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Sample records for resolution noncontrast mri

  1. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet

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    Zheng, Jie [Cardiovascular Imaging Lab, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, The Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, MO (United States); Muccigross, David; Hildebolt, Charles F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fan, Zhaoyang [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gao, Fabao [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Curci, John [Washington University School of Medicine, The Department of Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8 %) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The average perfusion for the medial plantar region of the right foot was lower in subjects with diabetes (38 ± 9 ml/min/100 g) than in healthy subjects (93 ± 33 ml/min/100 g). Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps demonstrate the feasibility of determining regional perfusion in foot muscles during toe challenge and may facilitate evaluation of muscle perfusion in diabetic feet. (orig.)

  2. Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome in diabetic feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jie; Hastings, Mary K.; Mueller, Michael J.; Muccigross, David; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Fan, Zhaoyang; Gao, Fabao; Curci, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to evaluate skeletal muscle perfusion in the diabetic foot based on the concept of angiosomes of the foot. Five healthy volunteers and five participants with diabetes (HbA1c = 7.2 ± 1.8 %) without a history of peripheral artery disease were examined. The non-contrast perfusion measurements were performed during a toe flexion challenge. Absolute perfusion maps were created and two regions (medial and lateral) on the maps were segmented based on angiosomes. Regional difference in the perfusion of foot muscle was readily visualized in the MRI perfusion angiosomes during the challenge. In the participants with diabetes, the perfusion during toe flexion challenge was significantly lower than in healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). The average perfusion for the medial plantar region of the right foot was lower in subjects with diabetes (38 ± 9 ml/min/100 g) than in healthy subjects (93 ± 33 ml/min/100 g). Non-contrast MRI perfusion angiosome maps demonstrate the feasibility of determining regional perfusion in foot muscles during toe challenge and may facilitate evaluation of muscle perfusion in diabetic feet. (orig.)

  3. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

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    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  4. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jee Young; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  5. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI for abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance: comparison with CT angiography

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    Zhu, Chengcheng; Leach, Joseph R.; Hope, Michael D. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tian, Bing; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Luguang [Changhai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Saloner, David [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Radiology Service, VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on diameter. CT angiography (CTA) is commonly used, but requires radiation and iodinated contrast. Non-contrast MRI is an appealing alternative that may allow better characterization of intraluminal thrombus (ILT). This study aims to 1) validate non-contrast MRI for measuring AAA diameter, and 2) to assess ILT with CTA and MRI. 28 patients with AAAs (diameter 50.7 ± 12.3 mm) underwent CTA and non-contrast MRI. MRI was acquired at 3 T using 1) a conventional 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and 2) a 3D T{sub 1}-weighted black blood fast-spin-echo sequence. Two radiologists independently measured the AAA diameter. The ratio of signal of ILT and adjacent psoas muscle (ILT{sub r} = signal{sub ILT}/signal{sub Muscle}) was quantified. Strong agreement between CTA and non-contrast MRI was shown for AAA diameter (intra-class coefficient > 0.99). Both approaches had excellent inter-observer reproducibility (ICC > 0.99). ILT appeared homogenous on CTA, whereas MRI revealed compositional variations. Patients with AAAs ≥5.5 cm and <5.5 cm had a variety of distributions of old/fresh ILT types. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI provides accurate and reproducible AAA diameter measurements as validated by CTA. It also provides unique information about ILT composition, which may be linked with elevated risk for disease progression. (orig.)

  6. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI for abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance: comparison with CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Leach, Joseph R.; Hope, Michael D.; Tian, Bing; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Luguang; Saloner, David

    2017-01-01

    Management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on diameter. CT angiography (CTA) is commonly used, but requires radiation and iodinated contrast. Non-contrast MRI is an appealing alternative that may allow better characterization of intraluminal thrombus (ILT). This study aims to 1) validate non-contrast MRI for measuring AAA diameter, and 2) to assess ILT with CTA and MRI. 28 patients with AAAs (diameter 50.7 ± 12.3 mm) underwent CTA and non-contrast MRI. MRI was acquired at 3 T using 1) a conventional 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and 2) a 3D T_1-weighted black blood fast-spin-echo sequence. Two radiologists independently measured the AAA diameter. The ratio of signal of ILT and adjacent psoas muscle (ILT_r = signal_I_L_T/signal_M_u_s_c_l_e) was quantified. Strong agreement between CTA and non-contrast MRI was shown for AAA diameter (intra-class coefficient > 0.99). Both approaches had excellent inter-observer reproducibility (ICC > 0.99). ILT appeared homogenous on CTA, whereas MRI revealed compositional variations. Patients with AAAs ≥5.5 cm and <5.5 cm had a variety of distributions of old/fresh ILT types. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI provides accurate and reproducible AAA diameter measurements as validated by CTA. It also provides unique information about ILT composition, which may be linked with elevated risk for disease progression. (orig.)

  7. Diagnosis of superior labral lesions: comparison of noncontrast MRI with indirect MR arthrography in unexercised shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinauer, Philip A.; Flemming, Donald J.; Murphy, Kevin P.; Doukas, William C.

    2007-01-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with indirect MR arthrography (I-MRa) of unexercised shoulders for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. Institutional Review Board approval and patient informed consent were obtained for this prospective study. Superior labral findings on shoulder MRI and unexercised I-MRa studies of 104 patients were correlated with findings at arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed the two sets of MR images while blinded to arthroscopic results. For each radiologist, the McNemar test was used to detect statistically significant differences between techniques. The superior labrum was intact in 24 and abnormal in 80 subjects. For detection of superior labral lesions by each radiologist, I-MRa was more sensitive (84-91%) than MRI (66-85%), with statistically significant improvement in sensitivity for one reader (p = 0.003). However, I-MRa was less specific (58-71%) than MRI (75-83%). Overall, accuracy was slightly improved on I-MRa (78-86%) compared with MRI (70-83%), but this difference was not statistically significant for either reader. Compared with noncontrast MRI, I-MRa was more sensitive for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. However, the diagnostic value of I-MRa in shoulders remaining at rest is potentially limited by decreased specificity of the technique. (orig.)

  8. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement

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    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M., E-mail: anacresporodriguez@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C., E-mail: jclucasv@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel, E-mail: m.pastrana@telefonica.net [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Hualde-Juvera, Ana, E-mail: ana.hualdej@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Méndez-Alonso, Santiago, E-mail: smendez.sma@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Padron, Mario, E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com [Department of Radiology, Clínica Cemtro, Avda Ventisquero de la Condesa 42 Madrid 28035, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • High resolution sequences at 3-T MRI extend accuracy in hip assessment without any need for intra-articular injection of contrast media. • As compared to 1.5-T MRA, 3-T non-contrast MRI of the hip improves the patient experience and avoids the potential risks of an invasive procedure and contrast media. • Avoiding the need for arthrographic procedures in the Radiology Department improves patient throughput and reduces costs. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Subjects and methods: Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. Results: The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Conclusion: Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast

  9. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M.; De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C.; Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel; Hualde-Juvera, Ana; Méndez-Alonso, Santiago; Padron, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High resolution sequences at 3-T MRI extend accuracy in hip assessment without any need for intra-articular injection of contrast media. • As compared to 1.5-T MRA, 3-T non-contrast MRI of the hip improves the patient experience and avoids the potential risks of an invasive procedure and contrast media. • Avoiding the need for arthrographic procedures in the Radiology Department improves patient throughput and reduces costs. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Subjects and methods: Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. Results: The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Conclusion: Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast

  10. Automatic segmentation of meningioma from non-contrasted brain MRI integrating fuzzy clustering and region growing

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    Liao Chun-Chih

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become important in brain tumor diagnosis. Using this modality, physicians can locate specific pathologies by analyzing differences in tissue character presented in different types of MR images. This paper uses an algorithm integrating fuzzy-c-mean (FCM and region growing techniques for automated tumor image segmentation from patients with menigioma. Only non-contrasted T1 and T2 -weighted MR images are included in the analysis. The study's aims are to correctly locate tumors in the images, and to detect those situated in the midline position of the brain. Methods The study used non-contrasted T1- and T2-weighted MR images from 29 patients with menigioma. After FCM clustering, 32 groups of images from each patient group were put through the region-growing procedure for pixels aggregation. Later, using knowledge-based information, the system selected tumor-containing images from these groups and merged them into one tumor image. An alternative semi-supervised method was added at this stage for comparison with the automatic method. Finally, the tumor image was optimized by a morphology operator. Results from automatic segmentation were compared to the "ground truth" (GT on a pixel level. Overall data were then evaluated using a quantified system. Results The quantified parameters, including the "percent match" (PM and "correlation ratio" (CR, suggested a high match between GT and the present study's system, as well as a fair level of correspondence. The results were compatible with those from other related studies. The system successfully detected all of the tumors situated at the midline of brain. Six cases failed in the automatic group. One also failed in the semi-supervised alternative. The remaining five cases presented noticeable edema inside the brain. In the 23 successful cases, the PM and CR values in the two groups were highly related. Conclusions Results indicated

  11. A comparison of non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in the initial stage of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

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    Kim, Harry K.W. [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Center of Excellence in Hip Disorders, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas Southwestern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Kaste, Sue [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Dempsey, Molly; Wilkes, David [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A prognostic indicator of outcome for Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCP) is needed to guide treatment decisions during the initial stage of the disease (stage 1), before deformity occurs. Radiographic prognosticators are applicable only after fragmentation (stage II). We investigated pre- and postcontrast MRI in depicting stage I femoral head involvement. Thirty children with stage I LCP underwent non-contrast coronal T1 fast spin-echo (FSE) and corresponding postcontrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences to quantify the extent of femoral head involvement. Three pediatric radiologists and one pediatric orthopedic surgeon independently measured central head involvement. Interobserver reliability of percent head involvement using non-contrasted MR images had intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.72. Postcontrast MRI improved interobserver reliability (ICC 0.82). Qualitatively, the area of involvement was more clearly visible on contrast-enhanced MRI. A comparison of results obtained by each observer using the two MRI techniques showed no correlation. ICC ranged from -0.08 to 0.03 for each observer. Generally, greater head involvement was depicted by contrast compared with non-contrast MRI (Pearson r = -0.37, P = 0.04). Pre- and postcontrast MRI assess two different components of stage I LCP. However, contrast-enhanced MRI more clearly depicts the area of involvement. (orig.)

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowson, Matthew G.; Rocke, Daniel J.; Kaylie, David M.; Hoang, Jenny K.; Weissman, Jane L.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine if a non-contrast screening MRI is cost-effective compared to a full MRI protocol with contrast for the evaluation of vestibular schwannomas. A decision tree was constructed to evaluate full MRI and screening MRI strategies for patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. If a patient were to have a positive screening MRI, s/he received a full MRI. Vestibular schwannoma prevalence, MRI specificity and sensitivity, and gadolinium anaphylaxis incidence were obtained through literature review. Institutional charge data were obtained using representative patient cohorts. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were completed to determine CE model threshold points for MRI performance characteristics and charges. The mean charge for a full MRI with contrast was significantly higher than a screening MRI ($4089 ± 1086 versus $2872 ± 741; p < 0.05). The screening MRI protocol was more cost-effective than a full MRI protocol with a willingness-to-pay from $0 to 20,000 USD. Sensitivity analyses determined that the screening protocol dominated when the screening MRI charge was less than $4678, and the imaging specificity exceeded 78.2%. The screening MRI protocol also dominated when vestibular schwannoma prevalence was varied between 0 and 1000 in 10,000 people. A screening MRI protocol is more cost-effective than a full MRI with contrast in the diagnostic evaluation of a vestibular schwannoma. A screening MRI likely also confers benefits of shorter exam time and no contrast use. Further investigation is needed to confirm the relative performance of screening protocols for vestibular schwannomas. (orig.)

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss

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    Crowson, Matthew G.; Rocke, Daniel J.; Kaylie, David M. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Weissman, Jane L. [Oregon Health Sciences University, Professor Emerita of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-08-15

    We aimed to determine if a non-contrast screening MRI is cost-effective compared to a full MRI protocol with contrast for the evaluation of vestibular schwannomas. A decision tree was constructed to evaluate full MRI and screening MRI strategies for patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. If a patient were to have a positive screening MRI, s/he received a full MRI. Vestibular schwannoma prevalence, MRI specificity and sensitivity, and gadolinium anaphylaxis incidence were obtained through literature review. Institutional charge data were obtained using representative patient cohorts. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were completed to determine CE model threshold points for MRI performance characteristics and charges. The mean charge for a full MRI with contrast was significantly higher than a screening MRI ($4089 ± 1086 versus $2872 ± 741; p < 0.05). The screening MRI protocol was more cost-effective than a full MRI protocol with a willingness-to-pay from $0 to 20,000 USD. Sensitivity analyses determined that the screening protocol dominated when the screening MRI charge was less than $4678, and the imaging specificity exceeded 78.2%. The screening MRI protocol also dominated when vestibular schwannoma prevalence was varied between 0 and 1000 in 10,000 people. A screening MRI protocol is more cost-effective than a full MRI with contrast in the diagnostic evaluation of a vestibular schwannoma. A screening MRI likely also confers benefits of shorter exam time and no contrast use. Further investigation is needed to confirm the relative performance of screening protocols for vestibular schwannomas. (orig.)

  14. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  15. Age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation: evaluation with noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) MRI with spatially selective inversion pulse using variable inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yasufumi; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Higashi, Hiroki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Sato, Tomohiro; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation and renal cortical thickness by means of noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with spatially selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse. The Institutional Review Board of our hospital approved this retrospective study and patient informed consent was waived. This study included 48 patients without renal diseases who underwent noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse using variable inversion times (TIs) (700-1500 msec). The signal intensity of renal cortex and medulla were measured to calculate renal corticomedullary contrast ratio. Additionally, renal cortical thickness was measured. The renal corticomedullary junction was clearly depicted in all patients. The mean cortical thickness was 3.9 ± 0.83 mm. The mean corticomedullary contrast ratio was 4.7 ± 1.4. There was a negative correlation between optimal TI for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary differentiation and age (r = -0.378; P = 0.001). However, there was no significant correlation between renal corticomedullary contrast ratio and age (r = 0.187; P = 0.20). Similarly, no significant correlation was observed between renal cortical thickness and age (r = 0.054; P = 0.712). In the normal kidney, noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse can be used to assess renal corticomedullary differentiation and cortical thickness without the influence of aging, although optimal TI values for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary junction were shortened with aging. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Standard high-resolution pelvic MRI vs. low-resolution pelvic MRI in the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Scioscia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To compare the capabilities of standard pelvic MRI with low-resolution pelvic MRI using fast breath-hold sequences to evaluate deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Sixty-eight consecutive women with suspected DIE were studied with pelvic MRI. A double-acquisition protocol was carried out in each case. High-resolution (HR)-MRI consisted of axial, sagittal, and coronal TSE T2W images, axial TSE T1W, and axial THRIVE. Low-resolution (LR)-MRI was acquired using fast single shot (SSH) T2 and T1 images. Two radiologists with 10 and 2 years of experience reviewed HR and LR images in two separate sessions. The presence of endometriotic lesions of the uterosacral ligament (USL), rectovaginal septum (RVS), pouch of Douglas (POD), and rectal wall was noted. The accuracies of LR-MRI and HR-MRI were compared with the laparoscopic and histopathological findings. Average acquisition times were 24 minutes for HR-MRI and 7 minutes for LR-MRI. The more experienced radiologist achieved higher accuracy with both HR-MRI and LR-MRI. The values of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy did not significantly change between HR and LR images or interobserver agreement for all of the considered anatomic sites. LR-MRI performs as well as HR-MRI and is a valuable tool for the detection of deep endometriosis extension. (orig.)

  17. Standard high-resolution pelvic MRI vs. low-resolution pelvic MRI in the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe [University Hospital ' ' Policlinico' ' of Bari, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, Bari (Italy); Scioscia, Marco [Sacro Cuore Don Calabria General Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Negrar, Verona (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    To compare the capabilities of standard pelvic MRI with low-resolution pelvic MRI using fast breath-hold sequences to evaluate deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Sixty-eight consecutive women with suspected DIE were studied with pelvic MRI. A double-acquisition protocol was carried out in each case. High-resolution (HR)-MRI consisted of axial, sagittal, and coronal TSE T2W images, axial TSE T1W, and axial THRIVE. Low-resolution (LR)-MRI was acquired using fast single shot (SSH) T2 and T1 images. Two radiologists with 10 and 2 years of experience reviewed HR and LR images in two separate sessions. The presence of endometriotic lesions of the uterosacral ligament (USL), rectovaginal septum (RVS), pouch of Douglas (POD), and rectal wall was noted. The accuracies of LR-MRI and HR-MRI were compared with the laparoscopic and histopathological findings. Average acquisition times were 24 minutes for HR-MRI and 7 minutes for LR-MRI. The more experienced radiologist achieved higher accuracy with both HR-MRI and LR-MRI. The values of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy did not significantly change between HR and LR images or interobserver agreement for all of the considered anatomic sites. LR-MRI performs as well as HR-MRI and is a valuable tool for the detection of deep endometriosis extension. (orig.)

  18. High-resolution MRI in detecting subareolar breast abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peifen; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Kanemaki, Yoshihide; Okamoto, Kyoko; Nakajima, Yasuo; Fukuda, Mamoru; Maeda, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    Because subareolar breast abscess has a high recurrence rate, a more effective imaging technique is needed to comprehensively visualize the lesions and guide surgery. We performed a high-resolution MRI technique using a microscopy coil to reveal the characteristics and extent of subareolar breast abscess. High-resolution MRI has potential diagnostic value in subareolar breast abscess. This technique can be used to guide surgery with the aim of reducing the recurrence rate.

  19. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. WE-FG-207B-09: Experimental Assessment of Noise and Spatial Resolution in Virtual Non-Contrast Dual-Energy CT Images Across Multiple Patient Sizes and CT Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, J; Ferrero, A; Yu, L; Leng, S; McCollough, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the noise and spatial resolution properties of virtual non-contrast (VNC) dual-energy CT images compared to true non-contrast (TNC) images across multiple patient sizes and CT systems. Methods: Torso-shaped water phantoms with lateral widths of 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 cm and a high resolution bar pattern phantom (Catphan CTP528) were scanned using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT systems (Scanner A: Somatom Definition Flash, Scanner B: Somatom Force, Siemens Healthcare) in dual-energy scan mode with the same radiation dose for a given phantom size. Tube potentials of 80/Sn140 and 100/Sn140 on Scanner A and 80/Sn150, 90/Sn150 and 100/Sn150 on Scanner B were evaluated to examine the impact of spectral separation. Images were reconstructed using a medium sharp quantitative kernel (Qr40), 1.0-mm thickness, 1.0-mm interval and 20 cm field of view. Mixed images served as TNC images. VNC images were created using commercial software (Virtual Unenhanced, Syngo VIA Version VA30, Siemens Healthcare). The noise power spectrum (NPS), area under the NPS, peak frequency of the NPS and image noise were measured for every phantom size and tube potential combination in TNC and VNC images. Results were compared within and between CT systems. Results: Minimal shift in NPS peak frequencies was observed in VNC images compared to TNC for NPS having pronounced peaks. Image noise and area under the NPS were higher in VNC images compared to TNC images across all tube potentials and for scanner A compared to scanner B. Limiting spatial resolution was deemed to be identical between VNC and TNC images. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of image quality in VNC images demonstrated higher noise but equivalent spatial resolution compared to TNC images. Decreased noise was observed in the 3rd generation dual-source CT system for tube potential pairs having greater spectral separation. Dr. McCollough receives research support from Siemens Healthcare

  1. WE-FG-207B-09: Experimental Assessment of Noise and Spatial Resolution in Virtual Non-Contrast Dual-Energy CT Images Across Multiple Patient Sizes and CT Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, J; Ferrero, A; Yu, L; Leng, S; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the noise and spatial resolution properties of virtual non-contrast (VNC) dual-energy CT images compared to true non-contrast (TNC) images across multiple patient sizes and CT systems. Methods: Torso-shaped water phantoms with lateral widths of 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 cm and a high resolution bar pattern phantom (Catphan CTP528) were scanned using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT systems (Scanner A: Somatom Definition Flash, Scanner B: Somatom Force, Siemens Healthcare) in dual-energy scan mode with the same radiation dose for a given phantom size. Tube potentials of 80/Sn140 and 100/Sn140 on Scanner A and 80/Sn150, 90/Sn150 and 100/Sn150 on Scanner B were evaluated to examine the impact of spectral separation. Images were reconstructed using a medium sharp quantitative kernel (Qr40), 1.0-mm thickness, 1.0-mm interval and 20 cm field of view. Mixed images served as TNC images. VNC images were created using commercial software (Virtual Unenhanced, Syngo VIA Version VA30, Siemens Healthcare). The noise power spectrum (NPS), area under the NPS, peak frequency of the NPS and image noise were measured for every phantom size and tube potential combination in TNC and VNC images. Results were compared within and between CT systems. Results: Minimal shift in NPS peak frequencies was observed in VNC images compared to TNC for NPS having pronounced peaks. Image noise and area under the NPS were higher in VNC images compared to TNC images across all tube potentials and for scanner A compared to scanner B. Limiting spatial resolution was deemed to be identical between VNC and TNC images. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of image quality in VNC images demonstrated higher noise but equivalent spatial resolution compared to TNC images. Decreased noise was observed in the 3rd generation dual-source CT system for tube potential pairs having greater spectral separation. Dr. McCollough receives research support from Siemens Healthcare.

  2. Higher Resolution and Faster MRI of 31Phosphorus in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Merideth; Barrett, Sean; Sethna, Zachary; Insogna, Karl; Vanhouten, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Probing the internal composition of bone on the sub-100 μm length scale is important to study normal features and to look for signs of disease. However, few useful non-destructive techniques are available to evaluate changes in the bone mineral chemical structure and functional micro-architecture on the interior of bones. MRI would be an excellent candidate, but bone is a particularly challenging tissue to study given the relatively low water density, wider linewidths of its solid components leading to low spatial resolution, and the long imaging time compared to conventional 1H MRI. Our lab has recently made advances in obtaining high spatial resolution (sub-400 μm)3 three-dimensional 31Phosphorus MRI of bone through use of the quadratic echo line-narrowing sequence (1). In this talk, we describe our current results using proton decoupling to push this technique even further towards the factor of 1000 increase in spatial resolution imposed by fundamental limits. We also discuss our work to speed up imaging through novel, faster reconstruction algorithms that can reconstruct the desired image from very sparse data sets. (1) M. Frey, et al. PNAS 109: 5190 (2012).

  3. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F.; Le Roux, P.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  4. STUDY OF POSTERIOR FOSSA TUMORS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Hari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the imaging modality used for the assessment of infratentorial neoplasms. Although Computed Tomography (CT provides better demonstration of small or subtle calcifications within tumors. OBJECTIVES Study is done to assess the potential of MRI in characterisation of different tumors in posterior fossa by evaluating various unenhanced and gadolinium enhanced sequences and to compare high resolution FSE MRI sequences with routine FSE MRI sequences in diagnosing posterior fossa brain tumors. Also correlate findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Pathological diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 52 patients were diagnosed by CT brain as having posterior fossa brain for a year of 2 years were included in the study. In all studies MR imaging was performed with a clinical 1.5 T system (General electrical medical systems. A dedicated phased-array coil was used. RESULTS The age group ranged from 1 year to 60 years, majority were between 1 to 20 years (39%. Slight male preponderance was seen (males 29, females 23. Commonest tumor encountered in our study was vestibular schwannoma. DWI alone can differentiate different pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors. One case of pilocytic astrocytoma showed solid lesion instead of typical cystic lesion with mural nodule. One case AT-RT showed 2 lesions one in cerebrum, one in CP angle. Common feature being intra-axial lesion involving cerebellum. MRI was able to predict diagnosis in 50 of the 52 tumors. CONCLUSION Magnetic Resonance Imaging was found to be a highly sensitive imaging procedure and method of choice for posterior fossa brain tumors.

  5. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuting; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L; Gulsen, Gultekin; Gao Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully. (paper)

  6. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Pancreatic cancer screening employing noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging combined with ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki-Suzuki, Seiko; Nagashima, Chieko; Machida, Minoru; Muramatsu, Yukio; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nasu, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We have conducted an initial evaluation on the potential of combining noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) to screen for pancreatic cancer. An independent ethics committee approved this study. A total of 2511 patients who underwent US were enrolled. Among them, noncontrast MRI was performed in patients in whom the entire pancreas was difficult to depict or in those with US-suspected pancreatic lesions. In total, using 1.5-T MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and diffusion-weighted imaging, we acquired a variety of images. The efficacy of US and MRI in screening for pancreatic lesions, including pancreatic cancer, was evaluated. Of 2511 patients, 184 underwent MRI, and the pancreas was demonstrated in all of them. Among the 2511, five pancreatic cancers were detected by MRI combined with US (detection rate 0.20%). Of the five pancreatic cancers, three were detected by US (detection rate 0.12%) and two by MRI. Four of the five pancreatic cancers were resectable. By combining noncontrast MRI with US, pancreatic cancer can be detected with high accuracy. Other pancreatic lesions that require follow-up, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, can also be detected. Thus, pancreatic cancer screening with a combination of US and MRI is suggested. (author)

  8. High-resolution vessel wall MRI for the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Havenon, Adam [University of Utah, Department of Neurology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Mossa-Basha, Mahmud [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Shah, Lubdha; Kim, Seong-Eun; Parker, Dennis; McNally, J.S. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Park, Min [University of Utah, Department of Neurosurgery, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-12-15

    High-resolution vessel wall MRI (vwMRI) of the intracranial arteries is an emerging diagnostic imaging technique with the goal of evaluating vascular pathology. vwMRI sequences have high spatial resolution and directly image the vessel wall by suppressing blood signal. With vwMRI, it is possible to identify distinct morphologic and enhancement patterns of atherosclerosis that can provide important information about stroke etiology and recurrence risk. We present a review of vwMRI research in relation to intracranial atherosclerosis, with a focus on the relationship between ischemic stroke and atherosclerotic plaque T1 post-contrast enhancement or plaque/vessel wall morphology. The goal of this review is to provide readers with the most current understanding of the reliability, incidence, and importance of specific vwMRI findings in intracranial atherosclerosis, to guide their interpretation of vwMRI research, and help inform clinical interpretation of vwMRI. We will also provide a translational perspective on the existing vwMRI literature and insight into future vwMRI research questions and objectives. With increased use of high field strength MRI, powerful gradients, and improved pulse sequences, vwMRI will become standard-of-care in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with cerebrovascular disease, making a firm grasp of its strengths and weakness important for neuroimagers. (orig.)

  9. High-resolution vessel wall MRI for the evaluation of intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Havenon, Adam; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Shah, Lubdha; Kim, Seong-Eun; Parker, Dennis; McNally, J.S.; Park, Min

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution vessel wall MRI (vwMRI) of the intracranial arteries is an emerging diagnostic imaging technique with the goal of evaluating vascular pathology. vwMRI sequences have high spatial resolution and directly image the vessel wall by suppressing blood signal. With vwMRI, it is possible to identify distinct morphologic and enhancement patterns of atherosclerosis that can provide important information about stroke etiology and recurrence risk. We present a review of vwMRI research in relation to intracranial atherosclerosis, with a focus on the relationship between ischemic stroke and atherosclerotic plaque T1 post-contrast enhancement or plaque/vessel wall morphology. The goal of this review is to provide readers with the most current understanding of the reliability, incidence, and importance of specific vwMRI findings in intracranial atherosclerosis, to guide their interpretation of vwMRI research, and help inform clinical interpretation of vwMRI. We will also provide a translational perspective on the existing vwMRI literature and insight into future vwMRI research questions and objectives. With increased use of high field strength MRI, powerful gradients, and improved pulse sequences, vwMRI will become standard-of-care in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with cerebrovascular disease, making a firm grasp of its strengths and weakness important for neuroimagers. (orig.)

  10. Improved automatic optic nerve radius estimation from high resolution MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The optic nerve (ON) is a vital structure in the human visual system and transports all visual information from the retina to the cortex for higher order processing. Due to the lack of redundancy in the visual pathway, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. These measures are typically taken at an arbitrary anatomically defined point along the nerve and do not characterize changes along the length of the ON. We propose a fully automated, three-dimensionally consistent technique building upon a previous independent slice-wise technique to estimate the radius of the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on high-resolution heavily T2-weighted isotropic MRI. We show that by constraining results to be three-dimensionally consistent this technique produces more anatomically viable results. We compare this technique with the previously published slice-wise technique using a short-term reproducibility data set, 10 subjects, follow-up <1 month, and show that the new method is more reproducible in the center of the ON. The center of the ON contains the most accurate imaging because it lacks confounders such as motion and frontal lobe interference. Long-term reproducibility, 5 subjects, follow-up of approximately 11 months, is also investigated with this new technique and shown to be similar to short-term reproducibility, indicating that the ON does not change substantially within 11 months. The increased accuracy of this new technique provides increased power when searching for anatomical changes in ON size amongst patient populations.

  11. Breast density estimation from high spectral and spatial resolution MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Weiss, William A.; Medved, Milica; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M.; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. A three-dimensional breast density estimation method is presented for high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MR imaging. Twenty-two patients were recruited (under an Institutional Review Board--approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant protocol) for high-risk breast cancer screening. Each patient received standard-of-care clinical digital x-ray mammograms and MR scans, as well as HiSS scans. The algorithm for breast density estimation includes breast mask generating, breast skin removal, and breast percentage density calculation. The inter- and intra-user variabilities of the HiSS-based density estimation were determined using correlation analysis and limits of agreement. Correlation analysis was also performed between the HiSS-based density estimation and radiologists’ breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS) density ratings. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 (pdensity estimations. An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (pdensity estimations. A moderate correlation coefficient of 0.55 (p=0.0076) was observed between HiSS-based breast density estimations and radiologists’ BI-RADS. In summary, an objective density estimation method using HiSS spectral data from breast MRI was developed. The high reproducibility with low inter- and low intra-user variabilities shown in this preliminary study suggest that such a HiSS-based density metric may be potentially beneficial in programs requiring breast density such as in breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring effects of therapy. PMID:28042590

  12. Analysis strategies for high-resolution UHF-fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Jonathan R; Renvall, Ville; Zaretskaya, Natalia; Fischl, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) benefits from both increased sensitivity and specificity with increasing magnetic field strength, making it a key application for Ultra-High Field (UHF) MRI scanners. Most UHF-fMRI studies utilize the dramatic increases in sensitivity and specificity to acquire high-resolution data reaching sub-millimeter scales, which enable new classes of experiments to probe the functional organization of the human brain. This review article surveys advanced data analysis strategies developed for high-resolution fMRI at UHF. These include strategies designed to mitigate distortion and artifacts associated with higher fields in ways that attempt to preserve spatial resolution of the fMRI data, as well as recently introduced analysis techniques that are enabled by these extremely high-resolution data. Particular focus is placed on anatomically-informed analyses, including cortical surface-based analysis, which are powerful techniques that can guide each step of the analysis from preprocessing to statistical analysis to interpretation and visualization. New intracortical analysis techniques for laminar and columnar fMRI are also reviewed and discussed. Prospects for single-subject individualized analyses are also presented and discussed. Altogether, there are both specific challenges and opportunities presented by UHF-fMRI, and the use of proper analysis strategies can help these valuable data reach their full potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Megan H.; Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika; Sheybani, Elizabeth F.

    2017-01-01

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  14. Rapid non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for post appendectomy intra-abdominal abscess in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Megan H. [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Eutsler, Eric P.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Pediatric Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Mercy Hospital St. Louis, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Acute appendicitis, especially if perforated at presentation, is often complicated by postoperative abscess formation. The detection of a postoperative abscess relies primarily on imaging. This has traditionally been done with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to accurately detect intra-abdominal abscesses, especially with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). To evaluate our single-center experience with a rapid non-contrast MRI protocol evaluating post-appendectomy abscesses in children with persistent postsurgical symptoms. In this retrospective, institutional review board-approved study, all patients underwent a clinically indicated non-contrast 1.5- or 3-Tesla abdomen/pelvis MRI consisting of single-shot fast spin echo, inversion recovery and DWI sequences. All MRI studies were reviewed by two blinded pediatric radiologists to identify the presence of a drainable fluid collection. Each fluid collection was further characterized as accessible or not accessible for percutaneous or transrectal drainage. Imaging findings were compared to clinical outcome. Seven of the 15 patients had a clinically significant fluid collection, and 5 of these patients were treated with percutaneous drain placement or exploratory laparotomy. The other patients had a phlegmon or a clinically insignificant fluid collection and were discharged home within 48 h. Rapid non-contrast MRI utilizing fluid-sensitive and DWI sequences can be used to identify drainable fluid collections in post-appendectomy patients. This protocol can be used to triage patients between conservative management vs. abscess drainage without oral/intravenous contrast or exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  15. MRI isotropic resolution reconstruction from two orthogonal scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Totterman, Saara; Parker, Kevin J.

    2001-07-01

    An algorithm for the reconstructions of ISO-resolution volumetric MR data sets from two standard orthogonal MR scans having anisotropic resolution has been developed. The reconstruction algorithm starts by registering a pair of orthogonal volumetric MR data sets. The registration is done by maximizing the correlation between the gradient magnitude using a simple translation-rotation model in a multi-resolution approach. Then algorithm assumes that the individual voxels on the MR data are an average of the magnetic resonance properties of an elongated imaging volume. Then, the process is modeled as the projection of MR properties into a single sensor. This model allows the derivation of a set of linear equations that can be used to recover the MR properties of every single voxel in the SO-resolution volume given only two orthogonal MR scans. Projections on convex sets (POCS) was used to solve the set of linear equations. Experimental results show the advantage of having a ISO-resolution reconstructions for the visualization and analysis of small and thin muscular structures.

  16. Robust isotropic super-resolution by maximizing a Laplace posterior for MRI volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xian-Hua; Iwamoto, Yutaro; Shiino, Akihiko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging can only acquire volume data with finite resolution due to various factors. In particular, the resolution in one direction (such as the slice direction) is much lower than others (such as the in-plane direction), yielding un-realistic visualizations. This study explores to reconstruct MRI isotropic resolution volumes from three orthogonal scans. This proposed super- resolution reconstruction is formulated as a maximum a posterior (MAP) problem, which relies on the generation model of the acquired scans from the unknown high-resolution volumes. Generally, the deviation ensemble of the reconstructed high-resolution (HR) volume from the available LR ones in the MAP is represented as a Gaussian distribution, which usually results in some noise and artifacts in the reconstructed HR volume. Therefore, this paper investigates a robust super-resolution by formulating the deviation set as a Laplace distribution, which assumes sparsity in the deviation ensemble based on the possible insight of the appeared large values only around some unexpected regions. In addition, in order to achieve reliable HR MRI volume, we integrates the priors such as bilateral total variation (BTV) and non-local mean (NLM) into the proposed MAP framework for suppressing artifacts and enriching visual detail. We validate the proposed robust SR strategy using MRI mouse data with high-definition resolution in two direction and low-resolution in one direction, which are imaged in three orthogonal scans: axial, coronal and sagittal planes. Experiments verifies that the proposed strategy can achieve much better HR MRI volumes than the conventional MAP method even with very high-magnification factor: 10.

  17. Ultra-high field upper extremity peripheral nerve and non-contrast enhanced vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh B Raval

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of Ultra-high field [UHF] 7 Tesla [T] MRI as compared to 3T MRI in non-contrast enhanced [nCE] imaging of structural anatomy in the elbow, forearm, and hand [upper extremity].A wide range of sequences including T1 weighted [T1] volumetric interpolate breath-hold exam [VIBE], T2 weighted [T2] double-echo steady state [DESS], susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], time-of-flight [TOF], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI], and diffusion spectrum imaging [DSI] were optimized and incorporated with a radiofrequency [RF] coil system composed of a transverse electromagnetic [TEM] transmit coil combined with an 8-channel receive-only array for 7T upper extremity [UE] imaging. In addition, Siemens optimized protocol/sequences were used on a 3T scanner and the resulting images from T1 VIBE and T2 DESS were compared to that obtained at 7T qualitatively and quantitatively [SWI was only qualitatively compared]. DSI studio was utilized to identify nerves based on analysis of diffusion weighted derived fractional anisotropy images. Images of forearm vasculature were extracted using a paint grow manual segmentation method based on MIPAV [Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization].High resolution and high quality signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]-images of the hand, forearm, and elbow were acquired with nearly homogeneous 7T excitation. Measured [performed on the T1 VIBE and T2 DESS sequences] SNR and CNR values were almost doubled at 7T vs. 3T. Cartilage, synovial fluid and tendon structures could be seen with higher clarity in the 7T T1 and T2 weighted images. SWI allowed high resolution and better quality imaging of large and medium sized arteries and veins, capillary networks and arteriovenous anastomoses at 7T when compared to 3T. 7T diffusion weighted sequence [not performed at 3T] demonstrates that the forearm nerves are clearly delineated by fiber tractography. The

  18. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.; Lagos Fritz, F.J.; Harms, R.L.; Hildebrand, S.; Tse, D.H.Y.; Poser, B.A.; Goebel, R.; Roebroeck, A.

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7 T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample

  19. Decoding Overlapping Memories in the Medial Temporal Lobes Using High-Resolution fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Martin J.; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus is proposed to process overlapping episodes as discrete memory traces, although direct evidence for this in human episodic memory is scarce. Using green-screen technology we created four highly overlapping movies of everyday events. Participants were scanned using high-resolution fMRI while recalling the movies. Multivariate…

  20. High-resolution MRI predicts steroid injection response in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Oki, Hodaka; Kinoshita, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Korogi, Yukunori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kitakyushu (Japan); Oshige, Takahisa; Sakai, Akinori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakyushu (Japan); Matsuyama, Atsushi; Hisaoka, Masanori [University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Oncology, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    To correlate median nerve T2 signal and shape at the carpal tunnel with steroid injection (SI) response in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. One hundred and sixty-three CTS wrists of 92 consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo SI were prospectively evaluated with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a nerve conduction study. All patients underwent axial high-resolution T2-weighted MRI (in-plane resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 mm). The CTS wrists were classified into three groups according to the nerve T2 signal and the flattening ratio at the hook of hamate level: group 1, high and oval; group 2, high and flat; group 3, low and flat. Clinical response to SI was evaluated at 6 months after injection. One hundred and thirteen of the 163 wrists (69.3 %) responded well to SI. The percentage of improvement was 81.7 % (49/60) in group 1, 69.9 % (51/73) in group 2, and 43.3 % (13/30) in group 3 (P < 0.01). On stepwise logistic regression analysis high-resolution MRI was the only significant independent factor for SI response in CTS patients (P < 0.01). High-resolution MRI correlates well with SI response in CTS patients and seems useful for predicting SI response. (orig.)

  1. Feasibility of high temporal resolution breast DCE-MRI using compressed sensing theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu; Miao, Yanwei; Zhou, Kun; Yu, Yanming; Bao, Shanglian; He, Qiang; Dai, Yongming; Xuan, Stephanie Y; Tarabishy, Bisher; Ye, Yongquan; Hu, Jiani

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high temporal resolution breast DCE-MRI using compressed sensing theory. Two experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility of using reference image based compressed sensing (RICS) technique in DCE-MRI of the breast. The first experiment examined the capability of RICS to faithfully reconstruct uptake curves using undersampled data sets extracted from fully sampled clinical breast DCE-MRI data. An average approach and an approach using motion estimation and motion compensation (ME/MC) were implemented to obtain reference images and to evaluate their efficacy in reducing motion related effects. The second experiment, an in vitro phantom study, tested the feasibility of RICS for improving temporal resolution without degrading the spatial resolution. For the uptake-curve reconstruction experiment, there was a high correlation between uptake curves reconstructed from fully sampled data by Fourier transform and from undersampled data by RICS, indicating high similarity between them. The mean Pearson correlation coefficients for RICS with the ME/MC approach and RICS with the average approach were 0.977 +/- 0.023 and 0.953 +/- 0.031, respectively. The comparisons of final reconstruction results between RICS with the average approach and RICS with the ME/MC approach suggested that the latter was superior to the former in reducing motion related effects. For the in vitro experiment, compared to the fully sampled method, RICS improved the temporal resolution by an acceleration factor of 10 without degrading the spatial resolution. The preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of RICS for faithfully reconstructing uptake curves and improving temporal resolution of breast DCE-MRI without degrading the spatial resolution.

  2. High-resolution whole-brain diffusion MRI at 7T using radiofrequency parallel transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Auerbach, Edward J; Vu, An T; Moeller, Steen; Lenglet, Christophe; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2018-03-30

    Investigating the utility of RF parallel transmission (pTx) for Human Connectome Project (HCP)-style whole-brain diffusion MRI (dMRI) data at 7 Tesla (7T). Healthy subjects were scanned in pTx and single-transmit (1Tx) modes. Multiband (MB), single-spoke pTx pulses were designed to image sagittal slices. HCP-style dMRI data (i.e., 1.05-mm resolutions, MB2, b-values = 1000/2000 s/mm 2 , 286 images and 40-min scan) and data with higher accelerations (MB3 and MB4) were acquired with pTx. pTx significantly improved flip-angle detected signal uniformity across the brain, yielding ∼19% increase in temporal SNR (tSNR) averaged over the brain relative to 1Tx. This allowed significantly enhanced estimation of multiple fiber orientations (with ∼21% decrease in dispersion) in HCP-style 7T dMRI datasets. Additionally, pTx pulses achieved substantially lower power deposition, permitting higher accelerations, enabling collection of the same data in 2/3 and 1/2 the scan time or of more data in the same scan time. pTx provides a solution to two major limitations for slice-accelerated high-resolution whole-brain dMRI at 7T; it improves flip-angle uniformity, and enables higher slice acceleration relative to current state-of-the-art. As such, pTx provides significant advantages for rapid acquisition of high-quality, high-resolution truly whole-brain dMRI data. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. High-resolution MRI of the labyrinth. Optimization of scan parameters with 3D-FSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Motomichi; Harada, Kuniaki; Shirase, Ryuji; Kumagai, Akiko; Ogasawara, Masashi

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to optimize the parameters of high-resolution MRI of the labyrinth with a 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequence. We investigated repetition time (TR), echo time (TE), Matrix, field of view (FOV), and coil selection in terms of CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) by comparing axial images and/or three-dimensional images. The optimal 3D-FSE sequence parameters were as follows: 1.5 Tesla MR unit (Signa LX, GE Medical Systems), 3D-FSE sequence, dual 3-inch surface coil, acquisition time=12.08 min, TR=5000 msec, TE=300 msec, 3 number of excitations (NEX), FOV=12 cm, matrix=256 x 256, slice thickness=0.5 mm/0.0 sp, echo train=64, bandwidth=±31.5 kHz. High-resolution MRI of the labyrinth using the optimized 3D-FSE sequence parameters permits visualization of important anatomic details (such as scala tympani and scala vestibuli), making it possible to determine inner ear anomalies and the patency of cochlear turns. To obtain excellent heavily T2-weighted axial and three-dimensional images in the labyrinth, high CNR, SNR, and spatial resolution are significant factors at the present time. Furthermore, it is important not only to optimize the scan parameters of 3D-FSE but also to select an appropriate coil for high-resolution MRI of the labyrinth. (author)

  4. Postmortem diffusion MRI of the entire human spinal cord at microscopic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Calabrese

    Full Text Available The human spinal cord is a central nervous system structure that plays an important role in normal motor and sensory function, and can be affected by many debilitating neurologic diseases. Due to its clinical importance, the spinal cord is frequently the subject of imaging research. Common methods for visualizing spinal cord anatomy and pathology include histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, both of which have unique benefits and drawbacks. Postmortem microscopic resolution MRI of fixed specimens, sometimes referred to as magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM, combines many of the benefits inherent to both techniques. However, the elongated shape of the human spinal cord, along with hardware and scan time limitations, have restricted previous microscopic resolution MRI studies (both in vivo and ex vivo to small sections of the cord. Here we present the first MRM dataset of the entire postmortem human spinal cord. These data include 50 μm isotropic resolution anatomic image data and 100 μm isotropic resolution diffusion data, made possible by a 280 h long multi-segment acquisition and automated image segment composition. We demonstrate the use of these data for spinal cord lesion detection, automated volumetric gray matter segmentation, and quantitative spinal cord morphometry including estimates of cross sectional dimensions and gray matter fraction throughout the length of the cord. Keywords: Spinal cord, Magnetic resonance microscopy, Tractography, Human, Gray matter

  5. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm 3 achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm 3 voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm 3 to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm 3 has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain

  6. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  7. Complete resolution and remodeling of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis on MRI and radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, Y.J.; Greenwood, S.J.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Cribb, G. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Davies, K. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medicine, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2018-04-15

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare condition thought to be under-diagnosed, with a true prevalence of more than the 1 in 10,000 estimated. It is a condition that is classically described as polyostotic with a relapsing and remitting course, preferentially affecting the metaphyses of tubular bones in the pediatric population. Lesions have characteristic appearances of cortical hyperostosis and mixed lytic/sclerotic medullary appearances radiographically, with active osteitis and periostitis best seen with fluid-sensitive sequences on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There are reports of lesions resolving on follow-up radiographs and MRI scans, but no supporting images. In particular, although the marrow appearances and degree of osteitis have been shown to improve on MRI, complete resolution and remodeling back to normal has never been demonstrated. We present a case of a lesion that has completely healed and remodeled back to normal appearances on both radiographs and MRI, and consider this the standard for the often loosely used terms ''normalization'' and ''resolution''. We discuss the implications of this for our understanding of the natural history of CRMO, and how this adds weight to the condition being significantly under-diagnosed. It provides a ''gold standard'' to be aimed for when assessing treatments for CRMO, and the optimal outcomes that are possible. It also provides further insight into the potential of pediatric bone to recover and remodel when affected by inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  8. In vivo high-resolution 7 Tesla MRI shows early and diffuse cortical alterations in CADASIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guio, François; Reyes, Sonia; Vignaud, Alexandre; Duering, Marco; Ropele, Stefan; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin's scale ≤1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥24). Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male) and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male). Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models. MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls. Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined.

  9. High-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yuki; Fujii, Masahiko; Muratsu, Hirotsugu; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Shibanuma, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been commonly used for the preoperative evaluation of recurrent lateral patellar dislocation (RLPD). The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of high-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) with a microscopy coil for diagnosing RLPD. The study group consisted of 15 patients with clinically diagnosed RLPD and 10 normal volunteers. All studies were performed on a 1.5-T MR system. First, conventional MRIs of the whole knee joint were obtained using the knee coil. Then HR-MRI scans using a microscopy coil in the medial aspect of the patella were obtained at the level of the superior pole of the patella, targeting the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL). The acquired HR-MRIs with RLPD were reviewed concerning the MPFL injury and the patellar injury. The MPFL was distinguished as a separate ligament, and the layer structure of the patellar cartilage was visualized clearly in all volunteers. The MPFL injury was visualized in 12 cases (87%); it included discontinuity, thickening, and loosening. The patellar injury was visualized in 11 cases (73%), which included dissecans of the medial margin and cartilage injuries. HR-MRI with a microscopy coil provides precise information of the MPFL and patellar cartilage injury for the diagnosis of RLPD. (author)

  10. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 1: MRI vs. histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A reliable detection of metastatic risk factors is important for children with retinoblastoma to choose the right therapeutic regimen. First studies using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with orbit surface coils were promising. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the ability of high-resolution MRI to detect metastatic and especially advanced metastatic risk factors in a large group of children with retinoblastoma. One hundred forty-three consecutive children with retinoblastoma (148 enucleated eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys, mean age 19.7 ± 15.3) who received pretherapeutical high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils on 1.5 T MR scanner systems between 2007 and 2012 and subsequent primary enucleation within 14 days were included in this retrospective study. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists experienced in ocular imaging in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity for the detection of metastatic risk factors using high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils were 60 %/88.7 % for postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 65.5 %/95.6 % for choroidal invasion, 100 %/99.3 % for scleral invasion, and 100 %/100 % for peribulbar fat invasion, respectively. The results increased for the detection of advanced metastatic risk factors, 81.8 %/89.1 % for deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 70.6 %/97.6 % for massive choroidal invasion. High-resolution MRI is clinically valuable for the detection of metastatic, especially of advanced metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma. (orig.)

  11. 3D Super-Resolution Motion-Corrected MRI: Validation of Fetal Posterior Fossa Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Danielle B; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Clancy, Sean; Kapur, Kush; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2016-09-01

    Current diagnosis of fetal posterior fossa anomalies by sonography and conventional MRI is limited by fetal position, motion, and by two-dimensional (2D), rather than three-dimensional (3D), representation. In this study, we aimed to validate the use of a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, 3D super-resolution motion-corrected MRI, to image the fetal posterior fossa. From a database of pregnant women who received fetal MRIs at our institution, images of 49 normal fetal brains were reconstructed. Six measurements of the cerebellum, vermis, and pons were obtained for all cases on 2D conventional and 3D reconstructed MRI, and the agreement between the two methods was determined using concordance correlation coefficients. Concordance of axial and coronal measurements of the transcerebellar diameter was also assessed within each method. Between the two methods, the concordance of measurements was high for all six structures (P fetal motion and orthogonal slice acquisition. This technique will facilitate further study of fetal abnormalities of the posterior fossa. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. Imaging of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction—Comparison of high-resolution ultrasound and 3 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldner, Michael A., E-mail: michael.arnoldner@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Gruber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Syré, Stefanie [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Trauma-Surgery, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Kristen, Karl-Heinz [Foot & Ankle Centre Vienna, Alser Straße 43/8, 1080 Vienna (Austria); Trnka, Hans-Jörg [Foot & Ankle Centre Vienna, Alser Straße 43/8, 1080 Vienna (Austria); Orthopaedic Hospital Vienna, Speisinger Straße 109, 1130 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • 18 MHz high-resolution ultrasound appears to be slightly more accurate than 3 T MRI in the diagnosis of PTTD. • High-resolution ultrasound is recommended as an initial diagnostic tool. • Long-lasting PTT discomfort may require MRI. • Other pathologies can mimic PTTD. - Abstract: Purpose: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired asymmetric flatfoot deformity. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the diagnostic value of MRI and high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US) in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD), and assess their correlation with intraoperative findings. Materials and methods: We reviewed 23 posterior tibial tendons in 23 patients with clinical findings of PTTD (13 females, 10 males; mean age, 50 years) with 18 MHz HR-US and 3 T MRI. Surgical intervention was performed in nine patients. Results: HR-US findings included 2 complete tears, 6 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 5 unremarkable tendons. MRI demonstrated 2 complete tears, 7 partial tears, 10 tendons with tendinosis, and 4 unremarkable tendons. HR-US and MRI were concordant in 20/23 cases (87%). Image findings for HR-US were confirmed in six of nine patients (66.7%) by intraoperative inspection, whereas imaging findings for MRI were concordant with five of nine cases (55.6%). Conclusion: Our results indicate that HR-US can be considered slightly more accurate than MRI in the detection of PTTD.

  13. A High-resolution Atlas and Statistical Model of the Vocal Tract from Structural MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z; Xing, Fangxu; Al-Talib, Meena; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the study of muscle anatomy and functional activity in the tongue. Objective assessment of similarities and differences in tongue structure and function has been performed using unnormalized data, but this is biased by the differences in size, shape, and orientation of the structures. To remedy this, we propose a methodology to build a 3D vocal tract atlas based on structural MRI volumes from twenty normal subjects. We first constructed high-resolution volumes from three orthogonal stacks. We then removed extraneous data so that all 3D volumes contained the same anatomy. We used an unbiased diffeomorphic groupwise registration using a cross-correlation similarity metric. Principal component analysis was applied to the deformation fields to create a statistical model from the atlas. Various evaluations and applications were carried out to show the behaviour and utility of the atlas.

  14. One dimensional spatial resolution optimization on a hybrid low field MRI-gamma detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agulles-Pedrós, L., E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co; Abril, A., E-mail: ajabrilf@unal.edu.co [Medical Physics Group, Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Hybrid systems like Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and MRI/gamma camera, offer advantages combining the resolution and contrast capability of MRI with the better contrast and functional information of nuclear medicine techniques. However, the radiation detectors are expensive and need an electronic set-up, which can interfere with the MRI acquisition process or viceversa. In order to improve these drawbacks, in this work it is presented the design of a low field NMR system made up of permanent magnets compatible with a gamma radiation detector based on gel dosimetry. The design is performed using the software FEMM for estimation of the magnetic field, and GEANT4 for the physical process involved in radiation detection and effect of magnetic field. The homogeneity in magnetic field is achieved with an array of NbFeB magnets in a linear configuration with a separation between the magnets, minimizing the effect of Compton back scattering compared with a no-spacing linear configuration. The final magnetic field in the homogeneous zone is ca. 100 mT. In this hybrid proposal, although the gel detector do not have spatial resolution per se, it is possible to obtain a dose profile (1D image) as a function of the position by using a collimator array. As a result, the gamma detector system described allows a complete integrated radiation detector within the low field NMR (lfNMR) system. Finally we present the better configuration for the hybrid system considering the collimator parameters such as height, thickness and distance.

  15. In vivo high-resolution 7 Tesla MRI shows early and diffuse cortical alterations in CADASIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François De Guio

    Full Text Available Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy, a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin's scale ≤1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE ≥24.Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male. Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models.MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls.Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined.

  16. Feasibility of high-resolution pituitary MRI at 7.0 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, Alexandra A.J. de; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Rutgers, Dik; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Visser, Fredy

    2014-01-01

    Since the pituitary gland measures 3-8 mm, imaging with the highest possible spatial resolution is important for the detection of even smaller lesions such as those seen in Cushing's disease. In the current feasibility study, we tested a multi-sequence MRI protocol to visualize the pituitary gland in high resolution at 7.0 Tesla (7.0 T). Ten healthy volunteers were examined with a 7.0 T pituitary gland protocol. The protocol consisted of a T1-weighted magnetization-prepared inversion recovery (MPIR) turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence and a T2-weighted TSE sequence. Additionally, this protocol was tested in five patients with clinical and biochemical suspicion of a microadenoma. The dedicated protocol was successful in visualizing normal pituitary anatomy. At 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T, four times as many slices covered the pituitary gland in sagittal and coronal direction. In three patients, a lesion was diagnosed at 7.0 T, and was confirmed by histopathology to be a microadenoma. Head-to-head comparisons of 7.0 T with 1.5 T and 3.0 T are needed with larger samples of patients and with imaging times feasible for clinical settings. However, the current study suggests that high-resolution 7.0 T MRI of the pituitary gland may provide new perspectives when used as a second-line diagnostic examination in the specific context of Cushing's disease. (orig.)

  17. Feasibility of high-resolution pituitary MRI at 7.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotte, Alexandra A.J. de; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Rutgers, Dik; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zelissen, Pierre M.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Endocrinology), Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Since the pituitary gland measures 3-8 mm, imaging with the highest possible spatial resolution is important for the detection of even smaller lesions such as those seen in Cushing's disease. In the current feasibility study, we tested a multi-sequence MRI protocol to visualize the pituitary gland in high resolution at 7.0 Tesla (7.0 T). Ten healthy volunteers were examined with a 7.0 T pituitary gland protocol. The protocol consisted of a T1-weighted magnetization-prepared inversion recovery (MPIR) turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence and a T2-weighted TSE sequence. Additionally, this protocol was tested in five patients with clinical and biochemical suspicion of a microadenoma. The dedicated protocol was successful in visualizing normal pituitary anatomy. At 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T, four times as many slices covered the pituitary gland in sagittal and coronal direction. In three patients, a lesion was diagnosed at 7.0 T, and was confirmed by histopathology to be a microadenoma. Head-to-head comparisons of 7.0 T with 1.5 T and 3.0 T are needed with larger samples of patients and with imaging times feasible for clinical settings. However, the current study suggests that high-resolution 7.0 T MRI of the pituitary gland may provide new perspectives when used as a second-line diagnostic examination in the specific context of Cushing's disease. (orig.)

  18. A computational atlas of the hippocampal formation using ex vivo, ultra-high resolution MRI: Application to adaptive segmentation of in vivo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Augustinack, Jean C.; Nguyen, Khoa

    2015-01-01

    level using ultra-high resolution, ex vivo MRI. Fifteen autopsy samples were scanned at 0.13 mm isotropic resolution (on average) using customized hardware. The images were manually segmented into 13 different hippocampal substructures using a protocol specifically designed for this study; precise...... datasets with different types of MRI contrast. The results show that the atlas and companion segmentation method: 1) can segment T1 and T2 images, as well as their combination, 2) replicate findings on mild cognitive impairment based on high-resolution T2 data, and 3) can discriminate between Alzheimer......'s disease subjects and elderly controls with 88% accuracy in standard resolution (1 mm) T1 data, significantly outperforming the atlas in FreeSurfer version 5.3 (86% accuracy) and classification based on whole hippocampal volume (82% accuracy)....

  19. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yi; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Nayak, Krishna; Lebel, R. Marc; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm 3 , FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm 3 , and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm 3 , and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm 3 . Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain.

  20. Role of pharmacokinetic parameters derived with high temporal resolution DCE MRI using simultaneous PET/MRI system in breast cancer: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Amarnath, E-mail: drjena2002@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Taneja, Sangeeta; Singh, Aru; Negi, Pradeep; Mehta, Shashi Bhushan [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Sarin, Ramesh [Department of Surgical Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI (with 3T MRI in the core) for quantitative pharmacokinetics. • Diagnostic accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and v{sub e} acquired through this system. • Incorporating high temporal resolution sequence with short acquisition time of 60 s within the routine DCE MRI in a simultaneous PET/MRI system. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, Kep and v{sub e} derived through DCE MRI breast protocol using 3 T Simultaneous PET/MRI (3 Tesla Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging) system in distinguishing benign and malignant lesions. Materials and methods: High temporal resolution DCE (Dynamic Contrast Enhancement) MRI performed as routine breast MRI for diagnosis or as a part of PET/MRI for cancer staging using a 3 T simultaneous PET/MRI system in 98 women having 109 breast lesions were analyzed for calculation of pharmacokinetic parameters (K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and Kep) at 60 s time point using an in-house developed computation scheme. Results: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed a cut off value for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} as 0.50, 2.59, 0.15 respectively which reliably distinguished benign and malignant breast lesions. Data analysis revealed an overall accuracy of 94.50%, 79.82% and 87.16% for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} respectively. Introduction of native T1 normalization with an externally placed phantom showed a higher accuracy (94.50%) than without native T1 normalization (93.50%) with an increase in specificity of 87% vs 84%. Conclusion: Overall the results indicate that reliable measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters with reduced acquisition time is feasible in a 3TMRI embedded PET/MRI system with reasonable accuracy and application may be extended to exploit the potential of simultaneous PET/MRI in further work on breast cancer.

  1. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladky, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.sladky@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Baldinger, Pia; Kranz, Georg S. [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Tröstl, Jasmin [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Moser, Ewald [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Windischberger, Christian, E-mail: christian.windischberger@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas.

  2. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladky, Ronald; Baldinger, Pia; Kranz, Georg S.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Moser, Ewald; Windischberger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas

  3. MRI of Retinal Free Radical Production With Laminar Resolution In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Biswal, Manas R.; Bredell, Bryce X.; Davis, Christopher; Roberts, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have suggested the hypothesis that quench-assisted 1/T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures free radical production with laminar resolution in vivo without the need of a contrast agent. Here, we test this hypothesis further by examining the spatial and detection sensitivity of quench-assisted 1/T1 MRI to strain, age, or retinal cell layer-specific genetic manipulations. Methods We studied: adult wild-type mice; mice at postnatal day 7 (P7); cre dependent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-specific MnSOD knockout mice; doxycycline-treated Sod2flox/flox mice lacking the cre transgene; and α-transducin knockout (Gnat1−/−) mice on a C57Bl/6 background. Transretinal 1/T1 profiles were mapped in vivo in the dark without or with antioxidant treatment, or followed by light exposure. We calibrated profiles spatially using optical coherence tomography. Results Dark-adapted RPE-specific MnSOD knockout mice had greater than normal 1/T1 in the RPE and outer nuclear layers that was corrected to wild-type levels by antioxidant treatment. Dark and light Gnat1−/− mice also had greater than normal outer retinal 1/T1 values. In adult wild-type mice, dark values of 1/T1 in the ellipsoid region and in the outer segment were suppressed by 13 minutes of light. By 29 minutes of light, 1/T1 reduction extended to the outer nuclear layer. Gnat1−/− mice demonstrated a faster light-evoked suppression of 1/T1 values in the outer retina. In P7 mice, transretinal 1/T1 profiles were the same in dark and light. Conclusions Quench-assisted MRI has the laminar resolution and detection sensitivity to evaluate normal and pathologic production of free radicals in vivo. PMID:26886890

  4. High-resolution MRI of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Wu, Wei Der; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Rafijah, Gregory; Yang, Lily; Hitt, Dave; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of injuries to the collateral ligaments of the wrist is technically challenging on MRI. Purpose To investigate usefulness of high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for identifying and classifying the morphology of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments (UCL and RCL) of the wrist. Material and Methods Thirty-seven participants were evaluated using 3T coronal 2D and isotropic 3D images by two radiologists independently. The UCL was classified into four types: 1a, narrow attachment to the tip of the ulnar styloid (Tip); 1b, broad attachment to the Tip; 2a, narrow attachment to the medial base of the ulnar styloid (Base); and 2b, broad attachment to the Base. The RCL was also classified into four types: 1a, separate radioscaphoid and scaphotrapezial ligaments (RS + ST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; 1b, RS + ST with broad scaphoid attachment; 2a, continuous radio-scapho-trapezial ligaments (RST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; and 2b, RST with broad scaphoid attachment. The inter-observer reliability of these classifications was calculated. Results Type 1a was the most common of both collateral ligaments. Of UCL classifications, 31.4% were revised after additional review of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images from isotropic data. The inter-observer reliability of UCL classification was substantial (k = 0.62) without MPR, and almost perfect (k = 0.84) with MPR. The inter-observer reliability of RCL classification was almost perfect (k = 0.89). Anatomic delineation between the two sequences was not statistically different. Conclusion The UCL and RCL were each identified on high-resolution 2D and isotropic 3D MRI equally well. MPR allows accurate identification of the UCL attachment to the ulnar styloid.

  5. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of the pleura and chest wall: Normal findings and pathological changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Schnoy, N.; Schoenfeld, N.; Grassot, A.; Loddenkemper, R.; Lode, H.; Kaiser, D.; Krumhaar, D.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of high-resolution MRI in pleural and chest wall diseases, the normal and pathologic costal pleura and adjacent chest wall between paravertebral and the axillar region were examined with contrast enhanced high-resolution T 1 -weighted MRI images using a surface coil. Normal anatomy was evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers and a normal specimen of the thoracic wall, and correlation was made with corresponding HR-CT and histologic sections. CT-proved focal and diffuse changes of the pleura and the chest wall in 36 patients underwent HR-MRI, and visual comparison of MRI and CT was done retrospectively. Especially sagittal T 1 -weighted HR-MRI images allowed accurate delineation of the peripleural fat layer (PFL) and the innermost intercostal muscle (IIM), which served as landmarks of the intact inner chest wall. PFL and IIM were well delineated in 3/4 patients with tuberculous pleuritis, and in all 7 patients with non-specific pleuritis, as opposed to impairment of the PFL and/or the IIM, which was detected in 15/18 malignancies as a pattern of malignant chest wall involvement. In one case of tuberculous pleural empyema with edema of the inner chest wall HR-MRI produced false positive diagnosis of malignant disease. HR-MRI images improved non-invasive evaluation of pleural and chest wall diseases, and allowed for differentiation of bengin and malignant changes. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Tumour size measurement in a mouse model using high resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montelius, Mikael; Ljungberg, Maria; Horn, Michael; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Animal models are frequently used to assess new treatment methods in cancer research. MRI offers a non-invasive in vivo monitoring of tumour tissue and thus allows longitudinal measurements of treatment effects, without the need for large cohorts of animals. Tumour size is an important biomarker of the disease development, but to our knowledge, MRI based size measurements have not yet been verified for small tumours (10 −2 –10 −1 g). The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of MRI based tumour size measurements of small tumours on mice. 2D and 3D T2-weighted RARE images of tumour bearing mice were acquired in vivo using a 7 T dedicated animal MR system. For the 3D images the acquired image resolution was varied. The images were exported to a PC workstation where the tumour mass was determined assuming a density of 1 g/cm 3 , using an in-house developed tool for segmentation and delineation. The resulting data were compared to the weight of the resected tumours after sacrifice of the animal using regression analysis. Strong correlations were demonstrated between MRI- and necropsy determined masses. In general, 3D acquisition was not a prerequisite for high accuracy. However, it was slightly more accurate than 2D when small (<0.2 g) tumours were assessed for inter- and intraobserver variation. In 3D images, the voxel sizes could be increased from 160 3 μm 3 to 240 3 μm 3 without affecting the results significantly, thus reducing acquisition time substantially. 2D MRI was sufficient for accurate tumour size measurement, except for small tumours (<0.2 g) where 3D acquisition was necessary to reduce interobserver variation. Acquisition times between 15 and 50 minutes, depending on tumour size, were sufficient for accurate tumour volume measurement. Hence, it is possible to include further MR investigations of the tumour, such as tissue perfusion, diffusion or metabolic composition in the same MR session

  7. A computational atlas of the hippocampal formation using ex vivo, ultra-high resolution MRI: Application to adaptive segmentation of in vivo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Augustinack, Jean C; Nguyen, Khoa; Player, Christopher M; Player, Allison; Wright, Michelle; Roy, Nicole; Frosch, Matthew P; McKee, Ann C; Wald, Lawrence L; Fischl, Bruce; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-07-15

    Automated analysis of MRI data of the subregions of the hippocampus requires computational atlases built at a higher resolution than those that are typically used in current neuroimaging studies. Here we describe the construction of a statistical atlas of the hippocampal formation at the subregion level using ultra-high resolution, ex vivo MRI. Fifteen autopsy samples were scanned at 0.13 mm isotropic resolution (on average) using customized hardware. The images were manually segmented into 13 different hippocampal substructures using a protocol specifically designed for this study; precise delineations were made possible by the extraordinary resolution of the scans. In addition to the subregions, manual annotations for neighboring structures (e.g., amygdala, cortex) were obtained from a separate dataset of in vivo, T1-weighted MRI scans of the whole brain (1mm resolution). The manual labels from the in vivo and ex vivo data were combined into a single computational atlas of the hippocampal formation with a novel atlas building algorithm based on Bayesian inference. The resulting atlas can be used to automatically segment the hippocampal subregions in structural MRI images, using an algorithm that can analyze multimodal data and adapt to variations in MRI contrast due to differences in acquisition hardware or pulse sequences. The applicability of the atlas, which we are releasing as part of FreeSurfer (version 6.0), is demonstrated with experiments on three different publicly available datasets with different types of MRI contrast. The results show that the atlas and companion segmentation method: 1) can segment T1 and T2 images, as well as their combination, 2) replicate findings on mild cognitive impairment based on high-resolution T2 data, and 3) can discriminate between Alzheimer's disease subjects and elderly controls with 88% accuracy in standard resolution (1mm) T1 data, significantly outperforming the atlas in FreeSurfer version 5.3 (86% accuracy) and

  8. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia; Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez

    2015-01-01

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  9. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia [Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital (CHUS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  10. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelides, Michael; Papas, Stylianos; Pantziara, Maria; Ioannidis, Kleanthis

    2014-01-01

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD

  11. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, Michael, E-mail: mihalismihailidis@gmail.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, MRI/CT Department (Cyprus); Papas, Stylianos, E-mail: vascular@drpapas.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, Vascular Surgery Department (Cyprus); Pantziara, Maria, E-mail: mgpantziara@gmail.com; Ioannidis, Kleanthis, E-mail: aktinodiagnostis@gmail.com [Ygia Polyclinic Hospital, MRI/CT Department (Cyprus)

    2013-05-14

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  12. Detection of osseous metastases of the spine: Comparison of high resolution multi-detector-CT with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, Sonja; Becker, Christoph; Duerr, Hans Roland; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-slice-computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection of vertebral metastases in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, 639 vertebral bodies of 41 patients with various histologically confirmed primary malignancies were analysed. The MDCT-images were acquired on a 16/64-row-MDCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16/64). MRI was performed on 1.5 T scanners (SIEMENS Symphony/Sonata). The MDCT- and MRI-images were evaluated separately by two experienced radiologists in a consensus reading. The combination of MDCT and MRI in an expert reading including follow-up examinations and/or histology as well as clinical data served as the gold standard. Results: 201/639 vertebral bodies were defined as metastatically affected by the gold standard. In MDCT 133/201 lesions, in MRI 198/201 lesions were detected. 68 vertebral bodies were false negative in MDCT, whereas 3 false negatives were found in MRI. 3 false positive results were obtained in MDCT, 5 in MRI. Sensitivity was significantly lower for MDCT (66.2%) than for MRI (98.5%) (p < 0.0001). Specificity was not significantly different for both methods (MDCT: 99.3%; MRI: 98.9%). The diagnostic accuracy resulted in 88.8% for MDCT and 98.7% for MRI. Conclusion: Although 16/64-row-MDCT provides excellent image quality and a high spatial resolution in the assessment of bony structures, metastatic lesions without significant bone destruction may be missed. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI proved to be significantly superior to 16/64-row-MDCT for the detection of osseous metastases.

  13. Direct comparison of high‐temporal‐resolution CINE MRI with Doppler ultrasound for assessment of diastolic dysfunction in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Anthony N.; Jackson, Laurence H.; Taylor, Valerie; David, Anna L.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Stuckey, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is a sensitive early indicator of heart failure and can provide additional data to conventional measures of systolic function. Transmitral Doppler ultrasound, which measures the one‐dimensional flow of blood through the mitral valve, is currently the preferred method for the measurement of diastolic function, but the measurement of the left ventricular volume changes using high‐temporal‐resolution cinematic magnetic resonance imaging (CINE MRI) is an alternative approach which is emerging as a potentially more robust and user‐independent technique. Here, we investigated the performance of high‐temporal‐resolution CINE MRI and compared it with ultrasound for the detection of diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. An in‐house, high‐temporal‐resolution, retrospectively gated CINE sequence was developed with a temporal resolution of 1 ms. Diastolic function in mice was assessed using a custom‐made, open‐source reconstruction package. Early (E) and late (A) left ventricular filling phases were easily identifiable, and these measurements were compared directly with high‐frequency, pulsed‐wave, Doppler ultrasound measurements of mitral valve inflow. A repeatability study established that high‐temporal‐resolution CINE MRI and Doppler ultrasound showed comparable accuracy when measuring E/A in normal control mice. However, when applied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction, high‐temporal‐resolution CINE MRI indicated diastolic heart failure (E/A = 0.94 ± 0.11), whereas ultrasound falsely detected normal cardiac function (E/A = 1.21 ± 0.11). The addition of high‐temporal‐resolution CINE MRI to preclinical imaging studies enhances the library of sequences available to cardiac researchers and potentially identifies diastolic heart failure early in disease progression. PMID:28643891

  14. Direct comparison of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI with Doppler ultrasound for assessment of diastolic dysfunction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas A; Price, Anthony N; Jackson, Laurence H; Taylor, Valerie; David, Anna L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Stuckey, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is a sensitive early indicator of heart failure and can provide additional data to conventional measures of systolic function. Transmitral Doppler ultrasound, which measures the one-dimensional flow of blood through the mitral valve, is currently the preferred method for the measurement of diastolic function, but the measurement of the left ventricular volume changes using high-temporal-resolution cinematic magnetic resonance imaging (CINE MRI) is an alternative approach which is emerging as a potentially more robust and user-independent technique. Here, we investigated the performance of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI and compared it with ultrasound for the detection of diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. An in-house, high-temporal-resolution, retrospectively gated CINE sequence was developed with a temporal resolution of 1 ms. Diastolic function in mice was assessed using a custom-made, open-source reconstruction package. Early (E) and late (A) left ventricular filling phases were easily identifiable, and these measurements were compared directly with high-frequency, pulsed-wave, Doppler ultrasound measurements of mitral valve inflow. A repeatability study established that high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI and Doppler ultrasound showed comparable accuracy when measuring E/A in normal control mice. However, when applied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction, high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI indicated diastolic heart failure (E/A = 0.94 ± 0.11), whereas ultrasound falsely detected normal cardiac function (E/A = 1.21 ± 0.11). The addition of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI to preclinical imaging studies enhances the library of sequences available to cardiac researchers and potentially identifies diastolic heart failure early in disease progression. © 2017 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A study of disrupted carotid plaque using high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Zhang Zhaoqi; Underhill, H.; Hatsukami, T.S.; Chun, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate distribution features of disrupted carotid plaque. Methods: Forty-three subjects with duplex ultrasound evidence of 50% to 99% stenosis were retrospectively analyzed. Plaques were categorized as disrupted if there was MRI evidence of fibrous cap rupture. Quantity measured areas of the lumen (LA), wall (WA), and plaque components. The morphological parameters used were total vessel area, vessel burden index, eccentricity index. Mann-Whitney test and Chi-square test appropriate used SPSS (v. 12.0). Results: There were 17 disrupted and 26 undisrupted lesions identified for comparison. Disrupted plaques showed a predominance of longer longitudinal length of large lip nucleus along the vessel wall (6 mm vs. 0 mm, U=126, P 2 vs. 30.18 mm 2 U=138 P<0.05) and a longer segment of stenosis when compared with the intact plaques. Conclusions: Disrupted plaques have significantly different characteristics in terms of both axial and longitudinal distribution. A combination of multi-plane and multi-contrast high resolution MRI may provide valuable information about overall lesion morphology and its association to vulnerability. (authors)

  16. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris [The Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oestergaard, Mikkel [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boeyesen, Pernille [Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); Moeller, Jakob M. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Therkildsen, Flemming [Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen (Denmark); Madsen, Ole Rintek [Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2{sup nd}-5{sup th} metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  17. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Oestergaard, Mikkel; Boeyesen, Pernille; Moeller, Jakob M.; Therkildsen, Flemming; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-01-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2 nd -5 th metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  18. Whole brain, high resolution spin-echo resting state fMRI using PINS multiplexing at 7 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, P.J.; Boyacioglu, R.; Barth, M.; Norris, David Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates the application of spin-echo EPI for resting state fMRI at 7 T. A short repetition time of 1860 ms was made possible by the use of slice multiplexing which permitted whole brain coverage at high spatial resolution (84 slices of 1.6 mm thickness). Radiofrequency power

  19. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zi-Yi; Chen, Jing; Liang, Qi-Zhou; Liao, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Qiong-Yue; Fu, Shui-Xi; Chen, Cai-Xiang; Yu, Dan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of 3.0 T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa. In total, 20 nerves were investigated on MRI of 12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with the FSE sequences with 5 mm and 2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences acquired with a 3.0-T scanner. The MR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale. In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. Comparing FSE and GRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional (3D) pulse sequence. The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section. The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves. GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables 3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yi Guo; Jing Chen; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Qiong-Yue Cheng; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen; Dan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of3.0T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa.Methods:In total,20 nerves were investigated onMRI of12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with theFSE sequences with5 mm and2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo(GRE) sequences acquired with a3.0-T scanner.TheMR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale.Results:In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. ComparingFSE andGRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional(3D) pulse sequence.Conclusions:The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section.The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves.GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem.

  1. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  2. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  3. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  4. Comparison of arthoroscopic findings and high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil findings for triangle fibrocartilage complex injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satomi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Arai, Takeshi; Izumiyama, Kou; Beppu, Moroe

    2008-01-01

    Triangle fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is very small and can be visualized in MRI. We compared image findings acquired by high-resolution MRI using a 47-mm-diameter microscopy coil with arthroscopic findings and reviewed the availability and possibility of application of both these techniques. The subjects were 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy of the radiocarpal joint and MRI for the diagnosis of pain in the ulnar wrist joint. Based on image evaluation, the impaired site was categorized as follows radius attachment, disc proper, triangular ligament (upper lamina), triangular ligament (lower lamina), lunate bone cartilage face, and triquete bone cartilage face; the findings of both techniques for impaired site around part 6 were compared. Joint morphology was assessed by the gradient-recalled echo (GRE) method with T2-weighted images, and the cartilage side was analyzed the fast SE (FSE) method with proton density-weighted image. Three orthopedic surgeons and 1 radiologist interpreted the results. The impaired site was verified in all 16 patients by high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil. The MRI findings were as follows radius attachment in 2 patients, disc proper in 4, upper lamina in 7, lower lamina in 5, lunate bone cartilage face in 3, and triquete bone cartilage face in 0. The frequency of injury according to arthroscopic findings was as follows: radius attachment in 2 patients, disc proper in 4, lunate bone cartilage face in 6, and triquete bone cartilage face in 0. The sensibility/specificity of arthroscopic findings in comparison with MRI findings was as follows: radius attachment 100%/100%, disc proper 75%/91.7%, lunate bone cartilage face 50%/100%, and triquete bone cartilage face 0%/100%. Eight of 16 patients had depression of TFCC tone, and the sensibility/specificity of arthroscopic findings in comparison with MRI findings for the depression of site and TFCC tone was as follows: upper lamina 75%/87.5% and lower lamina 50%/87.5%. High-resolution

  5. Measurement of left atrial volume by 2D and 3D non-contrast computed tomography compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredgart, Maise Høigaard; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard for assessment of left atrial (LA) volume. We assessed the feasibility of evaluating LA volume using 3D non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). Furthermore, since manual tracing of LA volume is time consuming, we...... evaluated the accuracy of the LA area using 2D NCCT imaging for LA volume assessment. Methods: MRI and NCCT imaging were performed in 69 patients before and one year after aortic valve replacement. In 3D MRI and 3D NCCT, each slice was manually traced, excluding the pulmonary veins and atrial appendage...

  6. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Fritz, F J; Harms, R L; Hildebrand, S; Tse, D H Y; Poser, B A; Goebel, R; Roebroeck, A

    2018-03-01

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample contrasts over the depth of the cortex and get closer to layer resolved imaging. Ex vivo MRI of human post mortem samples is an important stepping stone to investigate MRI contrast in the cortex, validate it against histology techniques applied in situ to the same tissue, and investigate the resolutions needed to translate ex vivo findings to in vivo UHF MRI. Here, we investigate key technology to extend such UHF studies to large human brain samples while maintaining high resolution, which allows investigation of the layered architecture of several cortical areas over their entire 3D extent and their complete borders where architecture changes. A 16 channel cylindrical phased array radiofrequency (RF) receive coil was constructed to image a large post mortem occipital lobe sample (~80×80×80mm 3 ) in a wide-bore 9.4T human scanner with the aim of achieving high-resolution anatomical and quantitative MR images. Compared with a human head coil at 9.4T, the maximum Signal-to-Noise ratio (SNR) was increased by a factor of about five in the peripheral cortex. Although the transmit profile with a circularly polarized transmit mode at 9.4T is relatively inhomogeneous over the large sample, this challenge was successfully resolved with parallel transmit using the kT-points method. Using this setup, we achieved 60μm anatomical images for the entire occipital lobe showing increased spatial definition of cortical details compared to lower resolutions. In addition, we were able to achieve sufficient control over SNR, B 0 and B 1 homogeneity and multi-contrast sampling to perform quantitative T 2 * mapping over the same volume at 200μm. Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling provided

  7. Phonological ambiguity modulates resolution of semantic ambiguity during reading: An fMRI study of Hebrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitan, Tali; Kaftory, Asaf; Meiri-Leib, Adi; Eviatar, Zohar; Peleg, Orna

    2017-10-01

    The current fMRI study examined the role of phonology in the extraction of meaning from print in each hemisphere by comparing homophonic and heterophonic homographs (ambiguous words in which both meanings have the same or different sounds respectively, e.g., bank or tear). The analysis distinguished between the first phase, in which participants read ambiguous words without context, and the second phase in which the context resolves the ambiguity. Native Hebrew readers were scanned during semantic relatedness judgments on pairs of words in which the first word was either a homophone or a heterophone and the second word was related to its dominant or subordinate meaning. In Phase 1 there was greater activation for heterophones in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), pars opercularis, and more activation for homophones in bilateral IFG pars orbitalis, suggesting that resolution of the conflict at the phonological level has abolished the semantic ambiguity for heterophones. Reduced activation for all ambiguous words in temporo-parietal regions suggests that although ambiguity enhances controlled lexical selection processes in frontal regions it reduces reliance on bottom-up mapping processes. After presentation of the context, a larger difference between the dominant and subordinate meaning was found for heterophones in all reading-related regions, suggesting a greater engagement for heterophones with the dominant meaning. Altogether these results are consistent with the prominent role of phonological processing in visual word recognition. Finally, despite differences in hemispheric asymmetry between homophones and heterophones, ambiguity resolution, even toward the subordinate meaning, is largely left lateralized. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Is the type and extent of hippocampal sclerosis measurable on high-resolution MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H; Schwarzwald, R [Medical Center University of Freiburg, Dept. of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Huppertz, H.J. [Swiss Epilepsy Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Becker, A.J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Neuropathology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Bahri, M. Delsous; Tschampa, H.J. [Medical Center University of Bonn, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to relate hippocampal volume and FLAIR signal intensity to Wyler grading of hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Of 100 consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and HS as histopathological diagnosis, 32 had high-resolution 3 Tesla MRI and anatomically well-preserved hippocampi following amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Hippocampal volume on 3D T1-weighted gradient echo and signal intensity on coronal FLAIR sequences were determined using FreeSurfer and SPM tools and related to Wyler grading. Seizure outcome was determined after 1 year. Histopathology showed four Wyler II, 19 Wyler III, and 9 Wyler IV HS. Hippocampal volumes were 3.08 ml for Wyler II (Wyler II/contralateral side: p > 0.05), 2.19 ml for Wyler III (p < 0.01), 2.62 ml for Wyler IV (p = 0.01), and 3.08 ml for the contralateral side. Normalized FLAIR signals were 1,354 (p = 0.0004), 1,408 (p < 0.0001), 1,371 (p < 0.04), and 1,296, respectively. Wyler II hippocampi were visually normal. Two of four (50 %) Wyler II, 16/19 (84 %) Wyler III, and 6/9 (66 %) Wyler IV patients achieved Engel I outcome. Combined volumetry and quantitative FLAIR signal analysis clearly identifies Wyler III and IV HS. Quantitative FLAIR signal analysis may be helpful to identify Wyler II HS. (orig.)

  9. The appearances of oesophageal carcinoma demonstrated on high-resolution, T2-weighted MRI, with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddell, A.M.; Allum, W.H.; Thompson, J.N.; Wotherspoon, A.C.; Richardson, C.; Brown, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the spectrum of imaging features of oesophageal adenocarcinoma seen using high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-nine patients with biopsy-proven oesophageal adenocarcinoma were scanned using an external surface coil. A sagittal T2W sequence was used to localise the tumour and to plan axial images perpendicular to the tumour. Fast spin-echo (FSE) T2W axial sequence parameters were: TR/TE, 3,300-5,000 ms/120-80 ms; field of view (FOV) 225 mm, matrix 176 x 512(reconstructed) mm to 256 x 224 mm, giving an in-plane resolution of between 1.28 x 0.44 mm and 0.88 x 1.00 mm, with 3-mm slice thickness. Thirty-three patients underwent resection and the MR images were compared with the histological whole-mount sections. There were four T1, 12 T2, and 17 T3 tumours. The T2W high-resolution MRI sequences produced detailed images of the oesophageal wall and surrounding structures. Analysis of the imaging appearances for different tumour T stages enabled the development of imaging criteria for local staging of oesophageal cancer using high-resolution MRI. Our study illustrates the spectrum of appearances of oesophageal cancer on T2W high-resolution MRI, and using the criteria established in this study, demonstrates the potential of this technique as an alternative non-invasive method for local staging for oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  10. Spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor of two-dimensional selective excitation pulses for MRI of objects containing conductive implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be disturbed by radiofrequency (RF field inhomogeneity induced by the conductive implants. This inhomogeneity causes a local decrease of the signal intensity around the conductor, resulting in a deterioration of the accurate quantification. In a previous study, we developed an MRI imaging method using a two-dimensional selective excitation pulse (2D pulse to mitigate signal inhomogeneity induced by metallic implants. In this paper, the effect of 2D pulse was evaluated quantitatively by numerical simulation and MRI experiments. We introduced two factors for evaluation, spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor. Numerical simulations were performed with two groups. One group was composed of four models with different signal loss width, to evaluate the spatial resolution of the 2D pulse. The other group is also composed of four models with different amounts of signal loss for evaluating maximum compensation factor. In MRI experiments, we prepared phantoms containing conductors, which have different electrical conductivities related with the amounts of signal intensity decrease. The recovery of signal intensity was observed by 2D pulses, in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  11. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara; Ferri, Mario; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra; Ziparo, Vincenzo; David, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting

  12. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ferri, Mario [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Pilozzi, Emanuela [Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ziparo, Vincenzo [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); David, Vincenzo [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting.

  13. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhang, Huibo [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Yin, Yuming [Radiology Associates, LLP, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    2017-12-15

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  14. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Yin, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huili; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Yin, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification.

  16. Motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI using dynamic 3D image self-navigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenwen; Ong, Frank; Johnson, Kevin M; Nagle, Scott K; Hope, Thomas A; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-06-01

    To achieve motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI utilizing a novel dynamic 3D image navigator derived directly from imaging data. Five-minute free-breathing scans were acquired with a 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence with 1.25 mm isotropic resolution. From this data, dynamic 3D self-navigating images were reconstructed under locally low rank (LLR) constraints and used for motion compensation with one of two methods: a soft-gating technique to penalize the respiratory motion induced data inconsistency, and a respiratory motion-resolved technique to provide images of all respiratory motion states. Respiratory motion estimation derived from the proposed dynamic 3D self-navigator of 7.5 mm isotropic reconstruction resolution and a temporal resolution of 300 ms was successful for estimating complex respiratory motion patterns. This estimation improved image quality compared to respiratory belt and DC-based navigators. Respiratory motion compensation with soft-gating and respiratory motion-resolved techniques provided good image quality from highly undersampled data in volunteers and clinical patients. An optimized 3D UTE sequence combined with the proposed reconstruction methods can provide high-resolution motion robust pulmonary MRI. Feasibility was shown in patients who had irregular breathing patterns in which our approach could depict clinically relevant pulmonary pathologies. Magn Reson Med 79:2954-2967, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Current and future diagnostic tools for traumatic brain injury: CT, conventional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, David L; Mac Donald, Christine L; Shimony, Joshua S

    2015-01-01

    Brain imaging plays a key role in the assessment of traumatic brain injury. In this review, we present our perspectives on the use of computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and newer advanced modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging. Specifically, we address assessment for immediately life-threatening intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), assessment of progression of intracranial lesions (noncontrast head CT), documenting intracranial abnormalities for medicolegal reasons (conventional MRI with blood-sensitive sequences), presurgical planning for post-traumatic epilepsy (high spatial resolution conventional MRI), early prognostic decision making (conventional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging), prognostic assessment for rehabilitative planning (conventional MRI and possibly diffusion tensor imaging in the future), stratification of subjects and pharmacodynamic tracking of targeted therapies in clinical trials (specific MRI sequences or positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, e.g., diffusion tensor imaging for traumatic axonal injury). We would like to emphasize that all of these methods, especially the newer research approaches, require careful radiologic-pathologic validation for optimal interpretation. We have taken this approach in a mouse model of pericontusional traumatic axonal injury. We found that the extent of reduction in the diffusion tensor imaging parameter relative anisotropy directly correlated with the number of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-stained axonal varicosities (r(2)=0.81, p<0.0001, n=20 injured mice). Interestingly, however, the least severe contusional injuries did not result in APP-stained axonal varicosities, but did cause reduction in relative anisotropy. Clearly, both the imaging assessments and the pathologic assessments will require iterative refinement. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  19. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Dzyubachyk

    Full Text Available In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  20. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyubachyk, Oleh; Khmelinskii, Artem; Plenge, Esben; Kok, Peter; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Poot, Dirk H J; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Botha, Charl P; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Weerd, Louise; Meijering, Erik; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2014-01-01

    In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  1. The resolution sensitivity of the Asian summer monsoon and its inter-model comparison between MRI-AGCM and MetUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Johnson, Stephanie J.; Schiemann, Reinhard; Demory, Marie-Estelle; Mizuta, Ryo; Yoshida, Kohei; Osamu Arakawa

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we compare the resolution sensitivity of the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) in two Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs): the MRI-AGCM and the MetUM. We analyze the MetUM at three different resolutions, N96 (approximately 200-km mesh on the equator), N216 (90-km mesh) and N512 (40-km mesh), and the MRI-AGCM at TL95 (approximately 180-km mesh on the equator), TL319 (60-km mesh), and TL959 (20-km mesh). The MRI-AGCM and the MetUM both show decreasing precipitation over the western Pacific with increasing resolution, but their precipitation responses differ over the Indian Ocean. In MRI-AGCM, a large precipitation increase appears off the equator (5-20°N). In MetUM, this off-equatorial precipitation increase is less significant and precipitation decreases over the equator. Moisture budget analysis demonstrates that a changing in moisture flux convergence at higher resolution is related to the precipitation response. Orographic effects, intra-seasonal variability and the representation of the meridional thermal gradient are explored as possible causes of the resolution sensitivity. Both high-resolution AGCMs (TL959 and N512) can represent steep topography, which anchors the rainfall pattern over south Asia and the Maritime Continent. In MRI-AGCM, representation of low pressure systems in TL959 also contributes to the rainfall pattern. Furthermore, the seasonal evolution of the meridional thermal gradient appears to be more accurate at higher resolution, particularly in the MRI-AGCM. These findings emphasize that the impact of resolution is only robust across the two AGCMs for some features of the ASM, and highlights the importance of multi-model studies of GCM resolution sensitivity.

  2. Development of a high-resolution detection module for the INSERT SPECT/MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busca, Paolo; Fiorini, Carlo; Butt, Arslan D; Occhipinti, Michele; Quaglia, Riccardo; Trigilio, Paolo [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Via Golgi 40, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nemeth, Gabor; Major, Peter; Bukki, Tamas; Nagy, Kalman [Mediso Medical Imaging Systems, Alsotorokvesz 14, H-1022 Budapest (Hungary); Piemonte, Claudio; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive, 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Rieger, Jan [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.UniversityF.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (Integrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes are being developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging (7 and 9.4 T), the second one dedicated to clinical imaging (3 T).

  3. Development of a high-resolution detection module for the INSERT SPECT/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busca, Paolo; Fiorini, Carlo; Butt, Arslan D; Occhipinti, Michele; Quaglia, Riccardo; Trigilio, Paolo; Nemeth, Gabor; Major, Peter; Bukki, Tamas; Nagy, Kalman; Piemonte, Claudio; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto; Rieger, Jan; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (Integrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes are being developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging (7 and 9.4 T), the second one dedicated to clinical imaging (3 T).

  4. Lesion discrimination in optic neuritis using high-resolution fat-suppressed fast spin-echo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, A.; Moseley, I.F.; Barker, G.J.; Jones, S.; MacManus, D.; McDonald, W.I.; Miller, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fast spin-echo (FSE) is a new sequence with acquisition times currently down to one-sixteenth of those obtained with conventional spin-echo sequences, which allows high-resolution (512 x 512 matrix) images to be acquired in an acceptable time. We compared the higher resolution of FSE with the medium resolution of a short inversion-time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence in depicting the optic nerves of healthy controls and patients with optic neuritis. Optic nerve MRI examinations were performed in 18 patients with optic neuritis and 10 normal controls. Two sequences were obtained coronally: fat-suppressed FSE (FSE TR 3250 ms/TEef 68 ms, echo-train length 16, 4 excitations, 24 cm rectangular field of view, 3 mm interleaved contiguous slices, in-plane resolution 0.5 x 0.5 mm) and STIR (TR 2000 ms/TE 50 ms/TI 175 ms, in-plane resolution 0.8 x 0.8 mm, slice thickness 5 mm). FSE demonstrated much more anatomical detail than STIR, e. g. distinction of optic nerve and sheath. Lesions were seen in 20 of 21 symptomatic nerves using FSE and in 18 of 21 using STIR. Nerve swelling or partial cross-sectional lesions of the optic nerve were each seen only on FSE in 3 cases. Fat-suppressed FSE imaging of the optic nerve improves anatomical definition and increases lesion detection in optic neuritis. (orig.). With 5 figs

  5. Value of noncontrast spiral CT for suspected acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Pil Yeob; Lee, Sang Wook; Kwon, Jae Soo; Sung, Young Soon; Rho, Myoung Ho; Chang, Jeong A.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and clinical efficacy of noncontrast spiral CT in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Over a six-month period, 100 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were prospectively evaluated with noncontrast spiral CT. All scans were obtained from the lower body of L3 to the symphysis pubis, with 5mm or 10mm collimation and pitch of 1 or 1.5, and without intravenous or oral contrast material. Diagnosis was established by means of surgical or clinical follow-up. Prospective diagnosis based on CT findings was compared with surgical results and clinical follow-up. Acute appendicitis was confirmed in 47 of 100 patients. On the basis of the Ct findings, SI patients were prospectively interpreted as positive for appendicitis, but in six the diagnosis was false-positive. Two of the 47 with acute appendicitis were prospectively interpreted as normal. The preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis was, thus, 45 true-positive, 47 true-negative, six false-positive and two false-negative yielding a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 89%, an accuracy of 92%, a positive predictive value of 88%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Using CT, an alternative diagnosis was established in 14 patients. Noncontrast spiral CT is a useful technique for diagnosing acute appendicitis. =20

  6. Automatic coronary calcium scoring using noncontrast and contrast CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guanyu, E-mail: yang.list@seu.edu.cn; Chen, Yang; Shu, Huazhong [Laboratory of Image Science and Technology, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Southeast University, No. 2, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096 (China); Centre de Recherche en Information Biomédicale Sino-Français (LIA CRIBs), Nanjing 210096 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Network and Information Integration, Southeast University, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210096 (China); Ning, Xiufang; Sun, Qiaoyu [Laboratory of Image Science and Technology, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Southeast University, No. 2, Si Pai Lou, Nanjing 210096 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Network and Information Integration, Southeast University, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210096 (China); Coatrieux, Jean-Louis [INSERM-U1099, Rennes F-35000 (France); Labotatoire Traitement du Signal et de l’Image (LTSI), Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Bat. 22, Rennes 35042 Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche en Information Biomédicale Sino-Français (LIA CRIBs), Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Calcium scoring is widely used to assess the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Accurate coronary artery calcification detection in noncontrast CT image is a prerequisite step for coronary calcium scoring. Currently, calcified lesions in the coronary arteries are manually identified by radiologists in clinical practice. Thus, in this paper, a fully automatic calcium scoring method was developed to alleviate the work load of the radiologists or cardiologists. Methods: The challenge of automatic coronary calcification detection is to discriminate the calcification in the coronary arteries from the calcification in the other tissues. Since the anatomy of coronary arteries is difficult to be observed in the noncontrast CT images, the contrast CT image of the same patient is used to extract the regions of the aorta, heart, and coronary arteries. Then, a patient-specific region-of-interest (ROI) is generated in the noncontrast CT image according to the segmentation results in the contrast CT image. This patient-specific ROI focuses on the regions in the neighborhood of coronary arteries for calcification detection, which can eliminate the calcifications in the surrounding tissues. A support vector machine classifier is applied finally to refine the results by removing possible image noise. Furthermore, the calcified lesions in the noncontrast images belonging to the different main coronary arteries are identified automatically using the labeling results of the extracted coronary arteries. Results: Forty datasets from four different CT machine vendors were used to evaluate their algorithm, which were provided by the MICCAI 2014 Coronary Calcium Scoring (orCaScore) Challenge. The sensitivity and positive predictive value for the volume of detected calcifications are 0.989 and 0.948. Only one patient out of 40 patients had been assigned to the wrong risk category defined according to Agatston scores (0, 1–100, 101–300, >300) by comparing with the ground

  7. MRI of the hip at 7T: feasibility of bone microarchitecture, high-resolution cartilage, and clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Gregory; Deniz, Cem M; Honig, Stephen; Egol, Kenneth; Regatte, Ravinder R; Zhu, Yudong; Sodickson, Daniel K; Brown, Ryan

    2014-06-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of performing bone microarchitecture, high-resolution cartilage, and clinical imaging of the hip at 7T. This study had Institutional Review Board approval. Using an 8-channel coil constructed in-house, we imaged the hips of 15 subjects on a 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We applied: 1) a T1-weighted 3D fast low angle shot (3D FLASH) sequence (0.23 × 0.23 × 1-1.5 mm(3) ) for bone microarchitecture imaging; 2) T1-weighted 3D FLASH (water excitation) and volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences (0.23 × 0.23 × 1.5 mm(3) ) with saturation or inversion recovery-based fat suppression for cartilage imaging; 3) 2D intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences without and with fat saturation (0.27 × 0.27 × 2 mm) for clinical imaging. Bone microarchitecture images allowed visualization of individual trabeculae within the proximal femur. Cartilage was well visualized and fat was well suppressed on FLASH and VIBE sequences. FSE sequences allowed visualization of cartilage, the labrum (including cartilage and labral pathology), joint capsule, and tendons. This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of performing a clinically comprehensive hip MRI protocol at 7T, including high-resolution imaging of bone microarchitecture and cartilage, as well as clinical imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Probing region-specific microstructure of human cortical areas using high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Nauen, David W; Troncoso, Juan C; Mori, Susumu

    2015-01-15

    Regional heterogeneity in cortical cyto- and myeloarchitecture forms the structural basis of mapping of cortical areas in the human brain. In this study, we investigate the potential of diffusion MRI to probe the microstructure of cortical gray matter and its region-specific heterogeneity across cortical areas in the fixed human brain. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data at an isotropic resolution of 92-μm and 30 diffusion-encoding directions were acquired using a 3D diffusion-weighted gradient-and-spin-echo sequence, from prefrontal (Brodmann area 9), primary motor (area 4), primary somatosensory (area 3b), and primary visual (area 17) cortical specimens (n=3 each) from three human subjects. Further, the diffusion MR findings in these cortical areas were compared with histological silver impregnation of the same specimens, in order to investigate the underlying architectonic features that constitute the microstructural basis of diffusion-driven contrasts in cortical gray matter. Our data reveal distinct and region-specific diffusion MR contrasts across the studied areas, allowing delineation of intracortical bands of tangential fibers in specific layers-layer I, layer VI, and the inner and outer bands of Baillarger. The findings of this work demonstrate unique sensitivity of diffusion MRI to differentiate region-specific cortical microstructure in the human brain, and will be useful for myeloarchitectonic mapping of cortical areas as well as to achieve an understanding of the basis of diffusion NMR contrasts in cortical gray matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reproducibility and differentiation of cervical arteriopathies using in vivo high-resolution black-blood MRI at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Strobl, Frederik F.; Cyran, Clemens C.; Helck, Andreas D.; Hartmann, Martin; Schindler, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Saam, Tobias; Nikolaou, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to evaluate the potential of high-resolution black-blood MRI (hr-bb-cMRI) to differentiate common cervical arteriopathies and to evaluate interobserver reproducibility. Forty-three consecutive patients with distinct cervical arteriopathies were examined with cervical hr-bb-cMRI at 3.0 Te with fat-saturated pre- and post-contrast T1w, T2w, and TOF images using dedicated carotid surface coils at our institution. Twenty-three patients had atherosclerotic disease, causing significant stenosis in 12 patients while 11 patients had moderate stenosis. Eight patients presented with cervical vasculitis, and five patients had arterial dissection. Furthermore, seven control subjects with no evidence of carotid disease were included. Two experienced readers blinded to all clinical information reviewed all MR images and classified both carotid and vertebral arteries as affected either by atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis, or no disease. Finally, a consensus reading was performed. On a per-vessel level, test performance parameters (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value) were 95, 97.7, 92.9, and 98.5 % for atherosclerotic disease; 91, 100, 100, and 98.7 % for vasculitis; and 100, 100, 100, and 100 % for dissection, respectively. On a per-patient level, performance parameters were 95.7, 85.7, 97.2, and 85.7 % for the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and 100, 100, 100, and 100 % for the diagnosis of dissection and of vasculitis, respectively. Accuracy rates were all above 95 % for all entities. There was a high agreement between observers both in a per-vessel (κ = 0.83) and in a per-patient analysis (κ = 0.82). This study demonstrates that hr-bb-cMRI is able to non-invasively differentiate between the most common cervical arteriopathies with an excellent interreader reproducibility. (orig.)

  10. Design and evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille stimulator with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowska, Weronika; Wolak, Tomasz; Soluch, Pawel; Orzechowski, Mateusz; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2013-02-15

    Neural correlates of Braille reading have been widely studied with different neuroimaging techniques. Nevertheless, the exact brain processes underlying this unique activity are still unknown, due to suboptimal accuracy of imaging and/or stimuli delivery methods. To study somatosensory perception effectively, the stimulation must reflect parameters of the natural stimulus and must be applied with precise timing. In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing these characteristics requires technologically advanced solutions and there have been several successful direct tactile stimulation devices designed that allow investigation of somatotopic organization of brain sensory areas. They may, however, be of limited applicability in studying brain mechanisms related to such distinctive tactile activity as Braille reading. In this paper we describe the design and experimental evaluation of an innovative MRI-compatible Braille Character Stimulator (BCS) enabling precise and stable delivery of standardized Braille characters with high temporal resolution. Our device is fully programmable, flexible in stimuli delivery and can be easily implemented in any research unit. The Braille Character Stimulator was tested with a same-different discrimination task on Braille characters during an event-related fMRI experiment in eleven right-handed sighted adult subjects. The results show significant activations in several cortical areas, including bilateral primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) cortices, bilateral premotor and supplementary motor areas, inferior frontal gyri, inferior temporal gyri and precuneus, as well as contralateral (to the stimulated hand) thalamus. The results validate the use of the BCS as a method of effective stimuli application in fMRI studies, in both sighted and visually impaired subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reproducibility and differentiation of cervical arteriopathies using in vivo high-resolution black-blood MRI at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Florian; Strobl, Frederik F.; Cyran, Clemens C.; Helck, Andreas D.; Hartmann, Martin; Schindler, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Saam, Tobias [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aims of the present study are to evaluate the potential of high-resolution black-blood MRI (hr-bb-cMRI) to differentiate common cervical arteriopathies and to evaluate interobserver reproducibility. Forty-three consecutive patients with distinct cervical arteriopathies were examined with cervical hr-bb-cMRI at 3.0 Te with fat-saturated pre- and post-contrast T1w, T2w, and TOF images using dedicated carotid surface coils at our institution. Twenty-three patients had atherosclerotic disease, causing significant stenosis in 12 patients while 11 patients had moderate stenosis. Eight patients presented with cervical vasculitis, and five patients had arterial dissection. Furthermore, seven control subjects with no evidence of carotid disease were included. Two experienced readers blinded to all clinical information reviewed all MR images and classified both carotid and vertebral arteries as affected either by atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis, or no disease. Finally, a consensus reading was performed. On a per-vessel level, test performance parameters (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value) were 95, 97.7, 92.9, and 98.5 % for atherosclerotic disease; 91, 100, 100, and 98.7 % for vasculitis; and 100, 100, 100, and 100 % for dissection, respectively. On a per-patient level, performance parameters were 95.7, 85.7, 97.2, and 85.7 % for the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and 100, 100, 100, and 100 % for the diagnosis of dissection and of vasculitis, respectively. Accuracy rates were all above 95 % for all entities. There was a high agreement between observers both in a per-vessel (κ = 0.83) and in a per-patient analysis (κ = 0.82). This study demonstrates that hr-bb-cMRI is able to non-invasively differentiate between the most common cervical arteriopathies with an excellent interreader reproducibility. (orig.)

  12. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Ali, E-mail: ali.gholipour@childrens.harvard.edu; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Department of Radiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aganj, Iman [Radiology Department, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sahin, Mustafa [Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  13. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Aganj, Iman; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  14. Q-ball imaging models: comparison between high and low angular resolution diffusion-weighted MRI protocols for investigation of brain white matter integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Trojsi, Francesca; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [MRI Research Center SUN-FISM-Neurological Institute for Diagnosis and Care ' ' Hermitage Capodimonte' ' , Naples (Italy); Second University of Naples, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Baronissi (Salerno) (Italy); Maastricht University, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is one of the typical data models for quantifying white matter (WM) anisotropy in diffusion-weighted MRI (DwMRI) studies. Brain and spinal investigation by high angular resolution DwMRI (high angular resolution imaging (HARDI)) protocols exhibits higher angular resolution in diffusion imaging compared to low angular resolution models, although with longer acquisition times. We aimed to assess the difference between QBI-derived anisotropy values from high and low angular resolution DwMRI protocols and their potential advantages or shortcomings in neuroradiology. Brain DwMRI data sets were acquired in seven healthy volunteers using both HARDI (b = 3000 s/mm{sup 2}, 54 gradient directions) and low angular resolution (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 32 gradient directions) acquisition schemes. For both sequences, tract of interest tractography and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) measures were extracted by using QBI model and were compared between the two data sets. QBI tractography and voxel-wise analyses showed that some WM tracts, such as corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal, and uncinate fasciculi, were reconstructed as one-dominant-direction fiber bundles with both acquisition schemes. In these WM tracts, mean percent different difference in GFA between the two data sets was less than 5 %. Contrariwise, multidirectional fiber bundles, such as corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus, were more accurately depicted by HARDI acquisition scheme. Our results suggest that the design of optimal DwMRI acquisition protocols for clinical investigation of WM anisotropy by QBI models should consider the specific brain target regions to be explored, inducing researchers to a trade-off choice between angular resolution and acquisition time. (orig.)

  15. 18F-FDG PET and high-resolution MRI co-registration for pre-surgical evaluation of patients with conventional MRI-negative refractory extra-temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Zhu, Yuankai; Jiang, Biao; Zhou, Yongji; Jin, Bo; Hou, Haifeng; Wu, Shuang; Zhu, Junming; Wang, Zhong Irene; Wong, Chong H; Ding, Meiping; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Shuang; Tian, Mei

    2018-04-18

    Epilepsy that originates outside of the temporal lobe can present some of the most challenging problems for surgical therapy, especially for patients with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative refractory extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE). This study aimed to evaluate the clinical value of pre-surgical 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) and high-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) co-registration in patients with conventional MRI-negative refractory ETLE, and compare their surgical outcomes. Sixty-seven patients with conventional MRI-negative refractory ETLE were prospectively included for pre-surgical 18 F-FDG PET and HR-MRI examinations. Under the guidance of 18 F-FDG PET and HR-MRI co-registration, HR-MRI images were re-read. Based on the image result changes from first reading to re-reading, patients were divided into three groups: Change-1 (lesions of subtle abnormality could be identified in re-read), Change-2 (non-specific abnormalities reported in the first reading were considered as lesions on HR-MRI re-read) and No-change. Post-surgical follow-ups were conducted for up to 59 months. Visual analysis of 18 F-FDG PET showed focal or regional abnormality in 46 patients (68.6%), while the abnormal rate increased to 94.0% (P evaluation by co-registration of 18 F-FDG PET and HR-MRI could improve the identification of the epileptogenic onset zone (EOZ), and may further guide the surgical decision-making and improve the outcome of the refractory ETLE with normal conventional MRI; therefore, it should be recommended as a standard procedure for pre-surgical evaluation of these patients.

  16. Balanced steady-state free precession with parallel imaging gives distortion-free fMRI with high temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Michael; Håberg, Asta K; Kristoffersen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Research on the functions of the human brain requires that functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) moves towards producing images with less distortion and higher temporal and spatial resolution. This study compares passband balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) acquisitions with and without parallel imaging (PI) to investigate whether combining PI with this pulse sequence is a viable option for functional MRI. Such a novel combination has the potential to offer the distortion-free advantages of bSSFP with the reduced acquisition time of PI. Scans were done on a Philips 3T Intera, using the installed bSSFP pulse sequence, both with and without the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) PI option. The task was a visual flashing checkerboard, and the viewing window covered the visual cortex. Sensitivity comparisons with and without PI were done using the same manually drawn region of interest for each time course of the subject, and comparing the z-score summary statistics: number of voxels with z>2.3, the mean of those voxels, their 90th percentile and their maximum value. We show that PI greatly improves the temporal resolution in bSSFP, reducing the volume acquisition time by more than half in this study to 0.67 s with 3-mm isotropic voxels. At the same time, a statistically significant increase was found for the maximum z-score using bSSFP with PI as compared to without it (P=.02). This improvement can be understood in terms of physiological noise, as demonstrated by noise measurements. This produces observed increases in the overall temporal signal to noise of the functional time series, giving greater sensitivity to functional activations with PI. This study demonstrates for the first time the possibility of combining PI with bSSFP to achieve distortion-free functional images without loss of sensitivity and with high temporal resolution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid resolution of diffusion weighted MRI abnormality in a patient with a stuttering stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jurriaan M; MacLean, Ainsley V; Young, Geoffrey S

    2010-01-01

    We report the unusually rapid and spontaneous normalisation of low diffusivity that accompanied resolution of acute neurological deficits in a stroke patient who underwent two magnetic resonance imaging examinations within 24 h of symptom onset. Diffusion weighted imaging obtained within hours of onset of left sided weakness demonstrated a focal right capsular area of low diffusivity that resolved within 24 h, coinciding with resolution of the patient’s symptoms. PMID:22315635

  18. The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestan, C.; Czerny, C.; Gstoettner, W.; Franz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas will be described in this paper. The pre- and postoperative imaging of the temporal bone was performed with HRCT and MRI. HRCT and MRI were performed in the axial and coronal plane. MRI was done with T2 weighted and T1 weighted sequences both before and after the intravenous application of contrast material. All imaging findings were confirmed clinically or surgically. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by HRCT included bony erosions of the ossicles, scutum, facial canal in the middle ear, tympanic walls including the tegmen tympani, and of the labyrinth. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by MRI included signs indicative for labyrinthitis, and brain abscess. Postoperative HRCT depicted bony erosions caused by recurrent cholesteatoma, bony defects of the facial nerve and of the labyrinth, and a defect of the tegmen tympani with a soft tissue mass in the middle ear. Postoperative MRI delineated neuritis of the facial nerve, labyrinthitis, and a meningo-encephalocele protruding into the middle ear. HRCT and MRI are excellent imaging tools to depict either bony or soft tissue complications or both if caused by acquired cholesteatomas. According to our findings and to the literature HRCT and MRI are complementary imaging methods to depict pre- or postoperative complications of acquired cholesteatomas if these are suspected by clinical examination. (orig.) [de

  19. Patterns of neurovascular compression in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia: A high-resolution MRI-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzoni, José; David, Philippe; Levivier, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the anatomical characteristics and patterns of neurovascular compression in patients suffering classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN), using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: The analysis of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve, brain stem and the vascular structures related to this nerve was made in 100 consecutive patients treated with a Gamma Knife radiosurgery for CTN between December 1999 and September 2004. MRI studies (T1, T1 enhanced and T2-SPIR) with axial, coronal and sagital simultaneous visualization were dynamically assessed using the software GammaPlan™. Three-dimensional reconstructions were also developed in some representative cases. Results: In 93 patients (93%), there were one or several vascular structures in contact, either, with the trigeminal nerve, or close to its origin in the pons. The superior cerebellar artery was involved in 71 cases (76%). Other vessels identified were the antero-inferior cerebellar artery, the basilar artery, the vertebral artery, and some venous structures. Vascular compression was found anywhere along the trigeminal nerve. The mean distance between the nerve compression and the origin of the nerve in the brainstem was 3.76 ± 2.9 mm (range 0–9.8 mm). In 39 patients (42%), the vascular compression was located proximally and in 42 (45%) the compression was located distally. Nerve dislocation or distortion by the vessel was observed in 30 cases (32%). Conclusions: The findings of this study are similar to those reported in surgical and autopsy series. This non-invasive MRI-based approach could be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in CTN, and it could help to understand its pathogenesis.

  20. To Resolve or Not To Resolve, that Is the Question: The Dual-Path Model of Incongruity Resolution and Absurd Verbal Humor by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ru H; Chen, Hsueh-Chih; Chan, Yu C; Wu, Ching-Lin; Li, Ping; Cho, Shu L; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2017-01-01

    It is well accepted that the humor comprehension processing involves incongruity detection and resolution and then induces a feeling of amusement. However, this three-stage model of humor processing does not apply to absurd humor (so-called nonsense humor). Absurd humor contains an unresolvable incongruity but can still induce a feeling of mirth. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the neural mechanisms of absurd humor. Specifically, we aimed to investigate the neural substrates associated with the complete resolution of incongruity resolution humor and partial resolution of absurd humor. Based on the fMRI data, we propose a dual-path model of incongruity resolution and absurd verbal humor. According to this model, the detection and resolution for the incongruity of incongruity resolution humor activate brain regions involved in the temporo-parietal lobe (TPJ) implicated in the integration of multiple information and precuneus, likely to be involved in the ability of perspective taking. The appreciation of incongruity resolution humor activates regions the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), implicated in autobiographic or event memory retrieval, and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), implying the funny feeling. By contrast, the partial resolution of absurd humor elicits greater activation in the fusiform gyrus which have been implicated in word processing, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for the process of incongruity resolution and superior temporal gyrus (STG) for the pragmatic awareness.

  1. A scalable multi-resolution spatio-temporal model for brain activation and connectivity in fMRI data

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2018-01-23

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a primary modality for studying brain activity. Modeling spatial dependence of imaging data at different spatial scales is one of the main challenges of contemporary neuroimaging, and it could allow for accurate testing for significance in neural activity. The high dimensionality of this type of data (on the order of hundreds of thousands of voxels) poses serious modeling challenges and considerable computational constraints. For the sake of feasibility, standard models typically reduce dimensionality by modeling covariance among regions of interest (ROIs)—coarser or larger spatial units—rather than among voxels. However, ignoring spatial dependence at different scales could drastically reduce our ability to detect activation patterns in the brain and hence produce misleading results. We introduce a multi-resolution spatio-temporal model and a computationally efficient methodology to estimate cognitive control related activation and whole-brain connectivity. The proposed model allows for testing voxel-specific activation while accounting for non-stationary local spatial dependence within anatomically defined ROIs, as well as regional dependence (between-ROIs). The model is used in a motor-task fMRI study to investigate brain activation and connectivity patterns aimed at identifying associations between these patterns and regaining motor functionality following a stroke.

  2. Clinical role of non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography for evaluation of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nomitsu, Yohei; Komeda, Yosuke; Okigawa, Takashi; Urata, Joji; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The association between a gadolinium-based contrast material and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been discussed. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) might provide sufficient information of renal artery stenosis. The non-contrast MRA of 26 patients with hypertension was retrospectively reviewed in the present study. The significant renal artery stenosis was visually evaluated by comparing non-contrast MRA with computed tomography or conventional angiographic finding. Difference of the intensities between the proximal and distal aorta was quantitatively evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of non-contrast MRA in the evaluation of the renal artery stenosis was 78%, 91%, 64% and 96%, respectively. The distal abdominal aorta showed less signal intensity than the proximal aorta by 16.9±12.2%. Non-contrast MRA is a non-invasive and effective method that allows evaluation of the renal artery stenosis. (author)

  3. A fundamental study of non-contrast enhanced MR angiography using ECG gated-3D fast spin echo at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakato, Kengo; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Tomiguchi, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) is frequently performed in body and extremity studies because of its superior ability to detect the vascular stenosis. However, nephrotoxicity of the contrast medium has been emphasized in recent years. Non-contrast MRA using the three-dimensional electrocardiogram-synchronized fast spin echo method (fresh blood imaging (FBI), non-contrast MRA of arteries and veins (NATIVE) and triggered acquisition non contrast enhancement MRA (TRANCE)) is recommended as a substitute for CE-MRA. There are a few reports in the literature that evaluate the detectability of vascular stenosis using non-contrast MRA on 3.0 T MRI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the detectability of vascular stenosis using non-contrast MRA at 3.0 T with an original vascular phantom. The vascular phantom consisted of silicon tubes. 30% and 70% stenosis of luminal diameter were made. Each silicon tube connected a pump producing a pulsatile flow. A flowing material to was used in this study to show the similarity of the intensity to blood on MRI. MRA without a contrast medium (NATIVE sequence) were performed in the vascular phantom by changing the image matrix, static magnetic field strength and flow velocity. In addition, the NATIVE sequence was used with or without flow compensation. Vascular stenosis was quantitatively estimated by measurement of the signal intensities in non-contrast MRA images. MRA with NATIVE sequence demonstrated an accurate estimation of 30% vascular stenosis at slow flow velocity. However, 30% stenosis was overestimated in cases of high flow velocity. Estimation was improved by using a flow compensation sequence. 70% stenosis was overestimated on MRA with NATIVE sequence. Estimation of 70% stenosis was improved by using a flow compensation sequence. Accurate estimation of vascular stenosis in MRA with a NATIVE sequence is improved by using the flow compensation technique. MRA with NATIVE sequence is considered to

  4. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  5. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizewski, Elke R.; Maderwald, Stefan; Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja; Dassinger, Benjamin; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  6. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B; Wang, K; Bayram, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  7. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, K; Bayram, E [GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  8. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm 3 . For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  9. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm3. For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  10. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier--a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-21

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm(3). For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  11. Dominance of layer-specific microvessel dilation in contrast-enhanced high-resolution fMRI: Comparison between hemodynamic spread and vascular architecture with CLARITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawsky, Alexander John; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kang, Bok-Man; Kim, Jae Hwan; Suh, Minah; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2017-08-16

    Contrast-enhanced cerebral blood volume-weighted (CBVw) fMRI response peaks are specific to the layer of evoked synaptic activity (Poplawsky et al., 2015), but the spatial resolution limit of CBVw fMRI is unknown. In this study, we measured the laminar spread of the CBVw fMRI evoked response in the external plexiform layer (EPL, 265 ± 65 μm anatomical thickness, mean ± SD, n = 30 locations from 5 rats) of the rat olfactory bulb during electrical stimulation of the lateral olfactory tract and examined its potential vascular source. First, we obtained the evoked CBVw fMRI responses with a 55 × 55 μm 2 in-plane resolution and a 500-μm thickness at 9.4 T, and found that the fMRI signal peaked predominantly in the inner half of EPL (136 ± 54 μm anatomical thickness). The mean full-width at half-maximum of these fMRI peaks was 347 ± 102 μm and the functional spread was approximately 100 or 200 μm when the effects of the laminar thicknesses of EPL or inner EPL were removed, respectively. Second, we visualized the vascular architecture of EPL from a different rat using a Clear Lipid-exchanged Anatomically Rigid Imaging/immunostaining-compatible Tissue hYdrogel (CLARITY)-based tissue preparation method and confocal microscopy. Microvascular segments with an outer diameter of limit of the fMRI spatial resolution is approximately the average length of 1-2 microvessel segments, which may be sufficient for examining sublaminar circuits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Visualization of intracranial vessel anatomy using high resolution MRI and a simple image fusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasel, C.

    2005-01-01

    A new technique for fusion and 3D viewing of high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and morphological MR sequences is reported. Scanning and image fusion was possible within 20 min on a standard 1.5 T MR-scanner. The procedure was successfully performed in 10 consecutive cases with excellent visualization of wall and luminal aspects of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid artery, the vertebrobasilar system and the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery

  13. Visualization of intracranial vessel anatomy using high resolution MRI and a simple image fusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasel, C. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: christian.nasel@perfusion.at

    2005-04-01

    A new technique for fusion and 3D viewing of high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and morphological MR sequences is reported. Scanning and image fusion was possible within 20 min on a standard 1.5 T MR-scanner. The procedure was successfully performed in 10 consecutive cases with excellent visualization of wall and luminal aspects of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid artery, the vertebrobasilar system and the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery.

  14. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data : A pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzyubachyk, O.; Khmelinskii, A.; Plenge, E.; Kok, P.; Snoeks, T.J.; Poot, D.H.; Löwik, C.W.; Botha, C.P.; Niessen, W.J.; Van der Weerd, L.; Meijering, E.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.

    2014-01-01

    In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such

  15. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: A pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.M. Dzyubachyk (Oleh); A. Khmelinskii (Artem); E. Plenge (Esben); P. Kok (Peter); T.J.A. Snoeks (Thomas); D.H.J. Poot; C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); C.P. Botha (Charl); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); L. van der Weerd; E. Meijering (Erik); B.P.F. Lelieveldt (Boudewijn)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to

  16. Value of non-contrast sequences in magnetic resonance angiography of hepatic arterial vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Vivek B., E-mail: vivek.kalra@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Box 208042, Tompkins East 2, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8042, United States of America (United States); Gilbert, John W., E-mail: jwgilbert@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, United States of America (United States); Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan, E-mail: sk3552@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, Milstein 3rd Fl, New York NY 10032 United States (United States); Cornfeld, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.cornfeld@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Box 208042, Tompkins East 2, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520-8042, United States of America (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate value of adding non-contrast MR angiographic sequence (In-Flow Inversion Recovery [IFIR]) to standard fat-suppressed T1-weighted postcontrast sequence (3D spoiled gradient echo [3D-GRE]) for evaluating hepatic arterial anatomy. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of 30 consecutive patients undergoing multiphase liver MRI. Individual vessels for IFIR/3D-GRE sequences were evaluated by two blinded readers using a four-point scale. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for vessel conspicuity between IFIR/3D-GRE sequences. Results: IFIR alone diagnostically imaged 8.1% of vessels, 3D-GRE alone 25.8%, 55.8% by both 3D-GRE/IFIR, and 10.3% of vessels by neither. Two patients with variant vascular anatomy were visualized with both sequences. Addition of IFIR to 3D-GRE resulted in statistically significant increase in arterial visualization (p < 0.001), 10% relative increase in identified vessels, and 3–5 mi increase in acquisition time for total scan time of 30–35 min. Conclusions: IFIR may be a useful adjunct to 3D-GRE in hepatic angiography without adding considerably to scan time. 10% more hepatic arteries were seen when combining information from IFIR/3D-GRE vs. 3D-GRE alone.

  17. Linear transforms for Fourier data on the sphere: application to high angular resolution diffusion MRI of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Justin P; Leahy, Richard M

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel family of linear transforms that can be applied to data collected from the surface of a 2-sphere in three-dimensional Fourier space. This family of transforms generalizes the previously-proposed Funk-Radon Transform (FRT), which was originally developed for estimating the orientations of white matter fibers in the central nervous system from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. The new family of transforms is characterized theoretically, and efficient numerical implementations of the transforms are presented for the case when the measured data is represented in a basis of spherical harmonics. After these general discussions, attention is focused on a particular new transform from this family that we name the Funk-Radon and Cosine Transform (FRACT). Based on theoretical arguments, it is expected that FRACT-based analysis should yield significantly better orientation information (e.g., improved accuracy and higher angular resolution) than FRT-based analysis, while maintaining the strong characterizability and computational efficiency of the FRT. Simulations are used to confirm these theoretical characteristics, and the practical significance of the proposed approach is illustrated with real diffusion weighted MRI brain data. These experiments demonstrate that, in addition to having strong theoretical characteristics, the proposed approach can outperform existing state-of-the-art orientation estimation methods with respect to measures such as angular resolution and robustness to noise and modeling errors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with Accuracy of Non-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Local Extension of Base of Tongue Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Rathod

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of base of tongue malignancy can be obtained through clinical examination and biopsy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT are used to detect its local extension, nodal spread and distant metastases. The main aim of study was to compare the accuracy of MRI and contrast enhanced CT in determining the local extent of base of tongue malignancy. Twenty five patients, biopsy proven cases of squamous cell carcinoma of base of tongue were taken. 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit with T2 weighted axial, coronal image; T1 weighted axial, coronal image; and STIR (Short tau inversion recovery axial and coronal images were used. 16 slice Computed Tomography unit with non-contrast and contrast enhanced images were used. Accuracy of CT to detect midline crossing: 50%; accuracy of MRI to detect midline crossing: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect anterior extension: 92%; accuracy of MRI to detect anterior extension: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect bone involvement: 20%; accuracy of MRI to detect bone involvement: 100%. MRI proved to be a better investigation than CT, in terms of evaluation of depth of invasion, presence of bony involvement, extension to opposite side, anterior half of tongue, tonsillar fossa, floor of mouth or oropharynx.

  19. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  20. An investigation into the effects of temporal resolution on hepatic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in volunteers and in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Andrew B; Graves, Martin J; Lomas, David J; Black, Richard T; Bowden, David J; Priest, Andrew N

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal resolution on the dual-input pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data from normal volunteer livers and from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Eleven volunteers and five patients were examined at 3 T. Two sections, one optimized for the vascular input functions (VIF) and one for the tissue, were imaged within a single heart-beat (HB) using a saturation-recovery fast gradient echo sequence. The data was analysed using a dual-input single-compartment PK model. The VIFs and/or uptake curves were then temporally sub-sampled (at interval ▵t = [2–20] s) before being subject to the same PK analysis. Statistical comparisons of tumour and normal tissue PK parameter values using a 5% significance level gave rise to the same study results when temporally sub-sampling the VIFs to HB < ▵t <4 s. However, sub-sampling to ▵t > 4 s did adversely affect the statistical comparisons. Temporal sub-sampling of just the liver/tumour tissue uptake curves at ▵t ≤ 20 s, whilst using high temporal resolution VIFs, did not substantially affect PK parameter statistical comparisons. In conclusion, there is no practical advantage to be gained from acquiring very high temporal resolution hepatic DCE-MRI data. Instead the high temporal resolution could be usefully traded for increased spatial resolution or SNR. (paper)

  1. Measuring the volume of temporal lobe in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Kefeng; Wu Li; Duan Hui; Han Dan; Chen Nan; Li Kuncheng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the morphological features of temporal lobe of healthy Chinese Han adults on the high-resolution MRI and provide morphological data of temporal lobe for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. Three hundred healthy Chinese volunteers (male 150, and female 150) recruited from 15 hospitals were divided equally into five groups according to their age, i.e., 18-30 (Group A), 31-40 (Group B), 41-50 (Group C), 51- 60(Group D), 61-70(Group E). All subjects were scanned using T 1 WI 3D MPRAGE sequence and volumes of standardized temporal lobe were collected. The bilateral volumes of standardized temporal lobe were compared by variance analysis between male and female subjects and among five age groups. Results: The mean volumes of left and right temporal lobe were (97 126±15 703) mm 3 and (97 015 ± 15 545) mm 3 respectively for men, and (95 123 ± 14 564) mm 3 and (96 423 ± 13 407) mm 3 for women. The difference temporal lobe volume between male and female wasn't significant on the same side (F=1.336, 0.127, P= 0.249, 0.722). The left temporal lobe volumes of Group A-E were (93 873±13 351), (95 566± 11 964), (10 1890 ± 14 511), (93 972 ± 14 050) and (95 636 ± 19 864) mm 3 respectively, and those on the right side were (93 409 ± 10 984), (98 158 ± 16 392), (102 079 ± 15 112), (95 448 ± 11 123) and (94 658 ± 16 928) mm 3 . There were significant differences among 5 groups between left and right temporal lobe volume(F=2.940, 3.514, P=0.021, 0.008). Further pairwise comparison revealed that left and right temporal lobe volume in Group C is higher than those of Group A and D (P 0.05). Conclusion: High-resolution MRI could offer detailed images and precise morphological data of temporal lobe, which provides morphological data of temporal lobe for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. (authors)

  2. High-resolution MRI study of pituitary glands in healthy adult of the Han nationality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bin; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the morphological characteristics of pituitary glands in healthy adult of the Han nationality on the High-resolution Mill and provide morphological data of pituitary glands for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. Nine hundred and seventy eight Chinese healthy volunteers (age range=18 to 70 ) recruited from 16 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i. e., Group A (age range = 18 to 30), B (age range = 31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range = 51 to 60), and E (age range = 61 to 70). All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. By Multiplan reconstruction with 3D software, the pituitary gland's volume, size, and inclination of pituitary, stalk were measured and the differences between sexualities and among age groups were compared by analysis of variance using SPSS13.0; those among five age groups were compared pair-wised by Tukey analysis; and the differences between male and female were analyzed by independent t test, and the differences of measurements of typing of pituitary glands were analyzed by Chi-square analysis. Results: (1) Volume of pituitary glands: the mean volume of male and female among 5 age groups were (1142 ± 290), (996 ± 223), (979 ± 178), (971 ± 174), (930 ± 189)and (1247 ± 210), (1199 ± 216), (1108 ± 196), (1059 ± 212), (984 ± 177) mm 3 respectively. There were significant differences among the age groups(F=13.811,27.091,P 0.05). (4) The typing of pituitary glands in middle sagittal MR images: there were significant differences between each typing (χ 2 =44.212, 107.518, P<0.01), there was a tendency of pituitary upper border to depressed when age increased. Conclusions: With high- resolution Mill and 3D volumetric analytic software, volume and size of pituitary glands and the angle of inclination of pituitary stalks were accurately measured

  3. Segmentation of High Angular Resolution Diffusion MRI using Sparse Riemannian Manifold Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Vidal, René

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of segmenting high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data into multiple regions (or fiber tracts) with distinct diffusion properties. We use the orientation distribution function (ODF) to represent HARDI data and cast the problem as a clustering problem in the space of ODFs. Our approach integrates tools from sparse representation theory and Riemannian geometry into a graph theoretic segmentation framework. By exploiting the Riemannian properties of the space of ODFs, we learn a sparse representation for each ODF and infer the segmentation by applying spectral clustering to a similarity matrix built from these representations. In cases where regions with similar (resp. distinct) diffusion properties belong to different (resp. same) fiber tracts, we obtain the segmentation by incorporating spatial and user-specified pairwise relationships into the formulation. Experiments on synthetic data evaluate the sensitivity of our method to image noise and the presence of complex fiber configurations, and show its superior performance compared to alternative segmentation methods. Experiments on phantom and real data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method in segmenting simulated fibers, as well as white matter fiber tracts of clinical importance in the human brain. PMID:24108748

  4. Functionally distinct amygdala subregions identified using DTI and high-resolution fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderston, Nicholas L.; Schultz, Douglas H.; Hopkins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is often directly linked with fear and emotion, amygdala neurons are activated by a wide variety of emotional and non-emotional stimuli. Different subregions within the amygdala may be engaged preferentially by different aspects of emotional and non-emotional tasks. To test this hypothesis, we measured and compared the effects of novelty and fear on amygdala activity. We used high-resolution blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging and streamline tractography to subdivide the amygdala into three distinct functional subunits. We identified a laterobasal subregion connected with the visual cortex that responds generally to visual stimuli, a non-projecting region that responds to salient visual stimuli, and a centromedial subregion connected with the diencephalon that responds only when a visual stimulus predicts an aversive outcome. We provide anatomical and functional support for a model of amygdala function where information enters through the laterobasal subregion, is processed by intrinsic circuits in the interspersed tissue, and is then passed to the centromedial subregion, where activation leads to behavioral output. PMID:25969533

  5. High resolution pituitary gland MRI at 7.0 tesla: a clinical evaluation in Cushing's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotte, Alexandra A.J. de; Groenewegen, Amy; Rutgers, Dik R.; Witkamp, Theo; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zelissen, Pierre M.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Endocrinology), Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijer, F.J.A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hermus, Ad [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Endocrinology), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the detection of pituitary lesions at 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T MRI in 16 patients with clinically and biochemically proven Cushing's disease. In seven patients, no lesion was detected on the initial 1.5 T MRI, and in nine patients it was uncertain whether there was a lesion. Firstly, two readers assessed both 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI examinations unpaired in a random order for the presence of lesions. Consensus reading with a third neuroradiologist was used to define final lesions in all MRIs. Secondly, surgical outcome was evaluated. A comparison was made between the lesions visualized with MRI and the lesions found during surgery in 9/16 patients. The interobserver agreement for lesion detection was good at 1.5 T MRI (κ = 0.69) and 7.0 T MRI (κ = 0.62). In five patients, both the 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI enabled visualization of a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland. In three patients, 7.0 T MRI detected a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland, while no lesion was visible at 1.5 T MRI. The interobserver agreement of image assessment for 7.0 T MRI in patients with Cushing's disease was good, and lesions were detected more accurately with 7.0 T MRI. (orig.)

  6. High resolution pituitary gland MRI at 7.0 tesla: a clinical evaluation in Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotte, Alexandra A.J. de; Groenewegen, Amy; Rutgers, Dik R.; Witkamp, Theo; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Meijer, F.J.A.; Lindert, Erik J. van; Hermus, Ad

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the detection of pituitary lesions at 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T MRI in 16 patients with clinically and biochemically proven Cushing's disease. In seven patients, no lesion was detected on the initial 1.5 T MRI, and in nine patients it was uncertain whether there was a lesion. Firstly, two readers assessed both 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI examinations unpaired in a random order for the presence of lesions. Consensus reading with a third neuroradiologist was used to define final lesions in all MRIs. Secondly, surgical outcome was evaluated. A comparison was made between the lesions visualized with MRI and the lesions found during surgery in 9/16 patients. The interobserver agreement for lesion detection was good at 1.5 T MRI (κ = 0.69) and 7.0 T MRI (κ = 0.62). In five patients, both the 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI enabled visualization of a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland. In three patients, 7.0 T MRI detected a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland, while no lesion was visible at 1.5 T MRI. The interobserver agreement of image assessment for 7.0 T MRI in patients with Cushing's disease was good, and lesions were detected more accurately with 7.0 T MRI. (orig.)

  7. Three-dimensional volumetric MRI with isotropic resolution: improved speed of acquisition, spatial resolution and assessment of lesion conspicuity in patients with recurrent soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Morris, Carol [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the acquisition speed, lesion conspicuity, and inter-observer agreement associated with volumetric T{sub 1}-weighted MR sequences with isotropic resolution for detecting recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Fifteen subjects with histologically proven recurrent STS underwent MRI, including axial and coronal T{sub 1}-weighted spin echo (T{sub 1}-WSE) (5-mm slice thickness) and coronal 3D volumetric T{sub 1}-weighted (fat-suppressed, volume-interpolated, breath-hold examination; repetition time/echo time, 3.7/1.4 ms; flip angle, 9.5 ; 1-mm slice thickness) sequences before and after intravenous contrast administration. Subtraction imaging and multiplanar reformations (MPRs) were performed. Acquisition times for T{sub 1}-WSE in two planes and 3D sequences were reported. Two radiologists reviewed images for quality (>50 % artifacts, 25-50 % artifacts, <25 % artifacts, and no substantial artifacts), lesion conspicuity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR{sub muscle}), recurrence size, and recurrence-to-joint distance. Descriptive and intraclass correlation (ICC) statistics are given. Mean acquisition times were significantly less for 3D imaging compared with 2-plane T{sub 1}-WSE (183.6 vs 342.6 s; P = 0.012). Image quality was rated as having no substantial artifacts in 13/15 and <25 % artifacts in 2/15. Lesion conspicuity was significantly improved for subtracted versus unsubtracted images (CNR{sub muscle}, 100 ± 138 vs 181 ± 199; P = 0.05). Mean recurrent lesion size was 2.5 cm (range, 0.7-5.7 cm), and measurements on 3D sequences offered excellent interobserver agreement (ICC, 0.98 for lesion size and 0.96 for recurrence-to-joint distance with MPR views). Three-dimensional volumetric sequences offer faster acquisition times, higher spatial resolution, and MPR capability compared with 2D T{sub 1}-WSE for postcontrast imaging. Subtraction imaging provides higher lesion conspicuity for detecting recurrent STS in skeletal muscle, with excellent interobserver

  8. A Specialized Multi-Transmit Head Coil for High Resolution fMRI of the Human Visual Cortex at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Shubharthi; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G; Poser, Benedikt A; Zimmermann, Jan; Goebel, Rainer; Adriany, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    To design, construct and validate radiofrequency (RF) transmit and receive phased array coils for high-resolution visual cortex imaging at 7 Tesla. A 4 channel transmit and 16 channel receive array was constructed on a conformal polycarbonate former. Transmit field efficiency and homogeneity were simulated and validated, along with the Specific Absorption Rate, using [Formula: see text] mapping techniques and electromagnetic simulations. Receiver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal SNR (tSNR) across EPI time series, g-factors for accelerated imaging and noise correlations were evaluated and compared with a commercial 32 channel whole head coil. The performance of the coil was further evaluated with human subjects through functional MRI (fMRI) studies at standard and submillimeter resolutions of upto 0.8mm isotropic. The transmit and receive sections were characterized using bench tests and showed good interelement decoupling, preamplifier decoupling and sample loading. SNR for the 16 channel coil was ∼ 1.5 times that of the commercial coil in the human occipital lobe, and showed better g-factor values for accelerated imaging. fMRI tests conducted showed better response to Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) activation, at resolutions of 1.2mm and 0.8mm isotropic. The 4 channel phased array transmit coil provides homogeneous excitation across the visual cortex, which, in combination with the dual row 16 channel receive array, makes for a valuable research tool for high resolution anatomical and functional imaging of the visual cortex at 7T.

  9. Computation of a high-resolution MRI 3D stereotaxic atlas of the sheep brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ella, Arsène; Delgadillo, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2017-02-15

    The sheep model was first used in the fields of animal reproduction and veterinary sciences and then was utilized in fundamental and preclinical studies. For more than a decade, magnetic resonance (MR) studies performed on this model have been increasingly reported, especially in the field of neuroscience. To contribute to MR translational neuroscience research, a brain template and an atlas are necessary. We have recently generated the first complete T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W MR population average images (or templates) of in vivo sheep brains. In this study, we 1) defined a 3D stereotaxic coordinate system for previously established in vivo population average templates; 2) used deformation fields obtained during optimized nonlinear registrations to compute nonlinear tissues or prior probability maps (nlTPMs) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) tissues; 3) delineated 25 external and 28 internal sheep brain structures by segmenting both templates and nlTPMs; and 4) annotated and labeled these structures using an existing histological atlas. We built a quality high-resolution 3D atlas of average in vivo sheep brains linked to a reference stereotaxic space. The atlas and nlTPMs, associated with previously computed T1W and T2W in vivo sheep brain templates and nlTPMs, provide a complete set of imaging space that are able to be imported into other imaging software programs and could be used as standardized tools for neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods, such as image registration, image segmentation, identification of brain structures, implementation of recording devices, or neuronavigation. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:676-692, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A high-resolution 7-Tesla fMRI dataset from complex natural stimulation with an audio movie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Michael; Baumgartner, Florian J; Ibe, Pierre; Kaule, Falko R; Pollmann, Stefan; Speck, Oliver; Zinke, Wolf; Stadler, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) dataset - 20 participants recorded at high field strength (7 Tesla) during prolonged stimulation with an auditory feature film ("Forrest Gump"). In addition, a comprehensive set of auxiliary data (T1w, T2w, DTI, susceptibility-weighted image, angiography) as well as measurements to assess technical and physiological noise components have been acquired. An initial analysis confirms that these data can be used to study common and idiosyncratic brain response patterns to complex auditory stimulation. Among the potential uses of this dataset are the study of auditory attention and cognition, language and music perception, and social perception. The auxiliary measurements enable a large variety of additional analysis strategies that relate functional response patterns to structural properties of the brain. Alongside the acquired data, we provide source code and detailed information on all employed procedures - from stimulus creation to data analysis. In order to facilitate replicative and derived works, only free and open-source software was utilized.

  11. Volume measurement of thalami in normal Chinese Han nationality adults by the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shuai; Chen Nan; Guo Yulin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure the volume of thalamus in 1000 healthy Chinese Han nationality adults, and to analyze the relationship between thalamic volume and age, sex, weight and cerebral volume, to provide reliable data for the construction of database of Chinese adults' digital standard brain. Methods: Totally 1000 healthy Chinese adults of Han nationality aged from 18 to 80 years were recruited.They were divided into 5 groups by age: 18-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60 and 61-80 years. Each group included 100 males and 100 females. Brain images were obtained on a 1.5 T MR, and the outline of thalami was drawn with Aquariusws software. Then the thalamic volume was calculated automatically. The volumes of left and right thalamus were compared by paired sample t-test. Thalamic volumes of the same side were compared between males and females by independent sample t-test. And thalamic volumes of different age groups were compared by one-way ANOVA. The relationships between thalamic volume and age, sex, weight and cerebral volume were analyzed respectively. Results: The males' standardized volumes of left and right thalamus of healthy Chinese Han nationality adults were (5776 ± 780), (5655 ± 759) mm 3 , and they were (5464 ±573), (5360 ± 542) mm 3 for female. The males' thalamic volume was more than the females' on the same side (t=2.245, 2.200, P<0.01). The left thalamic volumes of various age groups were (6180 ± 534), (6047 ± 562), (5426 ± 471), (5552 ± 526), (4866 ± 552) mm 3 , respectively, while the right thalamic volumes of the 5 groups were (6069 ± 532), (5895 ± 539), (5357 ± 480), (5396 ± 445),(4791 ± 558)mm 3 , respectively. There were statistically significant difference among the 5 groups (F=165.686, 165.235, P<0.01). The left and right thalamic volume were all negatively correlated with age (r=-0.633, -0.645, P<0.05). Conclusions: With high resolution 1.5 T MR scanner,grey matter and white matter can be depicted clearly and the outline

  12. High resolution MRI for preoperative work-up of neonates with an anorectal malformation: a direct comparison with distal pressure colostography/fistulography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomeer, Maarten G. [Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Devos, Annick; Lequin, Maarten; Graaf, Nanko de; Meradji, Morteza [Erasmus MC, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Meeussen, Conny J.H.M.; Blaauw, Ivo de; Sloots, Cornelius E.J. [Erasmus MC, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    To compare MRI and colostography/fistulography in neonates with anorectal malformations (ARM), using surgery as reference standard. Thirty-three neonates (22 boys) with ARM were included. All patients underwent both preoperative high-resolution MRI (without sedation or contrast instillation) and colostography/fistulography. The Krickenbeck classification was used to classify anorectal malformations, and the level of the rectal ending in relation to the levator muscle was evaluated. Subjects included nine patients with a bulbar recto-urethral fistula, six with a prostatic recto-urethral fistula, five with a vestibular fistula, five with a cloacal malformation, four without fistula, one with a H-type fistula, one with anal stenosis, one with a rectoperineal fistula and one with a bladderneck fistula. MRI and colostography/fistulography predicted anatomy in 88 % (29/33) and 61 % (20/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.012). The distal end of the rectal pouch was correctly predicted in 88 % (29/33) and 67 % (22/33) of cases, respectively (p = 0.065). The length of the common channel in cloacal malformation was predicted with MRI in all (100 %, 5/5) and in 80 % of cases (4/5) with colostography/fistulography. Two bowel perforations occurred during colostography/fistulography. MRI provides the most accurate evaluation of ARM and should be considered a serious alternative to colostography/fistulography during preoperative work-up. (orig.)

  13. SU-F-J-93: Automated Segmentation of High-Resolution 3D WholeBrain Spectroscopic MRI for Glioblastoma Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreibmann, E; Shu, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Cordova, J; Gurbani, S; Holder, C; Cooper, L; Shim, H [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We report on an automated segmentation algorithm for defining radiation therapy target volumes using spectroscopic MR images (sMRI) acquired at nominal voxel resolution of 100 microliters. Methods: Wholebrain sMRI combining 3D echo-planar spectroscopic imaging, generalized auto-calibrating partially-parallel acquisitions, and elliptical k-space encoding were conducted on 3T MRI scanner with 32-channel head coil array creating images. Metabolite maps generated include choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), as well as Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr ratio maps. Automated segmentation was achieved by concomitantly considering sMRI metabolite maps with standard contrast enhancing (CE) imaging in a pipeline that first uses the water signal for skull stripping. Subsequently, an initial blob of tumor region is identified by searching for regions of FLAIR abnormalities that also display reduced NAA activity using a mean ratio correlation and morphological filters. These regions are used as starting point for a geodesic level-set refinement that adapts the initial blob to the fine details specific to each metabolite. Results: Accuracy of the segmentation model was tested on a cohort of 12 patients that had sMRI datasets acquired pre, mid and post-treatment, providing a broad range of enhancement patterns. Compared to classical imaging, where heterogeneity in the tumor appearance and shape across posed a greater challenge to the algorithm, sMRI’s regions of abnormal activity were easily detected in the sMRI metabolite maps when combining the detail available in the standard imaging with the local enhancement produced by the metabolites. Results can be imported in the treatment planning, leading in general increase in the target volumes (GTV60) when using sMRI+CE MRI compared to the standard CE MRI alone. Conclusion: Integration of automated segmentation of sMRI metabolite maps into planning is feasible and will likely streamline acceptance of this

  14. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI--a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. RESULTS: Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38--0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis...... is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. KEY POINTS...

  15. Feasibility and evaluation of dual-source transmit 3D imaging of the orbits: Comparison to high-resolution conventional MRI at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim, E-mail: achim.seeger@gmx.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schulze, Maximilian, E-mail: maximilian.schulze@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schuettauf, Frank, E-mail: fschuettauf@uni-tuebingen.de [University Eye Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Schleichstrasse 12, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Klose, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.klose@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.ernemann@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Hauser, Till-Karsten, E-mail: till-karsten.hauser@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Reduced FOV imaging enables a 3D approach for a very fast assessment of the orbits. • Conventional MRI exhibited higher eSNR values and consecutively higher scores for overall image quality in the subjective readers’ analysis. • All pathologies could be detected compared to high-resolution conventional MRI making 3D pTX SPACE to a potential alternative and fast imaging technique. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of orbital MR images obtained by using a dual-source parallel transmission (pTX) 3D sequence (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution, SPACE) with the image quality of conventional high-resolution standard protocol for clinical use in patients at 3T. Materials and methods: After obtaining institutional review board approval and patient consent, 32 patients with clinical indication for orbital MRI were examined using a high-resolution conventional sequences and 3D pTX SPACE sequences. Quantitative measurements, image quality of the healthy orbit, incidence of artifacts, and the subjective diagnostic performance to establish diagnosis was rated. Statistical significance was calculated by using a Student's t-test and nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Length measurements were comparable in the two techniques, 3D pTX SPACE resulted in significant faster image acquisition with higher spatial resolution and less motion artifacts as well as better delineation of the optic nerve sheath. However, estimated contrast-to-noise and signal-to-noise and overall image quality as well as subjective scores of the conventional TSE imaging were rated significantly higher. The conventional MR sequences were the preferred techniques by the readers. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of 3D pTX SPACE of the orbit resulting in a rapid acquisition of isotropic high-resolution images. Although no pathology was

  16. RESOLUTE PET/MRI Attenuation Correction for O-(2-F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) in Brain Tumor Patients with Metal Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Andersen, Flemming L; Kjær, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    of agreement for TMAX/B was for RESOLUTE (-3%; 4%), Dixon (-9%; 16%), and UTE (-7%; 10%). The absolute error when measuring BTV was 0.7 ± 1.9 mL (N.S) with RESOLUTE, 5.3 ± 10 mL using Dixon, and 1.7 ± 3.7 mL using UTE. RESOLUTE performed best in the identification of the location of peak activity and in brain...... to be quantitatively correct in order to be used clinically, which require accurate attenuation correction (AC) in PET/MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the subject-specific MR-derived AC method RESOLUTE in post-operative brain tumor patients.Methods:We analyzed 51 post-operative brain tumor...... patients (68 examinations, 200 MBq [18F]-FET) investigated in a PET/MRI scanner. MR-AC maps were acquired using: (1) the Dixon water fat separation sequence, (2) the ultra short echo time (UTE) sequences, (3) calculated using our new RESOLUTE methodology, and (4) a same day low-dose CT used as reference...

  17. High-resolution 3 T MRI of traumatic and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) abnormalities using Palmer and Outerbridge classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, T; Rafijah, G; Yang, L; Ueno, T; Horiuchi, S; Hitt, D; Yoshioka, H

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of high-resolution 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of traumatic and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) abnormalities among three groups: patients presenting with wrist pain who were (a) younger than age 50 years or (b) age 50 or older (PT<50 and PT≥50, respectively), and (c) asymptomatic controls who were younger than age 50 years (AC). High-resolution 3 T MRI was evaluated retrospectively in 96 patients, including 47 PT<50, 38 PT≥50, and 11 AC. Two board-certified radiologists reviewed the MRI images independently. MRI features of TFCC injury were analysed according to the Palmer classification, and cartilage degeneration around the TFCC was evaluated using the Outerbridge classification. Differences in MRI findings among these groups were detected using chi-square test. Cohen's kappa was calculated to assess interobserver and intra-observer reliability. The incidence of Palmer class 1A, 1C and 1D traumatic TFCC injury was significantly (p<0.05) higher in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (class 1A: 47.4% versus 27.7%, class 1C: 31.6% versus 12.8%, and class 1D: 21.1% versus 2.1%). Likewise, MRI findings of TFCC degeneration were observed more frequently in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (p<0.01). Outerbridge grade 2 or higher cartilage degeneration was significantly (p<0.01) more frequently seen in PT≥50 than in PT<50 (55.3% versus 17% in the lunate, 28.9% versus 4.3% in the triquetrum, 73.7% versus 12.8% in the ulna). High-resolution wrist MRI at 3 T enables detailed evaluation of TFCC traumatic injury and degenerative changes using the Palmer and Outerbridge classifications, with good or excellent interobserver and intra-observer reliability. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Virtual Non-Contrast CT Using Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Feasibility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Inyoung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated V...

  19. Improving temporal resolution in fMRI using a 3D spiral acquisition and low rank plus sparse (L+S) reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrii Y; Herbst, Michael; Andrew Stenger, V

    2017-08-15

    Rapid whole-brain dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is of particular interest in Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). Faster acquisitions with higher temporal sampling of the BOLD time-course provide several advantages including increased sensitivity in detecting functional activation, the possibility of filtering out physiological noise for improving temporal SNR, and freezing out head motion. Generally, faster acquisitions require undersampling of the data which results in aliasing artifacts in the object domain. A recently developed low-rank (L) plus sparse (S) matrix decomposition model (L+S) is one of the methods that has been introduced to reconstruct images from undersampled dynamic MRI data. The L+S approach assumes that the dynamic MRI data, represented as a space-time matrix M, is a linear superposition of L and S components, where L represents highly spatially and temporally correlated elements, such as the image background, while S captures dynamic information that is sparse in an appropriate transform domain. This suggests that L+S might be suited for undersampled task or slow event-related fMRI acquisitions because the periodic nature of the BOLD signal is sparse in the temporal Fourier transform domain and slowly varying low-rank brain background signals, such as physiological noise and drift, will be predominantly low-rank. In this work, as a proof of concept, we exploit the L+S method for accelerating block-design fMRI using a 3D stack of spirals (SoS) acquisition where undersampling is performed in the k z -t domain. We examined the feasibility of the L+S method to accurately separate temporally correlated brain background information in the L component while capturing periodic BOLD signals in the S component. We present results acquired in control human volunteers at 3T for both retrospective and prospectively acquired fMRI data for a visual activation block-design task. We show that a SoS fMRI acquisition with an

  20. MR-Imaging of teeth and periodontal apparatus: an experimental study comparing high-resolution MRI with MDCT and CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudino, Chiara; Csernus, Reka; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Rohde, Stefan; Cosgarea, Raluca; Kim, Ti-Sun; Heiland, Sabine; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize dental and periodontal structures and (2) to compare findings with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). Four porcine mandibles were examined with (1) 3T-MRI, (2) MDCT and (3) CBCT. Two observers independently reviewed MR, MDCT and CBCT images and assessed image quality of different dental and periodontal structures. To assess quantitatively the accuracy of the different imaging technique, both observers measured burr holes, previously drilled in the mandibles. Dental structures, e.g. teeth roots, pulpa chamber and dentin, were imaged accurately with all imaging sources. Periodontal space and cortical/trabecular bone were better visualized by MRI (p < 0.001). MRI could excellently display the lamina dura, not detectable with MDCT and only inconstant visible with CBCT (p < 0.001). Burr hole measurements were highly precise with all imaging techniques. This experimental study shows the diagnostic feasibility of MRI in visualization of teeth and periodontal anatomy. Detection of periodontal structures was significantly better with MRI than with MDCT or CBCT. Prospective trials have to evaluate further the potential benefit of MRI in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  1. MR-Imaging of teeth and periodontal apparatus: an experimental study comparing high-resolution MRI with MDCT and CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudino, Chiara; Csernus, Reka; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Rohde, Stefan [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Cosgarea, Raluca; Kim, Ti-Sun [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Periodontology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heiland, Sabine [University Hospital Heidelberg, Section of Experimental Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Department of Radiology, Interdisciplinary Center for Biomedical Research, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize dental and periodontal structures and (2) to compare findings with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). Four porcine mandibles were examined with (1) 3T-MRI, (2) MDCT and (3) CBCT. Two observers independently reviewed MR, MDCT and CBCT images and assessed image quality of different dental and periodontal structures. To assess quantitatively the accuracy of the different imaging technique, both observers measured burr holes, previously drilled in the mandibles. Dental structures, e.g. teeth roots, pulpa chamber and dentin, were imaged accurately with all imaging sources. Periodontal space and cortical/trabecular bone were better visualized by MRI (p < 0.001). MRI could excellently display the lamina dura, not detectable with MDCT and only inconstant visible with CBCT (p < 0.001). Burr hole measurements were highly precise with all imaging techniques. This experimental study shows the diagnostic feasibility of MRI in visualization of teeth and periodontal anatomy. Detection of periodontal structures was significantly better with MRI than with MDCT or CBCT. Prospective trials have to evaluate further the potential benefit of MRI in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of optic tracts in normal Chinese adults of the Han nationality based on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Changying; Shi Linping; Zhang Yang; Wang Jian; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the morphological characteristics of optic tracts in healthy Chinese Han adults on the high-resolution MRI and fill the database of Chinese standard brain with morphological data of optic tracts. Methods: Cerebral MRI scans with T 1 WI 3D MPRAGE sequence of 1000 healthy Chinese volunteers from 15 hospitals were divided into five stages, ranging in age from 18 to 70. With the technique of multi-baseline, structure and morphology of optic tracts were displayed optimally on the images with multiplanar reconstruction. Data were measured as following: transverse distance of the cisternal optic tract (TD1) and peri-crural optic tract (TD2), length from the cisternal optic tract to the peri-crural optic tract (L), angle between optic tract(AOT) and height of optic tract from its first segment to plane of anterior commissure (H) including H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5. The measurements of optic tracts between sexualities and among age groups were compared by anasis of covariance; those among five age groups were compared pairwisedly by least significant difference analysis (LSD); and the differences of measurements between left and right optic tracts were analyzed using paired t test. Results: (1) Comparisons of optic tract structures between male and female: the mean optic tract length of male [(11.69±1.45),(11.56±1.44) mm] was significant longer than that of female [(10.58±1.29), (10.40±1.34) mm] (F=22.236, 29.703, P=0.000); the mean H1 of male [(2.56±0.28), (2.60±0.29) mm] and female [(2.57±0.31), (2.63±0.32) mm] were significantly different (F= 11.130,7.805, P=0.000, 0.005). No significant differences of the other measurements were found between male and female (P>0.05). (2) Comparisons among age groups: among 5 age groups, TD1 of both sides [left TD1 :(4.64 ± 0.51) ,(4.64 ± 0.57), (4.55 ± 0.58), (4.39 ± 0.53), (4.36 ± 0.58) mm; right TD1: (4.84 ± 0.53), (4.80 ± 0.60 ), (4.77 ± 0.65), (4.60 ± 0.59), (4.57 ± 0.59) mm ] and the right TD2

  3. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic, and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7-Tesla fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we used the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7-Tesla fMRI compared with 3 Tesla and time-efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1-mm isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). The delineated Pearson's correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor, and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and other motor disorders.

  4. A scalable multi-resolution spatio-temporal model for brain activation and connectivity in fMRI data

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano; Ombao, Hernando; Genton, Marc G.

    2018-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a primary modality for studying brain activity. Modeling spatial dependence of imaging data at different spatial scales is one of the main challenges of contemporary neuroimaging, and it could allow

  5. Noncontrast computed tomographic Hounsfield unit evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis: a quantitative evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besachio, David A. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City (United States); United States Navy, Bethesda, MD (United States); Quigley, Edward P.; Shah, Lubdha M.; Salzman, Karen L. [University of Utah, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Our objective is to determine the utility of noncontrast Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit values corrected for the patient's hematocrit, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit difference measurements in the identification of intracranial venous thrombosis on noncontrast head computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed noncontrast head computed tomography exams performed in both normal patients and those with cerebral venous thrombosis, acquiring Hounsfield unit values in normal and thrombosed cerebral venous structures. Also, we acquired Hounsfield unit values in the internal carotid artery for comparison to thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures and compared the venous Hounsfield unit values to the patient's hematocrit. A significant difference is identified between Hounsfield unit values in thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures. Applying Hounsfield unit threshold values of greater than 65, a Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratio of greater than 1.7, and venoarterial difference values greater than 15 alone and in combination, the majority of cases of venous thrombosis are identifiable on noncontrast head computed tomography. Absolute Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratios, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit value differences are a useful adjunct in noncontrast head computed tomographic evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis. (orig.)

  6. Noncontrast computed tomographic Hounsfield unit evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis: a quantitative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besachio, David A.; Quigley, Edward P.; Shah, Lubdha M.; Salzman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to determine the utility of noncontrast Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit values corrected for the patient's hematocrit, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit difference measurements in the identification of intracranial venous thrombosis on noncontrast head computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed noncontrast head computed tomography exams performed in both normal patients and those with cerebral venous thrombosis, acquiring Hounsfield unit values in normal and thrombosed cerebral venous structures. Also, we acquired Hounsfield unit values in the internal carotid artery for comparison to thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures and compared the venous Hounsfield unit values to the patient's hematocrit. A significant difference is identified between Hounsfield unit values in thrombosed and nonthrombosed venous structures. Applying Hounsfield unit threshold values of greater than 65, a Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratio of greater than 1.7, and venoarterial difference values greater than 15 alone and in combination, the majority of cases of venous thrombosis are identifiable on noncontrast head computed tomography. Absolute Hounsfield unit values, Hounsfield unit to hematocrit ratios, and venoarterial Hounsfield unit value differences are a useful adjunct in noncontrast head computed tomographic evaluation of cerebral venous thrombosis. (orig.)

  7. Measuring the volume of caudate nucleus in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Mingfei; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Wu Jianlin; Li Kuncheng; Zhou Xin; Zhou Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the normal range of the caudate nucleus' volume in Chinese adults of the Han nationality and provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. Methods: This was a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range =18 to 70) recruited from 16 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i.e, Group A (age range = 18 to 30), B (age range =31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range =51 to 60), and E (age range =61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. The volume of caudate was measured manually using 3D volume analysis software. The difference of volumes of the caudate between male and female were analyzed by independent sample t-test, and among age groups by ANOVA. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to characterize the relationship between volumes and age. The differences of measurements between left and right caudate nucleus were analyzed by paired t test. Results: (1) The mean volume of bilateral caudate nucleus in healthy Chinese adults was (10.973± 1.647) cm 3 . The mean volume of the the male's left and right caudate nucleus were (5.656±0.860) and (5.671±0.855) cm 3 respectively,no significant differences were found between the volume of left and right caudate nucleus (t=1.230, P>0.05). The mean volume of the the female's left and right caudate nucleus were (5.287±0.774) and (5.331±0.766) cm 3 respectively, and the right's was larger than the left's with significant differences (t=3.999, P<0.01); (2) Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between the nucleus volume and age (male and female's, left and right) (r=-0.561, -0.568, -0.548, -0.552, P<0.05). Conclusion: With high-resolution MRI and 3D volumetric analytic software (Midob), the volume of the caudate nucleus can be

  8. Measuring the volume of the hippocampus in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To measure the volume of hippocampal formation (HPF) in healthy Chinese Han adults and provide database for researching on a variety of diseases associated with alteration of hippocampal structure. Methods: This is a clinical multi-center study. One thousand Chinese healthy volunteers (age range=18 to 70) recruited from 15 hospitals were divided into 5 groups, i. e., Group A (age range=18 to 30), B (age range=31 to 40), C (age range =41 to 50), D (age range =51 to 60), and E (age range = 61 to 70). Each group contained 100 males and 100 females. All of the volunteers were scanned by MR using T 1 weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence. The margin of HPF were outlined manually for each side. Using multiple linear regression, relationships between hippocampal volume and sex, age, weight and height were analyzed respectively. Independent two sample t test was used to study the differences between male and female and between left and right. The differences of hippocampal volume among age groups were analyzed by ANOVA. Results: Hippocampal volume for left and right side were (4752±659) and (5032±660) mm 3 respectively. The volume of HPF is significant correlated with gender and age, but without relevance to height and weight (left and right r=0.283,0.311, F=30.127,37.050,P 3 respectively for men, and (4647±624) and (4904±630) mm 3 for women. The right hippocampal volume was larger than the left (t=7.030,6.696, P 3 respectively, while the volumes of the fight hippocampus were (5340± 647), (5276±582), (5264±620), (5133±661), (4894±699) mm 3 respectively. Among age groups, the differences were statistically significant (left and right F=5.737,7.607, P 0.05). There was no significant difference of hippocampal among different groups in women (P>0.05). Conclusions: With high-resolution MRI, the volume of the HPF was accurately measured, so as to provide the basic data for research of the hippocampus

  9. Measuring the volume of cingulate cortex in Chinese normal adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chao; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhou Xin; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    correlated with age (r=-0.330, -0.324, -0.169, -0.243, P<0.05), though the correlation coefficient is not high. Conclusions: Cingulate cortex volume could be accurately measured on the high-resolution MRI with 3D volume analysis software, which can provide morphological data for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. The results may provide normal range for the diagnosis of the volumetric deficits of cingulate cortex. (authors)

  10. Automated detection of acute haemorrhagic stroke in non-contrasted CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetz, K.; Buelow, T.

    2007-01-01

    An efficient treatment of stroke patients implies a profound differential diagnosis that includes the detection of acute haematoma. The proposed approach provides an automated detection of acute haematoma, assisting the non-stroke expert in interpreting non-contrasted CT images. It consists of two steps: First, haematoma candidates are detected applying multilevel region growing approach based on a typical grey value characteristic. Second, true haematomas are differentiated from partial volume artefacts, relying on spatial features derived from distance-based histograms. This approach achieves a specificity of 77% and a sensitivity of 89.7% in detecting acute haematoma in non-contrasted CT images when applied to a set of 25 non-contrasted CT images. (orig.)

  11. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  12. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Hasboun, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France); Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France)

    1999-07-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  13. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Hasboun, D.; Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  14. Prediction of prostate cancer extracapsular extension with high spatial resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, B.N.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Costa, Daniel N.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Rofsky, Neil M.; Smith, Martin P.; Kressel, Herbert Y.; Ngo, Long; Sanda, Martin G.; DeWolf, William C.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) combined with T2-weighted (T2W) endorectal coil (ERC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 T for determining extracapsular extension (ECE) of prostate cancer. In this IRB-approved study, ERC 3-T MRI of the prostate was performed in 108 patients before radical prostatectomy. T2W fast spin-echo and DCE 3D gradient echo images were acquired. The interpretations of readers with varied experience were analysed. MRI-based staging results were compared with radical prostatectomy histology. Descriptive statistics were generated for prediction of ECE and staging accuracies were determined by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for ECE were 75 %, 92 %, 79 % and 91 %, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy for staging was 86 %, 80 % and 91 % for all readers, experienced and less experienced readers, respectively. ERC 3-T MRI of the prostate combining DCE and T2W imaging is an accurate pretherapeutic staging tool for assessment of ECE in clinical practice across varying levels of reader experience. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution intracranial vessel wall MRI in an elderly asymptomatic population: comparison of 3T and 7T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harteveld, Anita A.; Kolk, Anja G. van der; Dieleman, Nikki; Siero, Jeroen C.W.; Luijten, Peter R.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Postbox 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Worp, H.B. van der; Frijns, Catharina J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kuijf, Hugo J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Several intracranial vessel wall sequences have been described in recent literature, with either 3-T or 7-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the current study, we compared 3-T and 7-T MRI in visualising both the intracranial arterial vessel wall and vessel wall lesions. Twenty-one elderly asymptomatic volunteers were scanned by 3-T and 7-T MRI with an intracranial vessel wall sequence, both before and after contrast administration. Two raters scored image quality, and presence and characteristics of vessel wall lesions. Vessel wall visibility was equal or significantly better at 7 T for the studied arterial segments, even though there were more artefacts hampering assessment. The better visualisation of the vessel wall at 7 T was most prominent in the proximal anterior cerebral circulation and the posterior cerebral artery. In the studied elderly asymptomatic population, 48 vessel-wall lesions were identified at 3 T, of which 7 showed enhancement. At 7 T, 79 lesions were identified, of which 29 showed enhancement. Seventy-one percent of all 3-T lesions and 59 % of all 7-T lesions were also seen at the other field strength. Despite the large variability in detected lesions at both field strengths, we believe 7-T MRI has the highest potential to identify the total burden of intracranial vessel wall lesions. (orig.)

  16. Three-dimensional inversion recovery manganese-enhanced MRI of mouse brain using super-resolution reconstruction to visualize nuclei involved in higher brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Dana S; Plenge, Esben; Poot, Dirk H J; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-07-01

    The visualization of activity in mouse brain using inversion recovery spin echo (IR-SE) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides unique contrast, but suffers from poor resolution in the slice-encoding direction. Super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) is a resolution-enhancing post-processing technique in which multiple low-resolution slice stacks are combined into a single volume of high isotropic resolution using computational methods. In this study, we investigated, first, whether SRR can improve the three-dimensional resolution of IR-SE MEMRI in the slice selection direction, whilst maintaining or improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the two-dimensional slice stacks. Second, the contrast-to-noise ratio of SRR IR-SE MEMRI was compared with a conventional three-dimensional gradient echo (GE) acquisition. Quantitative experiments were performed on a phantom containing compartments of various manganese concentrations. The results showed that, with comparable scan times, the signal-to-noise ratio of three-dimensional GE acquisition is higher than that of SRR IR-SE MEMRI. However, the contrast-to-noise ratio between different compartments can be superior with SRR IR-SE MEMRI, depending on the chosen inversion time. In vivo experiments were performed in mice receiving manganese using an implanted osmotic pump. The results showed that SRR works well as a resolution-enhancing technique in IR-SE MEMRI experiments. In addition, the SRR image also shows a number of brain structures that are more clearly discernible from the surrounding tissues than in three-dimensional GE acquisition, including a number of nuclei with specific higher brain functions, such as memory, stress, anxiety and reward behavior. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. High-resolution cellular MRI: gadolinium and iron oxide nanoparticles for in-depth dual-cell imaging of engineered tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Corato, Riccardo; Gazeau, Florence; Le Visage, Catherine; Fayol, Delphine; Levitz, Pierre; Lux, François; Letourneur, Didier; Luciani, Nathalie; Tillement, Olivier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-09-24

    Recent advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering opened new windows for regenerative medicine, but still necessitate innovative noninvasive imaging technologies. We demonstrate that high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows combining cellular-scale resolution with the ability to detect two cell types simultaneously at any tissue depth. Two contrast agents, based on iron oxide and gadolinium oxide rigid nanoplatforms, were used to "tattoo" endothelial cells and stem cells, respectively, with no impact on cell functions, including their capacity for differentiation. The labeled cells' contrast properties were optimized for simultaneous MRI detection: endothelial cells and stem cells seeded together in a polysaccharide-based scaffold material for tissue engineering appeared respectively in black and white and could be tracked, at the cellular level, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, endothelial cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles could be remotely manipulated by applying a magnetic field, allowing the creation of vessel substitutes with in-depth detection of individual cellular components.

  18. Combined MR direct thrombus imaging and non-contrast magnetic resonance venography reveal the evolution of deep vein thrombosis: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendichovszky, I A; Priest, A N; Bowden, D J; Hunter, S; Joubert, I; Hilborne, S; Graves, M J; Baglin, T; Lomas, D J

    2017-06-01

    Lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the temporal evolution of the acute thrombus by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its relationship to venous recanalization in patients with recurrent DVTs. Thirteen patients with newly diagnosed lower limb DVTs underwent MRI with non-contrast MR venography (NC-MRV) and MR direct thrombus imaging (MR-DTI), an inversion-recovery water-selective fast gradient-echo acquisition. Imaging was performed within 7 days of the acute thrombotic event, then at 3 and 6 months. By 3 months from the thrombotic event a third of the thrombi had resolved and by 6 months about half of the cases had resolved on the basis of vein recanalisation using NC-MRV. On the initial MR-DTI acute thrombus was clearly depicted by hyperintense signal, while the remaining thrombi were predominantly low signal at 3 and 6 months. Some residual thrombi contained small and fragmented persisting hyperintense areas at 3 months, clearing almost completely by 6 months. Our study suggests that synergistic venous assessment with combined NC-MRV and MR-DTI is able to distinguish acute venous thrombosis from the established (old) or evolving DVT detected by ultrasound. • MRI can distinguish between acute and evolving or chronic lower limb DVT • Two advanced MRI techniques can follow the evolution of lower limb DVT • MRI could be used to avoid an incorrect diagnosis of recurrent DVT • MRI could help avoid the risks and complications of lifelong anticoagulation therapy.

  19. Perfusion maps of the whole liver based on high temporal and spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI (4D THRIVE): Feasibility and initial results in focal liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth; Ghekiere, Johan; Denolin, Vincent; Gabriele, Beck; Herigault, Gwen; Haspeslagh, Marc; Daled, Peter; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap; Rigauts, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a new imaging sequence (4D THRIVE) for whole liver perfusion in high temporal and spatial resolution. Feasibility of parametric mapping and its potential for characterizing focal liver lesions (FLLs) are investigated. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients suspected for colorectal liver metastases (LMs) were included. Parametric maps were evaluated qualitatively (ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) and compared to three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI. Quantitative analysis was based on average perfusion values of entire FLLs. Reference standard comprised surgery with histopathology or follow-up imaging. Fisher's exact test was used for qualitative and Kruskal-Wallis test for quantitative analysis. Results: In total 29 LMs, 17 hemangiomas and 4 focal nodular hyperplasias were evaluated. FLLs could be differentiated by qualitative assessment of parametric maps respectively three-phased contrast-enhanced MRI (Fisher's p < 0.001 for comparisons between LMs and hemangiomas and LMs and FNHs for both ring-enhancement and lesion heterogeneity) rather than by quantitative analysis of parametric maps (Chi-square for Kep = 0.33 (p = 0.847) and Chi-square for Kel = 1.35 (p = 0.509)). Conclusion: This preliminary study shows potential of 4D THRIVE for whole liver imaging enabling calculation of parametric maps. Qualitative rather than quantitative analysis was accurate for differentiating malignant and benign FLLs.

  20. Cerebellar Ataxia with Complete Clinical Recovery and Resolution of MRI Lesions Related to Central Pontine Myelinolysis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Dolciotti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available There are several reports of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM in a setting of malnutrition, alcoholism, and chronic debilitating illness associated with electrolyte abnormalities, especially hyponatremia. The cause of myelinolysis is still under debate, and, although osmotic effects are thought to be responsible in most cases, alternative pathological factors should be considered [King et al.: Am J Med Sci 2010;339:561–567]. We report a case of CPM in a patient with recent chemotherapy for colon cancer without electrolyte unbalance and otherwise unexplained causes. Moreover, the present case is an example of the unusual clinical ataxic variant, followed by complete recovery without any specific treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI, which showed a characteristic hyperintense signal abnormality in the central part of the pons with an unaffected outer rim. One month later, we observed complete resolution of clinical and radiological symptoms.

  1. Intracranial arterial wall imaging using three-dimensional high isotropic resolution black blood MRI at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ye; Steinman, David A; Qin, Qin; Etesami, Maryam; Schär, Michael; Astor, Brad C; Wasserman, Bruce A

    2011-07-01

    To develop a high isotropic-resolution sequence to evaluate intracranial vessels at 3.0 Tesla (T). Thirteen healthy volunteers and 4 patients with intracranial stenosis were imaged at 3.0T using 0.5-mm isotropic-resolution three-dimensional (3D) Volumetric ISotropic TSE Acquisition (VISTA; TSE, turbo spin echo), with conventional 2D-TSE for comparison. VISTA was repeated for 6 volunteers and 4 patients at 0.4-mm isotropic-resolution to explore the trade-off between SNR and voxel volume. Wall signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR(wall) ), wall-lumen contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR(wall-lumen) ), lumen area (LA), wall area (WA), mean wall thickness (MWT), and maximum wall thickness (maxWT) were compared between 3D-VISTA and 2D-TSE sequences, as well as 3D images acquired at both resolutions. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlations (ICC). Compared with 2D-TSE measurements, 3D-VISTA provided 58% and 74% improvement in SNR(wall) and CNR(wall-lumen) , respectively. LA, WA, MWT and maxWT from 3D and 2D techniques highly correlated (ICCs of 0.96, 0.95, 0.96, and 0.91, respectively). CNR(wall-lumen) using 0.4-mm resolution VISTA decreased by 27%, compared with 0.5-mm VISTA but with reduced partial-volume-based overestimation of wall thickness. Reliability for 3D measurements was good to excellent. The 3D-VISTA provides SNR-efficient, highly reliable measurements of intracranial vessels at high isotropic-resolution, enabling broad coverage in a clinically acceptable time. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Carotid artery dissection on non-contrast CT: Does color improve the diagnostic confidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca, E-mail: lucasaba@tiscali.it [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Argiolas, Giovanni Maria [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), di Cagliari, Cagliari 09100 (Italy); Raz, Eytan [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York (United States); Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Sannia, Stefano [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Suri, Jasjit S. [Diagnostic and Monitoring Division, AtheroPointTM LLC, Roseville, CA (United States); Electrical Engineering Department (Aff.), Idaho State University, ID (United States); Siotto, Paolo [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), di Cagliari, Cagliari 09100 (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Department of Vascular Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Piga, Mario [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari – Polo di Monserrato, s.s. 554 Monserrato, Cagliari 09045 (Italy); Wintermark, Max [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, University of Virginia, Box 800170, Charlottesville, VA, 22908 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The use of a color scale to display the non-contrast CT images in lieu of the classic grayscale improves the diagnostic confidence of the readers. • Radiologists should consider the use of a color scale, rather than the conventional grayscale, to assess non-contrast CT studies for possible carotid artery dissection. - Abstract: Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate if the use of color maps, instead of conventional grayscale images, would improve the observer's diagnostic confidence in the non-contrast CT evaluation of internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD). Materials and methods: One hundred patients (61 men, 39 women; mean age, 51 years; range, 25–78 years), 40 with and 60 without ICAD, underwent non-contrast CT and were included in this the retrospective study. In this study, three groups of patients were considered: patients with MR confirmation of ICAD, n = 40; patients with MR confirmation of ICAD absence, n = 20; patients who underwent CT of the carotid arteries because of atherosclerotic disease, n = 40. Four blinded observers with different levels of expertise (expert, intermediate A, intermediate B and trainee) analyzed the non-contrast CT datasets using a cross model (one case grayscale and the following case using the color scale). The presence of ICAD was scored on a 5-point scale in order to assess the observer's diagnostic confidence. After 3 months the four observers evaluated the same datasets by using the same cross-model for the alternate readings (one case color scale and the following case using the grayscale). Statistical analysis included receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, the Cohen weighted test and sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy, LR+ and LR−. Results: The ROC curve analysis showed that, for all observers, the use of color scale resulted in an improved diagnostic confidence with AUC values increasing from 0.896 to 0.936, 0.823 to 0.849, 0.84 to 0.909 and 0

  3. Dual-energy CT in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes: Comparative study of virtual non-contrast and true non-contrast images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Cho, Hyun Hae; Choi, Mi Joo; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Baek, Seung Yon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images reconstructed from contrast-enhanced, dual-energy scans compared with true non-contrast (TNC) images in the assessment of high CT attenuation or calcification of mediastinal lymph nodes. A total of 112 mediastinal nodes from 45 patients who underwent non-contrast and dual-energy contrast-enhanced scans were analyzed. Node attenuation in TNC and VNC images was compared both objectively, using computed tomography (CT) attenuation, and subjectively, via visual scoring (0, attenuation ≤ the aorta; 1, > the aorta; 2, calcification). The relationship among attenuation difference between TNC and VNC images, CT attenuation in TNC images, and net contrast enhancement (NCE) was analyzed. CT attenuation in TNC and VNC images showed moderate agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.612). The mean absolute difference was 7.8 ± 7.6 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 0-36 HU), and the absolute difference was equal to or less than 10 HU in 65.2% of cases (73/112). Visual scores in TNC and VNC images showed fair agreement (κ value, 0.335). Five of 16 nodes (31.3%) which showed score 1 (n = 15) or 2 (n = 1) in TNC images demonstrated score 1 in VNC images. The TNC-VNC attenuation difference showed a moderate positive correlation with CT attenuation in TNC images (partial correlation coefficient [PCC] adjusted by NCE: 0.455) and a weak negative correlation with NCE (PCC adjusted by CT attenuation in TNC: -0.245). VNC images may be useful in the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes by providing additional information of high CT attenuation of nodes, although it is underestimated compared with TNC images.

  4. Dual-energy CT in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes: Comparative study of virtual non-contrast and true non-contrast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Cho, Hyun Hae; Choi, Mi Joo; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Baek, Seung Yon [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seou (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To evaluate the reliability of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images reconstructed from contrast-enhanced, dual-energy scans compared with true non-contrast (TNC) images in the assessment of high CT attenuation or calcification of mediastinal lymph nodes. A total of 112 mediastinal nodes from 45 patients who underwent non-contrast and dual-energy contrast-enhanced scans were analyzed. Node attenuation in TNC and VNC images was compared both objectively, using computed tomography (CT) attenuation, and subjectively, via visual scoring (0, attenuation ≤ the aorta; 1, > the aorta; 2, calcification). The relationship among attenuation difference between TNC and VNC images, CT attenuation in TNC images, and net contrast enhancement (NCE) was analyzed. CT attenuation in TNC and VNC images showed moderate agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.612). The mean absolute difference was 7.8 ± 7.6 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 0-36 HU), and the absolute difference was equal to or less than 10 HU in 65.2% of cases (73/112). Visual scores in TNC and VNC images showed fair agreement (κ value, 0.335). Five of 16 nodes (31.3%) which showed score 1 (n = 15) or 2 (n = 1) in TNC images demonstrated score 1 in VNC images. The TNC-VNC attenuation difference showed a moderate positive correlation with CT attenuation in TNC images (partial correlation coefficient [PCC] adjusted by NCE: 0.455) and a weak negative correlation with NCE (PCC adjusted by CT attenuation in TNC: -0.245). VNC images may be useful in the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes by providing additional information of high CT attenuation of nodes, although it is underestimated compared with TNC images.

  5. Dual-energy CT in the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes: comparative study of virtual non-contrast and true non-contrast images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seon Young; Kim, Yookyung; Cho, Hyun Hae; Choi, Mi Joo; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Baek, Seung Yon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of virtual non-contrast (VNC) images reconstructed from contrast-enhanced, dual-energy scans compared with true non-contrast (TNC) images in the assessment of high CT attenuation or calcification of mediastinal lymph nodes. A total of 112 mediastinal nodes from 45 patients who underwent non-contrast and dual-energy contrast-enhanced scans were analyzed. Node attenuation in TNC and VNC images was compared both objectively, using computed tomography (CT) attenuation, and subjectively, via visual scoring (0, attenuation ≤ the aorta; 1, > the aorta; 2, calcification). The relationship among attenuation difference between TNC and VNC images, CT attenuation in TNC images, and net contrast enhancement (NCE) was analyzed. CT attenuation in TNC and VNC images showed moderate agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.612). The mean absolute difference was 7.8 ± 7.6 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 0-36 HU), and the absolute difference was equal to or less than 10 HU in 65.2% of cases (73/112). Visual scores in TNC and VNC images showed fair agreement (κ value, 0.335). Five of 16 nodes (31.3%) which showed score 1 (n = 15) or 2 (n = 1) in TNC images demonstrated score 1 in VNC images. The TNC-VNC attenuation difference showed a moderate positive correlation with CT attenuation in TNC images (partial correlation coefficient [PCC] adjusted by NCE: 0.455) and a weak negative correlation with NCE (PCC adjusted by CT attenuation in TNC: -0.245). VNC images may be useful in the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes by providing additional information of high CT attenuation of nodes, although it is underestimated compared with TNC images.

  6. Single-energy non-contrast hepatic steatosis criteria applied to virtual non-contrast images: is it still highly specific and positively predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Momenian, S; Parkinson, W; Khati, N; Brindle, K; Earls, J; Zeman, R K

    2018-06-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of single-energy non-contrast hepatic steatosis criteria on dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images. Forty-eight computed tomography (CT) examinations, which included single-energy non-contrast (TNC) and contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT angiography (CTA) of the abdomen, were enrolled. VNC images were reconstructed from the CTA. Region of interest (ROI) attenuations were measured in the right and left hepatic lobes, spleen, and aorta on TNC and VNC images. The right and left hepatic lobes were treated as separate samples. Steatosis was diagnosed based on TNC liver attenuation of ≤40 HU or liver attenuation index (LAI) of ≤-10 HU, which are extremely specific and predictive for moderate to severe steatosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of VNC images for steatosis were calculated. VNC-TNC deviations were correlated with aortic enhancement and patient water equivalent diameter (PWED). Thirty-two liver ROIs met steatosis criteria based on TNC attenuation; VNC attenuation had sensitivity, specificity, and a positive predictive value of 66.7%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Twenty-one liver ROIs met steatosis criteria based on TNC LAI. VNC LAI had sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 61.9%, 90.7%, and 65%, respectively. Hepatic and splenic VNC-TNC deviations did not correlate with one another (R 2 =0.08), aortic enhancement (R 2 predictive for moderate to severe steatosis on VNC reconstructions from the arterial phase. Hepatic attenuation performs better than LAI criteria. VNC deviations are independent of aortic enhancement and PWED. Copyright © 2018 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-transcendence trait and its relationship with in vivo serotonin transporter availability in brainstem raphe nuclei: An ultra-high resolution PET-MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Joo, Yo-Han; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2015-12-10

    Self-transcendence is an inherent human personality trait relating to the experience of spiritual aspects of the self. We examined the relationship between self-transcendence and serotonin transporter (SERT) availability in brainstem raphe nuclei, which are collections of five different serotonergic nuclei with rostro-caudal extension, using ultra-high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)benzonitrile ([(11)C]DASB) to elucidate potential roles of serotonergic neuronal activities in this personality trait. Sixteen healthy subjects completed 7.0T MRI and High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET. The regions of interest (ROIs) included the dorsal raphe nucleus (R1), median raphe nucleus (R2), raphe pontis (R3), and the caudal raphe nuclei (R4 and R5). For the estimation of SERT availability, the binding potential (BPND) was derived using the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM2). The Temperament and Character Inventory was used to measure self-transcendence. The analysis revealed that the self-transcendence total score had a significant negative correlation with the [(11)C]DASB BPND in the caudal raphe (R5). The subscale score for spiritual acceptance was significantly negatively correlated with the [(11)C]DASB BPND in the median raphe nucleus (R2). The results indicate that the self-transcendence trait is associated with SERT availability in specific raphe subnuclei, suggesting that the serotonin system may serve as an important biological basis for human self-transcendence. Based on the connections of these nuclei with cortico-limbic and visceral autonomic structures, the functional activity of these nuclei and their related neural circuitry may play a crucial role in the manifestation of self-transcendence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Distinct prediction errors in mesostriatal circuits of the human brain mediate learning about the values of both states and actions: evidence from high-resolution fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Jaron T; Pauli, Wolfgang M; Larsen, Tobias; Tyszka, J Michael; O'Doherty, John P

    2017-10-01

    Prediction-error signals consistent with formal models of "reinforcement learning" (RL) have repeatedly been found within dopaminergic nuclei of the midbrain and dopaminoceptive areas of the striatum. However, the precise form of the RL algorithms implemented in the human brain is not yet well determined. Here, we created a novel paradigm optimized to dissociate the subtypes of reward-prediction errors that function as the key computational signatures of two distinct classes of RL models-namely, "actor/critic" models and action-value-learning models (e.g., the Q-learning model). The state-value-prediction error (SVPE), which is independent of actions, is a hallmark of the actor/critic architecture, whereas the action-value-prediction error (AVPE) is the distinguishing feature of action-value-learning algorithms. To test for the presence of these prediction-error signals in the brain, we scanned human participants with a high-resolution functional magnetic-resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol optimized to enable measurement of neural activity in the dopaminergic midbrain as well as the striatal areas to which it projects. In keeping with the actor/critic model, the SVPE signal was detected in the substantia nigra. The SVPE was also clearly present in both the ventral striatum and the dorsal striatum. However, alongside these purely state-value-based computations we also found evidence for AVPE signals throughout the striatum. These high-resolution fMRI findings suggest that model-free aspects of reward learning in humans can be explained algorithmically with RL in terms of an actor/critic mechanism operating in parallel with a system for more direct action-value learning.

  9. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 2: new vs. old imaging concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma according to recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of a new imaging concept with two orbit surface coils to that of an old imaging concept with one orbit surface coil. One hundred forty-three patients (148 eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys) underwent high-resolution MRI on 1.5 T scanners using orbit surface coils. The old imaging concept (one orbit surface coil focusing on the (most) effected eye additionally to the standard head coil) was used in 100 patients/103 eye; the new imaging concept (two orbit surface coils (each focusing on one eye) additionally to the standard head coil) in 43 patients/45 eyes. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Detection rate for choroidal invasion was higher for the new compared to that for the old imaging concept (sensitivity/specificity 87.5/94.6 % vs. 57.1/96.1 % for choroidal invasion and 100/97.5 % vs. 58.3/97.7 % for massive choroidal invasion, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, peribulbar fat, and scleral invasion were comparable in both imaging concepts; however positive predictive value was higher in the new imaging concept (new vs. old imaging concept: 60 vs. 31.6 % for postlaminar and deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, respectively, and 100 vs. 66.7 % for scleral invasion). The new imaging concept shows a trend towards improving the accuracy of detecting metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma and is therefore recommended for pretherapeutic imaging and follow-up. (orig.)

  10. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 2: new vs. old imaging concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L.; Metz, Klaus A.; Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus; Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma according to recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of a new imaging concept with two orbit surface coils to that of an old imaging concept with one orbit surface coil. One hundred forty-three patients (148 eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys) underwent high-resolution MRI on 1.5 T scanners using orbit surface coils. The old imaging concept (one orbit surface coil focusing on the (most) effected eye additionally to the standard head coil) was used in 100 patients/103 eye; the new imaging concept (two orbit surface coils (each focusing on one eye) additionally to the standard head coil) in 43 patients/45 eyes. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Detection rate for choroidal invasion was higher for the new compared to that for the old imaging concept (sensitivity/specificity 87.5/94.6 % vs. 57.1/96.1 % for choroidal invasion and 100/97.5 % vs. 58.3/97.7 % for massive choroidal invasion, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, peribulbar fat, and scleral invasion were comparable in both imaging concepts; however positive predictive value was higher in the new imaging concept (new vs. old imaging concept: 60 vs. 31.6 % for postlaminar and deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, respectively, and 100 vs. 66.7 % for scleral invasion). The new imaging concept shows a trend towards improving the accuracy of detecting metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma and is therefore recommended for pretherapeutic imaging and follow-up. (orig.)

  11. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  12. RESOLUTE PET/MRI Attenuation Correction for O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET in Brain Tumor Patients with Metal Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes N. Ladefoged

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Positron emission tomography (PET imaging is a useful tool for assisting in correct differentiation of tumor progression from reactive changes, and the radiolabeled amino acid analog tracer O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET-PET is amongst the most frequently used. The FET-PET images need to be quantitatively correct in order to be used clinically, which require accurate attenuation correction (AC in PET/MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the subject-specific MR-derived AC method RESOLUTE in post-operative brain tumor patients.Methods: We analyzed 51 post-operative brain tumor patients (68 examinations, 200 MBq [18F]-FET investigated in a PET/MRI scanner. MR-AC maps were acquired using: (1 the Dixon water fat separation sequence, (2 the ultra short echo time (UTE sequences, (3 calculated using our new RESOLUTE methodology, and (4 a same day low-dose CT used as reference “gold standard.” For each subject and each AC method the tumor was delineated by isocontouring tracer uptake above a tumor(T-to-brain background (B activity ratio of 1.6. We measured B, tumor mean and maximal activity (TMEAN, TMAX, biological tumor volume (BTV, and calculated the clinical metrics TMEAN/B and TMAX/B.Results: When using RESOLUTE 5/68 studies did not meet our predefined acceptance criteria of TMAX/B difference to CT-AC < ±0.1 or 5%, TMEAN/B < ±0.05 or 5%, and BTV < ±2 mL or 10%. In total, 46/68 studies failed our acceptance criteria using Dixon, and 26/68 using UTE. The 95% limits of agreement for TMAX/B was for RESOLUTE (−3%; 4%, Dixon (−9%; 16%, and UTE (−7%; 10%. The absolute error when measuring BTV was 0.7 ± 1.9 mL (N.S with RESOLUTE, 5.3 ± 10 mL using Dixon, and 1.7 ± 3.7 mL using UTE. RESOLUTE performed best in the identification of the location of peak activity and in brain tumor follow-up monitoring using clinical FET PET metrics.Conclusions: Overall, we found RESOLUTE to be the AC method that most robustly

  13. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Deuk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  14. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution MRI for the quantitative evaluation of subendocardial and subepicardial perfusion under pharmalogical stress and at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, C.O.; Savio, K. del; Brackertz, A.; Beer, M.; Hahn, D.; Koestler, H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: MR stress perfusion imaging of the heart allows the quantification of myocardial perfusion and the evaluation of myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) and the ratio of subendocardial to subepicardial perfusion at rest and under adenosine stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-resolution GRAPPA sequence for quantitative MR first pass perfusion imaging in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: First pass stress and rest perfusion studies were performed on 10 healthy volunteers using a 1.5 T MR scanner with a multislice SR-TrueFISP first pass perfusion sequence with a GRAPPA algorithm (acceleration factor 3) in prebolus technique and an image resolution of 1.8 x 1.8 mm. For the comparison group, we examined 12 different healthy volunteers with a standard first pass perfusion SR-TrueFISP sequence using a resolution of 2.7 x 3.3 mm. Myocardial contours were manually delineated followed by an automatic division of the myocardium into two rings with an equal thickness for the subendo- and subepicardial layer. Eight sectors per slice were evaluated using contamination and baseline correction. Results: Using the GRAPPA sequence, the ratio of subendo- to subepimyocardial perfusion was 1.18 ± 0.32 for the examination at rest. Under pharmacologically induced stress, the ratio was 1.08 ± 0.27. For the standard sequence the ratio was 1.15 ± 0.28 at rest and 1.11 ± 0.33 under stress. For the high resolution sequence higher mean values for the subendo- to subepimyocardial ratio were obtained with comparable standard deviations. The difference between the sequences was not significant. Conclusion: The evaluation of subendomyocardial and subepimyocardial perfusion is feasible with a high-resolution first pass perfusion sequence. The use of a higher resolution to avoid systematic error leads to increased image noise. However, no relevant reduction in the quantitative perfusion values under stress and at rest was able to be depicted. (orig.)

  16. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  17. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  18. The subcortical role of language processing. High level linguistic features such as ambiguity-resolution and the human brain; an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketteler, Daniel; Kastrau, Frank; Vohn, Rene; Huber, Walter

    2008-02-15

    In the present study, we were interested in the neurofunctional representations of ambiguity processing by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twelve right-handed, healthy adults aged between 21 and 29 years (6 male, 6 female) underwent an ambiguity resolution task with 4 different conditions (dominant vs. non-dominant; dominant vs. distractor; non-dominant vs. distractor; distractor vs. distractor). After subtraction of the corresponding control task (distractor vs. distractor) we found significant activation especially in the thalamus and some parts of the basal ganglia (caudate nucleus, putamen). Our findings implicate a participation of the thalamus and other basal ganglia circuits in high level linguistic functions and match with theoretical considerations on this highly controversial topic. Subcortical neural circuits probably become activated when the language processing system cannot rely entirely on automatic mechanisms but has to recruit controlled processes as well. Furthermore, we found broad activation in the inferior parietal lobule, the prefrontal gyrus, pre-SMA and SMA and the cingulate cortex. This might reflect a strategic semantic search mechanism which probably can be illustrated with connectionist models of language processing. According to this, we hypothesize a neuroregulatory role for the thalamus and basal ganglia in regulating and monitoring the release of preformulated language segments for motor programming and semantic verification. According to our findings there is strong evidence, that especially the thalamus, the caudate nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the inferior parietal lobule and the prefrontal cortex are responsible for an accurate ambiguity resolution in the human brain.

  19. Primary lower limb lymphoedema. Classification with non-contrast MR lymphography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrive, Lionel; Derhy, S.; El Mouhadi, S.; Monnier-Cholley, L.; Menu, Y. [Saint-Antoine Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Universite Paris 06, Faculte de Medecine Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Dahan, B. [Cochin Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Paris (France); Becker, C. [HEGP, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2018-01-15

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse the performance of non-contrast MR lymphography for the classification of primary lower limb lymphoedema in 121 consecutive patients with 187 primary lower limb lymphoedemas. 121 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed primary lower limb lymphoedema underwent non-contrast MR lymphography with a free-breathing 3D fast spin-echo sequence with a very long TR/TE (4000/884 ms). MR examinations were retrospectively reviewed for severity of lymphoedema (absent, mild, moderate, severe) and characteristics of inguinal lymph nodes and iliac and inguinal lymphatic trunks graded as aplasic (no lymph nodes or lymphatic trunks), hypoplasic (less lymph nodes or lymphatic trunks), normal and hyperplasic (more lymph nodes or more and/or dilated trunks). There was an excellent correlation between clinical stage and severity of lymphoedema (Cramer's V of 0,73 (p < 0.001)). Differentiation was feasible between inguinal lymphatic vessel aplasia (21%), hypoplasia (15%), normal pattern (53%) and hyperplasia (11%). Severe lymphoedema was observed in 46% of aplasic patterns and in 37% of hyperplasic patterns, but in only 15% of hypoplasic patterns and never observed in normal patterns (p < 0.001). Non-contrast MR lymphography is able to classify primary lower limb lymphoedemas into hyperplasic, aplasic, hypoplasic and normal patterns. (orig.)

  20. Age-related reorganization of functional networks for successful conflict resolution: a combined functional and structural MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tilman; Müller-Oehring, Eva M; Chanraud, Sandra; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2011-11-01

    Aging has readily observable effects on the ability to resolve conflict between competing stimulus attributes that are likely related to selective structural and functional brain changes. To identify age-related differences in neural circuits subserving conflict processing, we combined structural and functional MRI and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task involving perceptual cueing and repetition to modulate resources in healthy young and older adults. In our Stroop Match-to-Sample task, older adults handled conflict by activating a frontoparietal attention system more than young adults and engaged a visuomotor network more than young adults when processing repetitive conflict and when processing conflict following valid perceptual cueing. By contrast, young adults activated frontal regions more than older adults when processing conflict with perceptual cueing. These differential activation patterns were not correlated with regional gray matter volume despite smaller volumes in older than young adults. Given comparable performance in speed and accuracy of responding between both groups, these data suggest that successful aging is associated with functional reorganization of neural systems to accommodate functionally increasing task demands on perceptual and attentional operations. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detailed spatiotemporal brain mapping of chromatic vision combining high-resolution VEP with fMRI and retinotopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Strappini, Francesca; Bultrini, Alessandro; Di Russo, Francesco

    2018-03-13

    Neuroimaging studies have identified so far, several color-sensitive visual areas in the human brain, and the temporal dynamics of these activities have been separately investigated using the visual-evoked potentials (VEPs). In the present study, we combined electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods to determine a detailed spatiotemporal profile of chromatic VEP and to localize its neural generators. The accuracy of the present co-registration study was obtained by combining standard fMRI data with retinotopic and motion mapping data at the individual level. We found a sequence of occipito activities more complex than that typically reported for chromatic VEPs, including feed-forward and reentrant feedback. Results showed that chromatic human perception arises by the combined activity of at the least five parieto-occipital areas including V1, LOC, V8/VO, and the motion-sensitive dorsal region MT+. However, the contribution of V1 and V8/VO seems dominant because the re-entrant activity in these areas was present more than once (twice in V8/VO and thrice in V1). This feedforward and feedback chromatic processing appears delayed compared with the luminance processing. Associating VEPs and neuroimaging measures, we showed for the first time a complex spatiotemporal pattern of activity, confirming that chromatic stimuli produce intricate interactions of many different brain dorsal and ventral areas. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Investigating the Mechanical Function of the Cervix during Pregnancy using Finite Element Models derived from High Resolution 3D MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, M.; House, M.; Jambawalikar, S.; Zork, N.; Vink, J.; Wapner, R.; Myers, K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is a strong contributor to perinatal mortality, and preterm infants that survive are at risk for long-term morbidities. During most of pregnancy appropriate mechanical function of the cervix is required to maintain the developing fetus in utero. Premature cervical softening and subsequent cervical shortening are hypothesized to cause preterm birth. Presently, there is a lack of understanding of the structural and material factors that influence the mechanical function of the cervix during pregnancy. In this study we build finite element (FE) models of the pregnant uterus, cervix, and fetal membrane based on magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) data in order to examine the mechanical function of the cervix under the physiologic loading conditions of pregnancy. We calculate the mechanical loading state of the cervix for two pregnant patients: 22 weeks gestational age with a normal cervical length and 28 weeks with a short cervix. We investigate the influence of 1) anatomical geometry 2) cervical material properties, and 3) fetal membrane material properties, including its adhesion properties, on the mechanical loading state of the cervix under physiologically relevant intrauterine pressures. Our study demonstrates that membrane-uterus interaction, cervical material modeling, and membrane mechanical properties are factors that must be deliberately and carefully handled in order to construct a high quality mechanical simulation of pregnancy. PMID:25970655

  3. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.P.; Nguyen, K.-L.; Han, F.; Zhou, Z.; Salusky, I.; Ayad, I.; Hu, P.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r 1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications.

  4. Lung morphology assessment of cystic fibrosis using MRI with ultra-short echo time at submillimeter spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dournes, Gael [University of Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); INSERM, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Service d' Exploration Fonctionnelle Respiratoire, Pessac (France); Centre de Recherche Cardio-thoracique de Bordeaux, INSERM, U1045, Universite de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Menut, Fanny [CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie de la Femme et de l' Enfant, Unite de Pneumologie pediatrique, Bordeaux (France); Macey, Julie; Montaudon, Michel; Berger, Patrick; Laurent, Francois [University of Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); INSERM, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Service d' Exploration Fonctionnelle Respiratoire, Pessac (France); Fayon, Michael [University of Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); INSERM, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie de la Femme et de l' Enfant, Unite de Pneumologie pediatrique, Bordeaux (France); Chateil, Jean-Francois [CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie de la Femme et de l' Enfant, Unite de Pneumologie pediatrique, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, Centre de Resonance Magnetique des Systemes Biologiques, Bordeaux (France); Salel, Marjorie; Corneloup, Olivier [University of Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Service d' Exploration Fonctionnelle Respiratoire, Pessac (France)

    2016-11-15

    We hypothesized that non-contrast-enhanced PETRA (pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition) MR (magnetic resonance) sequencing could be an alternative to unenhanced computed tomography (CT) in assessing cystic fibrosis (CF) lung structural alterations, as well as compared agreements and concordances with those of conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. Thirty consecutive CF patients completed both CT and MRI the same day. No contrast injection was used. Agreement in identifying structural alterations was evaluated at the segmental level using a kappa test. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis were used to assess concordances and reproducibility in Helbich-Bhalla disease severity scoring. Agreement between PETRA and CT was higher than that of T1- or T2-weighted sequences, notably in assessing the segmental presence of bronchiectasis (Kappa = 0.83; 0.51; 0.49, respectively). The concordance in Helbich-Bhalla scores was very good using PETRA (ICC = 0.97), independently from its magnitude (mean difference (MD) = -0.3 [-2.8; 2.2]), whereas scoring was underestimated using both conventional T1 and T2 sequences (MD = -3.6 [-7.4; 0.1]) and MD = -4.6 [-8.2; -1.0], respectively. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility were very good for all imaging modalities (ICC = 0.86-0.98). PETRA showed higher agreement in describing CF lung morphological changes than that of conventional sequences, whereas the Helbich-Bhalla scoring matched closely with that of CT. (orig.)

  5. Combined MR direct thrombus imaging and non-contrast magnetic resonance venography reveal the evolution of deep vein thrombosis: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendichovszky, I.A.; Lomas, D.J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Priest, A.N.; Bowden, D.J.; Hunter, S.; Joubert, I.; Hilborne, S.; Graves, M.J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Baglin, T. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Haematology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    Lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the temporal evolution of the acute thrombus by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its relationship to venous recanalization in patients with recurrent DVTs. Thirteen patients with newly diagnosed lower limb DVTs underwent MRI with non-contrast MR venography (NC-MRV) and MR direct thrombus imaging (MR-DTI), an inversion-recovery water-selective fast gradient-echo acquisition. Imaging was performed within 7 days of the acute thrombotic event, then at 3 and 6 months. By 3 months from the thrombotic event a third of the thrombi had resolved and by 6 months about half of the cases had resolved on the basis of vein recanalisation using NC-MRV. On the initial MR-DTI acute thrombus was clearly depicted by hyperintense signal, while the remaining thrombi were predominantly low signal at 3 and 6 months. Some residual thrombi contained small and fragmented persisting hyperintense areas at 3 months, clearing almost completely by 6 months. Our study suggests that synergistic venous assessment with combined NC-MRV and MR-DTI is able to distinguish acute venous thrombosis from the established (old) or evolving DVT detected by ultrasound. (orig.)

  6. Combined MR direct thrombus imaging and non-contrast magnetic resonance venography reveal the evolution of deep vein thrombosis: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendichovszky, I.A.; Lomas, D.J.; Priest, A.N.; Bowden, D.J.; Hunter, S.; Joubert, I.; Hilborne, S.; Graves, M.J.; Baglin, T.

    2017-01-01

    Lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common condition with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the temporal evolution of the acute thrombus by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its relationship to venous recanalization in patients with recurrent DVTs. Thirteen patients with newly diagnosed lower limb DVTs underwent MRI with non-contrast MR venography (NC-MRV) and MR direct thrombus imaging (MR-DTI), an inversion-recovery water-selective fast gradient-echo acquisition. Imaging was performed within 7 days of the acute thrombotic event, then at 3 and 6 months. By 3 months from the thrombotic event a third of the thrombi had resolved and by 6 months about half of the cases had resolved on the basis of vein recanalisation using NC-MRV. On the initial MR-DTI acute thrombus was clearly depicted by hyperintense signal, while the remaining thrombi were predominantly low signal at 3 and 6 months. Some residual thrombi contained small and fragmented persisting hyperintense areas at 3 months, clearing almost completely by 6 months. Our study suggests that synergistic venous assessment with combined NC-MRV and MR-DTI is able to distinguish acute venous thrombosis from the established (old) or evolving DVT detected by ultrasound. (orig.)

  7. A non-contrast self-navigated 3-dimensional MR technique for aortic root and vascular access route assessment in the context of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Medicine I, Giessen (Germany); Varga-Szemes, Akos; Rier, Jeremy D.; Steinberg, Daniel H. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Baumann, Stefan [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Heidelberg, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Mannheim, University Medical Centre Mannheim (UMM), Mannheim (Germany); Piccini, Davide [Siemens Healthcare IM BM PI, Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital (CHUV) and University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Zenge, Michael O.; Mueller, Edgar [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Rehwald, Wolfgang G. [Duke University Medical Center, Cardiovascular MR Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moellmann, Helge [Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Hamm, Christian W. [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Medicine I, Giessen (Germany); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' -Polo Pontino, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Due to the high prevalence of renal failure in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) candidates, a non-contrast MR technique is desirable for pre-procedural planning. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of a novel, non-contrast, free-breathing, self-navigated three-dimensional (SN3D) MR sequence for imaging the aorta from its root to the iliofemoral run-off in comparison to non-contrast two-dimensional-balanced steady-state free-precession (2D-bSSFP) imaging. SN3D [field of view (FOV), 220-370 mm{sup 3}; slice thickness, 1.15 mm; repetition/echo time (TR/TE), 3.1/1.5 ms; and flip angle, 115 ] and 2D-bSSFP acquisitions (FOV, 340 mm; slice thickness, 6 mm; TR/TE, 2.3/1.1 ms; flip angle, 77 ) were performed in 10 healthy subjects (all male; mean age, 30.3 ± 4.3 yrs) using a 1.5-T MRI system. Aortic root measurements and qualitative image ratings (four-point Likert-scale) were compared. The mean effective aortic annulus diameter was similar for 2D-bSSFP and SN3D (26.7 ± 0.7 vs. 26.1 ± 0.9 mm, p = 0.23). The mean image quality of 2D-bSSFP (4; IQR 3-4) was rated slightly higher (p = 0.03) than SN3D (3; IQR 2-4). The mean total acquisition time for SN3D imaging was 12.8 ± 2.4 min. Our results suggest that a novel SN3D sequence allows rapid, free-breathing assessment of the aortic root and the aortoiliofemoral system without administration of contrast medium. (orig.)

  8. A non-contrast self-navigated 3-dimensional MR technique for aortic root and vascular access route assessment in the context of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renker, Matthias; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Rier, Jeremy D.; Steinberg, Daniel H.; Schoepf, U.J.; Baumann, Stefan; Piccini, Davide; Zenge, Michael O.; Mueller, Edgar; Rehwald, Wolfgang G.; Moellmann, Helge; Hamm, Christian W.; De Cecco, Carlo N.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence of renal failure in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) candidates, a non-contrast MR technique is desirable for pre-procedural planning. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of a novel, non-contrast, free-breathing, self-navigated three-dimensional (SN3D) MR sequence for imaging the aorta from its root to the iliofemoral run-off in comparison to non-contrast two-dimensional-balanced steady-state free-precession (2D-bSSFP) imaging. SN3D [field of view (FOV), 220-370 mm 3 ; slice thickness, 1.15 mm; repetition/echo time (TR/TE), 3.1/1.5 ms; and flip angle, 115 ] and 2D-bSSFP acquisitions (FOV, 340 mm; slice thickness, 6 mm; TR/TE, 2.3/1.1 ms; flip angle, 77 ) were performed in 10 healthy subjects (all male; mean age, 30.3 ± 4.3 yrs) using a 1.5-T MRI system. Aortic root measurements and qualitative image ratings (four-point Likert-scale) were compared. The mean effective aortic annulus diameter was similar for 2D-bSSFP and SN3D (26.7 ± 0.7 vs. 26.1 ± 0.9 mm, p = 0.23). The mean image quality of 2D-bSSFP (4; IQR 3-4) was rated slightly higher (p = 0.03) than SN3D (3; IQR 2-4). The mean total acquisition time for SN3D imaging was 12.8 ± 2.4 min. Our results suggest that a novel SN3D sequence allows rapid, free-breathing assessment of the aortic root and the aortoiliofemoral system without administration of contrast medium. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.franke@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institut für Diagnostische Radiologie, Gartenstr. 28, 79098 Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael, E-mail: mmarkl@northwestern.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Chicago, 737 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Heinzelmann, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.heinzelmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Freiburg, Killianstr. 5, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Vaith, Peter, E-mail: peter.vaith@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Bürk, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.buerk@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geiger, J., E-mail: julia.geiger@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Children‘s Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstr. 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3 T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3 T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries’ inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries’ inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ = 0.89 for 12-channel and κ = 0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ = 0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ = 0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (p < 0.01) were obtained with the 32-channel coil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  10. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  11. An fMRI Study of Self-Regulatory Control and Conflict Resolution in Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Rachel; Horga, Guillermo; Wang, Zhishun; Wang, Pengwei; Klahr, Kristin W.; Berner, Laura A.; Walsh, B. Timothy; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors examined functional activity in the frontostriatal systems that mediate self-regulatory capacities and conflict resolution in adolescents with bulimia nervosa. Method Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in 18 female adolescents with bulimia nervosa and 18 healthy female age-matched subjects during performance on a Simon spatial incompatibility task. Bayesian analyses were used to compare the two groups on patterns of brain activation during correct responses to conflict stimuli and to explore the effects of antecedent stimulus context on group differences in self-regulation and conflict resolution. Results Adolescents with and without bulimia nervosa performed similarly on the task. During correct responses in conflict trials, frontostriatal circuits—including the right inferolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and putamen—failed to activate to the same degree in adolescents with bulimia nervosa as in healthy comparison subjects. Instead, deactivation was seen in the left inferior frontal gyrus as well as a neural system encompassing the posterior cingulate cortex and superior frontal gyrus. Group differences in cortical and striatal regions were driven by the differential responses to stimuli preceded by conflict and nonconflict stimuli, respectively. Conclusions When engaging the self-regulatory control processes necessary to resolve conflict, adolescents with bulimia nervosa displayed abnormal patterns of activation in frontostriatal and default-mode systems. Their abnormal processing of the antecedent stimulus context conditioned their brain response to conflict differently from that of healthy comparison subjects, specifically in frontal regions. It is suspected that functional disturbances in frontal portions of frontostriatal systems may release feeding behaviors from regulatory control, thereby perpetuating the conflicting desires to consume fattening foods and

  12. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging: a feasibility study on ultra-high-field 7.0-T MRI with an endorectal monopole antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Verheijen, Rene H.M.; Zweemer, Ronald P. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Gynaecological Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Centre, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kalleveen, Irene M.L.; Castro, Catalina S.A. de; Raaijmakers, Alexander J.E.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Veldhuis, Wouter B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    We studied the feasibility of high-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging on an ultra-high-field 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using an endorectal antenna of 4.7-mm thickness. A feasibility study on 20 stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer patients was conducted. All underwent pre-treatment 1.5-T MRI. At 7.0-T MRI, an external transmit/receive array with seven dipole antennae and a single endorectal monopole receive antenna were used. Discomfort levels were assessed. Following individualised phase-based B{sub 1} {sup +} shimming, T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin echo sequences were completed. Patients had stage IB1 (n = 9), IB2 (n = 4), IIA1 (n = 1) or IIB (n = 6) cervical cancer. Discomfort (ten-point scale) was minimal at placement and removal of the endorectal antenna with a median score of 1 (range, 0-5) and 0 (range, 0-2) respectively. Its use did not result in adverse events or pre-term session discontinuation. To demonstrate feasibility, T{sub 2}-weighted acquisitions from 7.0-T MRI are presented in comparison to 1.5-T MRI. Artefacts on 7.0-T MRI were due to motion, locally destructive B{sub 1} interference, excessive B{sub 1} under the external antennae and SENSE reconstruction. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted 7.0-T MRI of stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer is feasible. The addition of an endorectal antenna is well tolerated by patients. (orig.)

  13. Simultaneous whole-body {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI with integrated high-resolution multiparametric imaging of the prostatic fossa for comprehensive oncological staging of patients with prostate cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kesch, Claudia; Radtke, Jan P.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Cardinale, Jens; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Flechsig, Paul; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Floca, Ralf [German Cancer Research Center, Medical Image Computing Group, Heidelberg (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [Technical University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Stenzinger, Albrecht [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of a comprehensive whole-body {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI protocol for imaging prostate cancer (PC) patients. Eight patients with high-risk biopsy-proven PC underwent a whole-body PET/MRI (3 h p.i.) including a multi-parametric prostate MRI after {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/CT (1 h p.i.) which served as reference. Seven patients presented with non-treated PC, whereas one patient presented with biochemical recurrence. SUV{sub mean}-quantification was performed using a 3D-isocontour volume-of-interest. Imaging data was consulted for TNM-staging and compared with histopathology. PC was confirmed in 4/7 patients additionally by histopathology after surgery. PET-artifacts, co-registration of pelvic PET/MRI and MRI-data were assessed (PI-RADS 2.0). The examinations were well accepted by patients and comprised 1 h. SUV{sub mean}-values between PET/CT (1 h p.i.) and PET/MRI (3 h p.i.) were significantly correlated (p < 0.0001, respectively) and similar to literature of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/CT 1 h vs 3 h p.i. The dominant intraprostatic lesion could be detected in all seven patients in both PET and MRI. T2c, T3a, T3b and T4 features were detected complimentarily by PET and MRI in five patients. PET/MRI demonstrated moderate photopenic PET-artifacts surrounding liver and kidneys representing high-contrast areas, no PET-artifacts were observed for PET/CT. Simultaneous PET-readout during prostate MRI achieved optimal co-registration results. The presented {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI protocol combines efficient whole-body assessment with high-resolution co-registered PET/MRI of the prostatic fossa for comprehensive oncological staging of patients with PC. (orig.)

  14. Attenuation values of renal parenchyma in virtual noncontrast images acquired from multiphase renal dual-energy CT: Comparison with standard noncontrast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Mao; Chiou, Yi-You; Wu, Mei-Han; Huang, Shan-Su; Shen, Shu-Huei

    2018-04-01

    To compare the renal parenchyma attenuation of virtual noncontrast (VNC) images derived from multiphase renal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) with standard noncontrast (SNC) images, and to determine the optimum phase for VNC images. Twenty-nine men and 16 women (mean age, 61 ± 13 years; range, 37-89 years) underwent dynamic renal DECT (100/Sn140 kVp) were included in this institutional review board-approved retrospective study. There were four phases of the scan, which included noncontrast, corticomedullary (CMP), nephrographic (NP), and excretory phases (EP). The VNC images was generated from CMP, NP and EP. CT numbers of SNC images and VNC images of each phases were measured in the renal cortex and medulla. Mean standard deviation of subcutaneous fat was measured as image noise on SNC and VNC images. Radiation dose was recorded and potential radiation dose reduction was estimated. Results were tested for statistical significance using the unpaired t-test and agreement using Bland-Altman plot analysis. The difference in mean attenuation between SNC and each phase of VNC images were ≤4 HU. The mean attenuation of renal cortex and medulla was 33.2 ± 4.4 HU, and 34.2 ± 4.8 HU in SNC, 33.6 ± 7.6 HU and 31.1 ± 8.3 HU in VNC of CMP, 34.8 ± 8.6 HU and 35.6 ± 8.5 HU in VNC of NP, 31.5 ± 7.6 HU and 32.4 ± 7.5 HU in VNC of EP. In VNC of CMP, the attenuation of the cortex was higher than the medulla (p VNC of NP, the attenuation of renal cortex was higher than SNC (p VNC of EP, the attenuation of cortex and medulla were lower than SNC (p VNC images from multiphase renal DECT were similar to SNC images. Using the nephrographic phase can gives more comparable VNC images to SNC images in renal parenchyma than other phases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Large-scale propagation of ultrasound in a 3-D breast model based on high-resolution MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahura, Gheorghe; Tillett, Jason C; Metlay, Leon A; Waag, Robert C

    2010-06-01

    A 40 x 35 x 25-mm(3) specimen of human breast consisting mostly of fat and connective tissue was imaged using a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. The resolutions in the image plane and in the orthogonal direction were 130 microm and 150 microm, respectively. Initial processing to prepare the data for segmentation consisted of contrast inversion, interpolation, and noise reduction. Noise reduction used a multilevel bidirectional median filter to preserve edges. The volume of data was segmented into regions of fat and connective tissue by using a combination of local and global thresholding. Local thresholding was performed to preserve fine detail, while global thresholding was performed to minimize the interclass variance between voxels classified as background and voxels classified as object. After smoothing the data to avoid aliasing artifacts, the segmented data volume was visualized using isosurfaces. The isosurfaces were enhanced using transparency, lighting, shading, reflectance, and animation. Computations of pulse propagation through the model illustrate its utility for the study of ultrasound aberration. The results show the feasibility of using the described combination of methods to demonstrate tissue morphology in a form that provides insight about the way ultrasound beams are aberrated in three dimensions by tissue.

  16. Aortic endograft surveillance: use of fast-switch kVp dual-energy computed tomography with virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturen, Katherine E; Kleaveland, Patricia A; Kaza, Ravi K; Liu, Peter S; Quint, Leslie E; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh H; Platt, Joel F

    2011-01-01

    To assess endoleak detection and patients' radiation exposure using fast-switch peak kilovoltage (kVp) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) with virtual noncontrast (VNC) imaging. Institutional review board approved retrospective review of triphasic CTs for endograft follow-up: single-energy true noncontrast (TNC) and dual-energy arterial- and venous-phase postcontrast scans on GE HD-750 64-detector scanners. Iodine-subtracted VNC images generated from dual-energy data. Two radiologists (VNC readers) independently performed 2 reading sessions without TNC images: (1) arterial and VNC and (2) venous and VNC. Interrater agreement, leak detection sensitivity, and dose estimates were calculated. Original dictations described 24 endoleaks in 78 scans. Virtual noncontrast reader agreement was high (κ = 0.78-0.79). Virtual noncontrast reader ranges for sensitivity and negative predictive value for leak detection were 87.5% to 95.8% and 94.0% to 98.0% in venous phase. Dose reduction estimate was 40% by eliminating one phase and 64% by eliminating 2 phases of imaging. Virtual noncontrast images from fast-switch peak kilovoltage DECT data can substitute for TNC imaging in the postendograft aorta, conferring substantial dose reduction. Eliminating 1 of 2 postcontrast phases further reduces dose, with greater negative predictive value for leak detection in the venous versus the arterial phase. Thus, the use of a monophasic venous-phase DECT with VNC images is suggested for long-term endograft surveillance in stable patients.

  17. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8±7.5 years were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV, flow-mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73±2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67±9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P<0.05 and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P<0.05. Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease.

  18. High resolution post-mortem MRI of non-fixed in situ foetal brain in the second trimester of gestation. Normal foetal brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scola, Elisa; Palumbo, Giovanni; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia Maria [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neuroradiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neuroradiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Postgraduation School in Radiodiagnostics, Milan (Italy); Boito, Simona; Persico, Nicola [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ' L. Mangiagalli' , Milan (Italy); Rizzuti, Tommaso [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Pathology Unit, Milan (Italy); Triulzi, Fabio [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Neuroradiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy)

    2018-01-15

    To describe normal foetal brain development with high resolution post-mortem MRI (PMMRI) of non-fixed foetal brains. We retrospectively collected PMMRIs of foetuses without intracranial abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations studied after a termination of pregnancy due to extracranial abnormalities or after a spontaneous intrauterine death. PMMRIs were performed on a 3-T scanner without any fixation and without removing the brain from the skull. All PMMRIs were evaluated in consensus by two neuroradiologists. Our analysis included ten PMMRIs (median gestational age (GA): 21 weeks; range: 17-28 weeks). At 19 and 20 weeks of GA, the corticospinal tracts are recognisable in the medulla oblongata, becoming less visible from 21 weeks. Prior to 20 weeks the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) is more hypointense than surrounding deep grey nuclei; starting from 21 weeks the PLIC becomes isointense, and is hyperintense at 28 weeks. From 19-22 weeks, the cerebral hemispheres show transient layers: marginal zone, cortical plate, subplate, and intermediate, subventricular and germinal zones. PMMRI of non-fixed in situ foetal brains preserves the natural tissue contrast and skull integrity. We assessed foetal brain development in a small cohort of foetuses, focusing on 19-22 weeks of gestation. (orig.)

  19. High resolution post-mortem MRI of non-fixed in situ foetal brain in the second trimester of gestation. Normal foetal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scola, Elisa; Palumbo, Giovanni; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia Maria; Conte, Giorgio; Boito, Simona; Persico, Nicola; Rizzuti, Tommaso; Triulzi, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    To describe normal foetal brain development with high resolution post-mortem MRI (PMMRI) of non-fixed foetal brains. We retrospectively collected PMMRIs of foetuses without intracranial abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations studied after a termination of pregnancy due to extracranial abnormalities or after a spontaneous intrauterine death. PMMRIs were performed on a 3-T scanner without any fixation and without removing the brain from the skull. All PMMRIs were evaluated in consensus by two neuroradiologists. Our analysis included ten PMMRIs (median gestational age (GA): 21 weeks; range: 17-28 weeks). At 19 and 20 weeks of GA, the corticospinal tracts are recognisable in the medulla oblongata, becoming less visible from 21 weeks. Prior to 20 weeks the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) is more hypointense than surrounding deep grey nuclei; starting from 21 weeks the PLIC becomes isointense, and is hyperintense at 28 weeks. From 19-22 weeks, the cerebral hemispheres show transient layers: marginal zone, cortical plate, subplate, and intermediate, subventricular and germinal zones. PMMRI of non-fixed in situ foetal brains preserves the natural tissue contrast and skull integrity. We assessed foetal brain development in a small cohort of foetuses, focusing on 19-22 weeks of gestation. (orig.)

  20. [3.0 T MRI with a high resolution protocol for the study of benign disease of the anus and rectum. Part one: High resolution protocol for 3.0 T MRI, anatomic review, benign tumors, and congenital or acquired alterations of the sphincter complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz Hidalgo, L; Cano Alonso, R; Carrascoso Arranz, J; Álvarez Moreno, E; Martínez de Vega Fernández, V

    2014-01-01

    Benign anorectal disease comprises a broad group of processes with very diverse origins; these processes may be congenital or acquired as well as inflammatory or tumor related. However, benign anorectal disease has received less attention in the scientific literature than malignant disease. We present an image-based review of the most common benign diseases of the anus and rectum. In this first part, we review the anatomy of the region and provide a brief description of the peculiarities of the high resolution protocol that we use with 3.0 T MRI. We go on to describe the most common benign anorectal tumors and developmental cystic lesions, together with their differential diagnoses, as well as congenital and acquired anomalies of the anorectal sphincter complex. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Virtual non-contrast CT using dual energy spectral CT: Feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Measured coronary calcium volumes from VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Among the three VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p < 0.001 for all pairs). The use of VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC

  2. Non-contrast thin-section helical CT of urinary tract calculi in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Bates, Gregory D.; Bloom, David A.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast thin-section helical CT has gained acceptance for the diagnosis of urinary tract calculi in adults, but experience with the technique in children is limited. Purpose: To evaluate the utility of non-contrast thin section helical CT for the diagnosis of urinary tract calculi in children. Materials and methods: Radiology databases at three pediatric institutions were searched to identify all pediatric patients evaluated by ''renal stone'' protocol CT scans (no oral or intravenous contrast, scans covering the entire urinary tract obtained in helical mode with narrow collimation (< 5 mm)). CT scans were reviewed for the primary finding of urinary tract calculi, for secondary signs of acute urinary tract obstruction and for evidence of alternative diagnoses. Medical records were reviewed to determine clinical presentation and to confirm the eventual diagnosis. Results: One hundred thirty-seven scans of 113 children (mean age: 11.2 years) were studied. Thirty-eight of 94 examinations (40%) performed on 82 children for acute pain and/or hematuria showed ureteral calculi. Alternative diagnoses were suggested by CT on 16 scans (17%). Twenty-eight scans were performed on 10 asymptomatic children with known calculus disease confirming renal stone burden on 21 scans (75%) and persistent ureteral calculi on 6 scans (21%). Upper tract calculi were demonstrated on 10 of 15 scans (67%) performed to evaluate for calculi in patients with known non-calculus genitourinary tract abnormalities. Conclusions: Non-contrast thin section helical CT is a useful method to diagnose urinary tract calculi in children. Radiation dose in this retrospective study may exceed the lowest possible radiation dose for diagnostic accuracy. Further research is needed to optimize CT imaging parameters, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy and minimizing radiation dose. (orig.)

  3. Virtual non-contrast CT using dual energy spectral CT: Feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Measured coronary calcium volumes from VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Among the three VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p < 0.001 for all pairs). The use of VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC.

  4. Fully automatic algorithm for segmenting full human diaphragm in non-contrast CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle which separates the thorax from the abdomen and it acts as the most important muscle of the respiratory system. As such, an accurate segmentation of the diaphragm, not only provides key information for functional analysis of the respiratory system, but also can be used for locating other abdominal organs such as the liver. However, diaphragm segmentation is extremely challenging in non-contrast CT images due to the diaphragm's similar appearance to other abdominal organs. In this paper, we present a fully automatic algorithm for diaphragm segmentation in non-contrast CT images. The method is mainly based on a priori knowledge about the human diaphragm anatomy. The diaphragm domes are in contact with the lungs and the heart while its circumference runs along the lumbar vertebrae of the spine as well as the inferior border of the ribs and sternum. As such, the diaphragm can be delineated by segmentation of these organs followed by connecting relevant parts of their outline properly. More specifically, the bottom surface of the lungs and heart, the spine borders and the ribs are delineated, leading to a set of scattered points which represent the diaphragm's geometry. Next, a B-spline filter is used to find the smoothest surface which pass through these points. This algorithm was tested on a noncontrast CT image of a lung cancer patient. The results indicate that there is an average Hausdorff distance of 2.96 mm between the automatic and manually segmented diaphragms which implies a favourable accuracy.

  5. Measuring the volume of insula in healthy Chinese adults of the Han nationality on the high-resolution MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Guangrui; Guo Yulin; Lai Yanbo; Gong Rui; Zhu Kai; Zhao Dan; Chen Nan; Wang Xing; Li Kuncheng; Zhuo Yan; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    volume (F= -0.361, -0.337, P 3 , the right were (8694 ± 1005), (8136 ± 1100), (8034 ± 910), (7496 ± 990), (6989 ± 932) mm 3 , there were significant differences among 5 groups between left and right insula volume (F= -0.490, -0.512, P<0.01). There was significant negative correlation between the volume and age( before standarizded: r= -0.361, -0.337, after standardized r=-0.490, -0.512, P<0.05). Before and after standardized, there was significant correlation between the volume of right and left insula and cerebral volume (r=0.470,0.459, P<0.05). Before and after standardized, there was significant correlation between the volume of right and left insula and weight(r =0.141,0.092,P<0.05). Conclusions: 1.5 T MR scanner has high resolution, for distinguishing the white matter from the gray matter, and provide morphological data of insula for the construction of database for Chinese Standard Brain. (authors)

  6. A convolutional neural network for intracranial hemorrhage detection in non-contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2018-02-01

    The assessment of the presence of intracranial hemorrhage is a crucial step in the work-up of patients requiring emergency care. Fast and accurate detection of intracranial hemorrhage can aid treating physicians by not only expediting and guiding diagnosis, but also supporting choices for secondary imaging, treatment and intervention. However, the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage is complicated by the variation in appearance on non-contrast CT images as a result of differences in etiology and location. We propose a method using a convolutional neural network (CNN) for the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage. The method is trained on a dataset comprised of cerebral CT studies for which the presence of hemorrhage has been labeled for each axial slice. A separate test dataset of 20 images is used for quantitative evaluation and shows a sensitivity of 0.87, specificity of 0.97 and accuracy of 0.95. The average processing time for a single three-dimensional (3D) CT volume was 2.7 seconds. The proposed method is capable of fast and automated detection of intracranial hemorrhages in non-contrast CT without being limited to a specific subtype of pathology.

  7. Application of computed tomography virtual noncontrast spectral imaging in evaluation of hepatic metastases: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shi-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lian; Liu, Jing-Hong; Sun, Mei-Yu; Wang, He-Qing; Liu, Yi-Jun

    2015-03-05

    The objective was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate hepatic metastases using computed tomography (CT) virtual noncontrast (VNC) spectral imaging in a retrospective analysis. Forty hepatic metastases patients underwent CT scans including the conventional true noncontrast (TNC) and the tri-phasic contrast-enhanced dual energy spectral scans in the hepatic arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases. The tri-phasic spectral CT images were used to obtain three groups of VNC images including in the arterial (VNCa), venous (VNCv), and equilibrium (VNCe) phase by the material decomposition process using water and iodine as a base material pair. The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis. The metastasis detection rates with the four nonenhanced image groups were calculated and compared using the Chi-square test. There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05). The quality of VNCe images was significantly worse than that of other three groups (P 0.05). The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). The quality of VNCa and VNCv images is identical to that of TNC images, and the metastasis detection rate in VNC images is similar to that in TNC images. VNC images obtained from arterial phase show metastases more clearly. Thus, VNCa imaging may be a surrogate to TNC imaging in hepatic metastasis diagnosis.

  8. Application of Computed Tomography Virtual Noncontrast Spectral Imaging in Evaluation of Hepatic Metastases: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Feng Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate hepatic metastases using computed tomography (CT virtual noncontrast (VNC spectral imaging in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Forty hepatic metastases patients underwent CT scans including the conventional true noncontrast (TNC and the tri-phasic contrast-enhanced dual energy spectral scans in the hepatic arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phases. The tri-phasic spectral CT images were used to obtain three groups of VNC images including in the arterial (VNCa, venous (VNCv, and equilibrium (VNCe phase by the material decomposition process using water and iodine as a base material pair. The image quality and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR of metastasis of the four groups were compared with ANOVA analysis. The metastasis detection rates with the four nonenhanced image groups were calculated and compared using the Chi-square test. Results: There were no significant differences in image quality among TNC, VNCa and VNCv images (P > 0.05. The quality of VNCe images was significantly worse than that of other three groups (P 0.05. The metastasis detection rate of the four nonenhanced groups with no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05. Conclusions: The quality of VNCa and VNCv images is identical to that of TNC images, and the metastasis detection rate in VNC images is similar to that in TNC images. VNC images obtained from arterial phase show metastases more clearly. Thus, VNCa imaging may be a surrogate to TNC imaging in hepatic metastasis diagnosis.

  9. Virtual non-contrast of liver from dual energy CT: a clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yu'e; Hu Hongjie; Zhang Qiaowei; Hu Peng; Shen Guohui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the virtual non-contrast liver CT from dual-energy CT for the clinical application. Methods: In total, 51 patients were included in the study, and all patients underwent multi-phase liver CT on a dual-source CT. The True non-contrast liver CT (TNCT) was performed in a single-energy acquisition mode, but the arterial and portovenous liver CT (VNCT) were performed in a dual- energy mode of 110 kV and 140 kV respectively. The virtual non-contrast CT images were derived from the arterial data using liver virtual non-contrast software. Between the true non-contrast CT and the virtual non- contrast CT, the image quality, mean CT HU values in the liver and muscle, signal to noise (SNR), the radiation dose of volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) in a single phase and total examination were compared with t test. Results: There was no significant difference in the detection of' liver lesions between TNCT and VNCT. The CT Hu values of muscle on both TNCT and VNCT images were almost equal. The CT HU values of liver on VNCT images were higher than that on TNCT images and the difference was significant [61.32±6.04 vs. (56.85±4.80) HU, t=-3.927, P<0.01]. There was also significant difference of SNR between TNCT (11.28±2.78) and VNCT (8.65±1.56) images (t=-5.590, P<0.01). The CTDIvol and DLP of single phase were (7.07±0.85) mGy and (155.11± 22.52) mGy · cm respectively in TNCT, and (7.05±0.87) mGy and (154.48±23.12) mGy · cm in VNCT. The total CTDIvol and DLP in VNCT were (14.35±1.66) mGy and (313.91±45.08) mGy · cm respectively, but in TNCT the total CTDIvol and DLP reached (21.43±2.46) mGy and (469.02± 66.22) mGy · cm. The difference of CTDIvol and DLP in single phase between TNCT and VNCT showed no significance, but the total CTDIvol and DLP were significantly different (t=16.168 and 13.132, P< 0.01). Conclusion: With the consequent reduction in radiation dose, the VNCT can replace TNCT as an imaging protocol in multi

  10. Incidental Findings in Abdominal Dual-Energy Computed Tomography: Correlation Between True Noncontrast and Virtual Noncontrast Images Considering Renal and Liver Cysts and Adrenal Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebocki, Karin; Kraus, Bastian; Chang, De-Hua; Hellmich, Martin; Maintz, David; Bangard, Christopher

    To assess correlation between attenuation measurements of incidental findings in abdominal second generation dual-energy computed tomography (CT) on true noncontrast (TNC) and virtual noncontrast (VNC) images. Sixty-three patients underwent arterial dual-energy CT (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; pitch factor, 0.75-1.0; gantry rotation time, 0.28 seconds) after endovascular aneurysm repair, consisting of a TNC single energy CT scan (collimation, 128 × 0.6 mm; 120 kVp) and a dual-energy arterial phase scan (collimation, 32 × 0.6 mm, 140 and 100 kVp; blended, 120 kVp data set). Attenuation measurements in Hounsfield units (HU) of liver parenchyma and incidental findings like renal and hepatic cysts and adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images were done by drawing regions of interest. Statistical analysis was performed by paired t test and Pearson correlation. Incidental findings were detected in 56 (89%) patients. There was excellent correlation for both renal (n = 40) and hepatic cysts (n = 12) as well as adrenal masses (n = 6) with a Pearson correlation of 0.896, 0.800, and 0.945, respectively, and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 10.6 HU ± 12.8 versus 5.1 HU ± 17.5 (attenuation value range from -8.8 to 59.1 HU vs -11.8 to 73.4 HU), 6.4 HU ± 5.8 versus 6.3 HU ± 4.6 (attenuation value range from 2.0 to 16.2 HU vs -3.0 to 15.9 HU), and 12.8 HU ± 11.2 versus 12.4 HU ± 10.2 (attenuation value range from -2.3 to 27.5 HU vs -2.2 to 23.6 HU), respectively. As proof of principle, liver parenchyma measurements also showed excellent correlation between TNC and VNC (n = 40) images with a Pearson correlation of 0.839 and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 47.2 HU ± 10.5 versus 43.8 HU ± 8.7 (attenuation value range from 21.9 to 60.2 HU vs 4.5 to 65.3 HU). In conclusion, attenuation measurements of incidental findings like renal cysts or adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images derived from second generation dual-energy CT scans show excellent

  11. High Spatiotemporal Resolution Prostate MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Subtask 2.2: Construct, tune, and match multiple pairs of triangular coils 7-12 (9) Dr. Riederer; Mr. Hulshizer Subtask 2.3: Test modular triangular...the project or its direction. If not previously reported in writing , provide the following additional information or state, “Nothing to Report,” if...all technical aspects of the projects. Name: Akira Kawashima, M.D., Ph.D. Project Role: Co-Investigator Nearest person month worked: .22

  12. The utility of high-resolution intraoperative MRI in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas: early experience in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hasan A.; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Litvack, Zachary N.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Dunn, Ian F.; Laws, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic skull base surgery has become increasingly popular among the skull base surgery community, with improved illumination and angled visualization potentially improving tumor resection rates. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is used to detect residual disease during the course of the resection. This study is an investigation of the utility of 3-T iMRI in combination with transnasal endoscopy with regard to gross-total resection (GTR) of pituitary macroadenomas. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic transsphenoidal operations performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite from November 2011 to December 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients harboring presumed pituitary macroadenomas with optic nerve or chiasmal compression and visual loss, operated on by a single surgeon. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent transsphenoidal resection in the AMIGO suite, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria. The endoscope alone, without the use of iMRI, would have correctly predicted 13 (65%) of 20 cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (60%) prior to MRI. Intraoperative MRI helped convert 1 STR and 4 NTRs to GTRs, increasing the number of GTRs from 12 (60%) to 16 (80%). Conclusions Despite advances in visualization provided by the endoscope, the incidence of residual disease can potentially place the patient at risk for additional surgery. The authors found that iMRI can be useful in detecting unexpected residual tumor. The cost-effectiveness of this tool is yet to be determined. PMID:26926058

  13. Detection of Early Ischemic Changes in Noncontrast CT Head Improved with "Stroke Windows".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Shraddha; Wahba, Mervat; Elijovich, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Noncontrast head CT (NCCT) is the standard radiologic test for patients presenting with acute stroke. Early ischemic changes (EIC) are often overlooked on initial NCCT. We determine the sensitivity and specificity of improved EIC detection by a standardized method of image evaluation (Stroke Windows). Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke who had NCCT at presentation. EIC was defined by the presence of hyperdense MCA/basilar artery sign; sulcal effacement; basal ganglia/subcortical hypodensity; and loss of cortical gray-white differentiation. NCCT was reviewed with standard window settings and with specialized Stroke Windows. Results. Fifty patients (42% females, 58% males) with a mean NIHSS of 13.4 were identified. EIC was detected in 9 patients with standard windows, while EIC was detected using Stroke Windows in 35 patients (18% versus 70%; P Windows (14% and 36%; P Windows (6% and 46%; P Windows significantly improved detection of EIC.

  14. MRI in diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko; Kakinoki, Yoshio; Kimura, Humiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nagayama, Takashi; Okada, Takaharu; Watanabe, Hiromi

    1985-01-01

    64 MRI studies of 57 cases of spinal cord diseases were reviewed, and following results were obtained. (1) MRI is usefull for screening method of spinal cord diseases, as CT in cerebral diseases. (2) MRI might replaces myelography in most of spinal cord disease, and more reliable informations might be obtained by MRI than in myelography in some cases, but (3) in detection of small organic changes, some technological problems are layed regarding to the image resolution of MRI. (author)

  15. What Does a Shoulder MRI Cost the Consumer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Schick, Cameron; Graves, Christopher M; Duchman, Kyle R; Weinstein, Stuart L

    2017-03-01

    More than 100 MRIs per 1000 inhabitants are performed in the United States annually, more than almost every other country. Little is known regarding the cost of obtaining an MRI and factors associated with differences in cost. By surveying all hospital-owned and independent imaging centers in Iowa, we wished to determine (1) the cost to the consumer of obtaining a noncontrast shoulder MRI, (2) the frequency and magnitude of discounts provided, and (3) factors associated with differences in cost including location (hospital-owned or independent) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services designation (rural, urban, and critical access). There were 71 hospitals and 26 independent imaging centers that offered MRI services in Iowa. Each site was contacted via telephone and posed a scripted request for the cost of the technical component of a noncontrast shoulder MRI. Radiologists' reading fees were not considered. Statistical analysis was performed using standard methods and significance was defined as a probability less than 0.05. The mean technical component cost to consumers for an MRI was USD 1874 ± USD 694 (range, USD 500-USD 4000). Discounts were offered by 49% of imaging centers, with a mean savings of 21%. Factors associated with increased cost include hospital-owned imaging centers (USD 2062 ± USD 664 versus USD 1400 ± USD 441 at independent imaging centers; p consumer of a shoulder MRI is significantly less at independent imaging centers compared with hospital-owned centers. Referring physicians and healthcare consumers should be aware that there may be substantial price discrepancies between centers that provide advanced imaging services. Level IV, Economic and decision analysis.

  16. Utility of combined high-resolution bone SPECT and MRI for the identification of rheumatoid arthritis patients with high-risk for erosive progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Sewerin, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.sewerin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Mattes-György, Katalin, E-mail: katalin.mattes@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg, E-mail: hans-joerg.wittsack@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Specker, Christof, E-mail: c.specker@kliniken-essen-sued.de [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Kliniken Essen-Sud, Propsteistrasse 2, D-45239 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm, E-mail: HansW.Mueller@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schneider@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Scherer, Axel, E-mail: scherer@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Ostendorf, Benedikt, E-mail: ostendorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Rheumatology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of sequentially acquired, post hoc fused, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled disphosphonates (Tc99m-DPD) for the identification of finger joints with later erosive progression in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients. Methods: Ten consecutive ERA patients prospectively underwent MPH-SPECT and MRI of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints prior to and after 6 months methotrexate therapy. Tc99m-DPD uptake was measured at proximal and distal MCP sites using regional analysis. The course of joint pathologies was scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Score (RAMRIS) criteria. Results: The frequency of increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, synovitis and bone marrow edemadecreased under MTX therapy; but the number of bone erosions increased. Joints with progressive and new erosions on follow-up had a higher baseline Tc99m-DPD uptake (2.64 ± 1.23 vs. 1.43 ± 0.91) (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Joints with erosive progression are characterized by an early increased Tc99m-DPD uptake, even in absence of MRI bone pathologies. Tc99m-DPD MPH-SPECT might thus be of additional value to morphological MRI for the identification of RA patients with a high risk for erosive progression.

  17. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, P D

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

  18. Pseudotumours in chronic kidney disease: Can diffusion-weighted MRI rule out malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Bhalla, Ashu S.; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Seth, Amlesh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Conventional non-contrast MRI is unable to distinguish CKD pseudotumors from RCCs. •Pseudotumours in a background of CKD do not show restricted diffusion. •CKD pseudotumours demonstrate high ADC values whereas RCCs show restricted diffusion. •DW-MRI is reliable in ruling out malignancy incase of pseudotumours found in chronic kidney disease. •DW-MRI may obviate contrast administration and/or tissue sampling in renal pseudotumours and prevent inadvertent surgeries. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate whether diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) can distinguish pseudotumours in chronic kidney disease (CKD pseudotumours) from renal-cell-carcinomas (RCCs) (with or without CKD) and whether it offers additional benefit over conventional MRI. Methods: One-hundred patients underwent MDCT, MRI and DW-MRI (at b-values of 0 and 500 s/mm 2 ) for evaluation of focal renal lesions. Of these, 20 patients with 40 CKD pseudotumours and 36 patients with 40 RCCs were retrospectively analyzed. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images were evaluated, apparent-diffusion-coefficient (ADC) values were compared and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn to establish cut-off ADC-values. Results: 92.5% of CKD pseudotumours remained indeterminate after conventional MRI. On DW-MRI, none of them showed restricted diffusion and thus malignancy could be ruled out in 100% of the lesions. In contrast, all the solid RCCs showed diffusion restriction. Mean ADC-value for CKD pseudotumours was significantly higher than RCCs and surrounding diseased parenchyma [2.50 vs 1.56 (×10 −3 mm 2 /s) (P < 0.0001) and 2.05 (×10 −3 mm 2 /s) (P = 0.0001) respectively]. ROC analysis for differentiating CKD pseudotumours and RCC yielded high sensitivity (91.7%) and specificity (100%) for cut-off ADC-value of 2.04 (×10 −3 mm 2 /s). Conclusions: CKD pseudotumors usually remain indeterminate on conventional non-contrast MRI. DW-MRI can distinguish CKD pseudotumors

  19. Pseudotumours in chronic kidney disease: Can diffusion-weighted MRI rule out malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Ankur, E-mail: ankurgoyalaiims@gmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (A.I.I.M.S.), New Delhi (India); Sharma, Raju, E-mail: raju152@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (A.I.I.M.S.), New Delhi (India); Bhalla, Ashu S., E-mail: ashubhalla1@yahoo.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (A.I.I.M.S.), New Delhi (India); Gamanagatti, Shivanand, E-mail: shiv223@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (A.I.I.M.S.), New Delhi (India); Seth, Amlesh, E-mail: amlesh.seth@gmail.com [Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (A.I.I.M.S.), New Delhi (India)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Conventional non-contrast MRI is unable to distinguish CKD pseudotumors from RCCs. •Pseudotumours in a background of CKD do not show restricted diffusion. •CKD pseudotumours demonstrate high ADC values whereas RCCs show restricted diffusion. •DW-MRI is reliable in ruling out malignancy incase of pseudotumours found in chronic kidney disease. •DW-MRI may obviate contrast administration and/or tissue sampling in renal pseudotumours and prevent inadvertent surgeries. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate whether diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) can distinguish pseudotumours in chronic kidney disease (CKD pseudotumours) from renal-cell-carcinomas (RCCs) (with or without CKD) and whether it offers additional benefit over conventional MRI. Methods: One-hundred patients underwent MDCT, MRI and DW-MRI (at b-values of 0 and 500 s/mm{sup 2}) for evaluation of focal renal lesions. Of these, 20 patients with 40 CKD pseudotumours and 36 patients with 40 RCCs were retrospectively analyzed. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images were evaluated, apparent-diffusion-coefficient (ADC) values were compared and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn to establish cut-off ADC-values. Results: 92.5% of CKD pseudotumours remained indeterminate after conventional MRI. On DW-MRI, none of them showed restricted diffusion and thus malignancy could be ruled out in 100% of the lesions. In contrast, all the solid RCCs showed diffusion restriction. Mean ADC-value for CKD pseudotumours was significantly higher than RCCs and surrounding diseased parenchyma [2.50 vs 1.56 (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) (P < 0.0001) and 2.05 (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) (P = 0.0001) respectively]. ROC analysis for differentiating CKD pseudotumours and RCC yielded high sensitivity (91.7%) and specificity (100%) for cut-off ADC-value of 2.04 (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Conclusions: CKD pseudotumors usually remain indeterminate on conventional non-contrast MRI. DW-MRI

  20. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Zoran [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Roessle, Martin; Schultheiss, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Freiburg (Germany); Euringer, Wulf; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Salem, Riad; Barker, Alex; Carr, James; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of early-stage optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma using high-resolution 1.5 Tesla MRI with surface coils: a multicentre, prospective accuracy study with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Institut CURIE, Imaging Department, Paris (France); Graaf, Pim de; Rodjan, Firazia; Jong, Marcus C. de; Castelijns, Jonas A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galluzzi, Paolo [Neuroimaging and Neurointerventional Unit (NINT) Azienda Ospedaliera e Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy); Cosker, Kristel; Savignoni, Alexia [Institut Curie, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Maeder, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Aerts, Isabelle [Institut Curie, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Desjardins, Laurence [Institut Curie, Department of Ophthalmology, Paris (France); Moll, Annette C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hadjistilianou, Theodora [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Department of Ophthalmology, Siena (Italy); Toti, Paolo [University of Siena, Department of Medical Biotechnologies, Pathology Unit, Siena (Italy); Valk, Paul van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sastre-Garau, Xavier [Institut Curie, Department of Biopathology, Paris (France); Collaboration: European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration (ERIC)

    2015-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of high-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing early-stage optic nerve (ON) invasion in a retinoblastoma cohort. This IRB-approved, prospective multicenter study included 95 patients (55 boys, 40 girls; mean age, 29 months). 1.5-T MRI was performed using surface coils before enucleation, including spin-echo unenhanced and contrast-enhanced (CE) T1-weighted sequences (slice thickness, 2 mm; pixel size <0.3 x 0.3 mm{sup 2}). Images were read by five neuroradiologists blinded to histopathologic findings. ROC curves were constructed with AUC assessment using a bootstrap method. Histopathology identified 41 eyes without ON invasion and 25 with prelaminar, 18 with intralaminar and 12 with postlaminar invasion. All but one were postoperatively classified as stage I by the International Retinoblastoma Staging System. The accuracy of CE-T1 sequences in identifying ON invasion was limited (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.55 - 0.72) and not confirmed for postlaminar invasion diagnosis (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.47 - 0.82); high specificities (range, 0.64 - 1) and negative predictive values (range, 0.81 - 0.97) were confirmed. HR-MRI with surface coils is recommended to appropriately select retinoblastoma patients eligible for primary enucleation without the risk of IRSS stage II but cannot substitute for pathology in differentiating the first degrees of ON invasion. (orig.)

  2. Transient osteoporosis of the hip, complete resolution after treatment with Alendronate as observed by MRI Description of 8 cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emad, Y.; Ragab, Y.; El Shaarawy, Nashwa; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2012-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), also referred to as transient bone marrow edema syndrome, is most common in middle-aged men and often after trivial trauma or sport-related injuries. Diagnosis is usually made by eliminating other possible causes of hip pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  3. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  5. In vivo imaging of macrophages during the early-stages of abdominal aortic aneurysm using high resolution MRI in ApoE mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyu Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiotensin II (ANG II promotes vascular inflammation and induces abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E knock-out (apoE(-/- mice. The aim of the present study was to detect macrophage activities in an ANG II-induced early-stage AAA model using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO as a marker. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-six male apoE(-/- mice received saline or ANG II (1000 or 500 ng/kg/min infusion for 14 days. All animals underwent MRI scanning following administration of SPIO with the exception of three mice in the 1000 ng ANG II group, which were scanned without SPIO administration. MR imaging was performed using black-blood T2 to proton density -weighted multi-spin multi-echo sequence. In vivo MRI measurement of SPIO uptake and abdominal aortic diameter were obtained. Prussian blue, CD68,α-SMC and MAC3 immunohistological stains were used for the detection of SPIO, macrophages and smooth muscle cells. ANG II infusion with 1000 ng/kg/min induced AAA in all of the apoE(-/- mice. ANG II infusion exhibited significantly higher degrees of SPIO uptake, which was detected using MRI as a distinct loss of signal intensity. The contrast-to-noise ratio value decreased in proportion to an increase in the number of iron-laden macrophages in the aneurysm. The aneurysmal vessel wall in both groups of ANG II treated mice contained more iron-positive macrophages than saline-treated mice. However, the presence of cells capable of phagocytosing haemosiderin in mural thrombi also induced low-signal-intensities via MRI imaging. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPIO is taken up by macrophages in the shoulder and the outer layer of AAA. This alters the MRI signaling properties and can be used in imaging inflammation associated with AAA. It is important to compare images of the aorta before and after SPIO injection.

  6. Errors on interrupter tasks presented during spatial and verbal working memory performance are linearly linked to large-scale functional network connectivity in high temporal resolution resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew Evan; Thompson, Garth John; Schwarb, Hillary; Pan, Wen-Ju; McKinley, Andy; Schumacher, Eric H; Keilholz, Shella Dawn

    2015-12-01

    The brain is organized into networks composed of spatially separated anatomical regions exhibiting coherent functional activity over time. Two of these networks (the default mode network, DMN, and the task positive network, TPN) have been implicated in the performance of a number of cognitive tasks. To directly examine the stable relationship between network connectivity and behavioral performance, high temporal resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected during the resting state, and behavioral data were collected from 15 subjects on different days, exploring verbal working memory, spatial working memory, and fluid intelligence. Sustained attention performance was also evaluated in a task interleaved between resting state scans. Functional connectivity within and between the DMN and TPN was related to performance on these tasks. Decreased TPN resting state connectivity was found to significantly correlate with fewer errors on an interrupter task presented during a spatial working memory paradigm and decreased DMN/TPN anti-correlation was significantly correlated with fewer errors on an interrupter task presented during a verbal working memory paradigm. A trend for increased DMN resting state connectivity to correlate to measures of fluid intelligence was also observed. These results provide additional evidence of the relationship between resting state networks and behavioral performance, and show that such results can be observed with high temporal resolution fMRI. Because cognitive scores and functional connectivity were collected on nonconsecutive days, these results highlight the stability of functional connectivity/cognitive performance coupling.

  7. Comparing kidney perfusion using noncontrast arterial spin labeling MRI and microsphere methods in an interventional swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Nathan S; Wentland, Andrew L; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Djamali, Arjang; Grist, Thomas M; Seo, Songwon; Fain, Sean B

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery-arterial spin labeling (FAIR-ASL) technique to track renal perfusion changes during pharmacologic and physiologic alterations in renal blood flow using microspheres as a gold standard. Fluorescent microsphere and FAIR-ASL perfusion were compared in the cortex of the kidney for 11 swine across 4 interventional time points: (1) under baseline conditions, (2) during an acetylcholine and fluid bolus challenge to increase perfusion, (3) initially after switching to isoflurane anesthesia, and (4) after 2 hours of isoflurane anesthesia. In 10 of the 11 swine, a bag of ice was placed on the hilum of 1 kidney at the beginning of isoflurane administration to further reduce perfusion in 1 kidney. Both ASL and microspheres tracked the expected cortical perfusion changes (P values were systematically lower compared with microsphere perfusion. Very good correlation (r = 0.81, P values in the expected physiologic range (microsphere perfusion values saturated for perfusion >550 mL/min/100 g. Cortical perfusion measured with ASL correlated with microspheres and reliably detected changes in renal perfusion in response to physiologic challenge.

  8. Dual-source virtual non-contrast CT of the head: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Xu Yiming; Shao Jin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate image quality and clinical value of dual-source dual energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) CT of the head. Methods: Sixty-two patients suspected of cerebrovascular diseases underwent conventional non-contrast (CNC) CT and dual energy CTA examination of the head with dual-source CT. Virtual non-contrast images were reconstructed using dual energy software. The CT values of gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, hyperdense hemorrhagic lesion and hypodense ischemic lesion were compared between CNC and VNC images. A four-score scale was used to assess image quality subjectively. Image noise, radiation dosage and detection rate were compared between CNC and VNC images. Paired t test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Chi-square test (McNemar test and Kappa test) were used. Results: The CT value on CNC and VNC images, were (43.3±1.5) and (33.2±1.3) HU for gray matter (t=46.98, P 0.05, Kappa = 1.000) at per-patient level. Twenty-two patients with hypodense ischemic lesions were found on VNC images with one false positive case and two false negative cases. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 91.3% (21/23), 97.4% (38/39), 95.5% (21/22) and 95.0% (38/40) respectively. No statistical difference was found in detecting hypodense lesions between VNC and CNC images (χ 2 = 0.00, P>0.05, Kappa = 0.895). In per-lesion analysis, 53 hemorrhage lesions were found on VNC images with false negative results of four lesions and no false positive result. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 93.0% (53/57). 100.0% (38/38), 100.0% (53/.53) and 90.5% (38/42) respectively. There was no significant difference in detection rate of hyperdense lesion between VNC and CNC images (χ 2 = 2.25, P>0.05, Kappa = 0.914). Thirty-eight hypodense lesions were found on VNC images with 2 false positive lesions and 13 false negative lesions. The sensitivity, specificity

  9. High resolution MRI of the breast at 3 T: which BI-RADS registered descriptors are most strongly associated with the diagnosis of breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker-Domenig, K.; Helbich, T.H.; Bogner, W.; Gruber, S.; Bickel, H.; Duffy, S.; Schernthaner, M.; Dubsky, P.; Pluschnig, U.; Rudas, M.; Trattnig, S.

    2012-01-01

    To identify which breast lesion descriptors in the ACR BI-RADS registered MRI lexicon are most strongly associated with the diagnosis of breast cancer when performing breast MR imaging at 3 T. 150 patients underwent breast MR imaging at 3 T. Lesion size, morphology and enhancement kinetics were assessed according to the BI-RADS registered classification. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. The effects of the BI-RADS registered descriptors on sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Data were analysed using logistic regression. Histopathological diagnoses were used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of breast MRI at 3 T was 99%, 81% and 93%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the final diagnosis of malignancy was positively associated with irregular shape (p registered breast lesion descriptors that are mostly strongly associated with breast cancer in breast MR imaging at 3 T are lesion shape, lesion margin, internal enhancement pattern and Type 3 enhancement kinetics. (orig.)

  10. Appearance of choroidal melanoma on high resolution MRI using 1.5 T and a dedicated surface coil in 200 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.J.; Hosten, N.; Frenzel, D.; Richter, M.; Felix, R.; Bornfeld, N.; Bechrakis, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Choroidal melanomas usually present a characteristic appearance in MRI. Differing characteristics can cause problems in differential diagnosis between melanomas and other masses in the globe. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appearance of choroidal melanomas with MRI in a large consecutive patient group. Methods: In a prospective study, 200 patients with choroidal melanomas were investigated with MRI using a 1.5 T scanner and a 5 cm surface coil. Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the resulting images was performed. Results: 78.5% of the melanomas presented with homogeneous signal intensities within the tumor due to a homogeneous pigmentation whereas 21.5% of the melanomas demonstrated a mixed pigmentation. Signal intensities of the homogeneous melanomas in the plain T 1 -WI were moderately or markedly hyperintense compared to the vitreous in 29.3% and moderately or markedly hypointense in the T 2 -WI in 37.1%. An accompanying retinal detachment was found in 65.5% and an extraocular growth in 7.0%. Conclusions: In 10% to 37% we observed the typical well known MR appearance, including homogenous high signal in the T 1 -WI and low signals in the T 2 -WI. For further differentiation, morphological criteria (e.g. shape, size, and position) were used, which are also discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  12. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Toward the automatic detection of coronary artery calcification in non-contrast computed tomography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Gerd; Chittajallu, Deepak R; Kurkure, Uday; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2010-10-01

    Measurements related to coronary artery calcification (CAC) offer significant predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD). In current medical practice CAC scoring is a labor-intensive task. The objective of this paper is the development and evaluation of a family of coronary artery region (CAR) models applied to the detection of CACs in coronary artery zones and sections. Thirty patients underwent non-contrast electron-beam computed tomography scanning. Coronary artery trajectory points as presented in the University of Houston heart-centered coordinate system were utilized to construct the CAR models which automatically detect coronary artery zones and sections. On a per-patient and per-zone basis the proposed CAR models detected CACs with a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 85.56 (± 15.80)%, 93.54 (± 1.98)%, and 85.27 (± 14.67)%, respectively while the corresponding values in the zones and segments based case were 77.94 (± 7.78)%, 96.57 (± 4.90)%, and 73.58 (± 8.96)%, respectively. The results of this study suggest that the family of CAR models provide an effective method to detect different regions of the coronaries. Further, the CAR classifiers are able to detect CACs with a mean sensitivity and specificity of 86.33 and 93.78%, respectively.

  14. The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas; CT und MRT des erworbenen Cholesteatoms: Prae- und postoperative Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, C.; Czerny, C. [Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Gstoettner, W. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Frankfurt (Germany); Franz, P. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Wien (Austria)

    2003-03-01

    The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas will be described in this paper. The pre- and postoperative imaging of the temporal bone was performed with HRCT and MRI. HRCT and MRI were performed in the axial and coronal plane. MRI was done with T2 weighted and T1 weighted sequences both before and after the intravenous application of contrast material. All imaging findings were confirmed clinically or surgically. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by HRCT included bony erosions of the ossicles, scutum, facial canal in the middle ear, tympanic walls including the tegmen tympani, and of the labyrinth. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by MRI included signs indicative for labyrinthitis, and brain abscess. Postoperative HRCT depicted bony erosions caused by recurrent cholesteatoma, bony defects of the facial nerve and of the labyrinth, and a defect of the tegmen tympani with a soft tissue mass in the middle ear. Postoperative MRI delineated neuritis of the facial nerve, labyrinthitis, and a meningo-encephalocele protruding into the middle ear. HRCT and MRI are excellent imaging tools to depict either bony or soft tissue complications or both if caused by acquired cholesteatomas. According to our findings and to the literature HRCT and MRI are complementary imaging methods to depict pre- or postoperative complications of acquired cholesteatomas if these are suspected by clinical examination. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wird die Rolle der hochaufloesenden Computertomographie (HRCT) und der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zur Abklaerung prae- und postoperativ bedingter Komplikationen erworbener Cholesteatome beschrieben. Die Bildgebung wurde sowohl mit der HRCT als auch mit der MRT durchgefuehrt. Die HRCT und die MRT wurden in axialer und koronaler Ebene (auch

  15. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  16. High-resolution MRI of the wrist and finger joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieners, Gero; Detert, Jacqueline; Burmester, Gerd; Backhaus, Marina; Streitparth, Florian; Fischbach, Frank; Bruhn, Harald; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare magnetic resonance (MR) image quality at different field strengths for evaluating lesions in wrist and finger joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in order to determine whether the higher field strength provides diagnostic gain. The hand mainly affected in 17 RA patients was examined at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T with comparable MR imaging (MRI) protocols. MR images were reviewed twice by two experienced radiologists using the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) of the OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials) group. Image quality was rated on a five-point scale using Friedmann's test and Kendall's W-test for statistical analysis. Image comparison revealed better image quality at higher field strength. Image quality of T1-weighted images was rated 14-22% better at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T by both readers. Moreover, the rating for the T2-weighted-images acquired at 3.0 T was one point better in the five-point scale used. Inter-reader correlation for image quality, bone erosions/defects, edema and synovitis ranged between 0.6 and 0.9 at 3.0 T and between 0.6 and 0.8 at 1.5 T. Intra-reader correlation for these parameters was high at 0.8-1.0. MRI image quality of RA hands is superior at 3.0 T, while an acceptable image quality is achieved at 1.5 T, which improves the evaluation of extent of bone edema, synovitis and identification of small bone erosions. (orig.)

  17. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  18. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-07-01

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  19. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using {sup 18}F-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H. [Research Institute for Advanced Industrial Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H., E-mail: ohch@korea.ac.kr [College of Health Science, Gachon University, Incheon, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.M. [College of Science and Technology, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.B. [Gachon University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. [Bioimaging Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using {sup 18}F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  20. Inter regional correlations of glucose metabolism between the basal ganglia and different cortical areas: an ultra-high resolution PET/MRI fusion study using 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Son, Y.D.; Kim, H.K.; Oh, C.H.; Kim, J.M.; Kim, Y.B.; Lee, C.

    2018-01-01

    Basal ganglia have complex functional connections with the cerebral cortex and are involved in motor control, executive functions of the forebrain, such as the planning of movement, and cognitive behaviors based on their connections. The aim of this study was to provide detailed functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex by conducting an inter regional correlation analysis of the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data based on precise structural information. Fifteen participants were scanned with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution research tomography (HRRT)-PET fusion system using 18 F-FDG. For detailed inter regional correlation analysis, 24 subregions of the basal ganglia including pre-commissural dorsal caudate, post-commissural caudate, pre-commissural dorsal putamen, post-commissural putamen, internal globus pallidus, and external globus pallidus and 80 cerebral regions were selected as regions of interest on the MRI image and their glucose metabolism were calculated from the PET images. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis was conducted for the inter regional correlation analysis of the basal ganglia. Functional correlation patterns between the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were not only consistent with the findings of previous studies, but also showed new functional correlation between the dorsal striatum (i.e., caudate nucleus and putamen) and insula. In this study, we established the detailed basal ganglia subregional functional correlation patterns using 18 F-FDG PET/MRI fusion imaging. Our methods and results could potentially be an important resource for investigating basal ganglia dysfunction as well as for conducting functional studies in the context of movement and psychiatric disorders. (author)

  1. High resolution MRI of the breast at 3 T: which BI-RADS {sup registered} descriptors are most strongly associated with the diagnosis of breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker-Domenig, K.; Helbich, T.H. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W.; Gruber, S. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bickel, H. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Duffy, S. [Queen Mary University of London, Cancer Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics and Statistics, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom); Schernthaner, M. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Dubsky, P. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Pluschnig, U. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, M. [Medical University Vienna, Clinical Institute of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Medical University Vienna, Dept. of Radiology, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    To identify which breast lesion descriptors in the ACR BI-RADS registered MRI lexicon are most strongly associated with the diagnosis of breast cancer when performing breast MR imaging at 3 T. 150 patients underwent breast MR imaging at 3 T. Lesion size, morphology and enhancement kinetics were assessed according to the BI-RADS {sup registered} classification. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. The effects of the BI-RADS {sup registered} descriptors on sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Data were analysed using logistic regression. Histopathological diagnoses were used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of breast MRI at 3 T was 99%, 81% and 93%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the final diagnosis of malignancy was positively associated with irregular shape (p < 0.001), irregular margin (p < 0.001), heterogeneous enhancement (p < 0.001), Type 3 enhancement kinetics (p = 0.02), increasing patient age (p = 0.02) and larger lesion size (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, significant associations with malignancy remained for mass shape (p = 0.06), mass margin (p < 0.001), internal enhancement pattern (p = 0.03) and Type 3 enhancement kinetics (p = 0.06). The ACR BI-RADS {sup registered} breast lesion descriptors that are mostly strongly associated with breast cancer in breast MR imaging at 3 T are lesion shape, lesion margin, internal enhancement pattern and Type 3 enhancement kinetics. (orig.)

  2. Disrupted Cerebro-cerebellar Intrinsic Functional Connectivity in Young Adults with High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Data-driven, Whole-brain, High Temporal Resolution fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold Anteraper, Sheeba; Guell, Xavier; D'Mello, Anila; Joshi, Neha; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Joshi, Gagan

    2018-06-13

    To examine the resting-state functional-connectivity (RsFc) in young adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HF-ASD) using state-of-the-art fMRI data acquisition and analysis techniques. Simultaneous multi-slice, high temporal resolution fMRI acquisition; unbiased whole-brain connectome-wide multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) techniques for assessing RsFc; and post-hoc whole-brain seed-to-voxel analyses using MVPA results as seeds. MVPA revealed two clusters of abnormal connectivity in the cerebellum. Whole-brain seed-based functional connectivity analyses informed by MVPA-derived clusters showed significant under connectivity between the cerebellum and social, emotional, and language brain regions in the HF-ASD group compared to healthy controls. The results we report are coherent with existing structural, functional, and RsFc literature in autism, extend previous literature reporting cerebellar abnormalities in the neuropathology of autism, and highlight the cerebellum as a potential target for therapeutic, diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic developments in ASD. The description of functional connectivity abnormalities using whole-brain, data-driven analyses as reported in the present study may crucially advance the development of ASD biomarkers, targets for therapeutic interventions, and neural predictors for measuring treatment response.

  3. Devising an endoluminal bimodal probe which combines autofluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy with high resolution MRI for early stage colorectal cancer diagnosis: technique, feasibility and preliminary in-vivo (rabbit) results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgolam, A.; Sablong, R.; Bou-Saïd, B.; Bouvard, S.; Saint-Jalmes, H.; Beuf, O.

    2011-07-01

    Conventional white light endoscopy (WLE) is the most widespread technique used today for colorectal cancer diagnosis and is considered as the gold standard when coupled to biopsy and histology. However for early stage colorectal cancer diagnosis, which is very often characterised by flat adenomas, the use of WLE is quite difficult due to subtle or quasiinvisible morphological changes of the colonic lining. Figures worldwide point out that diagnosing colorectal cancer in its early stages would significantly reduce the death toll all while increasing the 5-year survival rate. Several techniques are currently being investigated in the scope of providing new tools that would allow such a diagnostic or assist actual techniques in so doing. We hereby present a novel technique where High spatial Resolution MRI (HR-MRI) is coupled to optical spectroscopy (autofluorescence and reflectance) in a bimodal endoluminal probe to extract morphological data and biochemical information respectively. The design and conception of the endoluminal probe along with the preliminary results obtained with an organic phantom and in-vivo (rabbit) are presented and discussed.

  4. Absolute Hounsfield unit measurement on noncontrast computed tomography cannot accurately predict struvite stone composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Gebreselassie, Surafel; Liu, Xiaobo; Pynadath, Cindy; Snyder, Grace; Monga, Manoj

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine, in vivo, whether single-energy noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) can accurately predict the presence/percentage of struvite stone composition. We retrospectively searched for all patients with struvite components on stone composition analysis between January 2008 and March 2012. Inclusion criteria were NCCT prior to stone analysis and stone size ≥4 mm. A single urologist, blinded to stone composition, reviewed all NCCT to acquire stone location, dimensions, and Hounsfield unit (HU). HU density (HUD) was calculated by dividing mean HU by the stone's largest transverse diameter. Stone analysis was performed via Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Independent sample Student's t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to compare HU/HUD among groups. Spearman's correlation test was used to determine the correlation between HU and stone size and also HU/HUD to % of each component within the stone. Significance was considered if pR=0.017; p=0.912) and negative with HUD (R=-0.20; p=0.898). Overall, 3 (6.8%) had stones (n=5) with other miscellaneous stones (n=39), no difference was found for HU (p=0.09) but HUD was significantly lower for pure stones (27.9±23.6 v 72.5±55.9, respectively; p=0.006). Again, significant overlaps were seen. Pure struvite stones have significantly lower HUD than mixed struvite stones, but overlap exists. A low HUD may increase the suspicion for a pure struvite calculus.

  5. Detection of cortical architecture of rat brain using high-resolution 7.0 T manganese-enhanced MRI in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Song; Gao Gejun; Yu Hui; Yang Tao; Dai Feng; Yan Lihui; An Yanli; Zang Fengchao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in the depiction of cortical architecture of rat brain after systemic administration of Mn 2+ through caudal vein and compare the effects of normal or opened blood-brain barrier on the manganese-enhanced MRI. Methods: Fifteen SD rats were randomly divided into three groups according to ranked list of random. Blood-brain barrier was opened in short time by the injection of 30% mannitol via the right internal carotid artery in group A, then 100 mmol/L MnCl 2 physiologic saline solution was delivered through vena caudalis, and MRI was performed 12 hours later.. In group B, 100 mmol/L MnCl 2 physiologic saline solutions was administrated through vena caudalis, following normal saline injection into the right internal carotid artery, and MRI was performed 12 hours later. The group C served as normal control group. All images were acquired with a 7.0 T micro MR scanner. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in regions of interest were measured by Paravision 4.0 and the differences of three groups were compared by using one-way ANOVA. The differences of SNR on both sides of hemispheres were compared by using paired t test. Results: MEMRI could show the gray matter and white matter of rat brain and the anatomy borders between somatosensory cortex and motor cortex clearly. Periventricular structures such as hippocampus, dentate gyrus, habenula united, and olfactory bulb could also be showed clearly. Symmetrical enhancement on both sides of the cortex and banded structures was shown clearly in group B. The SNR increased and t he differences were significant in right cerebral cortex, both sides of cerebellar cortex, hippocampus and pituitary among three groups (right cerebral cortex 35.2 ± 7.0, 30.1 ± 2.4, 26.6 ± 2.8, F=4.36, P=0.038; left cerebellar cortex 27.1 ± 5.2, 29.4 ± 3.8, 19.4 ± 4.5, F=6.66, P=0.011; right cerebellar cortex 27.8 ± 3.8, 28.5 ± 4.2, 20.4 ± 4.8, F=5.84, P=0.017; left hippocampus 34.5 ± 4

  6. Virtual Non-Contrast CT Using Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Feasibility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Inyoung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC.

  7. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  8. High-resolution MRI vessel wall imaging: spatial and temporal patterns of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and central nervous system vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obusez, E C; Hui, F; Hajj-Ali, R A; Cerejo, R; Calabrese, L H; Hammad, T; Jones, S E

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution MR imaging is an emerging tool for evaluating intracranial artery disease. It has an advantage of defining vessel wall characteristics of intracranial vascular diseases. We investigated high-resolution MR imaging arterial wall characteristics of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome to determine wall pattern changes during a follow-up period. We retrospectively reviewed 3T-high-resolution MR imaging vessel wall studies performed on 26 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome during a follow-up period. Vessel wall imaging protocol included black-blood contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences with fat suppression and a saturation band, and time-of-flight MRA of the circle of Willis. Vessel wall characteristics including enhancement, wall thickening, and lumen narrowing were collected. Thirteen patients with CNS vasculitis and 13 patients with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome were included. In the CNS vasculitis group, 9 patients showed smooth, concentric wall enhancement and thickening; 3 patients had smooth, eccentric wall enhancement and thickening; and 1 patient was without wall enhancement and thickening. Six of 13 patients had follow-up imaging; 4 patients showed stable smooth, concentric enhancement and thickening; and 2 patients had resoluton of initial imaging findings. In the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome group, 10 patients showed diffuse, uniform wall thickening with negligible-to-mild enhancement. Nine patients had follow-up imaging, with 8 patients showing complete resolution of the initial findings. Postgadolinium 3T-high-resolution MR imaging appears to be a feasible tool in differentiating vessel wall patterns of CNS vasculitis and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome changes during a follow-up period. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Stroke Imaging: Technical and Clinical Considerations of Virtual Noncontrast Images for Detection of the Hyperdense Artery Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, Sebastian; Vittoria De Martini, Ilaria; Nern, Chrisitian; Blume, Iris; Wegener, Susanne; Pangalu, Athina; Valavanis, Antonios; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman

    The technical feasibility of virtual noncontrast (VNC) images from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for the detection of the hyperdense artery sign (HAS) in ischemic stroke patients was investigated. True noncontrast (TNC) scans of 60 patients either with or without HAS (n = 30 each) were investigated. Clot presence and characteristics were assessed on VNC images from DECT angiography and compared with TNC images. Clot characterization included the level of confidence for diagnosing HAS, a qualitative clot burden score, and quantitative attenuation (Hounsfield unit [HU]) measurements. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of VNC for diagnosing HAS were 97%, 90%, and 93%, respectively. No significant differences were found regarding the diagnostic confidence (P = 0.18) and clot burden score (P = 0.071). No significant HU differences were found among vessels with HAS in VNC (56 ± 7HU) and TNC (57 ± 8HU) (P = 0.691) images. Virtual noncontrast images derived from DECT enable an accurate detection and characterization of HAS.

  10. Calculating the number of shock waves, expulsion time, and optimum stone parameters based on noncontrast computerized tomography characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Khaled; Abdeldaeim, Hussein; Youssif, Mohamed; Assem, Akram

    2013-11-01

    To define the parameters that accompanied a successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), namely the number of shock waves (SWs), expulsion time (ET), mean stone density (MSD), and the skin-to-stone distance (SSD). A total of 368 patients diagnosed with renal calculi using noncontrast computerized tomography had their MSD, diameter, and SSD recorded. All patients were treated using a Siemens lithotripter. ESWL success meant a stone-free status or presence of residual fragments 934 HUs and SSD >99 mm. The required number of SWs and the expected ET can be anticipated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Noncontrast chest computed tomography immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Clinical benefits and effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon-Il; Kim, Hyun Beom; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Koh, Young Whan; An, Sang Bu; Ko, Heung-kyu; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical benefits of noncontrast chest computed tomography (CT) immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and to assess the effect of radiation reduction on image quality in low-dose scanning. Materials and methods: From June to October 2010, we performed standard-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization in 160 patients and low-dose CTs in 88 patients. We reviewed the entire noncontrast chest CTs and follow-up CTs to reveal the clinical benefits of CT evaluation immediately after transarterial chemoembolization. Using two independent readers, we also retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose and image quality in terms of the image noise, contrast between the liver parenchyma and iodized oil and diagnostic acceptability for the evaluation of treatment response after transarterial chemoembolization. Results: In 5.2% of the patients, additional treatment was performed immediately after the interpretation of the noncontrast chest CT, and additional pulmonary lesions were found in 8.5% of the patients. The measured mean dose-length product for the low-dose scanning was 18.4% of that of the standard-dose scanning. The image noise was significantly higher with the low-dose scanning (p < 0.001). However, all of the low-dose CT scans were diagnostically acceptable, and the mean scores for the subjective assessments of the contrast and diagnostic acceptability showed no significant differences for either reader. Conclusion: A noncontrast chest CT immediately after transarterial chemoembolization has some clinical benefits for immediate decision making and detecting pulmonary lesions. Low-dose, noncontrast chest CTs immediately after transarterial chemoembolization consistently provide diagnostically acceptable images and information on treatment response in patients who have undergone transarterial chemoembolization.

  12. Noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography of the hand: improved arterial conspicuity by multidirectional flow-sensitive dephasing magnetization preparation in 3D balanced steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaoyang; Hodnett, Philip A; Davarpanah, Amir H; Scanlon, Timothy G; Sheehan, John J; Varga, John; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2011-08-01

    : To develop a flow-sensitive dephasing (FSD) preparative scheme to facilitate multidirectional flow-signal suppression in 3-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession imaging and to validate the feasibility of the refined sequence for noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography (NC-MRA) of the hand. : A new FSD preparative scheme was developed that combines 2 conventional FSD modules. Studies using a flow phantom (gadolinium-doped water 15 cm/s) and the hands of 11 healthy volunteers (6 males and 5 females) were performed to compare the proposed FSD scheme with its conventional counterpart with respect to the signal suppression of multidirectional flow. In 9 of the 11 healthy subjects and 2 patients with suspected vasculitis and documented Raynaud phenomenon, respectively, 3-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession imaging coupled with the new FSD scheme was compared with spatial-resolution-matched (0.94 × 0.94 × 0.94 mm) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine) in terms of overall image quality, venous contamination, motion degradation, and arterial conspicuity. : The proposed FSD scheme was able to suppress 2-dimensional flow signal in the flow phantom and hands and yielded significantly higher arterial conspicuity scores than the conventional scheme did on NC-MRA at the regions of common digitals and proper digitals. Compared with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, the refined NC-MRA technique yielded comparable overall image quality and motion degradation, significantly less venous contamination, and significantly higher arterial conspicuity score at digital arteries. : The FSD-based NC-MRA technique is improved in the depiction of multidirectional flow by applying a 2-module FSD preparation, which enhances its potential to serve as an alternative magnetic resonance angiography technique for the assessment of hand vascular abnormalities.

  13. Esophageal carcinoma: Ex vivo evaluation by high-spatial-resolution T2 -mapping MRI compared with histopathological findings at 3.0T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi; Wu, Sen; Gao, Feifei; Sun, Tingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Ning, Peigang; Zhao, Cuihua; Li, Ziyuan; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Linlin; Zhu, Shaocheng

    2017-06-01

    To prospectively determine the feasibility of T 2 -mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitatively describe the signal characteristics of the normal esophageal wall and assess the depth of esophageal wall invasion by carcinoma at 3.0T. Thirty-two patient specimens, each having foci of carcinoma, were studied using 3.0T MR. Freehand regions of interest were placed to measure the T 2 value of the normal esophageal layers and were compared with the regions of carcinoma. Three independent readers reviewed the MR images to evaluate the depth of carcinoma invasion; when the three radiologists could not fully agree with each other, the final stage was determined by consensus. The Games-Howell test was used to compare the difference between the normal esophageal layers and carcinoma. Spearman correlation coefficient analysis was used to compare the stage at MRI with that at histopathological analysis. The interobserver agreement was compared with Cohen's kappa. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detecting carcinoma invasion were calculated. The T 2 values between the carcinoma and normal esophageal layers were different (all P < 0.01), except for the inner circular muscle (P = 0.511). The T 2 value of each layer of the normal esophageal wall was also different from that of the adjacent layer (all P < 0.01). In 29 of 32 lesions, the depth of the esophageal wall invasion determined by MR was consistent with the histopathological stage (r = 0.969, P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80%, 96.3%, and 93.8%, respectively, for invasion into the mucosa; 77.8%, 95.7%, and 90.6%, respectively, for invasion into submucosa; 100%, 95.8%, and 96.9%, respectively, for invasion into muscularis propria; and 100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively, for invasion into the adventitia. T 2 -mapping MR images obtained using a 3.0T MR scanner can be used to depict the precise histopathological layers of the esophageal wall clearly and provide

  14. Clinical impact of gadolinium in the MRI diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Young, Robert S.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The incremental value of gadolinium in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection by MRI is controversial. To compare diagnostic utility of noncontrast with contrast MRI in the evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal infections. We reviewed 90 gadolinium-enhanced MRIs in children with suspected musculoskeletal infection. Noncontrast and contrast MRI scans were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection and identification of abscesses. Pre- and post-contrast diagnosis of osteomyelitis sensitivity was 89% and 91% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 96% and 96% (P = 1.00), respectively; septic arthritis sensitivity was 50% and 67% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 98% and 98% (P = 1.00), respectively; cellulitis/myositis sensitivity was 100% and 100% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 84% and 88% (P = 0.59), respectively; abscess for the total group was 22 (24.4%) and 42 (46.6%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Abscesses identified only on contrast sequences led to intervention in eight additional children. No child with a final diagnosis of infection had a normal pre-contrast study. Intravenous gadolinium should not be routinely administered in the imaging work-up of nonspinal musculoskeletal infections, particularly when pre-contrast images are normal. However, gadolinium contrast significantly increases the detection of abscesses, particularly small ones that might not require surgical intervention. (orig.)

  15. Clinical impact of gadolinium in the MRI diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.H.; Young, Robert S.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Yu, Chang

    2010-01-01

    The incremental value of gadolinium in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection by MRI is controversial. To compare diagnostic utility of noncontrast with contrast MRI in the evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal infections. We reviewed 90 gadolinium-enhanced MRIs in children with suspected musculoskeletal infection. Noncontrast and contrast MRI scans were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection and identification of abscesses. Pre- and post-contrast diagnosis of osteomyelitis sensitivity was 89% and 91% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 96% and 96% (P = 1.00), respectively; septic arthritis sensitivity was 50% and 67% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 98% and 98% (P = 1.00), respectively; cellulitis/myositis sensitivity was 100% and 100% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 84% and 88% (P = 0.59), respectively; abscess for the total group was 22 (24.4%) and 42 (46.6%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Abscesses identified only on contrast sequences led to intervention in eight additional children. No child with a final diagnosis of infection had a normal pre-contrast study. Intravenous gadolinium should not be routinely administered in the imaging work-up of nonspinal musculoskeletal infections, particularly when pre-contrast images are normal. However, gadolinium contrast significantly increases the detection of abscesses, particularly small ones that might not require surgical intervention. (orig.)

  16. Noninvasive detection of coronary artery wall thickening with age in healthy subjects using high resolution MRI with beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Firmin, David N

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate coronary artery wall thickening with age in a small healthy cohort using a highly efficient, reliable, and reproducible high-resolution MR technique. A 3D cross-sectional MR vessel wall images (0.7 × 0.7 × 3 mm resolution) with retrospective beat-to-beat respiratory motion correction (B2B-RMC) were obtained in the proximal right coronary artery of 21 healthy subjects (age, 22-62 years) with no known cardiovascular disease. Lumen and outer wall (lumen + vessel wall) areas were measured in one central slice from each subject and average wall thickness and wall area/outer wall area ratio (W/OW) calculated. Imaging was successful in 18 (86%) subjects with average respiratory efficiency 99.3 ± 1.7%. Coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW significantly correlate with subject age, increasing by 0.088 mm and 0.031 per decade respectively (R = 0.53, P = 0.024 and R = 0.48, P = 0.046). No relationship was found between lumen area and vessel wall thickness (P = NS), but outer wall area increased significantly with vessel wall thickness at 19 mm(2) per mm (P = 0.046). This is consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Despite the small size of our healthy cohort, using high-resolution MR imaging and B2B-RMC, we have demonstrated increasing coronary vessel wall thickness and W/OW with age. The results obtained are consistent with outward vessel wall remodeling. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Identification and assessment of Anderson-Fabry disease by cardiovascular magnetic resonance noncontrast myocardial T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado, Daniel M; White, Steven K; Piechnik, Stefan K; Banypersad, Sanjay M; Treibel, Thomas; Captur, Gabriella; Fontana, Marianna; Maestrini, Viviana; Flett, Andrew S; Robson, Matthew D; Lachmann, Robin H; Murphy, Elaine; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn; Neubauer, Stefan; Elliott, Perry M; Moon, James C

    2013-05-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a rare but underdiagnosed intracellular lipid disorder that can cause left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Lipid is known to shorten the magnetic resonance imaging parameter T1. We hypothesized that noncontrast T1 mapping by cardiovascular magnetic resonance would provide a novel and useful measure in this disease with potential to detect early cardiac involvement and distinguish AFD LVH from other causes. Two hundred twenty-seven subjects were studied: patients with AFD (n=44; 55% with LVH), healthy volunteers (n=67; 0% with LVH), patients with hypertension (n=41; 24% with LVH), patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n=34; 100% with LVH), those with severe aortic stenosis (n=21; 81% with LVH), and patients with definite amyloid light-chain (AL) cardiac amyloidosis (n=20; 100% with LVH). T1 mapping was performed using the shortened modified Look-Locker inversion sequence on a 1.5-T magnet before gadolinium administration with primary results derived from the basal and midseptum. Compared with health volunteers, septal T1 was lower in AFD and higher in other diseases (AFD versus healthy volunteers versus other patients, 882±47, 968±32, 1018±74 milliseconds; Pgadolinium enhancement (1001±82 versus 891±38 milliseconds; P<0.0001). Noncontrast T1 mapping shows potential as a unique and powerful measurement in the imaging assessment of LVH and AFD.

  18. A Novel Imaging Technique (X-Map) to Identify Acute Ischemic Lesions Using Noncontrast Dual-Energy Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kyo; Itoh, Toshihide; Naruto, Norihito; Takashima, Shutaro; Tanaka, Kortaro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether X-map, a novel imaging technique, can visualize ischemic lesions within 20 hours after the onset in patients with acute ischemic stroke, using noncontrast dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Six patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in this study. Noncontrast head DECT scans were acquired with 2 X-ray tubes operated at 80 kV and Sn150 kV between 32 minutes and 20 hours after the onset. Using these DECT scans, the X-map was reconstructed based on 3-material decomposition and compared with a simulated standard (120 kV) computed tomography (CT) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The X-map showed more sensitivity to identify the lesions as an area of lower attenuation value than a simulated standard CT in all 6 patients. The lesions on the X-map correlated well with those on DWI. In 3 of 6 patients, the X-map detected a transient decrease in the attenuation value in the peri-infarct area within 1 day after the onset. The X-map is a powerful tool to supplement a simulated standard CT and characterize acute ischemic lesions. However, the X-map cannot replace a simulated standard CT to diagnose acute cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Cheuk Fan; Chan, L.W.; Cheng, C.W.; Yu, S.C.H.; Wong, W.S.; Wong, K.T.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT) in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (Cr Cl) for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. Materials And Methods: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG) of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and Cr Cl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine) and the normal side (voided urine) were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. Results: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential Cr Cl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl) was defined as the percentage of Cr Cl of the obstructed kidney as of the total Cr Cl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol) was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort) was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00) x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  20. The utility of noncontrast computed tomography in the prompt diagnosis of postoperative complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnessin, Ehud; Mandeville, Jessica A; Handa, Shelly E; Lingeman, James E

    2012-04-01

    Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) is commonly utilized after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) to assess stone-free (SF) status. In addition to assessing SF status, CT is useful in the recognition of complications after PNL. We characterized complications demonstrated by postoperative CT scan and compared hospital re-admission rates based on whether or not CT was performed. We retrospectively reviewed records of 1032 consecutive patients from April 1999 to June 2010. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on whether they had a CT within 24 hours of PNL. Demographic data, CT findings, and need for re-admission for complication management were assessed. Nine hundred fifty-seven patients (92.7%) underwent post-PNL CT. CT-diagnosed complications were perinephric hematoma in 41 (4.3%; 2 requiring embolization and 9 necessitating transfusion), pleural effusion in 25 (2.6%; 10 requiring intervention), colon perforation in 2 (0.2%), and splenic injury in 2 (0.2%). Of patients with postoperative complications, 33% required intervention. Among patients with a CT, 6 (0.6%) were readmitted despite negative postoperative CT (four perinephric hematomas, one calyceal-pleural fistula, and one pseudoaneurysm). The sensitivity of CT for diagnosing complications was 92.7%. Seventy-five patients (7.3%) did not undergo CT post-PNL. Of these, four (5.33%) were readmitted: three for perinephric hematomas and one for ureteral clot obstruction. Patients undergoing post-PNL CT were less likely to be readmitted because of missed complications (p=0.02). Serious post-PNL complications are uncommon, but their prompt diagnosis and treatment is imperative. In addition to identifying residual stones, CT is useful in diagnosing postoperative complications. Postoperative CT could potentially be considered for all patients undergoing PNL, particularly in complex cases such as patients with anatomical abnormalities (renal anatomic abnormality or retrorenal colon), patients requiring upper

  1. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (CrCl for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and CrCl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine and the normal side (voided urine were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. RESULTS: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential CrCl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl was defined as the percentage of CrCl of the obstructed kidney as of the total CrCl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00 x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  2. Hippocampal malrotation: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez, Paulina; Martinez, Adriana; Romero, Carlos; Lopez, Miriam; Zaffaroni, Alejandra; Lopez, Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the common features of hippocampus malrotation in patients with epilepsy by volumetric and high-resolution MRI. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 5 patients (2 females and 3 males) ages ranged between 6-41 years (average: 25 years), all of them with epilepsy diagnosis. MRI was performed with a 1.5 T (GE Signa). The epilepsy protocol include sagittal T1, axial T1 and T2, coronal FLAIR, coronal T2 (high-resolution) and volumetric 3D SPGR IR 1.5 mm thick sequences. Results: The common features found in all patients were: a) Incomplete inversion and round configuration of the hippocampus; b) Unilateral affectation; c) Variable affectation of the hippocampus; d) Normal signal intensity; e) Modification of the inner structure of the hippocampus; f) Abnormal angularity of the collateral sulcus; g) Abnormal position and size of the fornix; h) Normal size of the temporal lobe; and i) Enlargement of the temporal horn with particular configuration. Conclusion: Hippocampus malrotation is a malformation that should be included in the differential diagnosis of the epilepsy patients. MRI provides accurate information for the diagnosis. (author)

  3. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  4. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  5. MRI features of peripheral traumatic neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology Section, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Belzberg, Allan J. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Montgomery, Elizabeth A. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Pathology, Oncology and Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Musculoskeletal Imaging Section Chief, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To describe the MRI appearance of traumatic neuromas on non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study retrospectively reviewed 13 subjects with 20 neuromas. Two observers reviewed pre-operative MRIs for imaging features of neuroma (size, margin, capsule, signal intensity, heterogeneity, enhancement, neurogenic features and denervation) and the nerve segment distal to the traumatic neuroma. Descriptive statistics were reported. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationship between size of neuroma and parent nerve. Of 20 neuromas, 13 were neuromas-in-continuity and seven were end-bulb neuromas. Neuromas had a mean size of 1.5 cm (range 0.6-4.8 cm), 100 % (20/20) had indistinct margins and 0 % (0/20) had a capsule. Eighty-eight percent (7/8) showed enhancement. All 100 % (20/20) had tail sign; 35 % (7/20) demonstrated discontinuity from the parent nerve. None showed a target sign. There was moderate positive correlation (r = 0.68, p = 0.001) with larger neuromas arising from larger parent nerves. MRI evaluation of the nerve segment distal to the neuroma showed increased size (mean size 0.5 cm ± 0.4 cm) compared to the parent nerve (mean size 0.3 cm ± 0.2 cm). Since MRI features of neuromas include enhancement, intravenous contrast medium cannot be used to distinguish neuromas from peripheral nerve sheath tumours. The clinical history of trauma with the lack of a target sign are likely the most useful clues. (orig.)

  6. Locoregional deformation pattern of the patellar cartilage after different loading types. High-resolution 3D-MRI volumetry at 3 T in-vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, Annie; Raya, J.; Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern; Zscharn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze locoregional deformation patterns indicative of contact areas in patellar cartilage after different loading exercises. Materials and Methods: 7 healthy patellae were examined in-vivo before and immediately after standardized loading (kneeling, squatting or knee bends) and after 90 minutes of rest using a sagittal 3D-T1-w FLASH WE sequence (22 msec/ 9.8msec/ 15 / 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm 3 ) at 3 T. After cartilage segmentation and 3D reconstruction, voxel-based and global precision errors (PR) were calculated. The former were used to determine significant differences in local cartilage thickness. Voxel-based 2σ-thickness difference maps were calculated to visualize locoregional deformation patterns. Global changes in volume (Vol), mean thickness (mTh) and cartilage-bone-interface area (CBIA) were calculated. Results: The voxel-based PR depended on cartilage thickness (D) ranging from 0.12 - 0.35 mm. For D ≥ 1 mm the RF was 3 (2.4 %) for Vol, 0.06 mm (2.0 %) for mTh and 16 mm 2 (1.4 %) for CBIA. The focal cartilage deformation equaled 14 % of the local thickness reduction. The deformation areas were oval and located in the peripheral medial (more vertically oriented, all exercises) and caudo-lateral (more horizontally oriented, kneeling and knee bends) aspects of the patella and were least pronounced in knee bends. Significant changes for Vol/mTh ranged from 2.1 to 3.7 %. Conclusion: This MRI-based study is the first to identify in-vivo voxel-based patellar cartilage deformation patterns indicating contact and loading zones after kneeling and squatting. These zones are anatomically and functionally plausible and may represent areas where stress induced degeneration and subsequent OA can originate. The data may facilitate understanding of individual knee loading properties and help to improve and validate biomechanical models for the knee. (orig.)

  7. Clinical indications for high-resolution MRI diagnostics of the peripheral nervous system; Klinische Indikationen hochaufloesender MRT-Diagnostik des peripheren Nervensystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godel, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Weiler, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Neurologische Klinik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Peripheral neuropathies are common and diagnostically often challenging disorders. Difficulties particularly exist in lesion localization and recognition of complex spatial lesion patterns. Medical history taking, neurological examination, neurophysiological tests and nerve ultrasonography represent the gold standard in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve lesions but have known methodical limitations. The use of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) is an additional diagnostic imaging tool recently developed for the high-resolution visualization of long segments of peripheral nerves. Reasonable clinical indications for MRN are exemplarily presented. Using MRN a direct visualization and thus precise localization of focal and non-focal peripheral nerve lesions of various origins can be achieved with high spatial resolution down to the anatomical level of nerve fascicles. Using MRN large anatomical areas of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can be covered in a single examination session, spatial nerve lesion patterns can be evaluated and the underlying causes can often be detected. The MRN is a valuable supplement to the diagnostic work-up of the PNS, especially in cases that cannot be clarified with standard diagnostic methods. Evaluation of the spatial nerve lesion pattern gives additional information on the origin of the underlying disease. Reasonable indications for MRN are the assessment of proximal nerve structures including the brachial and lumbosacral nerve plexi, the clarification of inconclusive diagnostic results, preoperative, postoperative and posttraumatic assessments, the identification of fascicular nerve lesions and the differential diagnosis of an alleged somatoform disorder. (orig.) [German] Periphere Neuropathien sind haeufige und diagnostisch mitunter anspruchsvolle Erkrankungen. Schwierigkeiten bestehen v. a. bei der Laesionslokalisation und Erkennung komplexer Laesionsmuster. Anamnese, klinisch-neurologische Untersuchung

  8. TH-CD-202-04: Evaluation of Virtual Non-Contrast Images From a Novel Split-Filter Dual-Energy CT Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J; Szczykutowicz, T; Bayouth, J; Miller, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of two dual-energy CT techniques, a novel split-filter single-source technique of superior temporal resolution against an established sequential-scan technique, to remove iodine contrast from images with minimal impact on CT number accuracy. Methods: A phantom containing 8 tissue substitute materials and vials of varying iodine concentrations (1.7–20.1 mg I /mL) was imaged using a Siemens Edge CT scanner. Dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images were generated using the novel split-filter technique, in which a 120kVp spectrum is filtered by tin and gold to create high- and low-energy spectra with < 1 second temporal separation between the acquisition of low- and high-energy data. Additionally, VNC images were generated with the sequential-scan technique (80 and 140kVp) for comparison. CT number accuracy was evaluated for all materials at 15, 25, and 35mGy CTDIvol. Results: The spectral separation was greater for the sequential-scan technique than the split-filter technique with dual-energy ratios of 2.18 and 1.26, respectively. Both techniques successfully removed iodine contrast, resulting in mean CT numbers within 60HU of 0HU (split-filter) and 40HU of 0HU (sequential-scan) for all iodine concentrations. Additionally, for iodine vials of varying diameter (2–20 mm) with the same concentration (9.9 mg I /mL), the system accurately detected iodine for all sizes investigated. Both dual-energy techniques resulted in reduced CT numbers for bone materials (by >400HU for the densest bone). Increasing the imaging dose did not improve the CT number accuracy for bone in VNC images. Conclusion: VNC images from the split-filter technique successfully removed iodine contrast. These results demonstrate a potential for improving dose calculation accuracy and reducing patient imaging dose, while achieving superior temporal resolution in comparison sequential scans. For both techniques, inaccuracies in CT numbers for bone materials

  9. TH-CD-202-04: Evaluation of Virtual Non-Contrast Images From a Novel Split-Filter Dual-Energy CT Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J; Szczykutowicz, T; Bayouth, J; Miller, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the ability of two dual-energy CT techniques, a novel split-filter single-source technique of superior temporal resolution against an established sequential-scan technique, to remove iodine contrast from images with minimal impact on CT number accuracy. Methods: A phantom containing 8 tissue substitute materials and vials of varying iodine concentrations (1.7–20.1 mg I /mL) was imaged using a Siemens Edge CT scanner. Dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images were generated using the novel split-filter technique, in which a 120kVp spectrum is filtered by tin and gold to create high- and low-energy spectra with < 1 second temporal separation between the acquisition of low- and high-energy data. Additionally, VNC images were generated with the sequential-scan technique (80 and 140kVp) for comparison. CT number accuracy was evaluated for all materials at 15, 25, and 35mGy CTDIvol. Results: The spectral separation was greater for the sequential-scan technique than the split-filter technique with dual-energy ratios of 2.18 and 1.26, respectively. Both techniques successfully removed iodine contrast, resulting in mean CT numbers within 60HU of 0HU (split-filter) and 40HU of 0HU (sequential-scan) for all iodine concentrations. Additionally, for iodine vials of varying diameter (2–20 mm) with the same concentration (9.9 mg I /mL), the system accurately detected iodine for all sizes investigated. Both dual-energy techniques resulted in reduced CT numbers for bone materials (by >400HU for the densest bone). Increasing the imaging dose did not improve the CT number accuracy for bone in VNC images. Conclusion: VNC images from the split-filter technique successfully removed iodine contrast. These results demonstrate a potential for improving dose calculation accuracy and reducing patient imaging dose, while achieving superior temporal resolution in comparison sequential scans. For both techniques, inaccuracies in CT numbers for bone materials

  10. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  11. MRI of the wrist: Comparison of high resolution pulse sequences and different fat-suppression techniques; Magnetresonanztomographie des Handgelenks - Vergleich hochaufloesender Pulssequenzen und unterschiedlicher Fettsignalunterdrueckungen an Leichenpraeparaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, A.; Spieker, A.; Bonel, H.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Schrank, C.; Putz, R. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Anatomische Anstalt; Petsch, R. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany). Unternehmensbereich Medizinische Technik

    2000-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high resolution sequences with and without fat-suppression techniques for MR imaging of the wrist. Results: The highest homogeneity and the least artifacts were achieved by the T{sub 1}-w SE sequence. For the STIR and PD-FS TSE sequence high rankings were found for the detection of free water. The PD FS sequence had high ranking also for visualization of the SL ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage. The best sequence for the assessment of hyaline cartilage was the FLASH-FS sequence. For detailed analysis of bony structures the CISS sequence performed best. Conclusion: The isolated use of a PD-FS-TSE sequence enables for evaluation of all clinically relevant structures at the wrist. Dedicated questions for hyaline cartilage are answered best by the use of a FLASH 3D-FS sequence. Selective water excitation reduces acquisition time to 60%, nevertheless FS sequences are still diagnostically superior to WE sequences. (orig./AJ) [German] Ziel: Beurteilung der Wertigkeit hochaufloesender MRT-Sequenzen ohne und mit Fettsignalunterdrueckung (FS) und selektiver Wasseranregung (WE) fuer Untersuchungen des Handgelenkes. Ergebnisse: SE-T{sub 1} zeigte die hoechste Signalhomogenitaet bei geringsten Artefakten. Die STIR und PD FS-Sequenz stellten Signal von freiem Wasser am besten dar. Die beste Knorpeldarstellung erreicht die FLASH 3D-FS-Sequenz. Die Kortikalis und die Spongiosa konnten am besten mit der CISS-Sequenz beurteilt werden. Die FS-Sequenzen waren den WE-Sequenzen diagnostisch ueberlegen. Schlussfolgerungen: Mit der PD FS TSE-Sequenz mit verlaengerter Echozeit ist eine gute Beurteilung aller klinisch wichtigen Strukturen moeglich. Die beste Darstellung des hyalinen Knorpels wird mit der FLASH-3D-FS-, des Knochens mit der CISS-Sequenz erreicht. Die selektive Wasseranregung bei FLASH- und DESS-Sequenzen reduziert die Aufnahmezeit, ohne die diagnostische Aussagekraft der FS-Sequenzen zu erreichen. (orig./AJ)

  12. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author)

  13. The usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of MRI for the diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies was evaluated. Pelvic MRI was carried out on 29 cases suspected of abnormal pregnancy by ultrasonography and clinical examinations. The abnormal pregnancies were classified into three categories: (1) maternal abnormalities, (2) fetal abnormalities and (3) placental abnormalities. MRI was of great value for the diagnosis of maternal abnormalities, particularly in cases of coexistent pelvic tumor. MRI allowed diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and dermoid cyst through its excellent tissue characterization and broad range of vision. MRI was useful in making diagnoses of fetal central nervous anomalies and fetal death, since the lack of fetal movement and the lesions were clear enough to be detected by MRI. However, anomalies in the fetal trunk or extremities could only be demonstrated, but not diagnosed, by MRI owing to its inferior spatial and time resolution. MRI showed placenta accreta and placental hematoma. Although accurate diagnosis was difficult because of their rarity, MRI revealed the hemorrhagic component of the lesions, which was not shown by ultrasonography. The author believes MRI has potential usefulness in making diagnoses of placental abnormalities through its tissue characterization. MRI was superior to ultrasonography in the soft tissue characterization, field of view, while MRI was inferior in time and spatial resolution. In summary, MRI hould be used in case of abnormal pregnancies such as pelvic tumors, fetal nervous anomalies and placental hemorrhagic lesions. MRI will become useful for the diagnosis of other abnormalities as its spatial resolution and fast scan technology advances. (author).

  14. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  15. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  16. Non-contrast MRA using an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery SSFP technique in pediatric abdominal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serai, Suraj; Towbin, Alexander J.; Podberesky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) is routinely performed in children. CE-MRA is challenging in children because of patient motion, difficulty in obtaining intravenous access, and the inability of young patients to perform a breath-hold during imaging. The combination of pediatric-specific difficulties in imaging and the safety concerns regarding the risk of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with impaired renal function has renewed interest in the use of non-contrast (NC) MRA techniques. At our institution, we have optimized 3-D NC-MRA techniques for abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery balanced steady-state free precession-based (b-SSFP) NC-MRA technique. (orig.)

  17. Virtual non-contrast in second-generation, dual-energy computed tomography: Reliability of attenuation values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toepker, Michael; Moritz, Thomas; Krauss, Bernhard; Weber, Michael; Euller, Gordon; Mang, Thomas; Wolf, Florian; Herold, Christian J.; Ringl, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of attenuation values in virtual non-contrast images (VNC) reconstructed from contrast-enhanced, dual-energy scans performed on a second-generation dual-energy CT scanner, compared to single-energy, non-contrast images (TNC). Materials and methods: Sixteen phantoms containing a mixture of contrast agent and water at different attenuations (0–1400 HU) were investigated on a Definition Flash-CT scanner using a single-energy scan at 120 kV and a DE-CT protocol (100 kV/SN140 kV). For clinical assessment, 86 patients who received a dual-phase CT, containing an unenhanced single-energy scan at 120 kV and a contrast enhanced (110 ml Iomeron 400 mg/ml; 4 ml/s) DE-CT (100 kV/SN140 kV) in an arterial (n = 43) or a venous phase, were retrospectively analyzed. Mean attenuation was measured within regions of interest of the phantoms and in different tissue types of the patients within the corresponding VNC and TNC images. Paired t-tests and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. Results: For all phantoms, mean attenuation in VNC was 5.3 ± 18.4 HU, with respect to water. In 86 patients overall, 2637 regions were measured in TNC and VNC images, with a mean difference between TNC and VNC of −3.6 ± 8.3 HU. In 91.5% (n = 2412) of all cases, absolute differences between TNC and VNC were under 15 HU, and, in 75.3% (n = 1986), differences were under 10 HU. Conclusions: Second-generation dual-energy CT based VNC images provide attenuation values close to those of TNC. To avoid possible outliers multiple measurements are recommended especially for measurements in the spleen, the mesenteric fat, and the aorta.

  18. Sensitivity of Non-Contrast Computed Tomography for Small Renal Calculi with Endoscopy as the Gold Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojani, Naeem; Paonessa, Jessica E; El Tayeb, Marawan M; Williams, James C; Hameed, Tariq A; Lingeman, James E

    2018-04-03

    To compare the sensitivity of non-contrast CT to endoscopy for detection of renal calculi. Imaging modalities for detection of nephrolithiasis have centered on abdominal x-ray (KUB), ultrasound (US), and non-contrast computed tomography (CT). Sensitivities of 58-62% (KUB), 45% (US), and 95-100% (CT) have been previously reported. However, these results have never been correlated with endoscopic findings. Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers with symptomatic calculi requiring ureteroscopy (URS) were studied. At the time of surgery, the number and location of all calculi within the kidney were recorded followed by basket retrieval. Each calculus was measured and sent for micro CT and infrared spectrophotometry. All CT scans were reviewed by the same genitourinary radiologist who was blinded to the endoscopic findings. The radiologist reported on the number, location, and size of each calculus. 18 renal units were studied in 11 patients. Average time from CT scan to URS was 28.6 days. The mean number of calculi identified per kidney was 9.2±6.1 for endoscopy and 5.9±4.1 for CT (p<0.004). The mean size of total renal calculi (sum of longest stone diameters) per kidney was 22.4±17.1 mm and 18.2±13.2 mm for endoscopy and CT, respectively (p=0.06). CT scan underreports the number of renal calculi, probably missing some small stones and unable to distinguish those lying in close proximity to one another. However, the total stone burden seen by CT is, on average, accurate when compared to that found on endoscopic examination. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh; Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 ± 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  20. Tin-filter enhanced dual-energy-CT: image quality and accuracy of CT numbers in virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Sauter, Alexander; Spira, Daniel; Gatidis, Sergios; Ketelsen, Dominik; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D; Thomas, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    To measure and compare the objective image quality of true noncontrast (TNC) images with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images acquired by tin-filter-enhanced, dual-source, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of upper abdomen. Sixty-three patients received unenhanced abdominal CT and enhanced abdominal DECT (100/140 kV with tin filter) in portal-venous phase. VNC images were calculated from the DECT datasets using commercially available software. The mean attenuation of relevant tissues and image quality were compared between the TNC and VNC images. Image quality was rated objectively by measuring image noise and the sharpness of object edges using custom-designed software. Measurements were compared using Student two-tailed t-test. Correlation coefficients for tissue attenuation measurements between TNC and VNC were calculated and the relative deviations were illustrated using Bland-Altman plots. Mean attenuation differences between TNC and VNC (HUTNC - HUVNC) image sets were as follows: right liver lobe -4.94 Hounsfield units (HU), left liver lobe -3.29 HU, vena cava -2.19 HU, spleen -7.46 HU, pancreas 1.29 HU, fat -11.14 HU, aorta 1.29 HU, bone marrow 36.83 HU (all P VNC and TNC series were observed for liver, vena portae, kidneys, pancreas, muscle and bone marrow (Pearson's correlation coefficient ≥0.75). Mean image noise was significantly higher in TNC images (P VNC and TNC images (P = .19). The Hounsfield units in VNC images closely resemble TNC images in the majority of the organs of the upper abdomen (kidneys, liver, pancreas). In spleen and fat, Hounsfield numbers in VNC images are tend to be higher than in TNC images. VNC images show a low image noise and satisfactory edge sharpness. Other criteria of image quality and the depiction of certain lesions need to be evaluated additionally. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: m_bazeed@yahoo.com; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh (Cardiology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)); Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim (Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aim Shams Univ. (Egypt)); Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh (Dept. of Cardiac Services, Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 +- 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  2. Virtual non-contrast in second-generation, dual-energy computed tomography: reliability of attenuation values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepker, Michael; Moritz, Thomas; Krauss, Bernhard; Weber, Michael; Euller, Gordon; Mang, Thomas; Wolf, Florian; Herold, Christian J; Ringl, Helmut

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the reliability of attenuation values in virtual non-contrast images (VNC) reconstructed from contrast-enhanced, dual-energy scans performed on a second-generation dual-energy CT scanner, compared to single-energy, non-contrast images (TNC). Sixteen phantoms containing a mixture of contrast agent and water at different attenuations (0-1400 HU) were investigated on a Definition Flash-CT scanner using a single-energy scan at 120 kV and a DE-CT protocol (100 kV/SN140 kV). For clinical assessment, 86 patients who received a dual-phase CT, containing an unenhanced single-energy scan at 120 kV and a contrast enhanced (110 ml Iomeron 400 mg/ml; 4 ml/s) DE-CT (100 kV/SN140 kV) in an arterial (n=43) or a venous phase, were retrospectively analyzed. Mean attenuation was measured within regions of interest of the phantoms and in different tissue types of the patients within the corresponding VNC and TNC images. Paired t-tests and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. For all phantoms, mean attenuation in VNC was 5.3±18.4 HU, with respect to water. In 86 patients overall, 2637 regions were measured in TNC and VNC images, with a mean difference between TNC and VNC of -3.6±8.3 HU. In 91.5% (n=2412) of all cases, absolute differences between TNC and VNC were under 15HU, and, in 75.3% (n=1986), differences were under 10 HU. Second-generation dual-energy CT based VNC images provide attenuation values close to those of TNC. To avoid possible outliers multiple measurements are recommended especially for measurements in the spleen, the mesenteric fat, and the aorta. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Dahye; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Joon; Koo, Ja Seung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters. Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years) with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1) were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US), 2) were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) 3) underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and 4) had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER), maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters. In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites showed

  4. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  5. MRI-powered biomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovet, Sierra; Ren, Hongliang; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Tokuda, Junichi; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2017-11-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is beneficial for imaging-guided procedures because it provides higher resolution images and better soft tissue contrast than computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and X-ray. MRI can be used to streamline diagnostics and treatment because it does not require patients to be repositioned between scans of different areas of the body. It is even possible to use MRI to visualize, power, and control medical devices inside the human body to access remote locations and perform minimally invasive procedures. Therefore, MR conditional medical devices have the potential to improve a wide variety of medical procedures; this potential is explored in terms of practical considerations pertaining to clinical applications and the MRI environment. Recent advancements in this field are introduced with a review of clinically relevant research in the areas of interventional tools, endovascular microbots, and closed-loop controlled MRI robots. Challenges related to technology and clinical feasibility are discussed, including MRI based propulsion and control, navigation of medical devices through the human body, clinical adoptability, and regulatory issues. The development of MRI-powered medical devices is an emerging field, but the potential clinical impact of these devices is promising.

  6. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, P D; Murphy, K P; Hayes, S A; Carey, K; Sammon, J; Crush, L; O'Neill, F; Normoyle, B; McGarrigle, A M; Barry, J E; Maher, M M

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). Thirty-three patients with clinically suspected renal colic were prospectively included. Conventional dose (CD-CT) and LD-CT data sets were contemporaneously acquired. LD-CT images were reconstructed with 40 %, 70 % and 90 % ASiR. Image quality was subjectively and objectively measured. Images were also clinically interpreted. Mean ED was 0.48 ± 0.07 mSv for LD-CT compared with 4.43 ± 3.14 mSv for CD-CT. Increasing the percentage ASiR resulted in a step-wise reduction in mean objective noise (p ASiR LD-CT images had higher diagnostic acceptability and spatial resolution than 90 % ASiR LD-CT images (p ASiR LD-CT with two false positives and 16 false negatives (diameter = 2.3 ± 0.7 mm) equating to a sensitivity and specificity of 72 % and 94 %. Seventy % ASiR LD-CT had a sensitivity and specificity of 87 % and 100 % for detection of calculi >3 mm. Reconstruction of LD-CT images with 70 % ASiR resulted in superior image quality than FBP, 40 % ASIR and 90 % ASIR. LD-CT with ASIR demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity for detection of calculi >3 mm. • Low-dose CT studies for urinary calculus detection were performed with a mean dose of 0.48 ± 0.07 mSv • Low-dose CT with 70 % ASiR detected calculi >3 mm with a sensitivity and specificity of 87 % and 100 % • Reconstruction with 70 % ASiR was superior to filtered back projection, 40 % ASiR and 90 % ASiR images.

  7. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  9. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  10. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  11. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  12. Multiparametric MRI of intracranial aneurysms treated with the Woven EndoBridge (WEB): a case of Faraday's cage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawka, Marie Teresa; Sedlacik, Jan; Frölich, Andreas; Bester, Maxim; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2018-02-10

    To evaluate multiparametric MRI including non-contrast and contrast-enhanced morphological and angiographic techniques for intracranial aneurysms treated with the single-layer Woven EndoBridge (WEB) embolization system applying simultaneous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference of standard. We retrospectively identified all patients with incidental and acute ruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with a WEB device (WEB SL and WEB SLS) between March 2014 and June 2016 in our neurovascular center with early (within 7 days) postinterventional multiparametric MRI as well as mid-term (5-8 months) follow-up MRI and DSA available. Occlusion rates were recorded both in DSA and MR angiography (MRA). In MRI, signal intensities within the WEB as well as in the occluded dome distal to the WEB, if present, were measured by region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Twenty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Rates of complete/adequate occlusion at mid-term follow-up were 84% with both MRA and DSA. A strong signal loss within the WEB was observed in all MR sequences at initial and follow-up examinations. ROI analysis did not reveal significant differences in non-contrast (P=0.946) and contrast-enhanced imaging (P=0.377). A T1-hyperintense thrombus in the non-WEB-carrying dome was a frequent observation. Signal intensity measurements in multiparametric MRI suggest that neither contrast-enhanced MRA nor morphological sequences are capable of revealing reliable information on the WEB lumen, presumably due to radio frequency shielding. MRI is therefore not suitable for confirming complete thrombus formation within the WEB. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. CT, MRI and MRA of cerebrovascular malformations (report of 16 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Qingguo; Hu Chunhong; Guo Liang; Ding Yi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of CT, MRI and MRA in cerebrovascular malformations. Methods: 16 cases of cerebrovascular malformations were confirmed by angiography and pathology, including 12 cases of arteriovenous malformations, 4 cases of cavernous angiomas. All of these cases were performed with CT, MRI non-contrast scan and 3D-TOF MRA. Results: CT appearances of AVM were mixed density with hypo-density, iso-density or hyper-density. Some had calcification or acute hemorrhage. MRI scan showed the dilated and tortuous nidus of AVMs on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The appearances of hemorrhage were variable. Feeding arteries and draining veins were showed clearly on MRA. The typical sign of cavernous angiomas was mixed signals with hypointensity ring on MRI, while MRA could not provide much information. Conclusions: CT, MRI and MRA had different value in diagnosis of cerebrovascular malformations. CT combined with MRI and MRA could sharply improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and aid in the comprehensive evaluation of cerebrovascular malformations

  14. Cystic angiomatosis with splenic involvement: unusual MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Dept. of Radiology, AZ St-Maarten, Campus Duffel, Duffel (Belgium); Schepper, A.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Raeve, H. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Berneman, Z. [Dept. of Hematology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Cystic angiomatosis is a rare disorder with a poor prognosis. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with longstanding bone pain, hemolytic anemia, and an enlarged spleen. Radiologically, multiple osseous lesions with a mixed pattern of lytic and sclerotic areas were seen within the shoulders, spine, and pelvis. On CT and MRI of the abdomen, the spleen was markedly enlarged, with internal hyperdense foci on non-contrast CT scan, corresponding to low signal intensity areas on all MR pulse sequences. After administration of contrast, a mottled enhancement pattern throughout the entire spleen was seen both on CT and MRI. Cystic angiomatosis was proven by histological analysis of a biopsy specimen of an involved vertebra and histopathological examination of the spleen after subsequent splenectomy. This is the first report of a patient with disseminated cystic angiomatosis with splenic involvement in which the MRI features differ from the previous reports. Instead of the usual pattern consisting of multiple well-defined cystic lesions, a diffuse involvement replacing the entire spleen, with heterogeneous signal intensities on T2-weighted images and heterogeneous enhancement pattern, was seen in our patient. (orig.)

  15. Cystic angiomatosis with splenic involvement: unusual MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Schepper, A.M.; Raeve, H.; Berneman, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Cystic angiomatosis is a rare disorder with a poor prognosis. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with longstanding bone pain, hemolytic anemia, and an enlarged spleen. Radiologically, multiple osseous lesions with a mixed pattern of lytic and sclerotic areas were seen within the shoulders, spine, and pelvis. On CT and MRI of the abdomen, the spleen was markedly enlarged, with internal hyperdense foci on non-contrast CT scan, corresponding to low signal intensity areas on all MR pulse sequences. After administration of contrast, a mottled enhancement pattern throughout the entire spleen was seen both on CT and MRI. Cystic angiomatosis was proven by histological analysis of a biopsy specimen of an involved vertebra and histopathological examination of the spleen after subsequent splenectomy. This is the first report of a patient with disseminated cystic angiomatosis with splenic involvement in which the MRI features differ from the previous reports. Instead of the usual pattern consisting of multiple well-defined cystic lesions, a diffuse involvement replacing the entire spleen, with heterogeneous signal intensities on T2-weighted images and heterogeneous enhancement pattern, was seen in our patient. (orig.)

  16. Prediction of Clinical Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Value of Repeated Noncontrast Computed Tomography, Computed Tomographic Angiography, and Computed Tomographic Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Jan W; Horsch, Alexander D; van den Hoven, Andor F; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Schaaf, Irene C; van Seeters, Tom; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-09-01

    Early prediction of outcome in acute ischemic stroke is important for clinical management. This study aimed to compare the relationship between early follow-up multimodality computed tomographic (CT) imaging and clinical outcome at 90 days in a large multicenter stroke study. From the DUST study (Dutch Acute Stroke Study), patients were selected with (1) anterior circulation occlusion on CT angiography (CTA) and ischemic deficit on CT perfusion (CTP) on admission, and (2) day 3 follow-up noncontrast CT, CTP, and CTA. Follow-up infarct volume on noncontrast CT, poor recanalization on CTA, and poor reperfusion on CTP (mean transit time index ≤75%) were related to unfavorable outcome after 90 days defined as modified Rankin Scale 3 to 6. Four multivariable models were constructed: (1) only baseline variables (model 1), (2) model 1 with addition of infarct volume, (3) model 1 with addition of recanalization, and (4) model 1 with addition of reperfusion. Area under the curves of the receiver operating characteristic curves of the models were compared using the DeLong test. A total of 242 patients were included. Poor recanalization was found in 21%, poor reperfusion in 37%, and unfavorable outcome in 44%. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic curve without follow-up imaging was 0.81, with follow-up noncontrast CT 0.85 ( P =0.02), CTA 0.86 ( P =0.01), and CTP 0.86 ( P =0.01). All 3 follow-up imaging modalities improved outcome prediction compared with no imaging. There was no difference between the imaging models. Follow-up imaging after 3 days improves outcome prediction compared with prediction based on baseline variables alone. CTA recanalization and CTP reperfusion do not outperform noncontrast CT at this time point. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00880113. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. MRI features of spinal epidural angiolipomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Su; Hu, Chun Hong; Wang, Xi Ming; Dai, Hui [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Jiangsu (China); Hu, Xiao Yun; Fang, Xiang Ming [Dept. of Radiology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu (China); Cui, Lei [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-10-15

    To describe the MRI findings in ten patients of spinal epidural angiolipoma for differentiated diagnosis presurgery. Ten surgically proved cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas were retrospectively reviewed, and the lesion was classified according to the MR findings. Ten tumors were located in the superior (n = 4), middle (n = 2), or inferior (n = 4) thoracic level. The mass, with the spindle shape, was located in the posterior epidural space and extended parallel to the long axis of the spine. All lesions contained a fat and vascular element. The vascular content, correlating with the presence of hypointense regions on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and hyperintense signals on T2-weighted imaging, had marked enhancement. However, there were no flow void signs on MR images. All tumors were divided into two types based on the MR features. In type 1 (n = 3), the mass was predominantly composed of lipomatous tissue (> 50%) and contained only a few small angiomatous regions, which had a trabeculated or mottled appear. In type 2 (n = 7), the mass, however, was predominantly composed of vascular components (> 50%), which presented as large foci in the center of the mass. Most spinal epidural angiolipomas exhibit hyperintensity on T1WI while the hypointense region on the noncontrast T1WI indicates to be vascular, which manifests an obvious enhancement with gadolinium administration.

  18. Virtual non-contrast computer tomography (CT) with spectral CT as an alternative to conventional unenhanced CT in the assessment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shi-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lian; Wang, He-Qing; Liu, Jing-Hong; Sun, Mei-Yu; Liu, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate computed tomography (CT) virtual non-contrast (VNC) spectral imaging for gastric carcinoma. Fifty-two patients with histologically proven gastric carcinomas underwent gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) including non-contrast and contrast-enhanced hepatic arterial, portal venous, and equilibrium phase acquisitions prior to surgery. VNC arterial phase (VNCa), VNC venous phase (VNCv), and VNC equilibrium phase (VNCe) images were obtained by subtracting iodine from iodine/water images. Images were analyzed with respect to image quality, gastric carcinoma-intragastric water contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), gastric carcinoma-perigastric fat CNR, serosal invasion, and enlarged lymph nodes around the lesions. Carcinoma-water CNR values were significantly higher in VNCa, VNCv, and VNCe images than in normal CT images (2.72, 2.60, 2.61, respectively, vs 2.35, p≤0.008). Carcinoma- perigastric fat CNR values were significantly lower in VNCa, VNCv, and VNCe images than in normal CT images (7.63, 7.49, 7.32, respectively, vs 8.48, pVNC arterial phase images may be a surrogate for conventional non-contrast CT images in gastric carcinoma evaluation.

  19. Assessment of pulmonary structure-function relationships in young children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis by multivolume proton-MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennati, Francesca; Roach, David J; Clancy, John P; Brody, Alan S; Fleck, Robert J; Aliverti, Andrea; Woods, Jason C

    2018-02-19

    Lung disease is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and there is a shortage of sensitive biomarkers able to regionally monitor disease progression and to assess early responses to therapy. To determine the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced multivolume MRI, which assesses intensity changes between expiratory and inspiratory breath-hold images, to detect and quantify regional ventilation abnormalities in CF lung disease, with a focus on the structure-function relationship. Retrospective. Twenty-nine subjects, including healthy young children (n = 9, 7-37 months), healthy adolescents (n = 4, 14-22 years), young children with CF lung disease (n = 10, 7-47 months), and adolescents with CF lung disease (n = 6, 8-18 years) were studied. 3D spoiled gradient-recalled sequence at 1.5T. Subjects were scanned during breath-hold at functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) through noncontrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Expiratory-inspiratory differences in MR signal-intensity (Δ 1 H-MRI) and CT-density (ΔHU) were computed to estimate regional ventilation. MR and CT images were also evaluated using a CF-specific scoring system. Quadratic regression, Spearman's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Δ 1 H-MRI maps were sensitive to ventilation heterogeneity related to gravity dependence in healthy lung and to ventilation impairment in CF lung disease. A high correlation was found between MRI and CT ventilation maps (R 2  = 0.79, P < 0.001). Globally, Δ 1 H-MRI and ΔHU decrease with increasing morphological score (respectively, R 2  = 0.56, P < 0.001 and R 2  = 0.31, P < 0.001). Locally, Δ 1 H-MRI was higher in healthy regions (median 15%) compared to regions with bronchiectasis, air trapping, consolidation, and to segments fed by airways with bronchial wall thickening (P < 0.001). Multivolume noncontrast-enhanced MRI, as a nonionizing imaging

  20. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  1. Automatic quantification of mammary glands on non-contrast x-ray CT by using a novel segmentation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Kano, Takuya; Cai, Yunliang; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Xinxin; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a brand new automatic segmentation method for quantifying volume and density of mammary gland regions on non-contrast CT images. The proposed method uses two processing steps: (1) breast region localization, and (2) breast region decomposition to accomplish a robust mammary gland segmentation task on CT images. The first step detects two minimum bounding boxes of left and right breast regions, respectively, based on a machine-learning approach that adapts to a large variance of the breast appearances on different age levels. The second step divides the whole breast region in each side into mammary gland, fat tissue, and other regions by using spectral clustering technique that focuses on intra-region similarities of each patient and aims to overcome the image variance caused by different scan-parameters. The whole approach is designed as a simple structure with very minimum number of parameters to gain a superior robustness and computational efficiency for real clinical setting. We applied this approach to a dataset of 300 CT scans, which are sampled with the equal number from 30 to 50 years-old-women. Comparing to human annotations, the proposed approach can measure volume and quantify distributions of the CT numbers of mammary gland regions successfully. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed approach achieves results consistent with manual annotations. Through our proposed framework, an efficient and effective low cost clinical screening scheme may be easily implemented to predict breast cancer risk, especially on those already acquired scans.

  2. Comparison between ultrasound and noncontrast helical computed tomography for identification of acute ureterolithiasis in a teaching hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ronan Marquez Ferreira de Souza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown noncontrast computed tomography (NCT to be more effective than ultrasound (US for imaging acute ureterolithiasis. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies directly comparing these techniques in an emergency teaching hospital setting. The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of US and NCT performed by senior radiology residents for diagnosing acute ureterolithiasis; and to assess interobserver agreement on tomography interpretations by residents and experienced abdominal radiologists. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of 52 consecutive patients, who underwent both US and NCT within an interval of eight hours, at Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: US scans were performed by senior residents and read by experienced radiologists. NCT scan images were read by senior residents, and subsequently by three abdominal radiologists. The interobserver variability was assessed using the kappa statistic. RESULTS: Ureteral calculi were found in 40 out of 52 patients (77%. US presented sensitivity of 22% and specificity of 100%. When collecting system dilatation was associated, US demonstrated 73% sensitivity, 82% specificity. The interobserver agreement in NCT analysis was very high with regard to identification of calculi, collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat. CONCLUSIONS: US has limited value for identifying ureteral calculi in comparison with NCT, even when collecting system dilatation is present. Residents and abdominal radiologists demonstrated excellent agreement rates for ureteral calculi, identification of collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat on NCT.

  3. Non-contrast computerized tomography (NCCT) and dynamic renal scintigraphy (DRS) in the patients with refractory renal colic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchick, Sergey; Stepnov, Eugeny; Lebedev, Valery; Linov, Lina; Leibovici, Octavian; Ben-Horin, Clara L. Dosoretz; Trejo, Leonardo; Peled, Ronit; Cytron, Shmuel

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the importance of combined use of non-contrast computerized tomography (NCCT) and dynamic renal scintigraphy (DRS) in evaluation of patients with refractory flank pain in the emergency department. Methods: The study involved 64 consecutive patients with refractory renal colic. All patients were evaluated with plain abdominal films kidneys, ureters and bladder (KUB), NCCT and DRS. We assessed the accuracy of different diagnostic procedures and their combinations; in addition, we determined their importance for different steps of evaluation. Results: Urololithiasis was diagnosed in 76.6% (n = 49) of the patients. Twenty-nine percent of calculi were >4 mm. Surgical intervention were performed in 20 patients (40.8%). A combination of NCCT plus DRS yielded the greatest sensitivity (96%) in establishing final diagnosis, however clinical, laboratory and KUB data in combination with DRS, yielded greater specificity (93%) and PPV (97%). Sex (male), WBC (mean 10.2 x 10 3 ± 3.1) and KUB (calculus > 4 mm) were chosen in the three-step multi-variant analysis, while only male sex was found to be the strongest predictor (p 3 and calculi > 4 mm on the KUB

  4. Spectral detector CT-derived virtual non-contrast images: comparison of attenuation values with unenhanced CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Lakshmi; Rajiah, Prabhakar; Ahn, Richard; Rassouli, Negin; Xi, Yin; Soesbe, Todd C; Lewis, Matthew A; Lenkinski, Robert E; Leyendecker, John R; Abbara, Suhny

    2017-03-01

    To assess virtual non-contrast (VNC) images obtained on a detection-based spectral detector CT scanner and determine how attenuation on VNC images derived from various phases of enhanced CT compare to those obtained from true unenhanced images. In this HIPAA compliant, IRB approved prospective multi-institutional study, 46 patients underwent pre- and post-contrast imaging on a prototype dual-layer spectral detector CT between October 2013 and November 2015, yielding 84 unenhanced and VNC pairs (25 arterial, 39 portal venous/nephrographic, 20 urographic). Mean attenuation was measured by one of three readers in the liver, spleen, kidneys, psoas muscle, abdominal aorta, and subcutaneous fat. Equivalence testing was used to determine if the mean difference between unenhanced and VNC attenuation was less than 5, 10, or 15 HU. VNC image quality was assessed on a 5 point scale. Mean difference between unenhanced and VNC attenuation was VNC attenuation were equivalent in all tissues except fat using a threshold of VNC overestimated the HU relative to unenhanced images. VNC image quality was rated as excellent or good in 84% of arterial phase and 85% of nephrographic phase cases, but only 40% of urographic phase. VNC images derived from novel dual layer spectral detector CT demonstrate attenuation values similar to unenhanced images in all tissues evaluated except for subcutaneous fat. Further study is needed to determine if attenuation thresholds currently used clinically for common pathology should be adjusted, particularly for lesions containing fat.

  5. Non-Contrast Computed Tomography Scan Based Parameters of Ureteric Stones Affecting the Outcome of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz Khan, Mohammad; Waqas Iqbal, Muhammad; Akbar, Mian Khalid; Saqib, Imad-ud-din; Akhter, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Objective  To compare the non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) scan-based parameters of ureteric stones affecting the outcome of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Materials and methods We retrospectively evaluated the pre-procedure NCCT of 74 patients who had ESWL for solitary ureteric calculi of 5-20 mm in diameter. We assessed the age, sex, basal metabolic index (BMI), laterality, location, presence of double 'J' (DJ) stent, skin to stone distance (SSD), stone maximum diameter, Hounsfield unit (HU), Hounsfield density (HD), area, and volume. All those who had no stone on follow-up imaging within 30 days were declared successful while those who had residual stone were declared failures. Results The overall success rate was 78% (58/74). Sixty (81.1%) patients were male. The success of ESWL was correlated with lower SSD, Hounsfield units (HU) and Hounsfield density (HD). However, in multivariate analysis, SSD, Hounsfield unit, and stone area showed correlation with success of procedure but Hounsfield density failed to show correlation. The success rate in patients with stone HU 1000 were 93.9%, 69%, and 58.3%, respectively. Patients with lower BMI (30 kg/m2) and higher HD (>76 HU/mm). Conclusion BMI, SSD, stone Hounsfield units and Hounsfield unit density were strong predictors of outcome of ESWL for ureteric stone. PMID:28589076

  6. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  7. Baseline results from the UK SIGNIFY study: a whole-body MRI screening study in TP53 mutation carriers and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Sibel; Killick, Emma; Thomas, Sarah; Taylor, Natalie; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Rothwell, Jeanette; Benafif, Sarah; Dias, Alexander; Mikropoulos, Christos; Pope, Jenny; Chamberlain, Anthony; Gunapala, Ranga; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Tomkins, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Barwell, Julian; Wiles, Vicki; Limb, Lauren; Eccles, Diana; Leach, Martin O; Shanley, Susan; Gilbert, Fiona J; Hanson, Helen; Gallagher, David; Rajashanker, Bala; Whitehouse, Richard W; Koh, Dow-Mu; Sohaib, S Aslam; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2017-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, current screening guidelines for TP53 germline mutation carriers solely recommends annual breast MRI, despite the wide spectrum of malignancies typically seen in this group. This study sought to investigate the role of one-off non-contrast whole-body MRI (WB MRI) in the screening of asymptomatic TP53 mutation carriers. 44 TP53 mutation carriers and 44 population controls were recruited. Scans were read by radiologists blinded to participant carrier status. The incidence of malignancies diagnosed in TP53 mutation carriers against general population controls was calculated. The incidences of non-malignant relevant disease and irrelevant disease were measured, as well as the number of investigations required to determine relevance of findings. In TP53 mutation carriers, 6 of 44 (13.6, 95% CI 5.2-27.4%) participants were diagnosed with cancer during the study, all of which would be considered life threatening if untreated. Two were found to have two primary cancers. Two participants with cancer had abnormalities on the MRI which were initially thought to be benign (a pericardial cyst and a uterine fibroid) but transpired to be sarcomas. No controls were diagnosed with cancer. Fifteen carriers (34.1, 95% CI 20.5-49.9%) and seven controls (15.9, 95% CI 6.7-30.1%) underwent further investigations following the WB MRI for abnormalities that transpired to be benign (p = 0.049). The cancer detection rate in this group justifies a minimum baseline non-contrast WB MRI in germline TP53 mutation carriers. This should be adopted into national guidelines for management of adult TP53 mutation carriers in addition to the current practice of contrast enhanced breast MRI imaging.

  8. The potential of multiparametric MRI of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    MRI is an essential tool in breast imaging, with multiple established indications. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is the backbone of any breast MRI protocol and has an excellent sensitivity and good specificity for breast cancer diagnosis. DCE-MRI provides high-resolution morphological information, as well as some functional information about neoangiogenesis as a tumour-specific feature. To overcome limitations in specificity, several other functional MRI parameters have been investigated and the application of these combined parameters is defined as multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the breast. MpMRI of the breast can be performed at different field strengths (1.5–7 T) and includes both established (diffusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopic imaging) and novel MRI parameters (sodium imaging, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), as well as hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and different radiotracers. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the underlying oncogenic processes of cancer development and progression and can provide additional specificity. This article will review the current and emerging functional parameters for mpMRI of the breast for improved diagnostic accuracy in breast cancer. PMID:27805423

  9. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears using a microscopy coil. Noninvasive detection without intraarticular contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitachi, Shin; Takase, Kei; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Tanaka, Minoru; Tojo, Yuichi; Tabata, Shiro; Majima, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears by comparing the method to conventional MRI and MRI arthrography. A total of 68 shoulders were prospectively studied using a 1.5-T MRI unit. Conventional MRI scans were obtained with a surface coil and high-resolution MRI scans with a microscopy coil. MRI arthrography was performed in 28 shoulders using a surface coil. MRI evaluation of tears of rotator cuff tendons was compared with arthroscopic findings and surgical results. The surgery revealed 40 full-thickness tears, 13 partial-thickness tears, and 15 intact cuffs. In all, 35 (88%) full-thickness tears were correctly diagnosed on conventional MRI and 40 (100%) on high-resolution MRI. MR arthrography delineated 11 of 12 (92%) full-thickness tears. Altogether, 5 (38%) of the partial-thickness tears were detected on conventional MRI, and 12 (92%) were clearly demonstrated on high-resolution MRI. MRI arthrography depicted three (60%) of five partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI showed higher sensitivity than conventional MRI (P<0.05) and had values equivalent to those of MRI arthrography for diagnosing partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil is a feasible, noninvasive technique for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. (author)

  10. Advances in PET-MRI technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality imaging is the general trend of clinical imaging. PET-CT is one of the most classic and mature multimodality imaging methods and is widely used today. MRI is another kind of conventional imaging method, in contrast to CT, MRI can not only yield images with higher soft-tissue contrast and better spatial resolution resolution but also provide some functional information by special imaging techniques such as MRS. The combination of PET and MRI for simultaneous data acquisition should have far-reaching consequences for clinical and scientific study. This review describes the progress to date and talks about the problems met in the development of PET-MRI and look forward to its potential application. (authors)

  11. Small animal MRI: clinical MRI as an interface to basic biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkernelle, J.G.; Stelter, L.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.

    2008-01-01

    The demand for highly resolved small animal MRI for the purpose of biomedical research has increased constantly. Dedicated small animal MRI scanners working at ultra high field strengths from 4.7 to 7.0 T and even above are MRI at its best. However, using high resolution RF coils in clinical scanners up to 3.0 T, small animal MRI can achieve highly resolved images showing excellent tissue contrast. In fact, in abundant experimental studies, clinical MRI is used for small animal imaging. Mostly clinical RF coils in the single-loop design are applied. In addition, custom-built RF coils and even gradient inserts are used in a clinical scanner. For the reduction of moving artifacts, special MRI-compatible animal ECG und respiration devices are available. In conclusion, clinical devices offer broad availability, are less expense in combination with good imaging performance and provide a translational nature of imaging results. (orig.)

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  18. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  19. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  20. Whole-body MRI screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  1. MRI in ischemic brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.; Pawlik, G.; Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of MRI and CT in 55 patients with brain infarcts were compared; in 26 of these cases an additional PET examination was obtained in order to study the regional glucose utilisation. MRI was superior to CT, demonstrating 11% more of the infarcts, particularly during the first 24 hours, in small lesions confined to the grey or subcortical white matter and in infratentorial ischemic lesion. On the other hand, only CT was able to show fresh hemorrhage, although MRI was the method of choice to demonstrate old blood collections. To characterise the follow up of an infarct, CT and MRI were similar, except the marginal contrast enhancement sometimes demonstrated by CT studies between the 2nd and 4th week after stroke event. PET was inferior to show details because of its poorer spatial resolution, but anyhow had a high sensitivity and provided additional informations concerning secondary inactivations of brain areas not directly damaged. Additionally PET was able to demonstrate areas of anaerobic glycolysis and lesions of diminished glucose utilisation in TIAs. Small areas of gliosis in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were frequently found in patients with cerebro-vascular diseases; they were best shown by MRI, but do not correlate with the extent of vascular stenoses or occlusions, shown by angiography. (orig) [de

  2. Whole-body MRI screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  3. CT and MRI diagnosis of acute hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rengui; Fumio Yamamoto; Pu Yonglin; Gao Yujie.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate and compare MR and CT in diagnosis of acute traumatic hepatic laceration, ten patients with acute hepatic rupture underwent CT scan and/or MRI in the first 24 hours after injury. The injury was graded as mild ( 50% of one lobe). In the first 24 hours after injury, 33.3% (3/9) and 28.6%(2/7) of the hepatic injury demonstrated isodensity and isointensity on plain CT scan and T 1 -weighted images. All the lesions (100%) were clearly identified as marked hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images. On T 2 WI, T 1 WI and non-contrast CT, 100%, 57.1% and 55.6% of the acute hepatic injuries could be graded respectively. Delayed complications occurred in four patients with deep hepatic injury about 1 to 3 weeks after injury. T 2 -weighted MR imaging is more sensitive and useful for detection of the type and severity of acute hepatic rupture. Follow-up MRI or CT within the first few weeks after injury is needed in patients with deep hepatic injury for detection of delayed complications

  4. A New Adaptive Gamma Correction Based Algorithm Using DWT-SVD for Non-Contrast CT Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Fathi; Ben Hamida, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    The performances of medical image processing techniques, in particular CT scans, are usually affected by poor contrast quality introduced by some medical imaging devices. This suggests the use of contrast enhancement methods as a solution to adjust the intensity distribution of the dark image. In this paper, an advanced adaptive and simple algorithm for dark medical image enhancement is proposed. This approach is principally based on adaptive gamma correction using discrete wavelet transform with singular-value decomposition (DWT-SVD). In a first step, the technique decomposes the input medical image into four frequency sub-bands by using DWT and then estimates the singular-value matrix of the low-low (LL) sub-band image. In a second step, an enhanced LL component is generated using an adequate correction factor and inverse singular value decomposition (SVD). In a third step, for an additional improvement of LL component, obtained LL sub-band image from SVD enhancement stage is classified into two main classes (low contrast and moderate contrast classes) based on their statistical information and therefore processed using an adaptive dynamic gamma correction function. In fact, an adaptive gamma correction factor is calculated for each image according to its class. Finally, the obtained LL sub-band image undergoes inverse DWT together with the unprocessed low-high (LH), high-low (HL), and high-high (HH) sub-bands for enhanced image generation. Different types of non-contrast CT medical images are considered for performance evaluation of the proposed contrast enhancement algorithm based on adaptive gamma correction using DWT-SVD (DWT-SVD-AGC). Results show that our proposed algorithm performs better than other state-of-the-art techniques.

  5. Does quantifying epicardial and intrathoracic fat with noncontrast computed tomography improve risk stratification beyond calcium scoring alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzandeh, Farshad; Chang, Su Min; Muhyieddeen, Kamil; Zaid, Rashid R; Trevino, Alejandro R; Xu, Jiaqiong; Nabi, Faisal; Mahmarian, John J

    2013-01-01

    Noncontrast cardiac computed tomography allows calculation of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and measurement of epicardial adipose tissue (EATv) and intrathoracic fat (ITFv) volumes. It is unclear whether fat volume information contributes to risk stratification. Cardiac computed tomography was performed in 760 consecutive patients with acute chest pain admitted thorough the emergency department. None had prior coronary artery disease. CACS was calculated using the Agatston method. EATv and ITFv were semiautomatically calculated. Median patient follow-up was 3.3 years. Mean patient age was 54.4±13.7 years and Framingham risk score 8.2±8.2. The 45 patients (5.9%) with major acute cardiac events (MACE) were older (64.8±13.9 versus 53.7±13.4 years), more frequently male (60% versus 40%), and had a higher median Framingham risk score (16 versus 4) and CACS (268 versus 0) versus those without events (all PEATv (154 versus 116 mL) and ITFv (330 versus 223 mL), and a higher prevalence of EATv >125 mL (67% versus 44%) and ITFv >250 mL (64% versus 42%) (all PEATv, and ITFv were all independently associated with MACE. CACS was associated with MACE after adjustment for fat volumes (PEATv and ITFv improved the risk model only in patients with CACS >400. CACS and fat volumes are independently associated with MACE in acute chest pain patients and beyond that provided by clinical information alone. Although fat volumes may add prognostic value in patients with CACS >400, CACS is most strongly correlated with outcome.

  6. Risk Stratification of Thyroid Incidentalomas Found on PET/CT: The Value of Iodine Content on Noncontrast Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwoo; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Cha, Jongtae; Jo, Kwanhyeong; Lee, Narae; Yun, Mijin

    2015-11-01

    The Hounsfield unit (HU) ratio of thyroid nodules was assessed compared to the contralateral thyroid lobe on noncontrast computed tomography (CT) to stratify further the risk of malignancy in thyroid incidentalomas found on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT). This retrospective analysis included 82 patients who had thyroid incidentalomas on PET/CT in 2011. On PET/CT, the maximal standardized uptake value ratios of the thyroid nodule compared to liver (T/BSUV) and the HU ratios of the thyroid nodule compared to contralateral thyroid lobe (T/BHU) were calculated. Diagnostic performances of the T/BSUV and T/BHU were compared. The area under the curve of T/BHU was higher than that of T/BSUV (0.941 vs. 0.689, p risk of malignancy was much higher (71.1%) in nodules with a T/BHU cutoff value ≤0.68, whereas it was 0% in nodules with a T/BHU of >0.68. In this study, there were 18 nodules with nondiagnostic (n = 7) or atypia of undetermined significance or follicular lesion of undetermined significance cytologies (n = 11) after fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). When the T/BHU cutoff value was applied, three (60%) of the five nodules with a T/BHU of ≤0.68 were found to be papillary carcinomas. The remaining 13 nodules with a T/BHU of >0.68 were all benign with a risk of malignancy of 0%. T/BHU is a simple and effective parameter to stratify the risk of malignancy in thyroid incidentalomas found on PET/CT. This may be of clinical relevance in those nodules with nondiagnostic or undetermined significance cytologies upon FNAB in the scheme of current clinical practice.

  7. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  8. MRI anatomy of anteriorly displaced anus: what obstructs defecation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid; Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Khairy, Khaled Talaat

    2014-01-01

    Anteriorly displaced anus is an anomaly that is debated with regard to its nomenclature, diagnosis and management. To describe MRI anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus and its impact on the process of defecation. We prospectively examined ten children (7 girls, 3 boys; age range 7 months to 8 years, mean 3 years) with anteriorly displaced anus between August 2009 and April 2012. Noncontrast MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T magnet. T1- and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis. The anorectal angle and the relative hiatal distance were measured in mid-sagittal images, and compared with those of a control group using the Mann-Whitney test. In children with anteriorly displaced anus, no anatomical abnormality was depicted at the level of the proximal anal canal. However, the distal anal canal was displaced anteriorly, running out its external muscle cuff, which remained un-displaced at the usual site of the anus. This changes the orientation of the central axis of the anal canal by passing across instead of along the fibers of the longitudinal muscle coat. Children with anteriorly displaced anus had a more obtuse anorectal angle (mean 112.1 ), which was significantly greater than that of the control group (mean 86.2 ). MRI is a valuable tool in studying the anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus. The abnormal orientation of the longitudinal muscle across the anal canal can explain the obstructed defecation in these children. Based on this study, it might be of interest to use MRI in studying equivocal cases and children with unexplained constipation. (orig.)

  9. MRI anatomy of anteriorly displaced anus: what obstructs defecation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid [Ain-Shams University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Cairo (Egypt); Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Khairy, Khaled Talaat [Ain-Shams University, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-07-15

    Anteriorly displaced anus is an anomaly that is debated with regard to its nomenclature, diagnosis and management. To describe MRI anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus and its impact on the process of defecation. We prospectively examined ten children (7 girls, 3 boys; age range 7 months to 8 years, mean 3 years) with anteriorly displaced anus between August 2009 and April 2012. Noncontrast MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T magnet. T1- and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis. The anorectal angle and the relative hiatal distance were measured in mid-sagittal images, and compared with those of a control group using the Mann-Whitney test. In children with anteriorly displaced anus, no anatomical abnormality was depicted at the level of the proximal anal canal. However, the distal anal canal was displaced anteriorly, running out its external muscle cuff, which remained un-displaced at the usual site of the anus. This changes the orientation of the central axis of the anal canal by passing across instead of along the fibers of the longitudinal muscle coat. Children with anteriorly displaced anus had a more obtuse anorectal angle (mean 112.1 ), which was significantly greater than that of the control group (mean 86.2 ). MRI is a valuable tool in studying the anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus. The abnormal orientation of the longitudinal muscle across the anal canal can explain the obstructed defecation in these children. Based on this study, it might be of interest to use MRI in studying equivocal cases and children with unexplained constipation. (orig.)

  10. MRI and the diagnosis of glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowe, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on an oral presentation given at the Sydney conference in February 2000. Two cases will be presented to demonstrate the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of glioblastomas, MRI has superior soft tissue imaging abilities making it ideal for imaging the brain. Conventional MRI is good for evaluating oedema and haemorrhage and offers high resolution without associated bone artefacts. However, as with all imaging modalities there are some disadvantages. Patients with pacemakers, certain types of metallic clips, or claustrophobia may not be suitable for an MRI scan. Copyright (2002) Australian Institute of Radiography

  11. PET-MRI and multimodal cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality imaging, specifically PET-CT, brought a new perspective into the fields of clinical imaging. Clinical cases have shown that PET-CT has great value in clinical diagnosis and experimental research. But PET-CT still bears some limitations. A major drawback is that CT provides only limited soft tissue contrast and exposes the patient to a significant radiation dose. MRI overcome these limitations, it has excellent soft tissue contrast, high temporal and spatial resolution and no radiation damage. Additionally, since MRI provides also functional information, PET-MRI will show a new direction of multimodality imaging in the future. (authors)

  12. Non-contrast MR angiography for diagnosis of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Mikaru; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Shin; Oyama, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    Fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (FIESTA) has been reported to be suitable for cardiac imaging in adolescents and adults. The purpose of this study was to establish the applicability and limitation of MR Angiography using FIESTA in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Thirty-five patients with congenital heart disease underwent MR Angiography using FIESTA and the 3D Gd-enhanced fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) technique. The measurements of the vascular diameters and diagnostic quality of the two techniques were compared. Correlations between FIESTA and the 3D Gd-fast SPGR technique were excellent in vascular diameter (aAo 0.90, arch 0.78, dAo 0.92, SCA 0.70, RPA 0.90, LPA 0.95). The agreement of the vascular diameters in the Bland-Altman method was good (aAo 0.22 mm, arch 0.07 mm, dAo 0.14 mm, SCA 0.31 mm, RPA 0.45 mm, LPA 0.12 mm). However, MR angiography (MRA) by 3D Gd-enhanced SPGR had a higher resolution than that by FIESTA. Due to signal loss caused at the regions of vascular stenosis or Blalock-Taussig shunt on FIESTA, we could not evaluate the vascular diameter or patency at those lesions. FIESTA is a useful technique of non-enhanced MRA for non-invasive diagnosis of congenital heart disease. However, MRA by FIESTA was not adequate for multiplanar reconstruction. (author)

  13. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, P. D.; Murphy, K. P.; Hayes, S. A.; Carey, K.; Sammon, J.; Crush, L.; O’Neill, F.; Normoyle, B.; McGarrigle, A. M.; Barry, J. E.; Maher, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). Methods Thirty-three patients with clinically suspected renal colic were prospectively included. Conventional dose (CD-CT) and LD-CT data sets were contemporaneously acquired. LD-CT images were reconstructed with 40 %, 70 % and 90 % ASiR. Image quality was sub...

  14. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  15. Boosting the SNR by adding a receive-only endorectal monopole to an external antenna array for high-resolution, T2 -weighted imaging of early-stage cervical cancer with 7-T MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kalleveen, I.M.L.; Hoogendam, J.P.; Raaijmakers, A.J.E.; Visser, F.; Arteaga de Castro, C.S.; Verheijen, R.H.M.; Luijten, P.R.; Zweemer, R.P.; Veldhuis, W.B.; Klomp, D.W.J.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain in early-stage cervical cancer at ultrahigh-field MRI (e.g. 7 T) using a combination of multiple external antennas and a single endorectal antenna. In particular, we used an endorectal monopole antenna to increase the SNR

  16. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative Rapid Assessment of Leukoaraiosis in CT : Comparison to Gold Standard MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Uta; Sporns, Peter Bernhard; Schmidt, Rene; Niederstadt, Thomas; Minnerup, Jens; Bier, Georg; Knecht, Stefan; Kemmling, André

    2017-10-20

    The severity of white matter lesions (WML) is a risk factor of hemorrhage and predictor of clinical outcome after ischemic stroke; however, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reliable quantification for this surrogate marker is limited for computed tomography (CT), the leading stroke imaging technique. We aimed to present and evaluate a CT-based automated rater-independent method for quantification of microangiopathic white matter changes. Patients with suspected minor stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke scale, NIHSS < 4) were screened for the analysis of non-contrast computerized tomography (NCCT) at admission and compared to follow-up MRI. The MRI-based WML volume and visual Fazekas scores were assessed as the gold standard reference. We employed a recently published probabilistic brain segmentation algorithm for CT images to determine the tissue-specific density of WM space. All voxel-wise densities were quantified in WM space and weighted according to partial probabilistic WM content. The resulting mean weighted density of WM space in NCCT, the surrogate of WML, was correlated with reference to MRI-based WML parameters. The process of CT-based tissue-specific segmentation was reliable in 79 cases with varying severity of microangiopathy. Voxel-wise weighted density within WM spaces showed a noticeable correlation (r = -0.65) with MRI-based WML volume. Particularly in patients with moderate or severe lesion load according to the visual Fazekas score the algorithm provided reliable prediction of MRI-based WML volume. Automated observer-independent quantification of voxel-wise WM density in CT significantly correlates with microangiopathic WM disease in gold standard MRI. This rapid surrogate of white matter lesion load in CT may support objective WML assessment and therapeutic decision-making during acute stroke triage.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of virtual non-contrast enhanced dual-energy CT for diagnosis of adrenal adenoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Michael J.; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Schieda, Nicola [University of Ottawa Department of Radiology, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (United States); El-Khodary, Mohamed [McMaster University Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McGrath, Trevor A. [University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy (DE) virtual non-contrast computed tomography (vNCT) to non-contrast CT (NCT) for the diagnosis of adrenal adenomas. Search of multiple databases and grey literature was performed. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS-2. Summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy were generated and sources of heterogeneity were assessed. Five studies (170 patients; 192 adrenal masses) were included for diagnostic accuracy assessment; all used dual-source dual-energy CT. Pooled sensitivity for adrenal adenoma on vNCT was 54% (95% CI: 47-62%). Pooled sensitivity for NCT was 57% (95% CI: 45-69%). Pooling of specificity was not performed since no false positives were reported. There was a trend for overestimation of HU density on vNCT as compared to NCT which appeared related to contrast timing. Potential sources of bias were seen regarding the index test and reference standard for the included studies. Potential sources of heterogeneity between studies were seen in adenoma prevalence and intravenous contrast timing. vNCT images generated from dual-energy CT demonstrated comparable sensitivity to NCT for the diagnosis of adenomas; however the included studies are heterogeneous and at high risk for some types of bias. (orig.)

  19. Noncontrast computed tomography can predict the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy via accurate stone measurement and abdominal fat distribution determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Hung Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a common disease of the urinary system. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL has become one of the standard treatments for renal and ureteral stones; however, the success rates range widely and failure of stone disintegration may cause additional outlay, alternative procedures, and even complications. We used the data available from noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCCT to evaluate the impact of stone parameters and abdominal fat distribution on calculus-free rates following SWL. We retrospectively reviewed 328 patients who had urinary stones and had undergone SWL from August 2012 to August 2013. All of them received pre-SWL NCCT; 1 month after SWL, radiography was arranged to evaluate the condition of the fragments. These patients were classified into stone-free group and residual stone group. Unenhanced computed tomography variables, including stone attenuation, abdominal fat area, and skin-to-stone distance (SSD were analyzed. In all, 197 (60% were classified as stone-free and 132 (40% as having residual stone. The mean ages were 49.35 ± 13.22 years and 55.32 ± 13.52 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, stone size, stone surface area, stone attenuation, SSD, total fat area (TFA, abdominal circumference, serum creatinine, and the severity of hydronephrosis revealed statistical significance between these two groups. From multivariate logistic regression analysis, the independent parameters impacting SWL outcomes were stone size, stone attenuation, TFA, and serum creatinine. [Adjusted odds ratios and (95% confidence intervals: 9.49 (3.72–24.20, 2.25 (1.22–4.14, 2.20 (1.10–4.40, and 2.89 (1.35–6.21 respectively, all p < 0.05]. In the present study, stone size, stone attenuation, TFA and serum creatinine were four independent predictors for stone-free rates after SWL. These findings suggest that pretreatment NCCT may predict the outcomes after SWL. Consequently, we can use these

  20. Noncontrast computed tomography can predict the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy via accurate stone measurement and abdominal fat distribution determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Tu, Hung-Pin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Jang, Mei-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jen; Li, Ching-Chia; Chou, Yii-Her; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease of the urinary system. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become one of the standard treatments for renal and ureteral stones; however, the success rates range widely and failure of stone disintegration may cause additional outlay, alternative procedures, and even complications. We used the data available from noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCCT) to evaluate the impact of stone parameters and abdominal fat distribution on calculus-free rates following SWL. We retrospectively reviewed 328 patients who had urinary stones and had undergone SWL from August 2012 to August 2013. All of them received pre-SWL NCCT; 1 month after SWL, radiography was arranged to evaluate the condition of the fragments. These patients were classified into stone-free group and residual stone group. Unenhanced computed tomography variables, including stone attenuation, abdominal fat area, and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) were analyzed. In all, 197 (60%) were classified as stone-free and 132 (40%) as having residual stone. The mean ages were 49.35 ± 13.22 years and 55.32 ± 13.52 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, stone size, stone surface area, stone attenuation, SSD, total fat area (TFA), abdominal circumference, serum creatinine, and the severity of hydronephrosis revealed statistical significance between these two groups. From multivariate logistic regression analysis, the independent parameters impacting SWL outcomes were stone size, stone attenuation, TFA, and serum creatinine. [Adjusted odds ratios and (95% confidence intervals): 9.49 (3.72-24.20), 2.25 (1.22-4.14), 2.20 (1.10-4.40), and 2.89 (1.35-6.21) respectively, all p < 0.05]. In the present study, stone size, stone attenuation, TFA and serum creatinine were four independent predictors for stone-free rates after SWL. These findings suggest that pretreatment NCCT may predict the outcomes after SWL. Consequently, we can use these predictors for selecting

  1. Prognostic Significance of Remote Myocardium Alterations Assessed by Quantitative Noncontrast T1 Mapping in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstadler, Sebastian J; Stiermaier, Thomas; Liebetrau, Johanna; Fuernau, Georg; Eitel, Charlotte; de Waha, Suzanne; Desch, Steffen; Reil, Jan-Christian; Pöss, Janine; Metzler, Bernhard; Lücke, Christian; Gutberlet, Matthias; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiele, Holger; Eitel, Ingo

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the prognostic significance of remote zone native T1 alterations for the prediction of clinical events in a population with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and compared it with conventional markers of infarct severity. The exact role and incremental prognostic relevance of remote myocardium native T1 mapping alterations assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) after STEMI remains unclear. We included 255 consecutive patients with STEMI who were reperfused within 12 h after symptom onset. CMR core laboratory analysis was performed to assess left ventricular (LV) function, standard infarct characteristics, and native T1 values of the remote, noninfarcted myocardium. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, reinfarction, and new congestive heart failure within 6 months (major adverse cardiac events [MACE]). Patients with increased remote zone native T1 values (>1,129 ms) had significantly larger infarcts (p = 0.012), less myocardial salvage (p = 0.002), and more pronounced LV dysfunction (p = 0.011). In multivariable analysis, remote zone native T1 was independently associated with MACE after adjusting for clinical risk factors (p = 0.001) or other CMR variables (p = 0.007). In C-statistics, native T1 of remote myocardium provided incremental prognostic information beyond clinical risk factors, LV ejection fraction, and other markers of infarct severity (all p remote zone native T1 to a model of prognostic CMR parameters (ejection fraction, infarct size, and myocardial salvage index) led to net reclassification improvement of 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.46 to 1.17; p remote zone alterations by quantitative noncontrast T1 mapping provided independent and incremental prognostic information in addition to clinical risk factors and traditional CMR outcome markers. Remote zone alterations may thus represent a novel therapeutic target and a

  2. Predicting the stone composition of children preoperatively by Hounsfield unit detection on non-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Mesut; Çitamak, Burak; Bozaci, Ali Cansu; Güneş, Altan; Doğan, Hasan Serkan; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Tekgül, Serdar

    2017-10-01

    Many studies have been performed on adult patients to reveal the relationship between Hounsfield unit (HU) value and composition of stone, but none have focused on childhood. We aimed to predict stone composition by HU properties in pre-intervention non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) in children. This could help to orient patients towards more successful interventions. Data of 94 children, whose pre-intervention NCCT and post-interventional stone analysis were available were included. Stones were grouped into three groups: calcium oxalate (CaOx), cystine, and struvite. Besides spot urine PH value, core HU, periphery HU, and Hounsfield density (HUD) values were measured and groups were compared statistically. The mean age of patients was 7 ± 4 (2-17) years and the female/male ratio was 51/43. The mean stone size was 11.7 ± 5 (4-24) mm. There were 50, 38, and 6 patients in the CaOx, cystine, and struvite groups, respectively. The median values for core HU, periphery HU, and mean HU in the CaOx group were significantly higher than the corresponding median values in the cystine and struvite groups. Significant median HUD difference was seen only between the CaOx and cystine groups. No difference was seen between the cystine and struvite groups in terms of HU parameters. To distinguish these groups, mean spot urine PH values were compared and were found to be higher in the struvite group than the cystine group (Table). The retrospective nature and small number of patients in some groups are limitations of this study, which also does not include all stone compositions. Our cystine stone rate was higher than childhood stone composition distribution in the literature. This is because our center is a reference center in a region with high recurrence rates of cystine stones. In fact, high numbers of cystine stones helped us to compare them with calcium stones more accurately and became an advantage for this study. NCCT at diagnosis can provide some information for

  3. 7 T renal MRI : challenges and promises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A.; Hoogduin, J.M.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Li, X.; Luijten, P.R.; Metzger, G.J.; Raaijmakers, A.J.E.; Umutlu, L.; Visser, F.; Leiner, T.

    The progression to 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields promises of substantial increase in signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. This increase can be traded off to increase image spatial resolution or to decrease acquisition time. However, renal 7 T MRI remains challenging due to

  4. Time-intensity curve in the abdominal aorta on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with high temporal and spatial resolution. Gd-EOB-DTPA versus Gd-DTPA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinaga, Yasunari; Tsukahara, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Yukiko; Kadoya, Masumi; Ueda, Hitoshi; Kitou, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in the time-intensity curves (TICs) of the abdominal aorta on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) between gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and gadolinium ethoxybenzydiethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA). Ten healthy volunteers underwent DCE-MRI three times with the following protocol: group A, Gd-DTPA at an injection rate of 3 ml/s; group B, Gd-EOB-DTPA, 3 ml/s; group C, Gd-EOB-DTPA, 1.5 ml/s. Signal intensities (SIs) of the abdominal aorta were measured, and the contrast enhancement ratio (CER) was calculated. Time-to-CER curves were compared among the three groups. The differences in maximum CER (CER max ) and time-to-peak of CER were analyzed. The time-to-CER curve showed a double peak pattern in group A and single-peak pattern in groups B and C. The mean time between the first and the second peak was 6.2 s. The mean CER max of each group was 4.50, 4.52 and 4.27, respectively. In group A, B and C, the mean time-to-peak was 14.6, 10.6 and 12.6 s, respectively. There was a significant difference between group A and B (P<0.01). To set up the optimal protocol for abdominal DCE-MRI, it should be noted that TIC in the Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA group showed different patterns, and a slower injection rate showed a less abrupt SI change in the Gd-EOB-DTPA group than in the Gd-DTPA group. (author)

  5. EPOXI EARTH OBS - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated, 750-nm filter images of Earth acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) during the EPOCh and Cruise 2 phases...

  6. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  7. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  8. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  9. Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement by MRI. A test of its validity and the electrical conductivity characteristics of glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tha, Khin Khin; Kudo, Kohsuke [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, N-14, W-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Sapporo (Japan); Katscher, Ulrich; Stehning, Christian [Philips Research Laboratories, Hamburg (Germany); Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kazumata, Ken [Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Fujima, Noriyuki [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, N-14, W-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo (Japan); Yamamoto, Toru [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sapporo (Japan); Van Cauteren, Marc [Clinical Science Philips Healthtech Asia Pacific, Tokyo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University, Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Sapporo (Japan); Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2018-01-15

    This study noninvasively examined the electrical conductivity (σ) characteristics of diffuse gliomas using MRI and tested its validity. MRI including a 3D steady-state free precession (3D SSFP) sequence was performed on 30 glioma patients. The σ maps were reconstructed from the phase images of the 3D SSFP sequence. The σ histogram metrics were extracted and compared among the contrast-enhanced (CET) and noncontrast-enhanced tumour components (NCET) and normal brain parenchyma (NP). Difference in tumour σ histogram metrics among tumour grades and correlation of σ metrics with tumour grades were tested. Validity of σ measurement using this technique was tested by correlating the mean tumour σ values measured using MRI with those measured ex vivo using a dielectric probe. Several σ histogram metrics of CET and NCET of diffuse gliomas were significantly higher than NP (Bonferroni-corrected p ≤.045). The maximum σ of NCET showed a moderate positive correlation with tumour grade (r =.571, Bonferroni-corrected p =.018). The mean tumour σ measured using MRI showed a moderate positive correlation with the σ measured ex vivo (r =.518, p =.040). Tissue σ can be evaluated using MRI, incorporation of which may better characterise diffuse gliomas. (orig.)

  10. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  11. MRI in mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Heussel, C.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease with major impact on the lungs. Pulmonary manifestation is crucial for the prognosis and life expectancy of patients. Imaging modalities and lung function tests reflect the pulmonary status in these patients. The standard imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary changes is chest x-ray. The gold standard for the detection of parenchymal lung changes remains high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), but this is not used routinely for CF-patients due to radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to be of no importance in monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease, as shown in studies from the 1980s and early 1990s. The continuing improvement of MRI techniques, however, has allowed for an adequate application of this non-radiation method in diagnosing the major pulmonary findings in CF, in addition to the assessment of lung function. (orig.) [de

  12. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Koo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bo Ra [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Biomedical Statistics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Chan Hong [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  13. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Bo Ra; Jeon, Chan Hong

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  14. PET-MRI: the likely future of molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua; Zhao Jun

    2008-01-01

    PET-CT is a successful combination of functional and morphologic information, and it has already been shown to have great value both in clinics and in scientific research. MRI is another kind of morphologic imaging method, in contrast to CT, MRI can yield images with higher soft-tissue contrast and better spatial resolution. The combination of PET and MRI for simultaneous data acquisition should have far- reaching consequences for molecular imaging. This review will talk about the problems met in the development of PET-MRI and describe the progress to date and look forward to its potential application. (authors)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  17. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  18. Extraction of temporal information in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Sungkarat, W.; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Zhou, Yongxia

    2002-10-01

    The temporal resolution of functional MRI (fMRI) is limited by the shape of the haemodynamic response function (hrf) and the vascular architecture underlying the activated regions. Typically, the temporal resolution of fMRI is on the order of 1 s. We have developed a new data processing approach to extract temporal information on a pixel-by-pixel basis at the level of 100 ms from fMRI data. Instead of correlating or fitting the time-course of each pixel to a single reference function, which is the common practice in fMRI, we correlate each pixel's time-course to a series of reference functions that are shifted with respect to each other by 100 ms. The reference function yielding the highest correlation coefficient for a pixel is then used as a time marker for that pixel. A Monte Carlo simulation and experimental study of this approach were performed to estimate the temporal resolution as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the time-course of a pixel. Assuming a known and stationary hrf, the simulation and experimental studies suggest a lower limit in the temporal resolution of approximately 100 ms at an SNR of 3. The multireference function approach was also applied to extract timing information from an event-related motor movement study where the subjects flexed a finger on cue. The event was repeated 19 times with the event's presentation staggered to yield an approximately 100-ms temporal sampling of the haemodynamic response over the entire presentation cycle. The timing differences among different regions of the brain activated by the motor task were clearly visualized and quantified by this method. The results suggest that it is possible to achieve a temporal resolution of /spl sim/200 ms in practice with this approach.

  19. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  20. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  1. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Bønløkke Carlsen, Bjarke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical...... AS in a general population undergoing CT. METHODS: CT scans from 566 randomly selected male participants (age 65-74) in the Danish cardiovascular screening study (DANCAVAS) were analyzed for AVC. All participants with a moderately or severely increased AVC score (≥300 arbitrary units (AU)) and a matched control...... ICD leads 16 individuals were excluded from the AVC scoring. Moderate or severe increased AVC was observed in 10.7% (95% CI: 8.4-13.7). Echocardiography was performed in 101 individuals; 32.7% (95% CI: 21.8 to 46.0) with moderate or high AVC score had moderate or severe AS, while none with no or low...

  2. SU-F-P-26: Study of Radiation Dose Evaluation for Organs at Risk Using MRI in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Guo, Y; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the contour and dosimetric feature of organs at risk (OARs) applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: 35 NPC patients was selected into this trail. CT simulation with non-contrast and contrast enhanced scan, MRI simulation with non-contrast and contrast enhanced T1, T2 and diffusion weighted imaging were achieved sequentially. And the OARs were contoured on the CT and MRI images after rigid registration respectively. 9 beams IMRT plan with equal division angle were designed for every patients, and the prescription dose for tumor target was set as 72Gy (2.4Gy/ fration). The boundary display, volume and dose-volume indices of each organ were compared between on MRI and CT images. Results: Compared to CT, MRI showed clearer boundary of brainstem, spinal cord, the deep lobe of Parotid gland and the optical nerve in canal. MRI images increase the volume of lens, optical nerve, while reducing the volume of eye slightly, and the maximum dose of lens, the mean dose of eyes and optical raised in different percentage, while there was no statistical differences were found. The left and right parotid volume on MRI increased by 7.07%, 8.13%, and the mean dose raised by 14.95% (4.01Gy), 18.76% (4.95Gy) with statistical significant difference (p<0.05). The brainstem volume reduced by 9.33% (p<0.05), and the dose of 0.1cm3 volume (D0.1cm3) reduced by mean 8.46% (4.32Gy), and D0.1cm3 of spinal cord increased by 1.5Gy on MRI. Conclusion: It is credible to evaluate the radiation dose of lens, eye and the spinal cord, while it should be necessary to evaluate the dose of brainstem, parotid and the optical nerve applying MRI images sometime, it will be more meaningful for these organs with high risk of radiation injury.

  3. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI: factors affecting sensitivity and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, C.W. [Department of Radiology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, 7th floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107-5244 (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) of the breast has been investigated for over 10 years. The reports of sensitivity for cancer detection have generally been greater than 90 %. However, estimates of specificity have varied greatly. Differing results are due to differences in study populations, technical methods and criteria for interpretation. Early and marked signal rise, detected using dynamic imaging technique following contrast administration, is the MRI hallmark of cancer. However, some malignant lesions may enhance slowly or minimally, and a variety of benign lesions may enhance rapidly with marked signal intensity. High resolution techniques generally requiring longer acquisition times are more likely to depict the slowly enhancing malignancies at the cost of a decrease in specificity due to lack of temporal resolution. This disadvantage may be offset by the improved visualization of lesion morphology with high resolution images. This report reviews the methods and results of the leading investigators of breast MRI. (orig.) With 3 figs., 70 refs.

  4. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI: factors affecting sensitivity and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccoli, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) of the breast has been investigated for over 10 years. The reports of sensitivity for cancer detection have generally been greater than 90 %. However, estimates of specificity have varied greatly. Differing results are due to differences in study populations, technical methods and criteria for interpretation. Early and marked signal rise, detected using dynamic imaging technique following contrast administration, is the MRI hallmark of cancer. However, some malignant lesions may enhance slowly or minimally, and a variety of benign lesions may enhance rapidly with marked signal intensity. High resolution techniques generally requiring longer acquisition times are more likely to depict the slowly enhancing malignancies at the cost of a decrease in specificity due to lack of temporal resolution. This disadvantage may be offset by the improved visualization of lesion morphology with high resolution images. This report reviews the methods and results of the leading investigators of breast MRI. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contrast MRA (C-MRA is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease. Objective : To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects. Methods : Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation. Results : C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98 except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78. Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9% except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%. Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels. Conclusion : These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

  6. Online Kidney Position Verification Using Non-Contrast Radiographs on a Linear Accelerator with on Board KV X-Ray Imaging Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Hubbard, Patricia; Haworth, Annette; Wheeler, Greg; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    The kidneys are dose-limiting organs in abdominal radiotherapy. Kilovoltage (kV) radiographs can be acquired using on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerators with better soft tissue contrast and lower radiation doses than conventional portal imaging. A feasibility study was conducted to test the suitability of anterior-posterior (AP) non-contrast kV radiographs acquired at treatment time for online kidney position verification. Anthropomorphic phantoms were used to evaluate image quality and radiation dose. Institutional Review Board approval was given for a pilot study that enrolled 5 adults and 5 children. Customized digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated to provide a priori information on kidney shape and position. Radiotherapy treatment staff performed online evaluation of kidney visibility on OBI radiographs. Kidney dose measured in a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom was 0.1 cGy for kV imaging and 1.7 cGy for MV imaging. Kidneys were rated as well visualized in 60% of patients (90% confidence interval, 34-81%). The likelihood of visualization appears to be influenced by the relative AP separation of the abdomen and kidneys, the axial profile of the kidneys, and their relative contrast with surrounding structures. Online verification of kidney position using AP non-contrast kV radiographs on an OBI-equipped linear accelerator appears feasible for patients with suitable abdominal anatomy. Kidney position information provided is limited to 2-dimensional 'snapshots,' but this is adequate in some clinical situations and potentially advantageous in respiratory-correlated treatments. Successful clinical implementation requires customized partial DRRs, appropriate imaging parameters, and credentialing of treatment staff.

  7. Whole brain, high resolution multiband spin-echo EPI fMRI at 7 T: A comparison with gradient-echo EPI using a color-word Stroop task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyacioglu, R.; Schulz, J.; Müller, N.C.J.; Koopmans, P.J.; Barth, M.; Norris, David Gordon

    2014-01-01

    A whole brain, multiband spin-echo (SE) echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence employing a high spatial (1.5 mm isotropic) and temporal (TR of 2 s) resolution was implemented at 7 T. Its overall performance (tSNR, sensitivity and CNR) was assessed and compared to a geometrically matched gradient-echo

  8. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Pawar

    Full Text Available The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS. In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  9. Advances in MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longmin; Liu Ailian

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in the world, and the incidence of prostate cancer in China shows an upward trend. MRI has high soft tissue resolution and multi-dimensional imaging advantages, and it can better show the anatomy of the prostate and adjacent tissue structures. With the development of MR technique, it plays a more and more important role in prostate cancer diagnosis. This review starts from the imaging performance of routine MRI sequence of prostate cancer, and a variety of functional MRI applications in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of prostate cancer are described in detail, such as MR perfusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopy, MR diffusion-weighted imaging, MR diffusion tensor imaging, intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging, MR susceptibility-weighted imaging. Meanwhile this review introduces that functional MRI has more advantages and can provide more image information than routine MRI sequence. According to a series of semi-quantitative and quantitative data, functional MRI can further provide the blood perfusion of prostate cancer, water molecule diffusion and microcirculation state, metabolism and biochemical composition change information. (authors)

  10. Ventricular Geometry From Non-contrast Non-ECG-gated CT Scans: An Imaging Marker of Cardiopulmonary Disease in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaghi, Farbod N; Vegas-Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Minhas, Jasleen K; Come, Carolyn E; De La Bruere, Isaac; Wells, James M; González, Germán; Bhatt, Surya P; Fenster, Brett E; Diaz, Alejandro A; Kohli, Puja; Ross, James C; Lynch, David A; Dransfield, Mark T; Bowler, Russel P; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J; San José Estépar, Raúl; Washko, George R

    2017-05-01

    Imaging-based assessment of cardiovascular structure and function provides clinically relevant information in smokers. Non-cardiac-gated thoracic computed tomographic (CT) scanning is increasingly leveraged for clinical care and lung cancer screening. We sought to determine if more comprehensive measures of ventricular geometry could be obtained from CT using an atlas-based surface model of the heart. Subcohorts of 24 subjects with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 262 subjects with echocardiography were identified from COPDGene, a longitudinal observational study of smokers. A surface model of the heart was manually initialized, and then automatically optimized to fit the epicardium for each CT. Estimates of right and left ventricular (RV and LV) volume and free-wall curvature were then calculated and compared to structural and functional metrics obtained from MRI and echocardiograms. CT measures of RV dimension and curvature correlated with similar measures obtained using MRI. RV and LV volume obtained from CT inversely correlated with echocardiogram-based estimates of RV systolic pressure using tricuspid regurgitation jet velocity and LV ejection fraction respectively. Patients with evidence of RV or LV dysfunction on echocardiogram had larger RV and LV dimensions on CT. Logistic regression models based on demographics and ventricular measures from CT had an area under the curve of >0.7 for the prediction of elevated right ventricular systolic pressure and ventricular failure. These data suggest that non-cardiac-gated, non-contrast-enhanced thoracic CT scanning may provide insight into cardiac structure and function in smokers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. High-resolution magnetic resonance of the extracranial facial nerve and parotid duct: demonstration of the branches of the intraparotid facial nerve and its relation to parotid tumours by MRI with a surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Okamoto, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Kawana, M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of high-resolution MR imaging in the evaluation of the extracranial facial nerve, compared with surgical findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients with benign parotid tumours were studied on a 1.5-T MR system with a 3 in circular surface coil. High-resolution T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast spin-echo, and three-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in the axial planes. Oblique reformatted images were generated. Tumours, parotid ducts and facial nerves were identified on these images. The relationship of the tumours to the facial nerves was confirmed at surgery. RESULTS: Facial nerves appeared as linear structures of low intensity on all pulse sequences. The main trunks and cervicofacial and temporofacial divisions of the facial nerves were identified in 100%, 84.1% and 53.8% of GRASS images, respectively. Parotid ducts appeared as structures of low intensity on T1-weighted (66.6%) and GRASS images (81.8%), and as structures of very high intensity on T2-weighted images (91.7%). The relationships of the tumours to the facial nerves were correctly diagnosed in 11 (91.7%) of 12 cases. CONCLUSION: High-resolution MR imaging depicts the extracranial facial nerve and the parotid duct, and is useful for preoperative evaluation of parotid gland tumours

  12. High-resolution magnetic resonance of the extracranial facial nerve and parotid duct: demonstration of the branches of the intraparotid facial nerve and its relation to parotid tumours by MRI with a surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan) and Department of Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, Niigata (Japan)]. E-mail: nandtr@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp; Okamoto, K. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Ohkubo, M. [Department of Radiotechnology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Kawana, M. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of high-resolution MR imaging in the evaluation of the extracranial facial nerve, compared with surgical findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients with benign parotid tumours were studied on a 1.5-T MR system with a 3 in circular surface coil. High-resolution T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast spin-echo, and three-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in the axial planes. Oblique reformatted images were generated. Tumours, parotid ducts and facial nerves were identified on these images. The relationship of the tumours to the facial nerves was confirmed at surgery. RESULTS: Facial nerves appeared as linear structures of low intensity on all pulse sequences. The main trunks and cervicofacial and temporofacial divisions of the facial nerves were identified in 100%, 84.1% and 53.8% of GRASS images, respectively. Parotid ducts appeared as structures of low intensity on T1-weighted (66.6%) and GRASS images (81.8%), and as structures of very high intensity on T2-weighted images (91.7%). The relationships of the tumours to the facial nerves were correctly diagnosed in 11 (91.7%) of 12 cases. CONCLUSION: High-resolution MR imaging depicts the extracranial facial nerve and the parotid duct, and is useful for preoperative evaluation of parotid gland tumours.

  13. Predictive MRI correlates of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, Rachel L. [Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Umans, Benjamin D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Umans, Hilary [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, New York, NY (United States); Elsinger, Elisabeth [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-07-15

    To identify correlated signs on non-enhanced MRI that might improve diagnostic detection of plantar plate (PP) tear. We performed an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective analysis of 100 non-contrast MRI (50 PP tear, 50 controls). All were anonymized, randomized, and reviewed; 20 were duplicated to assess consistency. One musculoskeletal radiologist evaluated qualitative variables. A trained non-physician performed measurements. Consistency and concordance were assessed. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to test the correlation between qualitative findings and PP tear status. Correlation between measurements and PP status was assessed using t tests and Wilcoxon's rank-sum test (p values < 0.05 considered significant). Classification and regression trees were utilized to identify attributes that, taken together, would consistently distinguish PP tear from controls. Quantitative measurements were highly reproducible (concordance 0.88-0.99). Elevated 2nd MT protrusion, lesser MT supination and rotational divergence of >45 between the 1st-2nd MT axis correlated with PP tear. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening correlated most strongly with PP tear, correctly classifying 95 % of cases and controls. Excluding pericapsular soft tissue thickening, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, 2nd flexor tendon subluxation, and splaying of the second and third toes accurately classified PP status in 92 %. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening most strongly correlated with PP tear. For cases in which it might be difficult to distinguish pericapsular fibrosis from neuroma, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, flexor tendon subluxation and splaying of the 2nd and 3rd toe is most helpful for optimizing accurate diagnosis of PP tear. (orig.)

  14. Proton MRI appearance of cystic fibrosis: Comparison to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Schmaehl, Astrid; Fink, Christian; Plathow, Christian; Wiebel, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established. (orig.)

  15. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  16. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  17. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  18. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  19. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  20. Resolution propositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    To put a resolution to the meeting in relation with the use of weapons made of depleted uranium is the purpose of this text. The situation of the use of depleted uranium by France during the Gulf war and other recent conflicts will be established. This resolution will give the most strict recommendations face to the eventual sanitary and environmental risks in the use of these kind of weapons. (N.C.)

  1. Analysis of artefacts and detail resolution of lung MRI with breath-hold T1-weighted gradient-echo and T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences with respiratory triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Reuter, M.; Both, M.; Grimm, J.; Heller, M.; Muhle, C.; Graessner, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility and limitations of two MR sequences for imaging of the lung using a semi-quantitative rating scale. Ten healthy volunteers were assessed with a breath-hold T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo (TR/TE=129/2.2 ms, matrix 173 x 256) and a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence with respiratory triggering (TR/TE=3000-5000/120 ms, matrix 270 x 512) in axial 6-mm slices. The T1-weighted GRE protocol included a pre-saturation pulse over the mediastinal structures. Artefacts and resolution of vessel/airway structures in each lung segment were evaluated by two observers (10 volunteers, 180 segments). Cardiac and vessel pulsation artefacts predominated on T1-weighted GRE, respiration artefacts on T2-weighted TSE (lingula and middle lobe). Pre-saturation of the mediastinum reduced pulsation artefacts on T1-weighted GRE. T1-weighted GRE images were improved by bright flow signal of vessels, whereas image quality of T2-weighted TSE was reduced by black-blood effects in central parts of the lung. Delineation of lung periphery and the mediastinum was superior with T2-weighted TSE. Segmental/sub-segmental vessels (up to fourth/fifth order) and bronchi (up to third order) were identified. All 180 lung segments were imaged in diagnostic quality with at least one of the two sequences (T1-weighted GRE not diagnostic in 9 of 180, T2-weighted TSE in 4 of 180). Both sequences were found to be complementary: superior identification of gross lung anatomy with T1-weighted GRE and higher detail resolution in the periphery and the mediastinum with T2-weighted TSE. (orig.)

  2. Estimation of trabecular bone parameters in children from multisequence MRI using texture-based regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekadir, Karim, E-mail: karim.lekadir@upf.edu; Hoogendoorn, Corné [Center for Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona 08018 (Spain); Armitage, Paul [The Academic Unit of Radiology, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2JF (United Kingdom); Whitby, Elspeth [The Academic Unit of Reproductive and Developmental Medicine, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2SF (United Kingdom); King, David [The Academic Unit of Child Health, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TH (United Kingdom); Dimitri, Paul [The Mellanby Centre for Bone Research, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Frangi, Alejandro F. [Center for Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a statistical approach for the prediction of trabecular bone parameters from low-resolution multisequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children, thus addressing the limitations of high-resolution modalities such as HR-pQCT, including the significant exposure of young patients to radiation and the limited applicability of such modalities to peripheral bones in vivo. Methods: A statistical predictive model is constructed from a database of MRI and HR-pQCT datasets, to relate the low-resolution MRI appearance in the cancellous bone to the trabecular parameters extracted from the high-resolution images. The description of the MRI appearance is achieved between subjects by using a collection of feature descriptors, which describe the texture properties inside the cancellous bone, and which are invariant to the geometry and size of the trabecular areas. The predictive model is built by fitting to the training data a nonlinear partial least square regression between the input MRI features and the output trabecular parameters. Results: Detailed validation based on a sample of 96 datasets shows correlations >0.7 between the trabecular parameters predicted from low-resolution multisequence MRI based on the proposed statistical model and the values extracted from high-resolution HRp-QCT. Conclusions: The obtained results indicate the promise of the proposed predictive technique for the estimation of trabecular parameters in children from multisequence MRI, thus reducing the need for high-resolution radiation-based scans for a fragile population that is under development and growth.

  3. Half-dose non-contrast CT in the investigation of urolithiasis: image quality improvement with third-generation integrated circuit CT detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Kang, Tony; Arepalli, Chesnal; Barrett, Sarah; O'Connell, Tim; Louis, Luck; Nicolaou, Savvakis; McLaughlin, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the effect of third-generation integrated circuit (IC) CT detector on objective image quality in full- and half-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract. 51 consecutive patients with acute renal colic underwent non-contrast CT of the urinary tract using a 128-slice dual-source CT before (n = 24) and after (n = 27) the installation of third-generation IC detectors. Half-dose images were generated using projections from detector A using the dual-source RAW data. Objective image noise in the liver, spleen, right renal cortex, and right psoas muscle was compared between DC and IC cohorts for full-dose and half-dose images reconstructed with FBP and IR algorithms using 1 cm(2) regions of interest. Presence and size of obstructing ureteric calculi were also compared for full-dose and half-dose reconstructions using DC and IC detectors. No statistical difference in age and lateral body size was found between patients in the IC and DC cohorts. Radiation dose, as measured by size-specific dose estimates, did not differ significantly either between the two cohorts (10.02 ± 4.54 mGy IC vs. 12.28 ± 7.03 mGy DC). At full dose, objective image noise was not significantly lower in the IC cohort as compared to the DC cohort for the liver, spleen, and right psoas muscle. At half dose, objective image noise was lower in the IC cohort as compared to DC cohort at the liver (21.32 IC vs. 24.99 DC, 14.7% decrease, p 0.05 for all comparisons). Third-generation IC detectors result in lower objective image noise at full- and half-radiation dose levels as compared with traditional DC detectors. The magnitude of noise reduction was greater at half-radiation dose indicating that the benefits of using novel IC detectors are greater in low and ultra-low-dose CT imaging.

  4. Dual-energy computed tomography to assess tumor response to hepatic radiofrequency ablation: potential diagnostic value of virtual noncontrast images and iodine maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Kyung Won; Klotz, Ernst; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2011-02-01

    to determine the value of dual-energy (DE) scanning with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images and iodine maps in the evaluation of therapeutic response to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatic tumors. a total of 75 patients with hepatic tumors and who underwent DE computed tomography (CT) after RFA, were enrolled in this study. Our DE CT protocol included precontrast, arterial, and portal phase scans. VNC images and iodine maps were created from 80 to 140 kVp images during the arterial and portal phases. VNC images were then compared with true, noncontrast (TNC) images, and iodine maps were compared with linearly blended images, both qualitatively and quantitatively. For the former comparison, image quality and acceptability of the VNC images as a replacement for TNC images were both rated. The CT numbers of the hepatic parenchyma, ablation zone, and image noise were measured. For the latter comparison, lesion conspicuity of the ablation zone and the additional benefit of integrating the iodine map into the routine protocol, were assessed. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the ablation zone-to-liver and aorta-to-liver as well as the CT number differences between the center and the periphery of the ablation zone were calculated. The image quality of the VNC images was rated as good (mean grading score, 1.88) and the level of acceptance was 90% (68/75). The mean CT numbers of the hepatic parenchyma and ablation zone did not differ significantly between the TNC and the VNC images (P > 0.05). The lesion conspicuity of the ablation zone was rated as excellent or good in 97% of the iodine map (73/75), and the additional benefits of the iodine maps were positively rated as better to the same (mean 1.5). The CNR of the aorta-to-liver parenchyma was significantly higher on the iodine map (P = 0.002), and the CT number differences between the center and the periphery of the ablation zone were significantly lower on the iodine map (P VNC images can be an alternative to TNC

  5. Usefulness of ACR MRI phantom for quality assurance of MRI instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Whee; Ahn, Kook Jin; Lee, Seung Koo; Na, Dong Gyu; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chang, Yong Min; Lim, Tae Hwan

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether the ACR phantom could be used in quality standards for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instruments in Korea. We conducted the phantom test using the ACR MRI phantom in 20 MRI instruments currently used in Korea. According to ACR criteria, we acquired the phantom images which were then assessed by the following seven tests: geometric accuracy, high spatial resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position accuracy, image intensity uniformity, percent signal ghosting, and low contrast object detectability. The phantom images were interpreted by three experienced radiologists according to ACR criteria. Then, we examined the failure rate of each test and evaluated the inter-observer variation in the measurements and test failure. The failure rate of each test could be broken into the following components: geometric accuracy (11-21%), high contrast spatial resolution (10-15%), slice thickness accuracy(6-22%), slice position accuracy (5-17%), image intensity uniformity (6%), percent signal ghosting (16%), and low contrast object detectability (8-10%). In this series, all the failure rates were less than 30%. In addition, no inter-observer variation was seen in the measurements and test failure. ACR MRI phantom promises to be established as the standard phantom for MRI instruments in Korea because of its objectivity in assessing the phantom images

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  10. Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement by MRI: a test of its validity and the electrical conductivity characteristics of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tha, Khin Khin; Katscher, Ulrich; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Stehning, Christian; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Kazumata, Ken; Yamamoto, Toru; Van Cauteren, Marc; Shirato, Hiroki

    2018-01-01

    This study noninvasively examined the electrical conductivity (σ) characteristics of diffuse gliomas using MRI and tested its validity. MRI including a 3D steady-state free precession (3D SSFP) sequence was performed on 30 glioma patients. The σ maps were reconstructed from the phase images of the 3D SSFP sequence. The σ histogram metrics were extracted and compared among the contrast-enhanced (CET) and noncontrast-enhanced tumour components (NCET) and normal brain parenchyma (NP). Difference in tumour σ histogram metrics among tumour grades and correlation of σ metrics with tumour grades were tested. Validity of σ measurement using this technique was tested by correlating the mean tumour σ values measured using MRI with those measured ex vivo using a dielectric probe. Several σ histogram metrics of CET and NCET of diffuse gliomas were significantly higher than NP (Bonferroni-corrected p ≤ .045). The maximum σ of NCET showed a moderate positive correlation with tumour grade (r = .571, Bonferroni-corrected p = .018). The mean tumour σ measured using MRI showed a moderate positive correlation with