ionization efficiency of the Leuven gas cell-based laser ion source was investigated under on- and off-line conditions using two distinctly different laser setups: a low-repetition rate dye laser system and a high-repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser system. A systematic study of the ion signal dependence on repetition rate and laser pulse energy was performed in off-line tests using stable cobalt and copper isotopes. These studies also included in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy measurements on the hyperfine structure of 63 Cu. A final run under on-line conditions in which the radioactive isotope 59 Cu (T 1/2 = 81.5 s) was produced, showed a comparable yield of the two laser systems for in-gas-cell ionization. However, a significantly improved time overlap by using the high-repetition rate laser system for in-gas-jet ionization was demonstrated by an increase of the overall duty cycle, and at the same time, pointed to the need for a better shaped atomic jet to reach higher ionization efficiencies.

  4. Study and realisation of a femtosecond dye laser operating at different wavelengths. Ultrashort pulses compression and amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    We present the study and the realization of a passively mode-locked dye laser producing pulses shorter than 100 femto-seconds (10 -13 s). In a ring cavity with an amplifier medium (Rhodamine 60) and a saturable absorber (DODCI), a sequence of four prisms controls the group velocity dispersion and allows the generation of very short pulses. Then we have studied the production of femtosecond pulses at other wavelengths directly from the femtosecond dye laser. For the first rime, 60 fs pulses at 685 nm and pulses shorter than 50 fs between 775 nm and 800 nm have been produced by passive mode locking. These near infrared pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics in semiconductors multiple quantum wells GaAs/GaAlAs. We have observed a singular behavior of the laser operating at 685 nm and analyzed the produced pulses in terms of optical solitons. To perform time resolved spectroscopy with shortest pulses, we have studied a pulse compressor and a multipass amplifier to increase the pulses energy. Pulses of 20 fs and 10 micro-joules (peak power: 0.5 GW) have been obtained at low repetition rate (10 Hz) and pulses of 16 fs and 0.6 micro-joules pulses have been generated at high repetition rate (11 kHz) using a copper vapor laser. These pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics of an organic dye (the Malachite Green). (author) [fr

  5. In vitro studies with a pulsed neodymium/YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, S; Guthrie, S; Foulds, W S; Lee, W R; Cruickshank, F R; Bailey, R T

    1985-02-01

    The relationships between the destructive effects of Q-switched Nd/YAG laser pulses and a number of experimental parameters were studied for various target materials including in particular excised, fixed samples of human trabecular meshwork. The laser parameters altered were the pulse energy, the convergence angle of the focused beam, and the position of the focus of the beam relative to the target's axial position. The main finding was that it was possible to make deep holes, of a diameter less than 100 micron, in virtually transparent samples of trabecular meshwork with a laser delivery system of 6 degrees convergence and pulse energies of 14 mJ or more. The relevance of this and the other experimental results to the development of a reliable system for performing internal trabeculotomies for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma is presented.

  6. Parametric study on femtosecond laser pulse ablation of Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xiaochang; Wang Chingyue; Yang Li; Li Jianping; Chai Lu; Jia Wei; Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Ablation process of 1 kHz rate femtosecond lasers (pulse duration 148 fs, wavelength 775 nm) with Au films on silica substrates has been systemically studied. The single-pulse threshold can be obtained directly. For the multiple pulses the ablation threshold varies with the number of pulses applied to the surface due to the incubation effect. From the plot of accumulated laser fluence N x φ th (N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film can be obtained (s = 0.765). As the pulse energy is increased, the single pulse ablation rate is increasing following two ablation logarithmic regimes, which can be explained by previous research

  7. Bibliographic study of photophysical and photochemical properties of laser dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doizi, D.

    1986-06-01

    Laser isotope separation of uranium requires high power and precise wave length. This report is a bibliographic and experimental study of the photophysical and photochemical properties of seven commercial laser dyes which have an emission wavelength in the range 5500-6500 A: Rhodamine 110 or 560, rhodamine 6G or 590, rhodamine B or 610, rhodamine 101 or 640, sulforhodamine B or kiton red 620, sulforhodamine 101 or 640 and DCM or LC 6500. Absorption and emission cross section values, fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields in various solvents are indicated. For each dye, a non exhaustive list of laboratory experiments made with two types of pump sources: Nd YAG (532) and copper vapor laser is given. When it is known, the toxicity of the dyes is mentioned [fr

  8. Laser fusion systems design study. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This study investigated: (1) the formulation and evaluation of an alignment system to accomplish pointing, focusing, centering and translation for the 20-arm SHIVA laser, (2) the formulation and evaluation of concepts for the correction of static phase distortions introduced by the accumulated optical elements in the laser chains, (3) the formulation and evaluation of concepts for the correction of optical path length differences between the arms of the SHIVA system, and (4) the conceptual design of appropriate control system hardware. (U.S.)

  9. Spectrally resolved measurement of the ion feature in the scattered spectrum of a hydrogen plasma obtained with a periodically pulsed Nd3+: YAG-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasparek, W.

    Ion temperature and density in a magnetically stabilized hydrogen arc were determined with laser scattering from collective electron density fluctuations. A 90 0 -scattering experiment was set up using a periodically pulsed Nd 3+ : YAG-laser, an IR-photomultiplier and synchronous signal detection. A spectral resolution of 0.3 Angstroem was achieved by narrowing the laser line width and by using a Fabry-Perot-interferometer in combination with a monochromator as spectrometer. The data obtained from the scattered spectra (Tsub(i) = 1,1 ... 1,8 eV, nsub(e) = 2 ... 6 x 10 21 m -3 ) agree well with those obtained by other methods. The achieved high resolution also allowed to measure separately the ion features of two ion species with different mass, which are spectrally distinguished from each other. The results confirm the theoretical model of Evans. Demixing effects in a H 2 /A mixture as well as a temperature difference between the ion sorts are deduced. (orig.) 891 HT/orig. 892 HIS

  10. Parametric study of a target factory for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the derivation of production rate equations has provided the basis for a parametric study. Rate equations describing the production of laser fusion targets have been developed for the purpose of identifying key parameters, attractive production techniques and cost scaling relationships for a commercial target factory

  11. TEM studies of P+ implanted and subsequently laser annealed Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.; Wilson, M.C.; Booker, G.R.; Washburn, J.

    1979-05-01

    The present investigation is concerned with laser annealing of P + implanted Si. The aim of the work was to study the crystallization behavior of damage structure occurring due to high dose rate implantation using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the method of examination

  12. Study of shock coalescence in laser-irradiated targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, S.E.; Willi, O.; Afshar-Rad, T.; Rose, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the first direct experimental observation of the coalescence of two shocks induced by a shaped laser pulse. Optical streak photography of the rear surface of aluminum multiple step targets was used to study the breakout of these shocks and observe their behavior. The experimental results are compared with simulations by a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code

  13. Recent studies of laser science in paintings conservation and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouli, Paraskevi; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Fotakis, Costas

    2010-06-15

    The removal of aged and deteriorated molecular overlayers from the surface of paintings is a delicate and critical intervention in Cultural Heritage (CH) conservation. This irreversible action gets particularly complicated given the multitude of materials that may be present within a painted work of art (often in ultrathin layers or traces), as well as the exceptional sensitivity of the original surfaces to environmental conditions such as heat, light, and so on. Lasers hold an important role among the available cleaning methodologies, as they enable high control and accuracy, material selectivity, and immediate feedback. Still, prior to their implementation, it is imperative to optimize the cleaning parameters, so to ensure that any potential implications to the remaining materials are minimal and well understood. Toward this aim, research at IESL-FORTH is focused on both refining and continuously updating the laser-cleaning protocols (by introducing novel laser technologies into the field, i.e., ultrashort laser pulses), as well as on investigating and studying the nature and extent of laser-induced physicochemical alterations to the involved materials. In this Account, extended work for the understanding of ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation of polymers is presented. Emphasis is placed on the use of model systems (polymers doped with chromophores of known photochemistry) to examine the in-depth laser-induced modifications at the processed surfaces and thus to illustrate the dependence of their nature and extent on laser parameters and material properties. Furthermore, studies for the potential use of femtosecond UV pulses to overcome certain limitations involved with the nanosecond ablation of molecular overlayers from CH surfaces are highlighted. In particular, it is demonstrated that in the femtosecond regime any chemical modifications are, qualitatively and quantitatively, highly defined, limited and nearly independent of the material properties, such as the

  14. Study of the Bulk Charge Carrier Dynamics in Anatase and Rutile TiO2 Single Crystals by Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Maity, Partha; Mohammed, Omar F.; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Idriss, Hicham

    2018-01-01

    as the best model for fundamental studies. Their ultrafast charge carrier dynamics especially on TiO2 anatase single crystal (the most active phase) are unresolved. Here femtosecond time resolved spectroscopy (TRS) was carried out to explore the dynamics

  15. Studies of Positron Generation from Ultraintense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerald Jackson

    Laser-produced pair jets possess unique characteristics that offer great potential for their use in laboratory-astrophysics experiments to study energetic phenomenon such as relativistic shock accelerations. High-flux, high-energy positron sources may also be used to study relativistic pair plasmas and useful as novel diagnostic tools for high energy density conditions. Copious amounts of positrons are produced with MeV energies from directly irradiating targets with ultraintense lasers where relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser field, drive positron-electron pair production. Alternatively, laser wakefield accelerated electrons can produce pairs by the same mechanisms inside a secondary converter target. This dissertation describes a series of novel experiments that investigate the characteristics and scaling of pair production from ultraintense lasers, which are designed to establish a robust platform for laboratory-based relativistic pair plasmas. Results include a simple power-law scaling to estimate the effective positron yield for elemental targets for any Maxwellian electron source, typical of direct laser-target interactions. To facilitate these measurements, a solenoid electromagnetic coil was constructed to focus emitted particles, increasing the effective collection angle of the detector and enabling the investigation of pair production from thin targets and low-Z materials. Laser wakefield electron sources were also explored as a compact, high repetition rate platform for the production of high energy pairs with potential applications to the creation of charge-neutral relativistic pair plasmas. Plasma accelerators can produce low-divergence electron beams with energies approaching a GeV at Hz frequencies. It was found that, even for high-energy positrons, energy loss and scattering mechanisms in the target create a fundamental limit to the divergence and energy spectrum of the emitted positrons. The potential future application of laser

  16. Study of the laser-induced forward transfer of liquids for laser bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing patterns of diverse materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. In conventional LIFT a small fraction of a solid thin film is vaporized by means of a laser pulse focused on the film through its transparent holder, and the resulting material recondenses on the receptor substrate. It has been recently shown that LIFT can also be used to transfer materials from liquid films. This widened its field of application to biosensors manufacturing, where small amounts of biomolecules-containing solutions have to be deposited with high precision on the sensing elements. However, there is still little knowledge on the physical processes and parameters determining the characteristics of the transfers. In this work, different parameters and their effects upon the transferred material were studied. It was found that the deposited material corresponds to liquid droplets which volume depends linearly on the laser pulse energy, and that a minimum threshold energy has to be overcome for transfer to occur. The liquid film thickness was varied and droplets as small as 10 μm in diameter were obtained. Finally, the effects of the variation of the film to substrate distance were also studied and it was found that there exists a wide range of distances where the morphology of the transferred droplets is independent of this parameter, what provides LIFT with a high degree of flexibility.

  17. Nd:YAG laser in caries prevention: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boari, Heloisa Gomes Dimiranda

    2000-01-01

    The caries prevention by using laser irradiation has been investigated during the last 30 years. The Nd: YAG laser associated with acidulated phosphate fluoride has been shown as a very promising technique for enamel caries prevention. The aim of this work was to clinically evaluate the efficiency of Nd: YAG laser associated with acidulated phosphate fluoride in pit and fissure caries prevention of children and adolescents. In this work it was determined the dye that enhance the effect of Nd: YAG laser in enamel. It was selected 242 pre-molar and molar teeth from 33 children and adolescents, aged from 7 to 15 years old. The selected teeth were free from caries or decalcification marks (active white marks) to the clinical and radiographic exams. The teeth were divided into two groups: the first group was laser irradiated and their homologous remained as a control. The right side teeth were dye-assisted Nd:YAG laser irradiated. The dye solution was a moisture of dust coal and equal parts of water and alcohol. The irradiation conditions were 60 mJ/10 Hz, optical fiber in contact mode, with diameter of 300 μm, resulting in an energy density of 84,9 J/cm 2 . The oclusal surface of the teeth was completely irradiated, specially on the slopes and in the deepest part of the pits and fissures. This procedure was repeated three times. In the sequence it was applied the acidulated phosphate fluoride for 4 minutes. On the left side teeth - control group- only acidulated phosphate fluoride was applied for the same time. The final examination considered the presence of caries and active white marks after a period of one year. There were statistical significant differences (p < 0.01) between the lased + fluoride group and the non irradiated group. The present study concluded that the technique used in this work can be an alternative clinical method for caries prevention. (author)

  18. Experimental study and numerical simulation of the propulsion of microbeads by femtosecond laser filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Nan; Liu Weiwei; Xu Zhijun; Wang Mingwei; Zhu Xiaonong

    2008-01-01

    The light filament formed by intense femtosecond laser pulses in air can be used to generate the effective impulse to propel a micro glass bead. In this report, through both experimental studies and the corresponding numerical simulations that involve the dynamics of the nonlinear propagation of light and the laser ablation mechanism, we confirm that this propulsion scheme is based on the laser ablation of the target material. The fundamental characteristics of laser propulsion using a single ultrafast laser filament is also revealed

  19. Dispersion of sulphur in the northern hemisphere. A study with a 3-dimensional time-resolved model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrason, L

    1996-12-31

    This thesis on atmospheric dispersion of sulphur presents a calculation of intercontinental transport of oxidized sulphur and allocates different contributions to sulphur background levels over Europe. It is found that a significant fraction of anthropogenic sulphur (AS) is transported out of continental boundaries thus affecting the background levels over major parts of the northern hemisphere. Over Europe, the contribution of AS from North America is similar in amount to that of Asian AS and natural sources from the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the yearly contribution of intercontinental transport to deposition of sulphur over Europe is quite small, it can be much more important over certain areas and seasons and is comparable to the contributions from individual European countries. The calculations are based on a three-dimensional Eulerian time-resolved model that describes sulphur dispersion in the atmosphere in connection with large-scale synoptic flows and agree well with observations. The thesis emphasizes the role of synoptic scale atmospheric motions in determining intercontinental transport of sulphur. It indicates the need to resolve individual cyclones and anticyclones in order to describe the dispersion and distribution of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere and stresses the value of comparing model calculations with observations, both in atmospheric chemistry studies and in climate applications. 260 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjaergaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Lapp, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A time-resolved optically stimulated exo-electron (TR-OSE) measurement system has been developed using a Photon Timer attached to a gas-flow semi-proportional pancake electron detector within a Risoe TL/OSL reader. The decay rate of the exo-electron emission after the stimulation pulse depends on the probability of (1) escape of electrons into the detector gas from the conduction band by overcoming the work function of the material and (2) thermalization of electrons in the conduction band, and subsequent re-trapping/recombination. Thus, we expect the exo-electron signal to reflect the instantaneous electron concentration in the conduction band. In this study, TR-OSE and time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) were measured for the first time using quartz, K-feldspar and NaCl by stimulating the samples using pulsed blue LEDs at different temperatures between 50 and 250 0 C after beta irradiation and preheating to 280 0 C. The majority of TR-OSE signals from all the samples decayed much faster than TR-OSL signals irrespective of the stimulation temperatures. This suggests that the lifetime of OSL in these dosimeters arises mainly from the relaxation of an excited state of the recombination centre, rather than from residence time of an electron in the conduction band.

  1. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdSe/CdMnS/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Delikanli, S.; Demir, H. V.; Scrace, T.; Zhang, P.; Norden, T.; Petrou, A.; Thomay, T.; Cartwright, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    We used photoluminescence spectroscopy to resolve two emission features in CdSe/CdMnS/CdS and CdSe/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelet heterostructures. The photoluminescence from the magnetic sample has a positive circular polarization with a maximum centered at the position of the lower energy feature. The higher energy feature has a corresponding signature in the absorption spectrum; this is not the case for the low-energy feature. We have also studied the temporal evolution of these features using a pulsed-excitation/time-resolved photoluminescence technique to investigate their corresponding recombination channels. A model was used to analyze the temporal dynamics of the photoluminescence which yielded two distinct timescales associated with these recombination channels. The above results indicate that the low-energy feature is associated with recombination of electrons with holes localized at the core/shell interfaces; the high-energy feature, on the other hand, is excitonic in nature with the holes confined within the CdSe cores.

  2. Dispersion of sulphur in the northern hemisphere. A study with a 3-dimensional time-resolved model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrason, L.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis on atmospheric dispersion of sulphur presents a calculation of intercontinental transport of oxidized sulphur and allocates different contributions to sulphur background levels over Europe. It is found that a significant fraction of anthropogenic sulphur (AS) is transported out of continental boundaries thus affecting the background levels over major parts of the northern hemisphere. Over Europe, the contribution of AS from North America is similar in amount to that of Asian AS and natural sources from the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the yearly contribution of intercontinental transport to deposition of sulphur over Europe is quite small, it can be much more important over certain areas and seasons and is comparable to the contributions from individual European countries. The calculations are based on a three-dimensional Eulerian time-resolved model that describes sulphur dispersion in the atmosphere in connection with large-scale synoptic flows and agree well with observations. The thesis emphasizes the role of synoptic scale atmospheric motions in determining intercontinental transport of sulphur. It indicates the need to resolve individual cyclones and anticyclones in order to describe the dispersion and distribution of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere and stresses the value of comparing model calculations with observations, both in atmospheric chemistry studies and in climate applications. 260 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  3. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdSe/CdMnS/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Department of Physics, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Delikanli, S.; Demir, H. V., E-mail: volkan@bilkent.edu.tr [LUMINOUS Center of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Materials Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Department of Physics, UNAM−Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Scrace, T.; Zhang, P.; Norden, T.; Petrou, A., E-mail: petrou@buffalo.edu [Department of Physics, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Thomay, T.; Cartwright, A. N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    We used photoluminescence spectroscopy to resolve two emission features in CdSe/CdMnS/CdS and CdSe/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelet heterostructures. The photoluminescence from the magnetic sample has a positive circular polarization with a maximum centered at the position of the lower energy feature. The higher energy feature has a corresponding signature in the absorption spectrum; this is not the case for the low-energy feature. We have also studied the temporal evolution of these features using a pulsed-excitation/time-resolved photoluminescence technique to investigate their corresponding recombination channels. A model was used to analyze the temporal dynamics of the photoluminescence which yielded two distinct timescales associated with these recombination channels. The above results indicate that the low-energy feature is associated with recombination of electrons with holes localized at the core/shell interfaces; the high-energy feature, on the other hand, is excitonic in nature with the holes confined within the CdSe cores.

  4. A time-resolved study on the photodynamic primary process of ADE. Pt.2: Photochemistry in biomolecular complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jingxi; Lin Weizhen; Han Zhenhui; Miao Jinling; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun; Zhu Dayuan

    2003-01-01

    By use of laser flash photolysis and steady state absorption techniques, a systematic study was carried out on the interaction of ADE, which is a kind of model compound of actinomycin D, with DNA and BSA. Non-covalent binding was found between ADE and ssDNA, dsDNA and BSA, and photoinduced electron transfer reaction was observed. These results indicate that actinomycins might be used as type I photodrugs in the future and will be helpful for structure modification of this kind of compound

  5. Basic studies on laser-assisted phacoemulsification using diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, Florian; Wurm, Holger; Stock, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of a novel diode-pumped Er:YAG laser for phacoemulsification in basic experimental investigations. An appropriate experimental setup was created, including a translation stage for sample movement, a sample holder, a water spray for sample humidification and a surgical microscope with a CCD camera for video documentation. The analysis of the laser cuts and histological sections was done by light microscopy. As samples porcine eye lenses hardened by formalin were used. In ablation experiments with different spot diameters and radiant powers and a constant repetition rate νr = 200 Hz the maximum ablation depths of (4.346 +/- 0.044) mm have reached at (Ø = 480 μm, Φ = 24.15 W) with a maximum extend of thermal damage of (0.165 +/- 0.030) mm. The average ablation efficiency is 0.241 mm3/J. With a spot diameter of 308 μm the maximum ablation depth is (4.238 +/- 0.040) mm at 24.65 W with a mean ablation efficiency of 0.293 mm3/J. The extend of the thermally damaged region is (0.171 +/- 0.024) mm at this laser power. Using a sapphire cylinder with a diameter of 412 μm (length 38.5 mm) in direct tissue contact with water spray for sample humidification the ablation depth reaches (1.017 +/- 0.074) mm at 4.93 W and (1.840 +/- 0.092) mm at 9.87 W with a mean efficiency of 0.261 mm3/J. A thermal damage zone of (0.064 +/-0.024) mm at 9.87 W was measured. Additionally, at this high power, a progressive contamination and destruction of the cylinder end facet was observed. In conclusion, the investigations show that the diode-pumped Er:YAG laser has considerable potential for cataract surgery.

  6. Comparison of two picosecond lasers to a nanosecond laser for treating tattoos: a prospective randomized study on 49 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorgeou, A; Perrillat, Y; Gral, N; Lagrange, S; Lacour, J-P; Passeron, T

    2018-02-01

    Q-switched nanosecond lasers demonstrated their efficacy in treating most types of tattoos, but complete disappearance is not always achieved even after performing numerous laser sessions. Picosecond lasers are supposed to be more efficient in clearing tattoos than nanosecond lasers, but prospective comparative data remain limited. To compare on different types of tattoos the efficacy of a nanosecond laser with two types of picosecond lasers. We conducted a prospective randomized study performed from December 2014 to June 2016 on adult patients with all types of tattoos. The tattoos were divided into two halves of equal size. After randomization, half of the tattoo was treated with a picosecond laser and the other half with a nanosecond laser. The evaluation was performed on standardized pictures performed before treatment and 2 months after the last session, by two physicians, not involved in the treatment, blinded on the type of treatments received. The main end point was a clearance above 75% of the tattoos. A total of 49 patients were included. Professional tattoos represented 85.7%, permanent make-up 8.2% and non-professional tattoo 6.1%. The majority were black or blue and 10.2% were polychromatic. No patient was lost during follow-up. A reduction of 75% or more of the colour intensity was obtained for 33% of the tattoos treated with the picosecond lasers compared to 14% with the nanosecond laser (P = 0.008). An improvement superior to 75% was obtained in 34% monochromic black or blue tattoos with the picosecond lasers compared to 9% for the nanosecond laser. Only one of the five polychromic tattoos achieved more than 75% of improvement with the two types of laser. Our results show a statistically significant superiority of the picosecond lasers compared to the nanosecond laser for tattoo clearance. However, they do not show better efficacy for polychromic tattoos and the difference in terms of side-effects was also minimal with a tendency of picosecond

  7. Study of the physical mechanisms involved in the femtosecond laser optical breakdown of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouskeftaras, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out detailed time resolved experimental studies of the mechanism of electron excitation-relaxation, when an ultrashort (60 fs -1 ps) laser (UV and IR) pulse interacts with a wide band gap dielectric material. The studies cover a range of different dielectric materials and the investigated regimes span from nondestructive ionization of the material at the low power end (∼TW/cm 2 ) to ablative domain at a higher laser power (∼10 TW/cm 2 ). This gives fundamental insight into the understanding of the laser damaging process taking place under our irradiation conditions. The usage of time-resolved spectral interferometry technique allows to directly measure the electron density of the irradiated material under different excitation conditions and hence leads to quantification of the process. The measurements, carried out at the optical breakdown threshold utilizing different pulse durations, raise questions regarding the usage of critical excitation density as a universal ablation criterion. A new criterion related to the exchanged energy is proposed. Additionally, the use of an experimental setup implementing a double pump pulse allows the identification of different excitation mechanisms taking place at time scales of the order of the pulse duration used. Electronic avalanche is observed in some materials (SiO 2 , NaCl) while this is not the case for others (Al 2 O 3 , MgO). These differences are discussed in detail. Next, we measure the energy spectrum of excited electrons with a complementary technique: the photoemission spectroscopy. These results allow us on one hand to show a crossed effect between the two 'pump' pulses and on the other hand to measure electron relaxation characteristic times, as a function of their kinetic energy. Finally, a morphological study of craters resulting from ablation in the case of a single pulse has been carried out for different irradiation parameters: number of shots, energy and pulse duration. This work has

  8. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3–TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alnama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma plume of Al2O3–TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  9. Studies on mechanisms of the laser particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurand, Bastian

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, many developments towards higher energies and particle numbers paved the way of particle acceleration performed by high intensity laser systems. Up to now, the process of a field-induced acceleration process (Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration (TNSA)) is investigated the most. Acceleration occurs as a consequence of separation of charges on a surface potential. Here, the broad energy spectrum is a problem not yet overcome although many improvements were achieved. Calculations for intensities higher than 10 20..21 W/cm 2 give hint that Radiation-Pressure-Acceleration (RPA) may lead to a sharper, monoenergetic energy spectrum. Within the framework of this thesis, the investigation of the acceleration mechanism is studied experimentally in the intensity range of 10 19 W/cm 2 . Suitable targets were developed and applied for patent. A broad range of parameters was scanned by means of high repetition rates together with an adequate laser system to provide high statistics of several thousands of shots, and the dependence of target material, intensity, laser polarisation and pre plasma-conditions was verified. Comparisons with 2-d numeric simulations lead to a model of the acceleration process which was analyzed by several diagnostic methods, giving clear evidence for a new, not field-induced acceleration process. In addition, a system for a continuous variation of the polarization based on reflective optics was developed in order to overcome the disadvantages of retardation plates, and their practicability of high laser energies can be achieved.

  10. Can RNA-Seq resolve the rapid radiation of advanced moths and butterflies (Hexapoda: Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia)? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Adam L; Cummings, Michael P; Mitter, Kim T; Mitter, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    Recent molecular phylogenetic studies of the insect order Lepidoptera have robustly resolved family-level divergences within most superfamilies, and most divergences among the relatively species-poor early-arising superfamilies. In sharp contrast, relationships among the superfamilies of more advanced moths and butterflies that comprise the mega-diverse clade Apoditrysia (ca. 145,000 spp.) remain mostly poorly supported. This uncertainty, in turn, limits our ability to discern the origins, ages and evolutionary consequences of traits hypothesized to promote the spectacular diversification of Apoditrysia. Low support along the apoditrysian "backbone" probably reflects rapid diversification. If so, it may be feasible to strengthen resolution by radically increasing the gene sample, but case studies have been few. We explored the potential of next-generation sequencing to conclusively resolve apoditrysian relationships. We used transcriptome RNA-Seq to generate 1579 putatively orthologous gene sequences across a broad sample of 40 apoditrysians plus four outgroups, to which we added two taxa from previously published data. Phylogenetic analysis of a 46-taxon, 741-gene matrix, resulting from a strict filter that eliminated ortholog groups containing any apparent paralogs, yielded dramatic overall increase in bootstrap support for deeper nodes within Apoditrysia as compared to results from previous and concurrent 19-gene analyses. High support was restricted mainly to the huge subclade Obtectomera broadly defined, in which 11 of 12 nodes subtending multiple superfamilies had bootstrap support of 100%. The strongly supported nodes showed little conflict with groupings from previous studies, and were little affected by changes in taxon sampling, suggesting that they reflect true signal rather than artifacts of massive gene sampling. In contrast, strong support was seen at only 2 of 11 deeper nodes among the "lower", non-obtectomeran apoditrysians. These represent a much

  11. Can RNA-Seq resolve the rapid radiation of advanced moths and butterflies (Hexapoda: Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia? An exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Bazinet

    Full Text Available Recent molecular phylogenetic studies of the insect order Lepidoptera have robustly resolved family-level divergences within most superfamilies, and most divergences among the relatively species-poor early-arising superfamilies. In sharp contrast, relationships among the superfamilies of more advanced moths and butterflies that comprise the mega-diverse clade Apoditrysia (ca. 145,000 spp. remain mostly poorly supported. This uncertainty, in turn, limits our ability to discern the origins, ages and evolutionary consequences of traits hypothesized to promote the spectacular diversification of Apoditrysia. Low support along the apoditrysian "backbone" probably reflects rapid diversification. If so, it may be feasible to strengthen resolution by radically increasing the gene sample, but case studies have been few. We explored the potential of next-generation sequencing to conclusively resolve apoditrysian relationships. We used transcriptome RNA-Seq to generate 1579 putatively orthologous gene sequences across a broad sample of 40 apoditrysians plus four outgroups, to which we added two taxa from previously published data. Phylogenetic analysis of a 46-taxon, 741-gene matrix, resulting from a strict filter that eliminated ortholog groups containing any apparent paralogs, yielded dramatic overall increase in bootstrap support for deeper nodes within Apoditrysia as compared to results from previous and concurrent 19-gene analyses. High support was restricted mainly to the huge subclade Obtectomera broadly defined, in which 11 of 12 nodes subtending multiple superfamilies had bootstrap support of 100%. The strongly supported nodes showed little conflict with groupings from previous studies, and were little affected by changes in taxon sampling, suggesting that they reflect true signal rather than artifacts of massive gene sampling. In contrast, strong support was seen at only 2 of 11 deeper nodes among the "lower", non-obtectomeran apoditrysians. These

  12. The electronic structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Bi2Se3: an angle-resolved photoemission study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Marco; Hatch, Richard; Guan, Dandan

    2012-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is used for a detailed study of the electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Nominally stoichiometric and calcium-doped samples were investigated. The pristine surface shows the topological surface state in the bulk band gap. As time passes....... For a sufficiently strong band bending, additional states appear at the Fermi level. These are interpreted as quantized conduction band states. For large band bendings, these states are found to undergo a strong Rashba splitting. The formation of quantum well states is also observed for the valence band states......, the Dirac point moves to higher binding energies, indicating an increasingly strong downward bending of the bands near the surface. This time-dependent band bending is related to a contamination of the surface and can be accelerated by intentionally exposing the surface to carbon monoxide and other species...

  13. An energy resolved electron-ion coincidence study near the S 2p thresholds of the SF6 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivimaeki, A; Ruiz, J Alvarez; Erman, P; Hatherly, P; Garcia, E Melero; Rachlew, E; Rius i Riu, J; Stankiewicz, M

    2003-01-01

    The fragmentation dynamics of the SF 6 molecule following the excitations of S 2p electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals has been studied using the energy-resolved electron-ion coincidence technique. Fragmentation patterns were found to depend on the particular excitation and on the electronic state of the molecular ion. The spectator resonant Auger decay at the 2p → 6a 1g resonance induces changes in the ion distributions as compared to direct photoionization. Furthermore, coincidence spectra related to the same Auger structure display different ion abundances at the 2t 2g and 4e g shape resonances. Differences were also found in the Auger decay spectra. These findings give further support for the previously suggested many-electron character of the 4e g shape resonance

  14. ESR spectrometer with a loop-gap resonator for cw and time resolved studies in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ferenc; Murányi, Ferenc

    2005-04-01

    The design and performance of an electron spin resonance spectrometer operating at 3 and 9 GHz microwave frequencies combined with a 9-T superconducting magnet are described. The probehead contains a compact two-loop, one gap resonator, and is inside the variable temperature insert of the magnet enabling measurements in the 0-9T magnetic field and 1.5-400 K temperature range. The spectrometer allows studies on systems where resonance occurs at fields far above the g approximately 2 paramagnetic condition such as in antiferromagnets. The low quality factor of the resonator allows time resolved experiments such as, e.g., longitudinally detected ESR. We demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer on the NaNiO2 antiferromagnet, the MgB2 superconductor, and the RbC60 conducting alkaline fulleride polymer.

  15. Study of the photoexcited carrier dynamics in InP:Fe using time-resolved reflection and photoluminescence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shihua; Li Xi; Lu Fang

    2004-01-01

    The photoexcited carrier dynamics and photoluminescence of the undoped InP and Fe implanted InP was studied by time-resolved reflection and photoluminescence spectra. The decay times of reflection recovery and the radiative recombination for Fe implanted InP are shorter than those of undoped InP. Considering the surface recombination, a model was developed to simulate the reflection recovery dynamics, it agrees with the experimental results very well. Moreover, we obtained the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and the surface recombination velocity by using the model. For Fe-doped InP, the surface recombination velocity is much larger than that for the undoped InP, which is probably due to Fe 2+/3+ trapping centers and the large surface band bending. The PL decay time for Fe implanted InP is shorter than that for undoped InP, which is ascribed to the capture centers introduced by metallic precipitates

  16. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  17. Spectrally resolved hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light emitting diodes: Magneto-electroluminescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooker, S. A.; Kelley, M. R.; Martinez, N. J. D.; Nie, W.; Mohite, A.; Nayyar, I. H.; Tretiak, S.; Smith, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Liu, F.; Ruden, P. P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    We use spectrally resolved magneto-electroluminescence (EL) measurements to study the energy dependence of hyperfine interactions between polaron and nuclear spins in organic light-emitting diodes. Using layered devices that generate bright exciplex emission, we show that the increase in EL emission intensity I due to small applied magnetic fields of order 100 mT is markedly larger at the high-energy blue end of the EL spectrum (ΔI/I ∼ 11%) than at the low-energy red end (∼4%). Concurrently, the widths of the magneto-EL curves increase monotonically from blue to red, revealing an increasing hyperfine coupling between polarons and nuclei and directly providing insight into the energy-dependent spatial extent and localization of polarons.

  18. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in and with ultra-short laser pulses; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchungen zur Fragmentationsdynamik von H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in ultra-kurzen Laserpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergler, T.

    2006-07-19

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} were focused onto a H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H{sup +}{sub 2} (D{sup +}{sub 2}) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D{sub 2} molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H{sup +}{sub 2} molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  19. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakawa Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  20. COMPARING THE OUTCOME OF SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE SESSION LASER PHOTOABLATION OF FLAT NEOVASCULARIZATION IN ZONE 1 AGGRESSIVE POSTERIOR RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinekar, Anand; Jayadev, Chaitra; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Bauer, Noel; Capone, Antonio; Trese, Michael; Shetty, Bhujang

    2015-10-01

    To compare single versus 2-session laser photoablation for flat neovascularization in cases with Zone 1 aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity. Twenty-nine Asian Indian infants with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity were randomized; each eye received 1 of 2 methods (29 each in Group A or B) proposed by the PHOTO-ROP group. Group A underwent single session laser to the avascular retina underlying the flat neovascularization by direct laser over the fronds. Group B underwent laser in 2 sessions; first, laser was delivered to the avascular periphery up to the flat neovascularization and 7 days later to the avascular bed exposed by the retraction of the fronds. Outcome and complications between the two groups were compared. Mean birthweight and gestational ages were 1,276 g and 30.1 weeks, respectively. All eyes showed favorable outcome at a minimum 12-month follow-up. Hemorrhages after laser (41.4% vs. 17.2%, P Large hemorrhages (>1 disk diameter) seen in Group A took longer than 8 weeks to resolve and developed focal fibrosis. This study demonstrates that the two-staged laser procedure produces fewer and smaller hemorrhages and no fibrosis compared with a single session. Both methods have comparable favorable outcomes in Asian Indian infants.