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Sample records for resolution inelastic x-ray

  1. A multiplexed high-resolution imaging spectrometer for resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Tony; Chuang, Yi De; Voronov, Dmitriy L; Padmore, Howard A

    2014-07-01

    The optical design of a two-dimensional imaging soft X-ray spectrometer is described. A monochromator will produce a dispersed spectrum in a narrow vertical illuminated stripe (∼2 µm wide by ∼2 mm tall) on a sample. The spectrometer will use inelastically scattered X-rays to image the extended field on the sample in the incident photon energy direction (vertical), resolving the incident photon energy. At the same time it will image and disperse the scattered photons in the orthogonal (horizontal) direction, resolving the scattered photon energy. The principal challenge is to design a system that images from the flat-field illumination of the sample to the flat field of the detector and to achieve sufficiently high spectral resolution. This spectrometer provides a completely parallel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurement at high spectral resolution (∼30,000) over the energy bandwidth (∼5 eV) of a soft X-ray absorption resonance.

  2. Improving the spatial resolution of a soft X-ray Charge Coupled Device used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J. (David John); Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Advanced Resonant Scattering (ADRESS) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer used as an end station for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering from 400 eV to 1600 eV. Through the dispersion of photons across a CCD, the energy of scattered photons may be determined by their detected spatial position. The limiting factor of the energy resolution is currently the spatial resolution achieved with the CC...

  3. An inelastic X-ray spectrometer with 2.2 meV energy resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sinn, H; Alatas, A; Barraza, J; Bortel, G; Burkel, E; Shu, D; Sturhahn, W; Sutter, J P; Toellner, T S; Zhao, J

    2001-01-01

    We present a new spectrometer at the Advanced Photon Source for inelastic X-ray scattering with an energy resolution of 2.2 meV at an incident energy of 21.6 keV. For monochromatization, a nested structure of one silicon channel cut and one 'artificial' channel cut is used in forward-scattering geometry. The energy analysis is achieved by a two-dimensional focusing silicon analyzer in backscattering geometry. In the first demonstration experiments, elastic scattering from a Plexiglas sup T sup M sample and two dispersion curves in a beryllium single crystal were measured. Based on these data sets, the performance of the new spectrometer is discussed.

  4. Improving the spatial resolution of a soft X-ray Charge Coupled Device used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2011-11-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Advanced Resonant Scattering (ADRESS) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer used as an end station for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering from 400 eV to 1600 eV. Through the dispersion of photons across a CCD, the energy of scattered photons may be determined by their detected spatial position. The limiting factor of the energy resolution is currently the spatial resolution achieved with the CCD, reported at 24 μm FWHM. For this energy range the electron clouds are formed by interactions in the `field free' region of the back-illuminated CCD. These clouds diffuse in all directions whilst being attracted to the electrodes, leading to events that are made up of signals in multiple pixels. The spreading of the charge allows centroiding techniques to be used to improve the CCD spatial resolution and therefore improve the energy resolution of SAXES. The PolLux microscopy beamline at the SLS produces an X-ray beam with a diameter of 20 nm. The images produced from scanning the narrow beam across CCD pixels (13.5 × 13.5 μm2) can aid in the production of event recognition algorithms, allowing the matching of event profiles to photon interactions in a specific region of a pixel. Through the use of this information software analysis can be refined with the aim of improving the energy resolution.

  5. High-resolution resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering applied to liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubensson, Jan-Erik, E-mail: jan-erik.rubensson@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hennies, Franz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); MAX-lab, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Pietzsch, Annette [MAX-lab, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Vibrational excitations in liquids resolved in RIXS are observed. ► Soft vibrational modes are quenched in the RIXS process. ► Intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction influences spectral features. ► Influence of room temperature is excitations observed. -- Abstract: The brilliance of modern synchrotron radiation sources and capabilities of new instrumentation facilitate resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering of liquids and molecular materials with high spectral quality. Especially, when the energy resolution approaches the natural line widths a detailed analysis provides information about local potential surfaces, dynamic coupling between nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom, and intermolecular interactions. After briefly commenting on various sample handling systems we review the recent high-resolution RIXS results on liquid acetone. The experimental RIXS spectra excited at the O K edge demonstrate that the CO stretching mode dominates the vibrational progressions, and that softer modes are little affected by the nuclear dynamics in the intermediate state. It is shown that intermolecular coupling can be neglected in this specific case, and it is predicted that such interaction significantly broadens spectral features in liquids with larger dipole–dipole interaction. Analysis of the data further shows that initial state thermal excitations at room temperature have a noticeable influence on the spectral features.

  6. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  7. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer with 25 meV resolution at Cu K-edge

    CERN Document Server

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Klementiev, Konstantin; Upton, Mary; Taherkhani, Mehran; Spiwek, Manfred; Dill, Frank-Uwe; Wille, Hans-Christian; Yavaş, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic x-ray scattering instrument at the Cu K-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single crystal quartz (SiO_{2}) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25 meV (FWHM) at 8981 eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. We demonstrated the performance of the spectrometer by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium (Be) single crystal.

  8. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  9. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm-1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm-1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s-1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  10. Ultra high energy resolution focusing monochromator for inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, A; Chubar, O; Cai, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    A further development of a focusing monochromator concept for X-ray energy resolution of 0.1 meV and below is presented. Theoretical analysis of several optical layouts based on this concept was supported by numerical simulations performed in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" software package using the physical-optics approach and careful modeling of partially-coherent synchrotron (undulator) radiation. Along with the energy resolution, the spectral shape of the energy resolution function was investigated. It was shown that under certain conditions the decay of the resolution function tails can be faster than that of the Gaussian function.

  11. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocov, V. N., E-mail: vladimir.strocov@psi.ch; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Wang, X. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Grioni, M. [Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Piazzalunga, A. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Patthey, L. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-09-01

    Concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source are described. Optimization of the optical scheme for high resolution and photon flux as well as diagnostics tools and alignment strategies are discussed. The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 10{sup 13} photons s{sup −1} (0.01% BW){sup −1} at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given.

  12. INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING AT ULTRAHIGH PRESSURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAO, H.K.; HEMLEY, J.; KAO, C.C.

    2000-08-28

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) provides high-pressure research with an arsenal of analytical capabilities for key measurements that were previously unattainable, and high pressure research provides IXS with numerous applications where the technique has unique advantages over other methods. High-pressure investigations can now be conducted using non-resonant IXS, resonant IXS, nuclear resonant IXS, and x-ray emission spectroscopy with energy resolutions of 100 meV to 1 eV for electronic transitions and 1 to 10 meV for phonon studies. By pressure-tuning materials over a wide range, we are able to investigate fundamental physics of electron gases, strongly correlated electron systems, high-energy electronic excitations, and phonons in energy and momentum space. The results will have a profound influence on materials applications as well as providing basic information for understanding the deep interior of the Earth and other planets.

  13. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  14. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  15. High-resolution detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a modern soft X-ray spectroscopy technique used to investigate the structure of and excitations in materials. It requires high resolution spectrometers and a brilliant, tunable, X-ray source and therefore is carried out at spectrometers such as SAXES at the Swiss Light Source Light, a synchrotron at the Paul Scherrer Institut.\\ud \\ud SAXES uses a grating to disperse X-rays scattered from a sample across a position sensitive detector, a Charge-Coup...

  16. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  17. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  18. 4 f excitations in Ce Kondo lattices studied by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorese, A.; Dellea, G.; Fanciulli, M.; Seiro, S.; Geibel, C.; Krellner, C.; Makarova, I. P.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Brookes, N. B.; Kummer, K.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering to measure 4 f crystal electric-field excitation spectra in Ce Kondo lattices has been examined. Spectra have been obtained for several Ce systems and show a well-defined structure determined by crystal-field, spin-orbit, and charge-transfer excitations only. The spectral shapes of the excitation spectra can be well understood in the framework of atomic multiplet calculations. For CeCu2Si2 we found notable disagreement between the inelastic x-ray-scattering spectra and theoretical calculations when using the crystal-field scheme proposed from inelastic neutron scattering. Modified sets of crystal-field parameters yield better agreement. Our results also show that, with the very recent improvements of soft x-ray spectrometers in resolution to below 30 meV at the Ce M4 ,5 edges, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering could be an ideal tool to determine the crystal-field scheme in Ce Kondo lattices and other rare-earth compounds.

  19. Inelastic X-Ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Gericke, D. O.; Döppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. These first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  20. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Saiz, E.; Riley, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.M.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX (United Kingdom); Gericke, D.O.; Vorberger, J.; Wunsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Barbrel, B.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Laser Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique - Universite Paris-6, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Freeman, R.R.; Weber, R.L.; Van Woerkom, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Neumayer, P.; Price, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Khattak, F.Y. [Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat-26000, NWFP (Pakistan); Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    One of the grand challenges of contemporary physics is understanding strongly interacting quantum systems comprising such diverse examples as ultracold atoms in traps, electrons in high-temperature superconductors and nuclear matter. Warm dense matter, defined by temperatures of a few electron volts and densities comparable with solids, is a complex state of such interacting matter. Moreover, the study of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where it is encountered during the implosion phase, and it also represents laboratory analogues of astrophysical environments found in the core of planets and the crusts of old stars. Here we demonstrate how warm dense matter states can be diagnosed and structural properties can be obtained by inelastic X-ray scattering measurements on a compressed lithium sample. Combining experiments and ab initio simulations enables us to determine its microscopic state and to evaluate more approximate theoretical models for the ionic structure. (authors)

  1. Ultraprecision motion control technique for high-resolution x-ray instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    2000-07-17

    With the availability of third-generation hard x-ray synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, x-ray inelastic scattering and x-ray nuclear resonant scattering provide powerful means for investigating the vibrational dynamics of a variety of materials and condensed matter systems. Novel high-resolution hard x-ray optics with meV energy resolution requires a compact positioning mechanism with 20--50-nrad angular resolution and stability. In this paper, the authors technical approach to this design challenge is presented. Sensitivity and stability test results are also discussed.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup.

  3. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlachetko, J; Nachtegaal, M; de Boni, E; Willimann, M; Safonova, O; Sa, J; Smolentsev, G; Szlachetko, M; van Bokhoven, J A; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Kayser, Y; Jagodzinski, P; Bergamaschi, A; Schmitt, B; David, C; Lücke, A

    2012-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  4. Kohn anomaly in MgB2 by inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, A Q R; Uchiyama, H; Tanaka, Y; Tsutsui, S; Ishikawa, D; Lee, S; Heid, R; Bohnen, K-P; Tajima, S; Ishikawa, T

    2004-05-14

    We study phonons in MgB2 using inelastic x-ray scattering (1.6 and 6 meV resolution). We clearly observe the softening and broadening of the crucial E(2g) mode through the Kohn anomaly along GammaM, in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. Low temperature measurements (just above and below T(c)) show negligible changes for the momentum transfers investigated and no change in the E(2g) mode at A between room temperature and 16 K. We report the presence of a longitudinal mode along GammaA near in energy to the E(2g) mode that is not predicted by theory.

  5. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Schnopper, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the perfection of state-of-the-art multilayers are presented. Data were obtained using a triple-axis perfect-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Measurements reveal large-scale figure errors in the substrate. A high-resolution triple-axis set up is required...

  6. Focusing polycapillary to reduce parasitic scattering for inelastic x-ray measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P.; Xiao, Y. M.; Rod, E.; Bai, L. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Sinogeikin, S.; Gao, N.; Ding, Y.; Mao, H.-K.

    2015-07-01

    The double-differential scattering cross-section for the inelastic scattering of x-ray photons from electrons is typically orders of magnitude smaller than that of elastic scattering. With samples 10-100 μm size in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure, the inelastic x-ray scattering signals from samples are obscured by scattering from the cell gasket and diamonds. One major experimental challenge is to measure a clean inelastic signal from the sample in a diamond anvil cell. Among the many strategies for doing this, we have used a focusing polycapillary as a post-sample optic, which allows essentially only scattered photons within its input field of view to be refocused and transmitted to the backscattering energy analyzer of the spectrometer. We describe the modified inelastic x-ray spectrometer and its alignment. With a focused incident beam which matches the sample size and the field of view of polycapillary, at relatively large scattering angles, the polycapillary effectively reduces parasitic scattering from the diamond anvil cell gasket and diamonds. Raw data collected from the helium exciton measured by x-ray inelastic scattering at high pressure using the polycapillary method are compared with those using conventional post-sample slit collimation.

  7. X-ray edge singularity in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Robert; Rehr, John; Bansil, Arun

    2013-03-01

    We develop a lattice model based on the theory of Mahan, Noziéres, and de Dominicis for x-ray absorption to explore the effect of the core hole on the RIXS cross section. The dominant part of the spectrum can be described in terms of the dynamic structure function S (q , ω) dressed by matrix element effects, but there is also a weak background associated with multi-electron-hole pair excitations. The model reproduces the decomposition of the RIXS spectrum into well- and poorly-screened components. An edge singularity arises at the threshold of both components. Fairly large lattice sizes are required to describe the continuum limit. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER46352 and facilitated by the DOE CMCSN, under grant number DE-SC0007091.

  8. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Geloni, Gianluca; Madsen, Anders [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd' ko, Yuri [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup -1} spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup -1} are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about 7 x 10{sup 12} ph/s in a 90-μeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  9. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Chubar, Oleg; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6~meV and 0.25~nm$^{-1}$ spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1~meV and 0.02~nm$^{-1}$ are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about $7\\times 10^{12}$~ph/s in a $90$-$\\mu$e...

  10. Collimating Montel mirror as part of a multi-crystal analyzer system for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungho; Shi, Xianbo; Casa, Diego; Qian, Jun; Huang, XianRong; Gog, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Advances in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) have come in lockstep with improvements in energy resolution. Currently, the best energy resolution at the Ir-L3 edge stands at ~25 meV, which is achieved using a diced Si spherical analyzer. An angular dispersion analyzer system using multiple flat crystals provides a promising way to achieve higher energy resolution, namely 10 meV or better, thereby overcoming the intrinsic energy resolution limit of diced spherical crystal analyzers. One essential component for a practical use of such multi-crystal systems is the xray collimation optics. In this work, a laterally graded, parabolic collimation Montel mirror was designed with larger than 10 mrad acceptance, collimating the x-ray beam to smaller than 100 μrad divergence at the Ir-L3 absorption energy. The x-ray collimation performance was investigated at beamline 27-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, using incident photons from a Diamond (111) monochromator illuminating a controlled 40 mrad divergence scattering source of 5 μm diameter. A flat Si (111) crystal served as the analyzer. It is found from experimental data and ray-tracing simulations, combined with metrology results, that the manufactured Montel mirror satisfies the required specifications of angular acceptance and collimated x-ray divergence for a high resolution RIXS spectrometer at the Ir-L3 edge.

  11. X-ray holography with atomic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegze, Miklós; Faigel, Gyula

    1996-03-01

    DIFFRACTION methods for crystallographic structure determination suffer from the so-called 'phase problem'; a diffraction pattern provides intensity but not phase information for the scattered beams, and therefore cannot be uniquely inverted to obtain the crystal structure of a sample. Holographic methods1, on the other hand, offer a means of extracting both intensity and phase information. To be useful for crystallographic applications, holography must be implemented with radiation of sufficiently small wavelength to resolve atomic-scale features2. One method, electron-emission holography3-9, uses electron waves and is a powerful tool for studying surface structure; but it cannot image the internal structure of solids because of complications arising from the highly anisotropic nature of electron scattering processes. A proposed alternative method uses X-rays2,10-13, which scatter more isotropically than electrons. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of atomic-scale X-ray holography by obtaining direct images of the three-dimensional arrangement of strontium atoms in the cubic perovskite SrTiO3. With more intense synchrotron sources for illumination, and with the development of improved X-ray detectors, X-ray holography should become a powerful general technique for unambiguous structure determination in condensed matter systems.

  12. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  13. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  14. Free-electron laser based resonant inelastic X-ray scattering on molecules and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunnus, Kristjan, E-mail: kkunnus@stanford.edu [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Schreck, Simon; Föhlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Femtosecond time-resolved RIXS can be used to follow charge, spin and structural dynamics of dilute solute molecules in solution. • Ultrashort X-ray pulses allow probing of highly radiation sensitive states of matter. • Nonlinear X-ray probes provide an enhanced selectivity and sensitivity as well as a path to control radiation damage and increase the photon yields in RIXS experiments. - Abstract: The unprecedented beam properties of free-electron laser based X-ray sources enable novel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments. Femtosecond time-resolved RIXS can be used to follow charge, spin and structural dynamics of dilute solute molecules in solution. Ultrashort X-ray pulses allow probing of highly radiation sensitive states of matter such as the metastable phase of supercooled liquid water. Nonlinear X-ray probes like amplified spontaneous emission and stimulated resonant X-ray scattering provide an enhanced selectivity and sensitivity as well as a path to control radiation damage and increase the photon yields in RIXS experiments.

  15. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals.

  16. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuan [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Key Laboratory of Multi-scale Manufacturing Technology, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Li, Chengyang [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Department of Physics, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Burns, Clement [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals.

  17. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and CopperSystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2007-07-11

    Rare earths and copper systems were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). The use of monochromased synchotron radiation and improved energy resolution for RIXS made possible to obtain valuable information on the electronic structure in 4f, 5f and 3d systems. Experimental results for rare-earths (Ho, Gd, Cm, U, Np, Pu) were analyzed by atomic multiplet theory based on the Hartree-Fock calculations. The inelastic scattering structures in RIXS spectra at 5d edge of actinides found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248-curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge found to be sensitive to actinide oxidation states in different systems. Comparison of experimental and calculated Cm 5d RIXS spectra gave direct information about valency of the 248 curium isotope in oxide. Scientific understanding of processes that control chemical changes of radioactive species from spent fuel is improved by studying interactions of actinide ions (U, Np, Pu) with corroded iron surfaces. RIXS measurements at the actinide 5d edge indicate the reduction of U(VI), NP(V) and Pu(VI) to U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) by presence of iron ions. This thesis is also addressed to the study of changes in the electronic structure of copper films during interaction with synthetic groundwater solutions. The surface modifications induced by chemical reactions of oxidized 100 Angstrom Cu films with CL-, SO42- and HCO3- ions in aqueous solutions with various concentrations were studied in-situ using XAS. It was shown that the pH value, the

  19. High Resolution Adjustable Mirror Control for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    The goal of the proposed program is to enable increased angular resolution and collection areas for future major X-ray observatories by incorporating control of the mirror surfaces after fab-rication and mounting. We propose to develop and implement a method for preparing adjustable optics with integrated control elements on curved mirror segments for future X-ray space telescopes. Development of such mirror elements will provide a major advance to the field of X-ray astronomy, by enabling mirrors with half an arcsecond angular resolution using thin, lightweight glass to significantly increase the collection area. This is an enabling technology for mission concepts such as the X-ray Surveyor. This proposal supports NASA's goals of technical advancement of technologies suitable for future missions, and training of graduate students.

  20. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  1. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectra of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrie, A.; Christensen, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer fitted with an x-ray monochromator for Al Kα1,2 radiation (1486.6 eV) has been used to record high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra for the 4d valence band as well as the 3d spin doublet in silver. The core-level spectrum has a line shape that can be described...

  2. d-d excitations in bilayer manganites probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Rosenkranz, S.; Castellan, J.-P.; Osborn, R.; Mitchell, J. F.; Zheng, H.; Case, D.; Kim, J. H.; Gog, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report a high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the bilayer manganites La{sub 2-2x}Sr{sub 1+2x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} with x=0.36 and 0.5. The momentum dependence along the crystallographic (110) direction for energy losses 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 15 eV has been measured in detail with the data analysis focusing on the energy-loss region 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 5 eV, which includes a strong peak located at {Delta}E {approx} 2 eV. We observe a clear dispersion of up to 0.5 eV in the measured q range, which is direct evidence of the nonlocal character of this excitation. Further, we found that the intensity in this low-energy region strongly depends on both the reduced wave vector q=(h,h,0), h=0.1-0.5, and temperature, i.e., different ordered phases. Results can be explained via an intersite d-d charge-transfer excitation, proposed for pseudocubic manganites, where the hopping rate is strongly increased (decreased) by ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) alignment of neighboring in-plane Mn ion core spins.

  3. Electronic Structure of the ID Conductor K0.3MoO3 studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Learmonth, T.; Glans, P.-A.; McGuinness, C.; Plucinski, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, J.-H.; Greenblatt, M.; Smith, K.E.

    2008-09-24

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one dimensional conductor K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data is compared to that from the related two dimensional insulator {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. Scattering features are observed from both oxides that are explained in terms of the band momentum selectivity of the scattering process, allowing a comparison of the scattering data to recent band structure calculations.

  4. High spectral and spatial resolution X-ray transmission radiography and tomography using a Color X-ray Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, Matthieu; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Scharf, Oliver; Cormode, David P.; Van Loo, Denis; Pauwels, Elin; Dierick, Manuel; Vincze, Laszlo; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2013-01-01

    High resolution X-ray radiography and computed tomography are excellent techniques for non-destructive characterization of an object under investigation at a spatial resolution in the micrometer range. However, as the image contrast depends on both chemical composition and material density, no chemical information is obtained from this data. Furthermore, lab-based measurements are affected by the polychromatic X-ray beam, which results in beam hardening effects. New types of X-ray detectors w...

  5. Collimating Montel mirror as part of a multi-crystal analyzer system for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Shi, Xianbo; Casa, Diego; Qian, Jun; Huang, XianRong; Gog, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Advances in resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) have come in lockstep with improvements in energy resolution. Currently, the best energy resolution at the Ir L3-edge stands at ∼25 meV, which is achieved using a diced Si(844) spherical crystal analyzer. However, spherical analyzers are limited by their intrinsic reflection width. A novel analyzer system using multiple flat crystals provides a promising way to overcome this limitation. For the present design, an energy resolution at or below 10 meV was selected. Recognizing that the angular acceptance of flat crystals is severely limited, a collimating element is essential to achieve the necessary solid-angle acceptance. For this purpose, a laterally graded, parabolic, multilayer Montel mirror was designed for use at the Ir L3-absorption edge. It provides an acceptance larger than 10 mrad, collimating the reflected X-ray beam to smaller than 100 µrad, in both vertical and horizontal directions. The performance of this mirror was studied at beamline 27-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. X-rays from a diamond (111) monochromator illuminated a scattering source of diameter 5 µm, generating an incident beam on the mirror with a well determined divergence of 40 mrad. A flat Si(111) crystal after the mirror served as the divergence analyzer. From X-ray measurements, ray-tracing simulations and optical metrology results, it was established that the Montel mirror satisfied the specifications of angular acceptance and collimation quality necessary for a high-resolution RIXS multi-crystal analyzer system.

  6. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/Ecarbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  7. Hard X-ray Spectrographs with Resolution Beyond 100 micro-eV

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Mundboth, Kiran; Kim, Jungho

    2013-01-01

    Spectrographs take snapshots of photon spectra with array detectors by dispersing photons of different energies into distinct directions and spacial locations. Spectrographs require optics with a large angular dispersion rate as the key component. In visible light optics diffraction gratings are used for this purpose. In the hard x-ray regime, achieving large dispersion rates is a challenge. Here we show that multi-crystal, multi-Bragg-reflection arrangements feature cumulative angular dispersion rates almost two orders of magnitude larger than those attainable with a single Bragg reflection. As a result, the multi-crystal arrangements become potential dispersing elements of hard x-ray spectrographs. The hard x-ray spectrograph principles are demonstrated by imaging a spectrum of photons with a record high resolution of $\\Delta E \\simeq 90 \\mu$eV in hard x-ray regime, using multi-crystal optics as dispersing element. The spectrographs can boost research using inelastic ultra-high-resolution x-ray spectroscopi...

  8. Picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Ng, A; Shlyaptsev, V; Dunn, J; Hunter, J; Keenan, R; Marconi, M; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Smith, R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a soft x-ray laser interferometry technique that allows two-dimensional diagnosis of plasma electron density with picosecond time resolution. It consists of the combination of a robust high throughput amplitude division interferometer and a 14.7 nm transient inversion soft x-ray laser that produces {approx} 5 ps pulses. Due to its picosecond resolution and short wavelength scalability, this technique has potential for extending the high inherent precision of soft x-ray laser interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas of significant fundamental and practical interest, such as those investigated for inertial confined fusion. Results of its use in the diagnostics of dense large scale laser-created plasmas are presented.

  9. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  10. Elastic properties of type-I clathrate K8Zn4Sn42 determined by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, Bogdan M.; Sturza, Mihai; Hong, Jiawang; Alatas, Ahmet; Baran, Volodymyr; Fassler, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    We measured the phonon dispersion at ambient conditions in single-crystal type-I clathrate K8Zn4Sn42, a material with promising thermoelectric properties that has only recently been synthesized, using the high-energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) technique. From the sound velocities along high-symmetry directions, we extracted the elastic constants (C 11, C 12, C 44 = 63.2, 19.1, 21.9 GPa, respectively). Experimental results agree with the predictions from first-principles calculations on the hypothetical, "guest-free", type-I clathrate Sn46. The size of the crystal investigated was several orders of magnitude smaller than what is required for neutron and ultrasonic measurements. Due to this essential property, together with the high-energy resolution, high-momentum-transfer resolution, and the access to the strongest Bragg reflections, IXS is the technique of choice for measuring the full elastic constant tensor for microcrystals.

  11. Inelastic x-ray scattering studies on dynamic structure factor of polymeric liquid Se under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ohara, Koji; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Baron, Alfred Q. [RIKEN HARIMA BRANCH, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    Inelastic X-ray scattering measurements at 25 MPa using synchrotron radiation were carried out for semiconducting liquid Se at high temperatures up to 1673 K. The excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses approximately 10-50 % faster than the ultrasonic sound velocity in the observed temperature range while the ultrasonic sound rapidly slows down with increasing temperature. We carried out X-ray scattering measurements and found that the average coordination number at 1673 K is 1.3, indicating that the high temperature liquid consists of short chain molecules. These results suggest that weakening of the interatomic interaction is correlated with breaking of polymeric chain molecules.

  12. Optimum Resolution in X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Niimura, N.; Staun Olsen, J.

    1978-01-01

    The resolution problem in X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry is discussed. It is shown that for a given characteristic of the solid-state detector system and a given range of interplanar spacings, an optimum scattering angle can be easily found for any divergence of the incident and scattered...

  13. Inelastic X-ray scattering measurement of electronic order in Bi2212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnoit, Craig; Gardner, Dillong; Said, Ayman; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Lee, Young

    2013-03-01

    We present inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on superconducting Bi2212, showing evidence for a phonon anomaly associated with an underlying electronic density-wave state. We observe an broadening of the longitudinal acoustic phonon at a wavevector comparable to the antinodal nesting wavevector, near (1/4,1/4,0) in orthorhombic notation. An observed asymmetry between phonon creation and annihilation processes indicates breaking of time reversal and inversion symmetry as temperature is lowered. These measurements are consistent with prior work on single layer Bi2201, indicating universality of these features in the family of Bi-based high-Tc materials.

  14. Novel rhenium gasket design for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Elizabeth A; Giefers, Hubertus; Nicol, Malcolm F

    2008-02-01

    For the first time, a highly absorbing element, rhenium, has been proven to be a strong, reliable, and safe gasket material for achieving high pressure in nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) experiments. Rhenium foil was cut into rectangular slices and in order to reduce absorption, the elevated imprint due to preindenting of the gasket is removed using electrical discharge machining. By utilizing this novel gasket design, transmission losses were mitigated while performing NRIXS experiments conducted on the 119Sn and 57Fe Mössbauer isotopes.

  15. Inferring the electron temperature and density of shocked liquid deuterium using inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, S P; Radha, P B; Boehly, T R; Goncharov, V N; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Smalyuk, V A [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623-1299 (United States); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Falk, K; Gregori, G, E-mail: sreg@lle.rochester.ed [Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    An experiment designed to launch laser-ablation-driven shock waves (10 to 70 Mbar) in a planar liquid-deuterium target on the OMEGA Laser System and to diagnose the shocked conditions using inelastic x-ray scattering is described. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) is inferred from the Doppler-broadened Compton-downshifted peak of the noncollective ({alpha}{sub s} = 1k{lambda}{sub D} > 1) x-ray scattering for T{sub e} > T{sub Fermi}. The electron density (n{sub e}) is inferred from the downshifted plasmon peak of the collective ({alpha}{sub scatter} > 1) x-ray scattering. A cylindrical layer of liquid deuterium is formed in a cryogenic cell with 8-{mu}m-thick polyimide windows. The polyimide ablator is irradiated with peak intensities in the range of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and shock waves are launched. Predictions from a 1-D hydrodynamics code show the shocked deuterium has a thickness of {approx}0.1 mm with spatially uniform conditions. For the drive intensities under consideration, electron density up to {approx}5 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature in the range of 10 to 25 eV are predicted. A laser-irradiated saran foil produces Cl Ly{sub {alpha}e}mission. The spectrally resolved x-ray scattering is recorded at 90{sup 0} for the noncollective scattering and at 40{sup 0} for the collective scattering with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystal spectrometer and an x-ray framing camera.

  16. An X-Ray Tomographic Microscope with Submicron Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampanoni, M.; Borchert, G. L.; Abela, R.; Patterson, B.; Vermeulen, D.; Rueegsegger, P.; Wyss, P.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) is a powerful non-destructive investigation method, that has been applied in many fields of modern research (material science, microelectronics, medicine, biology, archaeology). Sofar the major limitations were imposed by low detection efficiency and low spatial resolution. With the advent of third generation synchrotron facilities excellent high intensity X-ray sources became available that by far counterbalanced low efficiency. On the other hand the resolution of presently used detector systems is restricted by scintillator properties, optical light transfer, and CCD granularity. They impose a practical limit of about one micrometer, while the progressing research demands urgently an advance in the submicron region. A break-through in this respect is being achieved by a novel detector type. It uses the properties of asymmetric Bragg reflection to increase the cross section of the reflected X-ray beam. A suitable combination of correspondingly cut Bragg crystals yields an image magnification that even at higher energies may surpass a factor of 1000. In this way the influence of the detector resolution can be scaled down accordingly. Such a device is being constructed and installed at the SLS which delivers an optimal X-ray beam of about 23 keV. The special properties of this experiment will be presented.

  17. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and ...

  18. High-resolution x-ray analysis with multilayer gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnard, Philippe; André, Jean-Michel; 10.1002/xrs.1128

    2013-01-01

    Periodic multilayers are nowadays widely used to perform x-ray analysis in the soft x-ray range (photon energy lower than 1 keV). However, they do not permit to obtain high-resolution spectra like natural or synthetic crystals. Thus, multilayers cannot resolve interferences between close x-ray lines. It has been shown and demonstrated experimentally that patterning a grating profile within a multilayer structure leads to a diffractive optics with improved resolving power. We illustrate the use of a Mo/B4C multilayer grating in the Fe L and C K spectral ranges, around 700 eV and 280 eV respectively. First, in the Fe L range, the improved spectral resolution enables us to distinguish the Fe L\\alpha and L\\beta emissions (separated by 13 eV). In addition, using a sample made of a mix of LiF and an iron ore, we show that it is possible to easily resolve the F K and Fe L emissions. These examples demonstrate that an improved x-ray analysis can be obtained with multilayer gratings when there is the need to study sam...

  19. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  20. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  1. High spectral and spatial resolution X-ray transmission radiography and tomography using a Color X-ray Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Matthieu N., E-mail: matthieu.boone@ugent.be [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281/S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Scharf, Oliver [IfG-Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Cormode, David P. [University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Radiology, Cardiology and Bioengineering, O3400 Spruce St, 1 Silverstein, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Van Loo, Denis; Pauwels, Elin; Dierick, Manuel [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vincze, Laszlo [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281/S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-01-21

    High resolution X-ray radiography and computed tomography are excellent techniques for non-destructive characterization of an object under investigation at a spatial resolution in the micrometer range. However, as the image contrast depends on both chemical composition and material density, no chemical information is obtained from this data. Furthermore, lab-based measurements are affected by the polychromatic X-ray beam, which results in beam hardening effects. New types of X-ray detectors which provide spectral information on the measured X-ray beam can help to overcome these limitations. In this paper, an energy dispersive CCD detector with high spectral resolution is characterized for use in high resolution radiography and tomography, where a focus is put on the experimental conditions and requirements of both measurement techniques.

  2. High resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fei; WANG Huan-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; LIANG Xiao-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; CAO Xue-Lei; JIANG Wei-Chun; ZHANG Jia-Yu; CUI Xing-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer (SOX) payload onboard a satellite is developed.A silicon drift detector (SDD) is adopted as the detector of the SOX spectrometer.The spectrometer consists of the detectors and their readout electronics,a data acquisition unit and a payload data handling unit.A ground test system is also developed to test SOX.The test results show that the design goals of the spectrometer system have been achieved.

  3. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braicovich, L., E-mail: lucio.braicovich@polimi.it; Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G. [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, Milano I-20133 (Italy); Le Tacon, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38043 (France); Supruangnet, R. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  4. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Braicovich, L; Dellea, G; Tacon, M Le; Sala, M Moretti; Morawe, C; Peffen, J-Ch; Supruangnet, R; Yakhou, F; Ghiringhelli, G; Brookes, N B

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B4C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF; it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L3 edge on a high-Tc superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the ...

  5. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  6. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  7. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is often the preferred choice for X-ray microanalysis, but there are still many disadvantages associated with EDS, the most significant of which is the relatively poor energy resolution, which limits detection sensitivity and the ability to distinguish among closely spaced spectral features, limiting even qualitative analysis. A new type of EDS detector that operates on the principle of microcalorimetry has the potential to eliminate this shortcoming, reaching resolutions an order of magnitude better. The detector consists of an absorber in thermal contact with a transition edge sensor (TES). An X-ray from the specimen hits the absorber and manifests itself as a change in temperature. Because the system is kept at 80 mK, the heat capacity is low and the temperature spike is observable. The TES responds to the increase in temperature by transitioning from its superconducting to its normal conducting state, thus sharply raising the overall resistance of the circuit. The circuit is kept at a constant voltage, so the increase in resistance is manifested as a decrease in current flow. This decrease in current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and by integrating the current over time, the energy of the incident X-ray is determined. The prototype microcalorimeter was developed by NIST, and this technology is now available commercially through a partnership between Vericold Technologies and EDAX International. ORNL has received the first of these commercial microcalorimeters in the United States. The absorber in this detector is gold, and the TES consists of a gold-iridium bilayer. It is designed to offer spectral resolution of 10-15 eV at a count rate of ~150 s-1. The goal of this project was to analyze and document the performance of the detector, with particular attention given to the effects of an X-ray optic used to improve collection efficiency, the multiple window system and any other sources

  8. Inelastic X-ray scattering on liquid benzene analyzed using a generalized Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Fukuyama, Nami; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Hosokawa, Shinya; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-07-01

    The dynamic structure factor, S(Q,ω), of liquid benzene was measured by meV-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and analyzed using a generalized Langevin model with a memory function including fast, μ-relaxation and slow, structural, α-relaxation. The model well reproduced the experimental S(Q,ω) of liquid benzene. The dispersion relation of the collective excitation energy yields the high-frequency sound velocity for liquid benzene as related to the α-relaxation. The ratio of the high-frequency to the adiabatic sound velocity is approximately 1.5, larger to that of carbon tetrachloride and smaller than those of methanol and water, reflecting the nature of intermolecular interactions.

  9. SPEC application for achieving inelastic X-ray scattering experiment in the SSRF

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Xuying; Liang, Dongxu; Yan, Shuai; Mao, Chengwen; Li, Aiguo; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In order to carry out inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiment at BL15U1 beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), the data acquisition and control system based on SPEC software has been developed. The IXS experimental method needs linkage control of monochromator, silicon drift detector (SDD) and ionization chamber on continuous segment-scan mode with variable step size, and gains the data of energy, spectrum and light intensity synchronously. A method is presented for achieving this function which was not realized only by using SSCAN of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). This paper shows work details including control system description, SPEC configurations for EPICS devices, macro definitions and applications in the BL15U1. An IXS experiment was executed by using the SPEC control system, its results prove that the method is feasible to perform the experiment.

  10. Some notes on data analysis for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Michael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) is a spectroscopy method to study atomic vibrations and dynamics, currently done with synchrotron radiation at a few high energy third generation facilities. It finds a wide range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biophysics, geosciences, and high-pressure researches. Many atomic dynamics and lattice thermodynamics information can be derived from NRIXS measurements. Phonon Density of States (DOS) characterizes lattice dynamics of a material and can be derived under the quasi-harmonic approximation. Combined with modeling and simulations, results from NRIXS can provide unique and clarifying insights into many fields of research. As for a spectroscopic technique, in order to be able to provide reliable information, close attention should be paid to many issues during experiments and data analysis afterwards. Here we discuss several issues relevant to its data analysis, namely, those of multiple sites, background treatments, and error estimates for some derived quantities.

  11. Some notes on data analysis for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Michael Y., E-mail: myhu@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) is a spectroscopy method to study atomic vibrations and dynamics, currently done with synchrotron radiation at a few high energy third generation facilities. It finds a wide range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biophysics, geosciences, and high-pressure researches. Many atomic dynamics and lattice thermodynamics information can be derived from NRIXS measurements. Phonon Density of States (DOS) characterizes lattice dynamics of a material and can be derived under the quasi-harmonic approximation. Combined with modeling and simulations, results from NRIXS can provide unique and clarifying insights into many fields of research. As for a spectroscopic technique, in order to be able to provide reliable information, close attention should be paid to many issues during experiments and data analysis afterwards. Here we discuss several issues relevant to its data analysis, namely, those of multiple sites, background treatments, and error estimates for some derived quantities.

  12. First results of the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering station at the ADRESS beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir; Schlappa, Justina; Patthey, Luc [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ghiringhelli, Giacomo; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Dallera, Claudia; Braicovich, Lucio [Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Wang, Xiaoqiang; Grioni, Marco [EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful bulk-sensitive probe of the electronic structure of condensed matter with atomic and orbital sensitivity. It is an unique tool for determining the energy and symmetry of charge neutral electronic excitations (e.g. crystal field or spin-flip excitations) in strongly correlated materials. The ADvanced RESonant Spectroscopies (ADRESS) beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) features advanced instrumentation for RIXS. This year it will be complemented by instrumentation for Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The RIXS station is equipped with a spectrometer (resolving power {approx}12000 for 1 keV) so-called SAXES (Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrograph) based on a variable line spacing spherical grating. The RIXS station is open since spring 2007 and was undergoing the operation tests during the 2nd half of 2007. We report on first results obtained with RIXS on transition metal monoxides (NiO, MnO and CuO) as reference compounds. These results demonstrate the capability of this set-up for RIXS studies on strongly correlated materials with unprecedented ultra-high resolution.

  13. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  14. Quantitative spectromicroscopy from inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renault, O., E-mail: olivier.renault@cea.fr; Zborowski, C.; Risterucci, P. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Wiemann, C.; Schneider, C. M. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Grenet, G. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Ecole Centrale, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Tougaard, S. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2016-07-04

    We demonstrate quantitative, highly bulk-sensitive x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy by analysis of inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range, enabling elemental depth distribution analysis in deeply buried layers. We show results on patterned structures used in electrical testing of high electron mobility power transistor devices with an epitaxial Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N channel and a Ti/Al metal contact. From the image series taken over an energy range of up to 120 eV in the Ti 1s loss feature region and over a typical 100 μm field of view, one can accurately retrieve, using background analysis together with an optimized scattering cross-section, the Ti depth distribution from 14 nm up to 25 nm below the surface. The method paves the way to multi-elemental, bulk-sensitive 3D imaging and investigation of phenomena at deeply buried interfaces and microscopic scales by photoemission.

  15. Quantitative spectromicroscopy from inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Risterucci, P.; Wiemann, C.; Grenet, G.; Schneider, C. M.; Tougaard, S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantitative, highly bulk-sensitive x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy by analysis of inelastically scattered photoelectrons in the hard X-ray range, enabling elemental depth distribution analysis in deeply buried layers. We show results on patterned structures used in electrical testing of high electron mobility power transistor devices with an epitaxial Al0.25Ga0.75N channel and a Ti/Al metal contact. From the image series taken over an energy range of up to 120 eV in the Ti 1s loss feature region and over a typical 100 μm field of view, one can accurately retrieve, using background analysis together with an optimized scattering cross-section, the Ti depth distribution from 14 nm up to 25 nm below the surface. The method paves the way to multi-elemental, bulk-sensitive 3D imaging and investigation of phenomena at deeply buried interfaces and microscopic scales by photoemission.

  16. Distorted Tetrahedral CoII in K5H[CoW12O40]·xH2O Probed by 2p3d Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, LIU BY; Wang, Ru Pan; Glass, Elliot N.; Hill, Craig L.; Cuk, Tanja; Okamoto, Jun; Huang, Di Jing; Van Schooneveld, Matti M.; De Groot, Frank M F

    2016-01-01

    The Co 2p3/2 X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy-resolution (∼0.09 eV fwhm) 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the single-cobalt-centered polyoxometalate K5H[CoW12O40]·xH2O were measured. The low-energy dd transition features at 0.55 eV, unmeasurable with

  17. Characterization of ceramic archaeological by high resolution X ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.; Freitas, Renato; Calza, Cristiane F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Lima, Inaya, E-mail: alecastro@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Carvalho, Daniele D.; Gaspar, Maria D. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of ceramic fragments is a very important area of research in art and archeometry area because it enables a greater understanding of how ancient civilizations behave and what were their traditions and customs. Petrography and chemical analyses are commonly used, but these techniques are destructive, which is not interesting for this type of sample. Through the exchange of multidisciplinary scientific knowledge and new partnerships, high resolution X-ray microtomography has been introduced in archaeological area as a great possibility of 3D inspection in a non-destructive way. The goal of this work is to investigate the internal microstructures of four samples of archeological ceramic, from the Archaeological Site of Macacu - RJ. The X-ray microtomography were performed in a high resolution setup, and can be used to infer the nature of organic temper even with all plant remains completely burnt out during the firing process and also to ensure the homogeneity of samples envisaged for geochemical analyses, especially with respect to the distribution of chemically diverse fabric compounds. In this way this study intends to contribute to our understanding of the archaeological and historical formations of this region. (author)

  18. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... used regular scintillators with similar resolution an efficiency increase by a factor 4 has been found for the structured scintillator....

  19. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  20. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  1. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  2. Dynamics of confined water reconstructed from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of bulk response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coridan, Robert H.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Lai, Ghee Hwee; Abbamonte, Peter; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoconfined water and surface-structured water impacts a broad range of fields. For water confined between hydrophilic surfaces, measurements and simulations have shown conflicting results ranging from “liquidlike” to “solidlike” behavior, from bulklike water viscosity to viscosity orders of magnitude higher. Here, we investigate how a homogeneous fluid behaves under nanoconfinement using its bulk response function: The Green's function of water extracted from a library of S(q,ω) inelastic x-ray scattering data is used to make femtosecond movies of nanoconfined water. Between two confining surfaces, the structure undergoes drastic changes as a function of surface separation. For surface separations of ≈9 Å, although the surface-associated hydration layers are highly deformed, they are separated by a layer of bulklike water. For separations of ≈6 Å, the two surface-associated hydration layers are forced to reconstruct into a single layer that modulates between localized “frozen’ and delocalized “melted” structures due to interference of density fields. These results potentially reconcile recent conflicting experiments. Importantly, we find a different delocalized wetting regime for nanoconfined water between surfaces with high spatial frequency charge densities, where water is organized into delocalized hydration layers instead of localized hydration shells, and are strongly resistant to `freezing' down to molecular distances (<6 Å).

  3. Theoretical approach to direct resonant inelastic X-ray scattering on magnets and superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, Pasquale

    2015-10-26

    The capability to probe the dispersion of elementary spin, charge, orbital, and lattice excitations has positioned resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the forefront of photon science. In this work, we will investigate how RIXS can contribute to a deeper understanding of the orbital properties and of the pairing mechanism in unconventional high-temperature superconductors. In particular, we show how direct RIXS spectra of magnetic excitations can reveal long-range orbital correlations in transition metal compounds, by discriminating different kind of orbital order in magnetic and antiferromagnetic systems. Moreover, we show how RIXS spectra of quasiparticle excitations in superconductors can measure the superconducting gap magnitude, and reveal the presence of nodal points and phase differences of the superconducting order parameter on the Fermi surface. This can reveal the properties of the underlying pairing mechanism in unconventional superconductors, in particular cuprates and iron pnictides, discriminating between different superconducting order parameter symmetries, such as s,d (singlet pairing) and p wave (triplet pairing).

  4. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr2IrO4 using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbăian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr2IrO4, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolution in the hard x-ray region is usually poor.

  5. Stationary and dispersive features in resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering at the Ge 3p resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, C.J. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Schmitt, T. [SLS, Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI West, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mattesini, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra, Astronomia y Astrofisica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Adell, M.; Ilver, L.; Kanski, J. [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Kjeldgaard, L. [MAX-lab, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Agaker, M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Martensson, N. [MAX-lab, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Ahuja, R.; Nordgren, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Rubensson, J.-E. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: jan-erik.rubensson@fysik.uu.se

    2009-07-15

    Resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering at the 3p resonances in crystalline Ge is presented. Both stationary and dispersive features are observed in a wide energy range above as well as below the ionization limits. These observations are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on a two-step model where the initially excited electron has no influence on the emission step. Excess population of states in the conduction band is found, and discussed in terms of attosecond electron dynamics.

  6. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G., E-mail: gheorghe.chiuzbaian@upmc.fr; Hague, Coryn F.; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Mariot, Jean-Michel [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Jaouen, Nicolas; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Maurizio [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-04-15

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 − 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm{sup 2} focal spot source with full polarization control.

  7. Active X-ray Optics for Generation-X, the Next High Resolution X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Elvis, M; Fabbiano, G; Schwartz, D A; Reid, P; Podgorski, W; Eisenhower, M; Juda, M; Phillips, J; Cohen, L; Wolk, S; Elvis, Martin

    2006-01-01

    X-rays provide one of the few bands through which we can study the epoch of reionization, when the first galaxies, black holes and stars were born. To reach the sensitivity required to image these first discrete objects in the universe needs a major advance in X-ray optics. Generation-X (Gen-X) is currently the only X-ray astronomy mission concept that addresses this goal. Gen-X aims to improve substantially on the Chandra angular resolution and to do so with substantially larger effective area. These two goals can only be met if a mirror technology can be developed that yields high angular resolution at much lower mass/unit area than the Chandra optics, matching that of Constellation-X (Con-X). We describe an approach to this goal based on active X-ray optics that correct the mid-frequency departures from an ideal Wolter optic on-orbit. We concentrate on the problems of sensing figure errors, calculating the corrections required, and applying those corrections. The time needed to make this in-flight calibrat...

  8. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  9. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soman, M.R., E-mail: m.r.soman@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hall, D.J.; Tutt, J.H.; Murray, N.J.; Holland, A.D. [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-11

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 µm from the current 24 µm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV–1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 µm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  10. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  11. Novel detector design for reducing intercell x-ray cross-talk in the variable resolution x-ray CT scanner : A Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arabi, Hosein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The variable resolution x-ray (VRX) CT scanner provides substantial improvement in the spatial resolution by matching the scanner's field of view (FOV) to the size of the object being imaged. Intercell x-ray cross-talk is one of the most important factors limiting the spatial resolution of

  12. High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy: An advanced tool for actinide research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, T; Brendebach, B; Dardenne, K; Denecke, M A; Lebid, A; Loeble, M; Rothe, J; Batuk, O N; Geckeis, H [Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), PO Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hormes, J; Liu, D [Physikalisches Institut, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Breher, F, E-mail: tonya.vitova@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Engesserstr. 15, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy (HRXES) is becoming increasingly important for our understanding of electronic and coordination structures. The combination of such information with development of quantum theoretical tools will advance our capability for predicting reactivity and physical behavior especially of 5f elements. HRXES can be used to remove lifetime broadening by registering the partial fluorescence yield emitted by the sample (i.e., recording a windowed signal from the energy dispersed fluorescence emission while varying incident photon energy), thereby yielding highly resolved X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Such spectra often display resonant features not observed in conventional XAFS. The spectrometer set-up can also be used for a wide range of other experiments, for example, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), where bulk electron configuration information in solids, liquids and gases is obtained. Valence-selective XAFS studies, where the local structure of a selected element's valence state present in a mixture of valence states can be obtained, as well as site-selective XAFS studies, where the coordination structure of a metal bound to selected elements can be differentiated from that of all the other ligating atoms. A HRXES spectrometer has been constructed and is presently being commissioned for use at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA at FZK. We present the spectrometer's compact, modular design, optimized for attaining a wide range of energies, and first test measurement results. Examples from HRXES studies of lanthanides, actinides counter parts, are also shown.

  13. Development toward high-resolution X-ray phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the use of X-ray phase contrast has been extensively studied for imaging weakly absorbing objects consisting of low-Z elements such as biological soft tissues and polymers. The development of X-ray microscopy was also progressing during this time, although absorption contrast was only available. It was straightforward and important to develop phase-contrast X-ray microscopy. One characteristic in the development is that quantitative phase measurement is possible through the acquisition of phase-contrast images under a specific procedure, thanks to digital X-ray image detectors. Therefore, such a technique is called 'phase imaging' rather than phase-contrast imaging in this review. Highly sensitive three-dimensional phase imaging is feasible in combination with tomography. This article reviews the progress in X-ray phase imaging, especially with regards to X-ray microscopy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. High-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of an undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning components of the accelerator, undulator, and beam line in an x-ray free-electron laser. Two retractable pinholes at each end of the undulator define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA. Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy (1–3   μm for target pinholes in the transverse directions over a long distance (200 m or longer. It can be used to define the beam axis of the electron-beam–based alignment, enabling high reproducibility of the latter. This x-ray–based concept should complement the electron-beam–based alignment and the existing survey methods to raise the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvement of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates will be discussed. We also propose a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation to allow real-time feedback for transverse position correction.

  15. Next Generation X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William

    2014-08-01

    Every conceivable future x-ray astronomical mission would require x-ray optics. These optics must meet the three-fold requirements of angular resolution, effective area, and cost.In this poster we will present the rationale, technical approach, and status of an x-ray optics technology development program that has been underway at Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  17. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  18. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  19. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; O'Dell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  20. The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) aboard the International X-ray Observatory (IXO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Didier; Ravera, Laurent; Bodin, Pierre; Amoros, Carine; Boutelier, Martin; Glorian, Jean-Michel; Godet, Olivier; Orttner, Guillaume; Lacombe, Karine; Pons, Roger; Rambaud, Damien; Ramon, Pascale; Ramchoun, Souad; Biffi, Jean-Marc; Belasic, Marielle; Clédassou, Rodolphe; Faye, Delphine; Pouilloux, Benjamin; Motch, Christian; Michel, Laurent; Lechner, Peter H.; Niculae, Adrian; Strueder, Lothar W.; Distratis, Giuseppe; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Santangelo, Andréa; Tenzer, Christoph; Wende, Henning; Wilms, Joern; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Schmid, Christian; Paltani, Stéphane; Cadoux, Franck; Fiorini, Carlo; Bombelli, Luca; Méndez, Mariano; Mereghetti, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) is one of the five focal plane instruments of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). The HTRS is the only instrument matching the top level mission requirement of handling a one Crab X-ray source with an efficiency greater than 10%. It will provide IX

  1. Miscibility gap and phonon thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys studied by inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Jorge A. [Intel Corporation, Information Technology Research, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Fultz, Brent [California Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Recent measurements of the phonon spectra of several Au-rich alloys of face-centered-cubic Fe-Au using inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering are summarized. The Wills-Harrison model, accounting for charge transfer upon alloying, is used to explain the observed negative excess vibrational entropy of mixing, which increases the miscibility gap temperature in the system by an estimated maximum of 550 K and we adjudicate to a charge transfer from the Fe to the Au atoms that results in an increase in the electron density in the free-electron-like states and in stronger sd-hybridization. When Au is the solvent, this softens the Fe–Fe bonds but stiffens the Au–Au and Au–Fe bonds which results in a net stiffening relative to the elemental components.

  2. Simulation studies of atomic resolution X-ray holography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesh Kashyap; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha; B K Godwal

    2004-02-01

    X-ray holography is a new method of structure determination based on measurement of interference of a known reference wave with an unknown object wave (containing information on atomic sites scattering the reference wave) so that phase information is preserved. Unlike X-ray diffraction, it does not demand for translational periodicity in the material. It is based on the idea similar to that of optical holography and has been tested on crystals, quasicrystals, thin films and doped semiconductors for their structure determination. In order to analyse potentials and limitations of this technique, we have carried out theoretical simulation studies on simple structures. In this paper we describe the basic algorithm of hologram generation and reconstruction of atomic positions from generated data. We illustrate this technique using Fe (bcc) single crystal as sample case to demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Simulations were carried out on the Cu (fcc) structure and on complex structure such as the Al–Pd–Mn quasicrystal. Technical issues such as low signal to noise ratio, twin image problem etc have been discussed briefly to emphasize the need for high intensity X-ray source such as synchrotron for experiments and proper reconstruction algorithm. Finally the scope and potential of this technique have been discussed.

  3. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-01

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one's ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  4. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereaux, T.P.; Shvaika, A.M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C.J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-25

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one’s ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  5. A compact permanent-magnet system for measuring magnetic circular dichroism in resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Jun; Suga, Shigemasa; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Niwa, Hideharu; Kiuchi, Hisao; Harada, Yoshihisa

    2017-03-01

    A compact and portable magnet system for measuring magnetic dichroism in resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (SX-RIXS) has been developed at the beamline BL07LSU in SPring-8. A magnetic circuit composed of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, which realised ∼0.25 T at the center of an 11 mm gap, was rotatable around the axis perpendicular to the X-ray scattering plane. Using the system, a SX-RIXS spectrum was obtained under the application of the magnetic field at an angle parallel, nearly 45° or perpendicular to the incident X-rays. A dedicated sample stage was also designed to be as compact as possible, making it possible to perform SX-RIXS measurements at arbitrary incident angles by rotating the sample stage in the gap between the magnetic poles. This system enables facile studies of magnetic dichroism in SX-RIXS for various experimental geometries of the sample and the magnetic field. A brief demonstration of the application is presented.

  6. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  7. A High-Resolution X-Ray Image of the Jet in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H. L.; Miller, B. P.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray image of the jet in M87 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level, but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core, and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A, are consistent with a simple power law (Sν~ν-α) with α=1.46+/-0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow, and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small-scale jet. The spectral energy distributions of the knots are well fitted by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however, are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch-angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  8. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. P.; Marshall, H. L.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small scale jet. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the knots are well fit by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  9. Improving the Resolution of X-Ray Telescopes with Occulting Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Copi, C J; Copi, Craig J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges of X-ray astronomy is how to both collect large numbersof photons yet attain high angular resolution. Because X-ray telescopes utilizegrazing optics, to collect more photons requires a larger acceptance anglewhich in turn compromises the angular resolution. All X-ray telescopes thushave angular resolution far poorer than their diffraction limit. Althoughcollecting more photons is a desirable goal, sometimes selective collectingfewer photons may yield more information. Natural (such as lunar) occultationshave long been used to study sources on small angular scales. But naturalocculters are of limited utility because of their large angular velocitiesrelative to the telescope, and because of the serendipity of their transits. Wedescribe here how one can make use of an X-ray Big Occulting SteerableSatellite (X-BOSS) to achieve very-high resolution of X-ray sources. An X-BOSScould significantly improve the resolution of existing X-ray facilities such asthe Chandra telescope, or X-ray Multiple...

  10. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics - Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcalorimeter x-ray instruments are non-dispersive, high spectral resolution, broad-band, high cadence imaging spectrometers. We have been developing these...

  11. Fabrication of High Resolution Lightweight X-ray Mirrors Using Mono-crystalline Silicon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "Three factors characterize an X-ray optics fabrication technology: angular resolution, effective area per unit mass, and production cost per unit effective...

  12. Effect of Pressure on Valence and Structural Properties of YbFe2Ge2 Heavy Fermion Compound A Combined Inelastic X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Theoretical Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Svane, Axel; Vaitheeswaran; #8741; , Ganapathy; Kanchana, Venkatakrishnan; Antonio, Daniel; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Bauer, Eric D.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (Aarhus); (CIW); (Hyderabad - India); (IIT-India); (LANL); (UNLV)

    2016-06-03

    The crystal structure and the Yb valence of the YbFe2Ge2 heavy fermion compound was measured at room temperature and under high pressures using high-pressure powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy via both partial fluorescence yield and resonant inelastic X-ray emission techniques. Furthermore, the measurements are complemented by first-principles density functional theoretical calculations using the self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation investigating in particular the magnetic structure and the Yb valence. While the ThCr2Si2-type tetragonal (I4/mmm) structure is stable up to 53 GPa, the X-ray emission results show an increase of the Yb valence from v = 2.72(2) at ambient pressure to v = 2.93(3) at ~9 GPa, where at low temperature a pressure-induced quantum critical state was reported.

  13. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  14. Spatial Resolution and Detectability Limits in Thin-Film X-Ray Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Lyman, C. E.; Zhang, Jing

    1990-01-01

    The major advantages of performing x-ray microanalysis in the analytical electron microscope (AEM) are the high compositional spatial resolution and the elemental analysis sensitivity. Unfortunately, there is usually a trade-off between these two advantages. This paper discusses the factors involved in the optimization of both spatial resolution and sensitivity during x-ray microanalysis and shows the results of such optimization experiments for several AEM instruments.

  15. X-ray pinhole camera resolution and emittance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Third generation synchrotron light sources are characterized by a low emittance and a low emittance coupling. Some light sources are already operating with extremely low coupling close to 0.1%. Measurement of the transverse beam size is generally used to measure the emittance and the coupling. To this end, several systems are currently used and an x-ray pinhole camera is one of them. In this paper we derive the point spread function of the x-ray pinhole camera both analytically and numerically using the Fresnel diffraction integral and taking into account the broadband spectrum of the bending magnet source, and we show that an optimized design allows the measurement of extremely small vertical beam sizes below 5  μm. The point spread function of several scintillator screens is also measured, and it shows that the contribution of the diffraction and the screen point spread functions have to be taken into account for an accurate measurement of a low coupling. Finally, we show measurements of the vertical beam sizes as small as 6  μm for our nonoptimized setup.

  16. Inelastic X-ray scattering of a transition-metal complex (FeCl4(-)): vibrational spectroscopy for all normal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weibing; Wang, Hongxin; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Fettinger, James C; Nix, Jay; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q R; Dowty, Eric; Cramer, Stephen P

    2013-06-17

    The tetraethylammonium salt of the transition-metal complex FeCl4(-) has been examined using inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) with 1.5 meV resolution (12 cm(-1)) at 21.747 keV. This sample serves as a feasibility test for more elaborate transition-metal complexes. The IXS spectra were compared with previously recorded IR, Raman, and nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) spectra, revealing the same normal modes but with less strict selection rules. Calculations with a previously derived Urey-Bradley force field were used to simulate the expected Q and orientation dependence of the IXS intensities. The relative merits of IXS, compared to other photon-based vibrational spectroscopies such as NRVS, Raman, and IR, are discussed.

  17. Phonon Softening in PrFeAsO1-y (y˜0.2) by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Alfred Q. R.; Fukuda, Tatsuo; Shamoto, Shin-Ichi; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Mizuki, Jun-Ichiro; Nakamura, Hiroki; Machida, Masahiko; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Arai, Masatoshi; Kito, Hijiri; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    We present phonon dispersion measurements from single crystals of PrFeAsO1-y with Tc (onset) of 42 to 45 K made using inelastic x-ray scattering with 1.5 meV resolution at BL35XU of SPring-8. In agreement with our previous results on powders and crystals [1] we see pronounced softening of the in-plane Fe-As modes compared to phonon calculations using pseudopotential methods in the tetragonal (non-magnetic) structure. C-axis modes are somewhat harder. No strong changes in phonon spectra across Tc were observed at the momentum transfers investigated. We also compare our results against calculations of phonons in the magnetic parent material. [1] Fukuda, et al, J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 77 (2008), 103715.

  18. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X-ray

  19. High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Williams, P M; Pollock, A M T; Skinner, S L; Corcoran, M F; Moffat, A F J

    2002-01-01

    We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind mom...

  20. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  1. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  2. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  3. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  4. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, MacCallum J. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Agostino, Christopher J. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Gong [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Im, Mi-Young [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Emerging Materials Science, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Fischer, Peter, E-mail: PJFischer@lbl.gov [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  5. Persistence of Covalent Bonding in Liquid Silicon Probed by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, J. T.; Sit, P. H.-L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wang, Y. J.; Barbiellini, B.; Ishikawa, T.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Bansil, A.; Ishikawa, R.; Hamaishi, M.; Masaki, T.; Paradis, P.-F.; Kimura, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Nanao, S.

    2012-02-01

    Metallic liquid silicon at 1787 K is investigated using x-ray Compton scattering. An excellent agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show persistence of covalent bonding in liquid silicon and provide support for the occurrence of theoretically predicted liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid states. The population of covalent bond pairs in liquid silicon is estimated to be 17% via a maximally localized Wannier function analysis. Compton scattering is shown to be a sensitive probe of bonding effects in the liquid state.

  6. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  7. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Investigations of Lattice Dynamics in SmFeAsO1-xFy Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J.P.; Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T.R.; Ruegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Noffsinger, J.; Walters, A.C.; Toulemonde, P.; Palenzona, A.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Karpinski, J.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2010-05-23

    We report measurements of the phonon density of states as measured with inelastic x-ray scattering in SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} powders. An unexpected strong renormalization of phonon branches around 23 meV is observed as fluorine is substituted for oxygen. Phonon dispersion measurements on SmFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub y} single crystals allow us to identify the 21 meV A{sub 1g} in-phase (Sm,As) and the 26 meV B{sub 1g} (Fe,O) modes to be responsible for this renormalization, and may reaveal unusual electron-phonon coupling through the spin channel in iron-based superconductors.

  8. Quantifying covalent interactions with resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering: Case study of Ni2+ aqua complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Miedema, P. S.; Techert, S.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Föhlisch, A.; Odelius, M.; Wernet, Ph.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the effects of covalent interactions in Ni 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra from aqueous Ni2+ ions and find that the relative RIXS intensities of ligand-to-metal charge-transfer final states with respect to the ligand-field final states reflect the covalent mixing between Ni 3d and water orbitals. Specifically, the experimental intensity ratio at the Ni L3-edge allows to determine that the Ni 3d orbitals have on average 5.5% of water character. We propose that 2p3d RIXS at the Ni L3-edge can be utilized to quantify covalency in Ni complexes without the use of external references or simulations.

  9. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  10. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  11. Resolution enhancement in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging by overcoming instrumental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Sunam; Kang, Hyon Chol; Hwu, Yeukuang; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Liang, Keng San; Noh, Do Young

    2014-11-17

    We report that reference objects, strong scatterers neighboring weak phase objects, enhance the phase retrieval and spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI). A CDI experiment with Au nano-particles exhibited that the reference objects amplified the signal-to-noise ratio in the diffraction intensity at large diffraction angles, which significantly enhanced the image resolution. The interference between the diffracted x-ray from reference objects and a specimen also improved the retrieval of the phase of the diffraction signal. The enhancement was applied to image NiO nano-particles and a mitochondrion and confirmed in a simulation with a bacteria phantom. We expect that the proposed method will be of great help in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  12. Soft X-ray Holographic Microscopy with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shiping; GAO Hongyi; ZHANG Yuxuan; ZHANG Xinyi1CHEN Min; Jianwen; XU Zhizhan

    2001-01-01

    Gabor X-ray in-line holograms are recorded with a photoresist at Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to read the X-ray holograms of minute granules recorded on photoresist PMMA. Digitized hologram is reconstructed by numerical method. The granules with a size less than 0.3 μm can be resolved in the reconstructed image. So the eatimated resolution reaches the level of suibmicrometer.

  13. Compact pnCCD-based X-ray camera with high spatial and energy resolution: a color X-ray camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, O; Ihle, S; Ordavo, I; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A; Bjeoumikhova, S; Buzanich, G; Gubzhokov, R; Günther, A; Hartmann, R; Kühbacher, M; Lang, M; Langhoff, N; Liebel, A; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Thünemann, A F; Wedell, R

    2011-04-01

    For many applications there is a requirement for nondestructive analytical investigation of the elemental distribution in a sample. With the improvement of X-ray optics and spectroscopic X-ray imagers, full field X-ray fluorescence (FF-XRF) methods are feasible. A new device for high-resolution X-ray imaging, an energy and spatial resolving X-ray camera, is presented. The basic idea behind this so-called "color X-ray camera" (CXC) is to combine an energy dispersive array detector for X-rays, in this case a pnCCD, with polycapillary optics. Imaging is achieved using multiframe recording of the energy and the point of impact of single photons. The camera was tested using a laboratory 30 μm microfocus X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation from BESSY II at the BAMline facility. These experiments demonstrate the suitability of the camera for X-ray fluorescence analytics. The camera simultaneously records 69,696 spectra with an energy resolution of 152 eV for manganese K(α) with a spatial resolution of 50 μm over an imaging area of 12.7 × 12.7 mm(2). It is sensitive to photons in the energy region between 3 and 40 keV, limited by a 50 μm beryllium window, and the sensitive thickness of 450 μm of the chip. Online preview of the sample is possible as the software updates the sums of the counts for certain energy channel ranges during the measurement and displays 2-D false-color maps as well as spectra of selected regions. The complete data cube of 264 × 264 spectra is saved for further qualitative and quantitative processing.

  14. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy and high-density monitoring in X-rays of Novae

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, Jan-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The 21st century X-ray observatories XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift gave us completely new insights into the X-ray behaviour of nova outbursts. These new-generation X-ray observatories provide particularly high spectral resolution and high density in monitoring campaigns, simultaneously in X-rays and UV/optical. The entire evolution of several nova outbursts has been observed with the Swift XRT and UVOT instruments, allowing studies of the gradual shift of the peak of the SED from UV to X-rays, time scales to the onset and duration of the X-ray brightest supersoft source (SSS) phase, and pre- and post-SSS X-ray emission. In addition, XMM-Newton and Chandra observations can efficiently be scheduled, allowing deeper studies of strategically chosen evolutionary stages. Before Swift joined in 2005, Chandra and XMM-Newton blind shots in search of SSS emission unavoidably led to some underexposed observations taken before and/or after the SSS phase. More systematic Swift studies reduced this number while increasing...

  16. Improving the spatial resolution of soft X-ray detection using an Electron-Multiplying Charge-Coupled Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) is an instrument at the Swiss Light Source designed for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering with an energy resolution (E/ΔE) better than 12000 at 930 eV. Improvements to the instrument have been predicted that could allow the energy resolution to be improved by a factor of two. To achieve this, the spatial resolution of the detector (currently a Charge-Coupled Device, CCD) over which the energy spectrum is dispersed would have to be improved to better than 5 μm. X-ray photons with energies between a few hundred to a few thousand electron volts primarily interact within the field-free region of back-illuminated CCDs, where each photon forms an electron cloud that diffuses isotropically before reaching the depleted region close to the electrodes. Each photon's electron cloud is likely to be detected as an event with signal split across multiple pixels. Analysing these split events using centroiding techniques allows the photon's interaction position to be determined to a sub-pixel level. PolLux is a soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source that can focus 200 eV to 1200 eV X-rays to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Previous studies using data taken with a linear scan across the centre of a pixel in 3 μm steps predicted an improved resolution by applying centroiding techniques and using an Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD). In this study, a full 2D map of the centroiding accuracy in the pixel is presented, formed by rastering in two dimensions across the image plane in single micron steps. The improved spatial resolution from centroiding events in the EM-CCD in all areas of the pixel over the standard CCD is attributed to the improved signal to noise ratio provided by the multiplication register even at high pixel readout speeds (tens of MHz).

  17. Measurement of the dynamic response of compressed hydrogen by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Y Khattak, F.; Kleppe, A. K.; Riley, D.; Toleikis, S.; Wark, J.; Wilhelm, H.; Gregori, G.

    2010-08-01

    Measurement of the dynamic properties of hydrogen and helium under extreme pressures is a key to understanding the physics of planetary interiors. The inelastic scattering signal from statically compressed hydrogen inside diamond anvil cells at 2.8 GPa and 6.4 GPa was measured at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in the UK. The first direct measurement of the local field correction to the Coulomb interactions in degenerate plasmas was obtained from spectral shifts in the scattering data and compared to predictions by the Utsumi-Ichimaru theory for degenerate electron liquids.

  18. X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) show the presence of Cr{sup +} at the surface and in the bulk of CrF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Mier, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, 04510 México DF, México (Mexico); Olalde-Velasco, P. [The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Swiss Light Source. Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Yang, W.-L.; Denlinger, J. [The Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-07-23

    X-Ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of CrF{sub 2} recorded at the chromium L{sub 2,3} are presented. An atomic multiplet crystal field calculation is compared with the experimental data. Experiment and theory are in agreement once the calculation includes three chromium oxidation states, namely Cr{sup +}, Cr{sup 2+}, and Cr{sup 3+}. X-Ray absorption allows a direct determination of the surface oxidation, while the RIXS spectra shows the presence of these three oxidation states in the sample bulk. To give a quantitative interpretation of the RIXS data the effect of the incomming and outgoing photon penetration depth and self-absorption must be considered. For the much simpler case of MnF{sub 2}, with only one metal oxidation state, the measured RIXS spectra relative intensities are found to be proportional to the square of the sample attenuation length.

  19. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W. Jr. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rothman, S.S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  20. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  1. Radiation damage free two-color X-ray ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Chapman, Henry; Shih, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) can enable diffractive structural determination of protein crystals or single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional X-ray analysis. However the electronic form factor could have been modified during the ultrashort X-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense X-ray pulse. For general X-ray imaging techniques, to minimize radiation damage effect is of major concern to ensure faithful reconstruction of the structure. Here we show that a radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with an atomic spatial resolution, by using X-ray parametric down-conversion (PDC), and two-color biphoton ghost imaging. We illustrate that formation of the diffractive patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that could be as fine as the lattice length scale of several Angstrom. Because the samples are illuminated by the optical photons of low energy, they can be free of radiation damage...

  2. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  3. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennetiere D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  4. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  5. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  6. Diagnostic imaging of gout: comparison of high-resolution US versus conventional X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettenbacher, Thomas; Ennemoser, Sybille; Weirich, Harald [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ulmer, Hanno [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Hartig, Frank; Klotz, Werner; Herold, Manfred [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-03-15

    The aim was to compare X-ray and ultrasound (US) in diagnosing gout. In a prospective study, 105 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of gout underwent conventional X-ray und high-resolution US in order to help in arriving at a definite diagnosis. X-ray findings suggestive of gout included soft-tissue opacifications with densities between soft tissue and bone, articular and periarticular bone erosions, and osteophytes at the margins of opacifications or erosions. US findings suggestive of gout included bright stippled foci and hyperechoic soft-tissue areas. Fifty-five patients had a definite diagnosis of gout (102 involved sites), 31 patients were diagnosed as having another disease (59 involved sites), and 19 patients were excluded from the study because a definite diagnosis could not be established. X-ray suggested gout with a sensitivity of 31% (32/102) and a specificity of 93% (55/59), whereas US suggested gout with a sensitivity of 96% (98/102) and a specificity of 73% (43/59). US was much more sensitive than conventional X-ray but less specific. Our data show that US often provided additional diagnostic information in patients with clinical suspicion of gout when laboratory findings and X-ray results were negative or inconclusive and should therefore be used in these cases. (orig.)

  7. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  8. The Astro-H high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Azzarello, Phillipp; Bialas, Tom; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng P.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Haas, Daniel; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kimball, Mark O.; Kitamoto, Shunji; Konami, Saori; Koyama, Shu; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Moseley, Harvey; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Noda, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ota, Naomi; Paltani, Stéphane; Porter, F. S.; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Yohichi; Sawada, Makoto; Seta, Hiromi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; de Vries, Cor P.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2016-07-01

    We present the overall design and performance of the Astro-H (Hitomi) Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). The instrument uses a 36-pixel array of x-ray microcalorimeters at the focus of a grazing-incidence x-ray mirror Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) for high-resolution spectroscopy of celestial x-ray sources. The instrument was designed to achieve an energy resolution better than 7 eV over the 0.3-12 keV energy range and operate for more than 3 years in orbit. The actual energy resolution of the instrument is 4-5 eV as demonstrated during extensive ground testing prior to launch and in orbit. The measured mass flow rate of the liquid helium cryogen and initial fill level at launch predict a lifetime of more than 4 years assuming steady mechanical cooler performance. Cryogen-free operation was successfully demonstrated prior to launch. The successful operation of the SXS in orbit, including the first observations of the velocity structure of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, demonstrates the viability and power of this technology as a tool for astrophysics.

  9. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Akio, E-mail: akio.yoneyama.bu@hitachi.com; Baba, Rika [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [Institute of Materials Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry Showa University, Ota-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu [Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  10. Development of the super high angular resolution principle for X-ray imaging *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhang; Shuang-Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Development of the Super High Angular Resolution Principle (SHARP)for coded-mask X-ray imaging is presented. We prove that SHARP can be considered as a generalized coded mask imaging method with a coding pattern comprised of diffraction-interference fringes in the mask pattern. The angular resolution of SHARP can be improved by detecting the fringes more precisely than the mask's element size,i.e. by using a detector with a pixel size smaller than the mask's element size. The proposed mission SHARP-X for solar X-ray observations is also briefly discussed.

  11. Microcalorimetry for High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Magnetic Microcalorimeters (MMCs) are gamma-ray detectors with an energy resolution 10x higher than high-purity germanium detectors. They can increase the accuracy of non-destructive analysis of nuclear materials, enable the detection of new isotopes (e.g. Pu-242 of U-236), and improve nuclear data in cases where Ge detectors are limited by line overlap. MMCs consist of a magnetic sensor operated at temperatures below 50 mK, and they infer gamma-ray energies from the change in magnetization due to the temperature increase after gamma-ray absorption. The goal of this project is to further increase the energy resolution and sensitivity of MMC gamma detectors.

  12. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  13. X-ray structure analysis of a metalloprotein with enhanced active-site resolution using in situ x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcovito, Alessandro; Benfatto, Maurizio; Cianci, Michele; Hasnain, S Samar; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Savino, Carmelinda; Strange, Richard W; Vallone, Beatrice; Della Longa, Stefano

    2007-04-10

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to the coordination geometry of an absorbing atom and therefore allows bond distances and angles of the surrounding atomic cluster to be measured with atomic resolution. By contrast, the accuracy and resolution of metalloprotein active sites obtainable from x-ray crystallography are often insufficient to analyze the electronic properties of the metals that are essential for their biological functions. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of both methods on the same metalloprotein single crystal yields a structural model of the protein with exceptional active-site resolution. To this end, we have collected an x-ray diffraction data set to 1.4-A resolution and Fe K-edge polarized x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra on the same cyanomet sperm whale myoglobin crystal. The XANES spectra were quantitatively analyzed by using a method based on the multiple scattering approach, which yielded Fe-heme structural parameters with +/-(0.02-0.07)-A accuracy on the atomic distances and +/-7 degrees on the Fe-CN angle. These XANES-derived parameters were subsequently used as restraints in the crystal structure refinement. By combining XANES and x-ray diffraction, we have obtained an cyanomet sperm whale myoglobin structural model with a higher precision of the bond lengths and angles at the active site than would have been possible with crystallographic analysis alone.

  14. Theory of low energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for rare-earth systems: Yb compounds as typical examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, A.

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical predictions are given for low energy excitations, such as crystal field excitations and Kondo resonance excitations, to be detected by high-resolution measurements of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of rare-earth materials with Yb compounds as typical examples. Crystal field excitations in the Yb 3d RIXS of a Yb3+ ion in the cubic crystal field are formulated, and the calculation of RIXS spectra for YbN is done. Kondo resonance excitations revealed in the Yb 3d RIXS spectra are calculated for mixed-valence Yb compounds, Yb1-xLuxAl3, in the leading term approximation of the 1/Nf expansion method with a single impurity Anderson model. It is emphasized that the high-resolution RIXS with polarization dependence is a powerful tool to study the crystal field levels together with their symmetry and also the Kondo bound state in rare-earth compounds. Some in-depth discussions are given on the polarization effects of RIXS, including 4d and 2p RIXS spectra, the coherence effect of the Kondo bound states, and the importance of the high-resolution RIXS spectra for condensed matter physics under extreme conditions.

  15. 3D spatially-resolved characterization of chemical environment distributions by inelastic X-ray scattering in confocal setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leani, J.J.; Sanchez, H.J.; Perez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Cba (Argentina); Perez, C.A. [Laboratoorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: 3D-micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy enables non-destructive three-dimensional investigation of elemental distribution in samples in the micrometer regime. In the last few years, accurate quantification procedures have been developed [1,2]. The most important problem in these quantification procedures is the existence of light elements in the sample from which no fluorescence is detected. This dark matrix problem is not yet solved and is now the most serious limitation of this technique [2]. Resonant Raman scattering is an inelastic scattering process that becomes dominant when atoms are irradiated with incident energy lower and close to an absorption edge. Recently, a spectroscopic technique in formation based in this process showed to be useful to distinguish surrounded chemical environments [3,4]. We present first results regarding the possibility of determining the oxidation state of an element, in a three-dimensional regime, by resonant Raman scattering using an energy dispersive system combined with a confocal setup. A depth scanning of a multilayer sample in confocal setup was carried out in the XRF Beamline of the LNLS (Campinas, Brazil) [5]. The sample consisted of different layers of Cu oxides over a Cu substrate. The sample was irradiated with monochromatic photons having energy close but lower than the K absorption edge of Cu. The Raman peaks were analyzed, residuals were determined and a FFT smoothing procedure, taking into account the instrument functions of the detecting system, was applied. The results show an oscillation pattern that depends on the oxidation state of cooper. The result is relevant since allows the discrimination of the oxidation state of the elements present in a sample in a 3D-micrometer regime by means of resonant Raman scattering combined with a confocal setup. This result could be used as a tool to determine the dark matrix present in the sample with the aim of establishing a reliable quantification procedure. 1

  16. Fine-pitch glass GEM for high-resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Toyokawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The fine-pitch G-GEM is made of a 400 μm thick photo-etchable glass substrate with 150 μm pitch holes. It is fabricated using the same wet etching technique as that for the standard G-GEM. In this work, we present the experimental results obtained with a single fine-pitch G-GEM with a 50 × 50 mm2 effective area. We recorded an energy resolution of 16.2% and gas gain up to 5,500 when the detector was irradiated with 5.9 keV X-rays. We present a 50 × 50 mm2 X-ray radiograph image acquired with a scintillation gas and optical readout system.

  17. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  18. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  19. Angular resolution measurements at SPring-8 of a hard X-ray optic for the New Hard X-ray Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Furuzawa, A; Basso, S; Binda, R; Borghi, G; Cotroneo, V; Grisoni, G; Kunieda, H; Marioni, F; Matsumoto, H; Mori, H; Miyazawa, T; Negri, B; Orlandi, A; Pareschi, G; Salmaso, B; Tagliaferri, G; Uesugi, K; Valsecchi, G; Vernani, D

    2015-01-01

    The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with on- ground X-ray facilities, aimed at measuring their effective area and the angular resolution; however, they in general suffer from effects of the finite distance of the X-ray source, e.g. a loss of effective area for double reflection. These effects increase with the focal length of the mirror under test; hence a "partial" full-illumination measurement might not be fully representative of the in-flight performances. Indeed, a pencil beam test can be adopted to overcome this shortcoming, because a sector at a time is exposed to the X-ray flux, and the compensation of the beam divergence is achieved by tilting the optic. In this work we present the result of a hard X-ray test campaign performed at the BL20B2 beamline of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, aime...

  20. Angular resolution measurements at SPring-8 of a hard x-ray optic for the New Hard X-ray Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Raimondi, L.; Furuzawa, A.; Basso, S.; Binda, R.; Borghi, G.; Cotroneo, V.; Grisoni, G.; Kunieda, H.; Marioni, F.; Matsumoto, H.; Mori, H.; Miyazawa, T.; Negri, B.; Orlandi, A.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Uesugi, K.; Valsecchi, G.; Vernani, D.

    2011-09-01

    The realization of X-ray telescopes with imaging capabilities in the hard (> 10 keV) X-ray band requires the adoption of optics with shallow (=10 m shall be produced and tested. Full-illumination tests of such mirrors are usually performed with onground X-ray facilities, aimed at measuring their effective area and the angular resolution; however, they in general suffer from effects of the finite distance of the X-ray source, e.g. a loss of effective area for double reflection. These effects increase with the focal length of the mirror under test; hence a "partial" full-illumination measurement might not be fully representative of the in-flight performances. Indeed, a pencil beam test can be adopted to overcome this shortcoming, because a sector at a time is exposed to the X-ray flux, and the compensation of the beam divergence is achieved by tilting the optic. In this work we present the result of a hard X-ray test campaign performed at the BL20B2 beamline of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility, aimed at characterizing the Point Spread Function (PSF) of a multilayer-coated Wolter-I mirror shell manufactured by Nickel electroforming. The mirror shell is a demonstrator for the NHXM hard X-ray imaging telescope (0.3 - 80 keV), with a predicted HEW (Half Energy Width) close to 20 arcsec. We show some reconstructed PSFs at monochromatic X-ray energies of 15 to 63 keV, and compare them with the PSFs computed from post-campaign metrology data, self-consistently treating profile and roughness data by means of a method based on the Fresnel diffraction theory. The modeling matches the measured PSFs accurately.

  1. Detecting non-bridging oxygens: non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in crystalline lithium borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Gérald; Radtke, Guillaume; Cormier, Laurent; Bricha, Hanane; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Ablett, James M; Cabaret, Delphine; Gélébart, Frédéric; Shukla, Abhay

    2014-10-20

    Probing the local environment of low-Z elements, such as oxygen, is of great interest for understanding the atomic-scale behavior in materials, but it requires experimental techniques allowing it to work with versatile sample environments. In this paper, the local environment of lithium borate crystals is investigated using non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) at energy losses corresponding to the oxygen K-edge. Large variations of the spectral features are observed close to the edge onset in the 535-540 eV energy range when varying the Li2O content. Calculations allow identification of contributions associated with bridging oxygen (BO) and non-bridging oxygen (NBO) atoms. The main result resides in the observed core-level shift of about 1.7 eV in the spectral signatures of the BO and NBO. The clear signature at 535 eV in the O K-edge NRXIS spectrum is thus an original way to probe the presence of NBOs in borates, with the great advantage of making possible the use of complex environments such as a high-pressure cell or high-temperature device for in situ measurements.

  2. High resolution X-ray scattering studies of substrates and multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland

    1988-01-01

    High resolution X-ray scattering measurements on multilayer substrates and surfaces are reviewed. It is shown that the usual substrates of float glass and Si-wafers are dominated by large scale figure error, whereas samples of super polished SiC substrates are comparable in flatness and roughness...

  3. On the use of CCD area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Catalano, J G; Park, C; Zhang, Z

    2006-07-01

    The use and application of charge coupled device (CCD) area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity is discussed. Direct comparison of high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity data measured with CCD area detectors and traditional X-ray scintillator ('point') detectors demonstrates that the use of CCD detectors leads to a substantial (approximately 30-fold) reduction in data acquisition rates because of the elimination of the need to scan the sample to distinguish signal from background. The angular resolution with a CCD detector is also improved by a factor of approximately 3. The ability to probe the large dynamic range inherent to high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data in the specular reflection geometry was demonstrated with measurements of the orthoclase (001)- and alpha-Al2O3 (012)-water interfaces, with measured reflectivity signals varying by a factor of approximately 10(6) without the use of any beam attenuators. Statistical errors in the reflectivity signal are also derived and directly compared with the repeatability of the measurements.

  4. X-ray structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at atomic resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, RA; Rozeboom, HJ; Kalk, KH; Murshudov, GN; Wilson, KS; Dijkstra, BW

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation and a CCD camera, X-ray data have been collected from wild-type bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at 100 K to 0.97 Angstrom resolution allowing full anisotropic refinement. The final model has a conventional R factor of 9.44% for all reflections, with a mean standard u

  5. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  6. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  7. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  8. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  9. Laboratory simulation of cometary X-rays using a high-resolution microcalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)]. E-mail: beiersdorfer@llnl.gov; Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Boyce, K.R. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brown, G.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kelley, R.L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kilbourne, C.A. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Porter, F.S. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kahn, S.M. [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    X-ray emission following charge exchange has been studied at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II using a high-resolution microcalorimeter. The measured spectra include the K-shell emission from hydrogenlike and heliumlike C, N, O, and Ne needed for simulations of cometary x-ray emission. A comparison of the spectra produced in the interaction of O{sup 8+} with N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} is presented that illustrates the dependence of the observed spectrum on the interaction gas.

  10. Laboratory simulation of cometary x rays using a high-resolution microcalorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kahn, S M

    2005-01-01

    X-ray emission following charge exchange has been studied on the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II using a high-resolution microcalorimeter. The measured spectra include the K-shell emission from hydrogenlike and heliumlike C, N, O, and Ne needed for simulations of cometary x-ray emission. A comparison of the spectra produced in the interaction of O8+ with N2 and CH4 is presented that illustrates the dependence of the observed spectrum on the interaction gas.

  11. Macro and micro full field x-ray fluorescence with an X-ray pinhole camera presenting high energy and high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Taccetti, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    This work describes a tabletop (50 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) full field X-ray pinhole camera (FF-XPC) presenting high energy- and high spatial-resolution. The FF-XPC consists of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled, in a coaxial geometry, to a pinhole collimator of small diameter. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is induced on the samples with an external low-power X-ray tube. The use of the CCD as an energy dispersive X-ray detector was obtained by adopting a multi-image acquisition in single photon counting and by developing a processing algorithm to be applied in real-time to each of the acquired image-frames. This approach allowed the measurement of X-ray spectra with an energy resolution down to 133 eV at the reference value of 5.9 keV. The detection of the X-ray fluorescence through the pinhole-collimator allowed the two-dimensional elemental mapping of the irradiated samples. Two magnifications (M), determined by the relative sample-pinhole-CCD distances, are used in the present setup. A low value of M (equal to 0.35×) allows the macro-FF-XRF of large area samples (up to 4 × 4 cm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 140 μm; a large magnification (M equal to 6×) is used for the micro-FF-XRF of small area samples (2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 30 μm.

  12. Piezo control for 1 nm spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofron, K. J.; Lauer, K.; Nazaretski, E.; Yan, H.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Greer, A.; Dalesio, B.; Chu, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    A novel motion control system which utilizes the Power PMAC controller from Delta Tau Data Systems Inc., has been developed for positioning with 1 nm spatial resolution. Present work is a significant step forward towards commissioning of the X-ray microscope which will operate at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at the NSLS-II. The control system is capable of performing high-speed / high-accuracy on-the-fly scans of the sample with respect to the nano-focusing optics e.g. Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) or Fresnel X-ray Zone Plates (ZP) [1]. The Power PMAC controls piezoelectric-based nano-positioning stages using piezo-expansion for short range motion and stick-slip motion for longer travel distances. An EPICS interface to the Power PMAC has been developed allowing for easy integration into a beamline control environment.

  13. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  14. Simulation study of spatial resolution in phase-contrast X-ray imaging with Takagi-Taupin equation

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, I

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate attainable spatial resolution of phase-contrast X-ray imaging using an LLL X-ray interferometer with a thin crystal wafer, a computer simulation study with Takagi-Taupin equation was performed. Modulation transfer function of the wafer for X-ray phase was evaluated. For a polyester film whose thickness is 0.1 mm, it was concluded that the spatial resolution can be improved up to 3 mu m by thinning the wafer, under our experimental condition.

  15. Energy Resolution Effects on Plasma Electron Temperature Measurements by Soft X-Ray Pulse-Height-Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yue-Jiang; WAN Bao-Nian

    2001-01-01

    The soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis technique is a conventional tool to measure electron temperature on tokamaks.The soft x-ray spectra distortion due to the energy resolution of the detector will affect the temperature andimpurity concentration determination. To evaluate these effects, distorted spectra as functions of energy resolutionare derived by numerical modelling. The results show that the low-energy resolution detector can fit for the largesized tokamak soft x-ray spectra.

  16. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  17. Affordable and Lightweight High-Resolution X-ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Bly, V. T.; Carter, J. M.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M.; Hohl, B. R.; Jones, W. D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray astronomical missions require x-ray mirror assemblies that provide both high angular resolution and large photon collecting area. In addition, as x-ray astronomy undertakes more sensitive sky surveys, a large field of view is becoming increasingly important as well. Since implementation of these requirements must be carried out in broad political and economical contexts, any technology that meets these performance requirements must also be financially affordable and can be implemented on a reasonable schedule. In this paper we report on progress of an x-ray optics development program that has been designed to address all of these requirements. The program adopts the segmented optical design, thereby is capable of making both small and large mirror assemblies for missions of any size. This program has five technical elements: (1) fabrication of mirror substrates, (2) coating, (3) alignment, (4) bonding, and (5) mirror module systems engineering and testing. In the past year we have made progress in each of these five areas, advancing the angular resolution of mirror modules from 10.8 arc-seconds half-power diameter reported (HPD) a year ago to 8.3 arc-seconds now. These mirror modules have been subjected to and passed all environmental tests, including vibration, acoustic, and thermal vacuum. As such this technology is ready for implementing a mission that requires a 10-arc-second mirror assembly. Further development in the next two years would make it ready for a mission requiring a 5-arc-second mirror assembly. We expect that, by the end of this decade, this technology would enable the x-ray astrophysical community to compete effectively for a major x-ray mission in the 2020s that would require one or more 1-arc-second mirror assemblies for imaging, spectroscopic, timing, and survey studies.

  18. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  19. High-Resolution X-Ray Lensless Imaging by Differential Holographic Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Diling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Wu, Benny [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Scherz, Andreas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Acremann, Yves [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); Tyliszczak, Tolek [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Fischer, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for X-ray Optics; Friedenberger, Nina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Ollefs, Katharina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Farle, Michael [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Fienup, James R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Stöhr, Joachim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    2010-07-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by split and- delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with state of-the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  20. High Angular Resolution and Lightweight X-Ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Evans, T. C.; Hong, M.; Jones, W. D.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. M.; McClelland, R. S.; ODell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray optics with both high angular resolution and lightweight is essential for further progress in x-ray astronomy. High angular resolution is important in avoiding source confusion and reducing background to enable the observation of the most distant objects of the early Universe. It is also important in enabling the use of gratings to achieve high spectral resolution to study, among other things, the myriad plasmas that exist in planetary, stellar, galactic environments, as well as interplanetary, inter-stellar, and inter-galactic media. Lightweight is important for further increase in effective photon collection area, because x-ray observations must take place on space platforms and the amount of mass that can be launched into space has always been very limited and is expected to continue to be very limited. This paper describes an x-ray optics development program and reports on its status that meets these two requirements. The objective of this program is to enable Explorer type missions in the near term and to enable flagship missions in the long term.

  1. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Owocki, S P; Townsend, R D

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Or...

  2. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  3. High-Resolution X-Ray Scattering Topography Using Synchrotron Radiation Microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaura, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Kii, Hideki

    1994-02-01

    Although spatial resolution is the most essential factor determining the function of X-ray topography, it has not been improved in 30 years in spite of increasing requirements for highly-resolvable topography in materials science. X-ray scattering topography using a microbeam is a method capable of overcoming this resolution problem. Because the maximum resolution of an apparatus using a sealed-off tube is limited to 20 µ m, we designed and constructed scattering topography equipment using a synchrotron radiation microbeam. In the experiment, the slit system forms the microbeam 7 µ m in diameter. We observed a cellulose distribution in bamboo as a testing material. When the scanning step was 2 µ m, we attained spatial resolution less than 5 µ m.

  4. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector binning, the projection

  5. Energy resolution in X-ray detecting micro-strip gas counters

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Mir, J A; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    Systematic measurements of the energy resolution available from a Micro-Strip Gas Counter (MSGC) are presented. The effect of factors such as bias potential, gas filling and strip geometry on the energy resolution are examined in detail and related to a simple model. The geometry of the MSGC is adapted to permit 'wall-less' detection of X-rays and this results in useful improvements in the pulse height spectra.

  6. A Quick Method of Phase Ambiguity Resolution with X-Ray Pulsar Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuerui Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposes a quick resolution method based on space search method which is based on least square method, space search method and ambiguity covariance method. The results of simulation indicate that this method can effectively improve the speed and efficiency of phase ambiguity resolution and has some certain reference value to the researches which is related to X-ray pulsar navigation.

  7. Optimizing spatial resolution with the mechanical design of an X-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Hughes, Simon H. C.; Slocum, Robert E.

    The most important factor limiting spatial resolution in a well-designed CT scanner - the width of the X-ray beam as it passes through the object being examined - is described. The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS), a second-generation CT scanner that has a variable geometry to allow a wide variety of objects to be scanned at peak spatial resolution, even with different radiation sources, is described.

  8. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  9. High-resolution x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stammler, T.; Anders, S.; Padmore, H.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States); Scheinfein, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-12-31

    X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) is a full-field imaging technique where the sample is illuminated by an x-ray beam and the photoemitted electrons are imaged on a screen by means of an electron optics. It therefore combines two well-established materials analysis techniques--photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and x-ray spectroscopy such as near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination opens a wide field of new applications in materials research and has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate simultaneously topological, elemental, chemical state, and magnetic properties of surfaces, thin films, and multilayers at high spatial resolution. A new X-PEEM installed at the bend magnet beamline 7.3.1.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is designed for a spatial resolution of 20 nm and is currently under commissioning. An overview of the ongoing experimental program using X-PEEM in the field of materials research at the ALS is given by elemental and chemical bonding contrast imaging of hard disk coatings and sliders, field emission studies on diamond films as possible candidates for field-emission flat-panel displays, and the study of dewetting and decomposition phenomena of thin polymer blends and bilayers.

  10. High Resolution X-ray Imaging of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C -Y; Murray, S S; Slane, P O; Park, S; Staveley-Smith, L; Manchester, R N; Burrows, D N

    2009-01-01

    We report observations of the remnant of Supernova 1987A with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A direct image from the HRC resolves the annular structure of the X-ray remnant, confirming the morphology previously inferred by deconvolution of lower resolution data from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Detailed spatial modeling shows that the a thin ring plus a thin shell gives statistically the best description of the overall remnant structure, and suggests an outer radius 0.96" +/- 0.05" +/- 0.03" for the X-ray-emitting region, with the two uncertainties corresponding to the statistical and systematic errors, respectively. This is very similar to the radius determined by a similar modeling technique for the radio shell at a comparable epoch, in contrast to previous claims that the remnant is 10-15% smaller at X-rays than in the radio band. The HRC observations put a flux limit of 0.010 cts/s (99% confidence level, 0.08-10 keV range) on any compact source at the rem...

  11. High-Resolution X-Ray Imaging of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murray, S. S.; Slane, P. O.; Park, S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Manchester, R. N.; Burrows, D. N.

    2009-11-01

    We report observations of the remnant of supernova 1987A with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A direct image from the HRC resolves the annular structure of the X-ray remnant, confirming the morphology previously inferred by deconvolution of lower resolution data from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Detailed spatial modeling shows that a thin ring plus a thin shell gives statistically the best description of the overall remnant structure, and suggests an outer radius of 0farcs96 ± 0farcs05 ± 0farcs03 for the X-ray-emitting region, with the two uncertainties corresponding to the statistical and systematic errors, respectively. This is very similar to the radius determined by a similar modeling technique for the radio shell at a comparable epoch, in contrast to previous claims that the remnant is 10%-15% smaller at X-rays than in the radio band. The HRC observations put a flux limit of 0.010 counts s-1 (99% confidence level, 0.08-10 keV range) on any compact source at the remnant center. Assuming the same foreground neutral hydrogen column density as toward the remnant, this allows us to rule out an unobscured neutron star with surface temperature T ∞ > 2.5 MK observed at infinity, a bright pulsar wind nebula or a magnetar.

  12. From lows to highs: using low-resolution models to phase X-ray data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom); Abrescia, Nicola G. A., E-mail: nabrescia@cicbiogune.es [CIC bioGUNE, CIBERehd, Bizkaia Technology Park, Bld 800, 48160 Derio (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    An unusual example of how virus structure determination pushes the limits of the molecular replacement method is presented. The study of virus structures has contributed to methodological advances in structural biology that are generally applicable (molecular replacement and noncrystallographic symmetry are just two of the best known examples). Moreover, structural virology has been instrumental in forging the more general concept of exploiting phase information derived from multiple structural techniques. This hybridization of structural methods, primarily electron microscopy (EM) and X-ray crystallography, but also small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is central to integrative structural biology. Here, the interplay of X-ray crystallography and EM is illustrated through the example of the structural determination of the marine lipid-containing bacteriophage PM2. Molecular replacement starting from an ∼13 Å cryo-EM reconstruction, followed by cycling density averaging, phase extension and solvent flattening, gave the X-ray structure of the intact virus at 7 Å resolution This in turn served as a bridge to phase, to 2.5 Å resolution, data from twinned crystals of the major coat protein (P2), ultimately yielding a quasi-atomic model of the particle, which provided significant insights into virus evolution and viral membrane biogenesis.

  13. Energy and symmetry of dd excitations in undoped layered cuprates measured by Cu L{sub 3} resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti Sala, M; Minola, M [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bisogni, V; Brookes, N B [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BoIte Postale 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Aruta, C; Luca, G M de; Miletto Granozio, F; Perna, P; Radovic, M; Salluzzo, M [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso di Monte S Angelo, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Balestrino, G; Di Castro, D; Medaglia, P G [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Berger, H; Grioni, M; Guarise, M [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institut de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Schmitt, T; Zhou, K J [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Braicovich, L; Ghiringhelli, G, E-mail: marco.moretti@esrf.fr [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We measured the high-resolution Cu L{sub 3} edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of undoped cuprates La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CaCuO{sub 2} and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6}. The dominant spectral features were assigned to dd excitations and we extensively studied their polarization and scattering geometry dependence. In a pure ionic picture, we calculated the theoretical cross sections for those excitations and used these to fit the experimental data with excellent agreement. By doing so, we were able to determine the energy and symmetry of Cu-3d states for the four systems with unprecedented accuracy and confidence. The values of the effective parameters could be obtained for the single-ion crystal field model but not for a simple two-dimensional cluster model. The firm experimental assessment of dd excitation energies carries important consequences for the physics of high-T{sub c} superconductors. On the one hand, we found that the minimum energy of orbital excitation is always {>=}1.4 eV, i.e. well above the mid-infrared spectral range, which leaves to magnetic excitations (up to 300 meV) a major role in Cooper pairing in cuprates. On the other hand, it has become possible to study quantitatively the effective influence of dd excitations on the superconducting gap in cuprates.

  14. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  15. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  16. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  17. Superconducting tunnel junction array development for high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfknecht, A. T.; Cramer, S. P; Frank, M.; Friedrich, S.; Hiller, L. J.; Labov, S. E.; Mears, C. A.; Niderost, B.

    1998-07-01

    Cryogenic energy-dispersive x-ray detectors are being developed because of their superior energy resolution ((less than or equal to) 10 eV FWHM for keV x rays) compared to semiconductor EDS systems. So far, their range of application is limited due to their comparably small size and low count rate. We present data on the development of superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector arrays to address both of these issues. A single STJ detector has a resolution around 10 eV below 1 keV and can be operated at count rates of order 10,000 counts/s. We show that the simultaneous operation of several STJ detectors does not diminish their energy resolution significantly, while increasing the detector area and the maximum count rate by a factor given by the total number of independent channels.

  18. Soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS): the high-resolution cryogenic spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Bialas, Thomas; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng; Costantini, Elisa; den Herder, Jan-Willem; de Vries, Cor; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Haas, Daniel; Hoshino, Akio; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kimball, Mark; Kitamoto, Shunji; Konami, Saori; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Miko, Joseph; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Noda, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ota, Naomi; Paltani, Stéphane; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Makoto; Seta, Hiromi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the development status of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the ASTRO-H mission. The SXS provides the capability of high energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of a FWHM energy resolution of operated at 50 mK. The SXS microcalorimeter subsystem is being developed in an EM-FM approach. The EM SXS cryostat was developed and fully tested and, although the design was generally confirmed, several anomalies and problems were found. Among them is the interference of the detector with the micro-vibrations from the mechanical coolers, which is the most difficult one to solve. We have pursued three different countermeasures and two of them seem to be effective. So far we have obtained energy resolutions satisfying the requirement with the FM cryostat.

  19. High-resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of non-Bragg diffracting materials using phase retrieval X-ray diffractometry (PRXRD) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikulin, A.Y.; Darahanau, A.V.; Horney, R.; Ishikawa, T

    2004-06-15

    An X-ray diffraction technique has recently been developed and successfully applied to comprehensively, including both phase and amplitude contrast, map the complex refractive index of non-crystalline materials with submicron spatial resolution. The methodology is based on the measurement of a high angular resolution X-ray Fraunhofer diffraction pattern with further application of the phase-retrieval formalism using a logarithmic dispersion relation. The technique is reviewed from the perspective of its ability to deliver ultra-high, order of several nanometres, spatial resolution and to uniquely determine both the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index of the material under analysis. Potential niche of practical applications is discussed in terms of the spatial resolution and field of view achievable by the method.

  20. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with Fresnel Zone Plate beyond the expected resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Weigand, Markus; Nadzeyka, Achim; Peto, Llyod; Schneider, Gerd; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Schütz, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray microscopy the highest spatial resolutions to date are achieved by employing diffraction based elements called Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) as focusing optics. They allow potential resolutions which are determined by the width of their outermost zone period {\\Lambda} according to the Rayleigh criterion . Here, we present a FZP with an outermost period {\\Lambda} of 200 nm which possess a particular design and has been fabricated by ion beam lithography (IBL). Unexpectedly, the measured resolution is strongly dependent on the photon energy and at 450 eV the FZP is able to resolve features of 31 nm. This is approximately twice as high as the expected Rayleigh resolution.

  1. High-resolution X-ray microdiffraction analysis of natural teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jing; Zhang, Linling; Zou, Ling; Liao, Yunmao; Li, Jiyao; Xiao, Liying; Li, Wei, E-mail: leewei2000@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, People’s Republic of (China)

    2008-05-01

    In situ microzone X-ray diffraction analysis of natural teeth is presented. From our experiment, layer orientation and continuous crystal variations in teeth could be conveniently studied using fast online measurements by high-resolution X-ray microdiffraction equipment. The main component of natural teeth was determined many years ago as calcium phosphate, mostly in the form of hydroxyapatite with different crystallites. In the past, the method used in tooth crystal investigation has been mainly powder X-ray diffraction analysis, but this method has its drawbacks, i.e. the destruction of the natural tooth structure and the difficulty in examining the preferred orientation in different layers of the tooth. During the last century, microzone X-ray diffraction on the tooth surface was carried out, but, as the technology was less sophisticated, the results obtained were not very detailed. The newly developed microdiffraction equipment permits analysis of the microzone of teeth in situ. To test this new microdiffraction equipment, microdiffraction analysis of one natural healthy deciduous molar tooth and one carious deciduous molar tooth has been performed, using a Bruker D8 instrument. Phase analysis of the two teeth was performed; the crystal size at six test points in the natural healthy tooth was calculated by reflection (211), and the crystal preferred orientation of reflection (300) and reflection (002) at six test points in the natural healthy tooth were compared. The results showed that the tooth was a kind of biological mixed crystal composed of several crystal phases, the main crystal phase being hydroxyapatite. The crystal size grew larger going from the dentin to the enamel. The crystal preferred orientation mainly existed in the enamel, especially in the reflection (002). From our experiment, layer orientation and continuous crystal variations in teeth could be conveniently studied using fast online measurements by high-resolution X-ray microdiffraction

  2. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  3. Large area high-resolution CCD-based X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, M; Jorden, A R; Cox, M P; Marshall, A; Long, P G; Moon, K; Jerram, P A; Pool, P; Nave, C; Derbyshire, G E; Helliwell, J R

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray detector system for macromolecular crystallography based on a large area charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor has been developed as part of a large research and development programme for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) in the UK. The prototype detector consists of two large area three-sides buttable charge-coupled devices (CCD 46-62 EEV), where the single CCD area is 55.3 mmx41.5 mm. Overall detector imaging area is easily extendable to 85 mmx110 mm. The detector consists of an optically coupled X-ray sensitive phosphor, skewed fibre-optic studs and CCDs. The crystallographic measurement requirements at synchrotron sources are met through a high spatial resolution (2048x1536 pixel array), high dynamic range (approx 10 sup 5), a fast readout (approx 1 s), low noise (<10e sup -) and much reduced parallax error. Additionally, the prototype detector system has been optimised by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray ene...

  4. The High-Resolution X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer, SXS, on Astro-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; denHerder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitamoto, Shunji; McCammon, Dan; Murakami, Masahide; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Paltani, Stephane; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Yoichi; Shinozaki, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    The science and an overview of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer onboard the STRO-H mission are presented. The SXS consists of X-ray focusing mirrors and a microcalorimeter array and is developed by international collaboration lead by JAXA and NASA with European participation. The detector is a 6 x 6 format microcalorimeter array operated at a cryogenic temperature of 50 mK and covers a 3' x 3' field of view of the X-ray telescope of 5.6 m focal length. We expect an energy resolution better than 7 eV (FWHM, requirement) with a goal of 4 eV. The effective area of the instrument will be 225 square centimeters at 7 keV; by a factor of about two larger than that of the X-ray microcalorimeter on board Suzaku. One of the main scientific objectives of the SXS is to investigate turbulent and/or macroscopic motions of hot gas in clusters of galaxies.

  5. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  6. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  7. Study of high resolution x-ray spectrometer concepts for NIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Ma, T.; Nora, R.; Scott, H.; Schneider, M.; Mancini, R.

    2015-11-01

    Options have been investigated for DIM-insertable (Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator) high resolution (E/ ΔE ~ 3000 - 5000) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometers for experiments on the NIF. Of interest are time integrated Cu K- and Ta L-edge absorption spectra and time resolved Kr He- β emission from compressed symcaps for inference of electron temperature from dielectronic satellites and electron density from Stark broadening. Cylindrical and conical von Hamos, Johann, and advanced high throughput designs have been studied. Predicted x-ray intensities, spectrometer throughputs, spectral resolution, and spatial focusing properties, as well as lab evaluations of some spectrometer candidates will be presented. Performed under the auspices of the US DOE by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, P. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Abteilung Anorganische Chemie, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A. [Abteilung Anorganische Chemie, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Guo, J. H. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Duda, L. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  9. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q R; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-07

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure.

  10. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  11. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, L.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-06-01

    High energy studies of astrophysical dust complement observations of dusty interstellar gas at other wavelengths. With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. At soft energies, the spectrum of scattered light is likely to have significant features at the 0.3 keV (C-K), 0.5 keV (O-K), and 0.7 keV (Fe-L) photoelectric absorption edges. This direct probe of ISM dust grain elements will be important for (i) understanding the relative abundances of graphitic grains or PAHs versus silicates, and (ii) measuring the depletion of gas phase elements into solid form. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. We discuss ways in which spectroscopy with XMM can yield insight into dust obscured objects such as stars, binaries, AGN, and foreground quasar absorption line systems.

  12. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  13. The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Barbara H G; Allen, Branden; Hong, Jaesub; Barthelmy, Scott; Braga, Joao; D'Amico, Flavio; Rothschild, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment ...

  14. The First High Resolution X-ray Spectrum of Cyg X-1 Soft X-Ray Ionization and Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, N S; Canizares, C R; Marshall, H L; Lee, J C; Miller, J M; Lewin, W H G

    2002-01-01

    We observed the black hole candidate Cyg X-1 for 15 ks with the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer aboard the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory. The source was observed during a period of intense flaring activity, so it was about a factor of 2.5 brighter than usual, with a 0.5-10 keV (1-24 A) luminosity of 1.6x10^37 erg/s (at a distance of 2.5 kpc). The spectrum of the source shows prominent absorption edges, some of which have complicated substructure. We use the most recent results from laboratory measurements and and calculations to model the observed substructure of the edges. From the model, we derive a total absorption column of 6.21+/-0.22 10^21 cm^-2. Furthermore, the results indicate that there are ~ 10 - 25% abundance variations relative to solar values for neon, oxygen and iron. The X-ray continuuum is described well by a two-component model that is often adopted for black hole candidates: a soft multicolor disk component (with kT = 203 eV) and a hard power law component (with a photon index of ...

  15. Improving x-ray image resolution using subpixel shifts of the detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruandet, Jean-Pierre; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    1999-05-01

    The resolution of digitized images is linked to the detector array pixel size. Aliasing effects result from a non- adequation between the detector sampling and the signal bandwidths. The aim of this study is to develop a super- resolution algorithm for X-ray images. Our technique uses controlled horizontal and vertical subpixel shifts. Generalized sampling theorem of Papoulis, based on a multichannel approach, is the theoretical justification for the recovery of a high resolution image thanks to a set of low resolution ones. A higher resolution image is recovered by a minimization of a quadratic criterion. An iterative relaxation method is used to compute the minimum. To regularize, a priori data about the signal are introduced in order to fight against noise effects. Because of the opposite effects of regularization and super-resolution an adapted regularization that preserves discontinuities has to be used. Results obtained show that our algorithm recovers high frequency components on X-ray images without noise amplification. An analysis of real acquisitions in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF) shows that we obtain, thanks to this method, a 'virtual' detector better than a low resolution one, and equivalent to a real high resolution one.

  16. Development of high resolution x-ray spectrometers for the investigation of bioinorganic chemistry in metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Owen Byron

    We have built an X-ray spectrometer for synchrotron-based high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy. The spectrometer uses four 9-pixel arrays of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as sensors. They infer the energy of an absorbed X-ray from a temporary increase in tunneling current. The STJs are operated in a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that uses liquid nitrogen and helium for precooling to 77 K and 4.2 K, and gallium gadolinium garnet and iron ammonium sulfate to attain a base temperature below 0.1 K. The sensors are held at the end of a 40-cm-long cold finger within ˜1 cm of a sample located inside the vacuum chamber of a synchrotron beam line end station. The spectrometer has an energy resolution between 10 eV and 20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, can be operated at rates up to ˜106 counts/s. STJ spectrometers are suited for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional germanium detectors do not have enough energy resolution. We have used this STJ spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron for spectroscopy on the lower energy X-ray absorption edges of the elements Mo, S, Fe and N. These elements play an important role in biological nitrogen fixation at the metalloprotein nitrogenase, and we have examined if STJ spectrometers can be used to provide new insights into some of the open questions regarding the reaction mechanism of this protein. We have taken X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) and extended fine structure spectra (EXAFS) of an Fe 6N(CO)15-compound containing a single N atom inside a cluster of six Fe atoms, as postulated to exist inside the Fe-S cluster of the FeMo-cofactor (FeMo-co) in nitrogenase. The STJ detector has enabled the first-ever extended range EXAFS scans on nitrogen through the oxygen K-edge, enabling a comparison with N EXAFS on FeMo-co. We have taken iron L23-edge spectra of the Fe-S cluster in FeMo-co, which can be

  17. X-ray optical system for imaging laser plumes with a spatial resolution of up to 70 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechai, A. N.; Pestov, A. E.; Polkovnikov, V. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Toropov, M. N.; Chkhalo, N. I.; Tsybin, N. N.; Shcherbakov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider an X-ray optical system which permits obtaining laser plume images at a wavelength of 13.5 nm with a resolution of up to 70 nm. The X-ray optical system comprises an X-ray Schwarzschild objective made up of two aspherical multilayer mirrors, a scintillator (YAG : Ce ceramics), which converts X-rays to the visible radiation, and a visible-optical system, which images the scintillator surface onto a CCD camera. The spatial resolution of the system is limited by the resolution of the optical system (0.7 μm) and the magnification (10×) of the X-ray objective and is as high as 70 nm. The effect of Schwarzschild objective mirror shapes on the spatial resolution is analysed. The profile of concave mirror aspherisation is considered, which provides the attainment of the diffraction-limited quality of the objective. Data are given for the quantum efficiency of the system at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. We describe the experimental test bench intended for studying the developed X-ray optical system and outline the first experimental data which illustrate its efficiency. Owing to the natural division into the 'X-ray' and 'visible' parts, the optical system under discussion permits an easy change of the magnification and the field of view without realigning the X-ray optical elements. The wavelength may be varied in a range between 3 and 40 nm by changing the multilayer mirrors.

  18. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator∕HARP (SHARP) combination is read out ...

  19. Hitomi X-ray Astronomy Satellite: Power of High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Aff001

    2017-01-01

    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) is an X-ray observatory developed by an international collaboration led by JAXA. An X-ray microcalorimeter onboard this satellite has opened a new window of high-resolution spectroscopy with an unprecedented energy resolution of 5 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV. The spacecraft was launched on February 17, 2016 from Tanegashima Island, Japan, and we completed initial operations including deployment of the hard X-ray imagers on the extensible optical bench. All scientific instruments had successfully worked until the sudden loss of the mission on March 26. We have obtained a spectrum showing fully resolved emission lines through the first-light observation of the Perseus Cluster. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164 +/- 10 km s-1 reveals the quiescent environment of intracluster medium at the cluster core, implying that measured cluster mass requires little correction for the turbulent pressure. We also discuss observations to the Galactic Center which could be performed with Hitomi.

  20. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  1. Narrow Line X-Ray Calibration Source for High Resolution Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokin, M.S.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.M.; Bandler, Simon Richard; Lee, S.J.; Moseley, S.H.; Smith, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a narrow line calibration source for use with X-ray microcalorimeters. At energies below 300 electronvolts fluorescent lines are intrinsically broad, making calibration of high resolution detectors difficult. This source consists of a 405 nanometers (3 electronvolts) laser diode coupled to an optical fiber. The diode is pulsed to create approximately one hundred photons in a few microseconds. If the pulses are short compared to the rise time of the detector, they will be detected as single events with a total energy in the soft X-ray range. Poisson fluctuations in photon number per pulse create a comb of X-ray lines with 3 electronvolts spacing, so detectors with energy resolution better than 2 electronvolts are required to resolve the individual lines. Our currently unstabilized diode has a multimode width less than 1 nanometer, giving a 300 electronvolt event a Full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than 0.1 electronvolts. By varying the driving voltage, or pulse width, the source can produce a comb centered on a wide range of energies. The calibration events are produced at precisely known times. This allows continuous calibration of a flight mission without contaminating the observed spectrum and with minimal deadtime.

  2. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  3. Strongly correlated electrons at high pressure: an approach by inelastic X-Ray scattering; Electrons correles sous haute pression: une approche par diffusion inelastique des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, J.P

    2007-06-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and associated methods has turn out to be a powerful alternative for high-pressure physics. It is an all-photon technique fully compatible with high-pressure environments and applicable to a vast range of materials. Standard focalization of X-ray in the range of 100 microns is typical of the sample size in the pressure cell. Our main aim is to provide an overview of experimental results obtained by IXS under high pressure in 2 classes of materials which have been at the origin of the renewal of condensed matter physics: strongly correlated transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds. Under pressure, d and f-electron materials show behaviors far more complex that what would be expected from a simplistic band picture of electron delocalization. These spectroscopic studies have revealed unusual phenomena in the electronic degrees of freedom, brought up by the increased density, the changes in the charge-carrier concentration, the over-lapping between orbitals, and hybridization under high pressure conditions. Particularly we discuss about pressure induced magnetic collapse and metal-insulator transitions in 3d compounds and valence fluctuations phenomena in 4f and 5f compounds. Thanks to its superior penetration depth, chemical selectivity and resonant enhancement, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has appeared extremely well suited to high pressure physics in strongly correlated materials. (A.C.)

  4. Posteroanterior chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumothorax: methods, usage, and resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Rossato Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Denise Rossato Silva, Sandra Jungblut Schuh, Paulo de Tarso Roth DalcinUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre-RS, BrazilAbstract: Most pneumothoraces are demonstrated on fully inspired erect posteroanterior (PA chest X-ray (CXR. Expiratory films may have a role in the clinical management of patients with a small respiratory reserve in whom pneumothorax is suspected and not demonstrated on the inspiratory film. PA CXR can be used for the diagnosis of spontaneous and ­nonspontaneous pneumothoraces. When digital radiography is used, for most authors, a 2.5-lp/mm spatial ­resolution is satisfactory to detect a pneumothorax.Keywords: radiography, computed tomography, pneumothorax, posteroanterior chest X-ray

  5. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  6. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  7. Microcalorimeters for broad band high resolution X-ray spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGros, Mark (Laboratory For Experimental Astrophysics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)); Silver, Eric (Laboratory For Experimental Astrophysics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)); Madden, Norman (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States)); Beeman, Jeffrey (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States)); Goulding, Frederick (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States)); Landis, Donald (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States)); Haller, Eugene (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States))

    1994-07-01

    A large area microcalorimeter with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV has been developed. When fully illuminated, it produces X-ray spectra between 0.5 and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 23 eV. On a smaller, but similar detector, we measure 18 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates of 10-50 Hz in real-time with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. The detector is incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use as a tool for analytical spectroscopy. ((orig.))

  8. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  9. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  10. X-Ray Nanofocus CT: Visualising Of Internal 3D-Structures With Submicrometer Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinekoetter, Christian

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows the visualization and failure analysis of the internal micro structure of objects—even if they have complicated 3D-structures where 2D X-ray microscopy would give unclear information. During the past several years, computed tomography has progressed to higher resolution and quicker reconstruction of the 3D-volume. Most recently it even allows a three-dimensional look into the inside of materials with submicron resolution. With the use of nanofocus® tube technology, nanoCT®-systems are pushing forward into application fields that were exclusive to high cost and rare available synchrotron techniques. The study was performed with the new nanotom, a very compact laboratory system which allows the analysis of samples up to 120 mm in diameter and weighing up to 1 kg with exceptional voxel-resolution down to click, this technique will substitute destructive mechanical slicing and cutting in many applications. The initial CT results obtained with the nanotom® demonstrate that it is now possible to analyze the three-dimensional micro structure of materials and small objects with submicrometer resolution. Any internal difference in material, density or porosity within a sample can be visualized and data like distances can be measured. NanoCT® widely expands the spectrum of detectable micro-structures. The nanotom® opens a new dimension of 3D-microanalysis and will replace more destructive methods—saving costs and time per sample inspected.

  11. Spectral Change in 3d-4f Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Ce Intermetallics Across the Transition between Kondo Singlet and Localized-Spin State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Norimasa; Tonai, Hironori; Uozumi, Takayuki

    2017-09-01

    The spectral change in the 3d resonant X-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS) induced by the spin-state transition between Kondo singlet (KS) and localized spin (LS) state is theoretically investigated for γ-like Ce intermetallics by means of a single impurity Anderson model. The basis configurations with an electron-hole pair are included in the calculation within the configuration interaction scheme, in addition to the intra-atomic full multiplet coupling of the Ce impurity. A distinct spectral change is found across the KS-LS transition in the RIXS excited at the charge-transfer satellite of the 3d X-ray absorption spectrum (XAS) under a polarized geometry. In contrast, the 3d XAS and RIXS spectra under a depolarized geometry are rather insensitive to the spin-state transition.

  12. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated and irradiated strontium hexaferrite crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balwinder Kaur; Monita Bhat; F Licci; Ravi Kumar; K K Bamzai; P N Kotru

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the irradiated crystals suggest the possibility of creation of low angle grain boundaries and other point/clusters of defects causing amorphization in the irradiated crystals. The perfection of the irradiated and unirradiated (0001) cleaved surfaces of the crystals is studied using the bulk method of X-ray topography. The topographs supplement the findings suggestive of modifications in the crystalline quality of SrFe12O19 on irradiation with SHI of Li3+. Etching of the (0001) cleaved surfaces in H3PO4 at 120°C suggests that the dissolution characteristics of the surfaces get affected on irradiation with SHI of Li3+, besides supporting the findings of HRXRD and X-ray topography regarding modifications in the perfection of SrFe12O19 on irradiation.

  13. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  14. Spatial resolution of electron probe X-ray microanalysis on sections of organic (biological) material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krefting, E.-R.; Felsmann, M.; Recker, A.; Feja, B.; Hoehling, H.J.; Reichelt, R. [Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Biophysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Robert-Koch-Str. 31, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Reimer, L. [Physikalisches Institut, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Wilhelm-Klm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    1999-05-01

    A locally enhanced element concentration influences the result of an X-ray microanalysis at a neighbouring position. This influence was investigated for the first time systematically in organic (biological) material using sections of epoxy resin (thickness 0.5-2.5 {mu}m) containing a layer of pure gold. Wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometers were applied to analyse the X-rays generated by 15-35 keV electrons. Characteristic X-rays could be detected up to distances of several {mu}m from the gold layer. For example, for a 2.4 {mu}m thick section and 35 keV electrons the measured apparent gold concentration was above 0.1% (weight% per dry mass) at a distance of 10 {mu}m. Thus, the lateral resolution may be not better than a multiple of the section thickness. The apparent gold concentration at a given distance is proportional to the specimen thickness and increases with increasing electron energy. Monte Carlo simulations confirm the experimental results. The influence of a local enrichment depends on the particular specimen properties (e.g. thickness, density, mean atomic number), the electron energy, and the geometry of the detector with respect to the specimen. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. A compact high-resolution X-ray ion mobility spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, T.; Kirk, A. T.; Heptner, A.; Niebuhr, D.; Böttger, S.; Zimmermann, S. [Department of Sensors and Measurement Technology, Institute of Electrical Engineering and Measurement Technology, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 9A, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    For the ionization of gaseous samples, most ion mobility spectrometers employ radioactive ionization sources, e.g., containing {sup 63}Ni or {sup 3}H. Besides legal restrictions, radioactive materials have the disadvantage of a constant radiation with predetermined intensity. In this work, we replaced the {sup 3}H source of our previously described high-resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length with a commercially available X-ray source. It is shown that the current configuration maintains the resolving power of R = 100 which was reported for the original setup containing a {sup 3}H source. The main advantage of an X-ray source is that the intensity of the radiation can be adjusted by varying its operating parameters, i.e., filament current and acceleration voltage. At the expense of reduced resolving power, the sensitivity of the setup can be increased by increasing the activity of the source. Therefore, the performance of the setup can be adjusted to the specific requirements of any application. To investigate the relation between operating parameters of the X-Ray source and the performance of the ion mobility spectrometer, parametric studies of filament current and acceleration voltage are performed and the influence on resolving power, peak height, and noise is analyzed.

  16. The high resolution X-ray imaging detector planes for the MIRAX mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, B. H. G.; Grindlay, J. E.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Braga, J.; D'Amico, F.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2013-09-01

    The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-masks telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm2, a large field of view (60° × 60° FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution ( ~ 2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~ 2.1 keV @ 60 keV and 2.3 @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

  17. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  18. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, A.; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  19. Optimization of <= 200 um pitch CZT detectors for future high-resolution X-ray instrumentation in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Zajczyk, Anna; Dowkontt, Paul; Guo, Qingzhen; Kislat, Fabian; Krawczynski, Henric; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Li, Shaorui; Beilicke, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride and Cadmium Telluride are the detector materials of choice for the detection of X-rays in the X-ray energy band E >= 5keV with excellent spatial and spectral resolution and without cryogenic cooling. Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolution between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of X-ray telescopes will require pixelated X-ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of <= 250um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5keV and an energy resolution of less than one keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, active galactic nuclei feedback, and the behaviour of matter at very high densities. In this...

  20. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Kevin; Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann; Tortorella, Daniele; Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo

    2017-02-01

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  1. Achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscopy based on total-reflection mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Emi, Yoji; Kino, Hidetoshi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-04-20

    We developed an achromatic and high-resolution full-field X-ray microscope based on advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics that comprises two pairs of elliptical mirrors and hyperbolic mirrors utilizing the total reflection of X-rays. Performance tests to investigate the spatial resolution and chromatic aberration were performed at SPring-8. The microscope clearly resolved the pattern with ~100-nm feature size. Imaging the pattern by changing the X-ray energy revealed achromatism in the wide energy range of 8-11 keV.

  2. High-resolution 3D X-ray imaging of intracranial nitinol stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; With, Peter H.N. de [Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Faculty Electrical Engineering, Signal Processing Systems group (SPS), Eindhoven (Netherlands); Soederman, Michael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Kroon, Johannes N.; Roijers, Ruben B.; Babic, Drazenko [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To assess an optimized 3D imaging protocol for intracranial nitinol stents in 3D C-arm flat detector imaging. For this purpose, an image quality simulation and an in vitro study was carried out. Nitinol stents of various brands were placed inside an anthropomorphic head phantom, using iodine contrast. Experiments with objects were preceded by image quality and dose simulations. We varied X-ray imaging parameters in a commercially interventional X-ray system to set 3D image quality in the contrast-noise-sharpness space. Beam quality was varied to evaluate contrast of the stents while keeping absorbed dose below recommended values. Two detector formats were used, paired with an appropriate pixel size and X-ray focus size. Zoomed reconstructions were carried out and snapshot images acquired. High contrast spatial resolution was assessed with a CT phantom. We found an optimal protocol for imaging intracranial nitinol stents. Contrast resolution was optimized for nickel-titanium-containing stents. A high spatial resolution larger than 2.1 lp/mm allows struts to be visualized. We obtained images of stents of various brands and a representative set of images is shown. Independent of the make, struts can be imaged with virtually continuous strokes. Measured absorbed doses are shown to be lower than 50 mGy Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). By balancing the modulation transfer of the imaging components and tuning the high-contrast imaging capabilities, we have shown that thin nitinol stent wires can be reconstructed with high contrast-to-noise ratio and good detail, while keeping radiation doses within recommended values. Experimental results compare well with imaging simulations. (orig.)

  3. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, L B; Zastrau, U; Galtier, E; Gamboa, E J; Goede, S; Schumaker, W; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; MacDonald, M J; Chen, Z; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Fry, A; Kim, J B; Roedel, C; Mishra, R; Pelka, A; Kraus, D; Barbrel, B; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  4. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Zastrau, U.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Chen, Z.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Pelka, A.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  5. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, L. B., E-mail: lbfletch@slac.stanford.edu; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Schumaker, W.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zastrau, U. [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Goede, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Ravasio, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Palaiseau Cedex (France); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Pelka, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, D. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Barbrel, B. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  6. Measurement of the inelastic branch of the $^{14}$O(α,p)$^{17}$F reaction Implications for explosive burning in novae and x-ray bursters

    CERN Document Server

    He, J J; Davinson, T; Aliotta, M; Büscher, J; Clement, E; Delahaye, P; Hass, M; Jenkins, D G; Kumar, V; Murphy, A St J; Neyskens, P; Raabe, R; Robinson, A P; Voulot, D; van der Walle, J; Warr, N; Wenander, F

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inelastic component of the key astrophysical resonance in the 14O(α,p)17F reaction for burning and breakout from hot carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycles is reported. The inelastic component is found to be comparable to the ground-state branch and will enhance the 14O(α,p)17F reaction rate. The current results for the reaction rate confirm that the 14O(α,p)17F reaction is unlikely to contribute substantially to burning and breakout from the CNO cycles under novae conditions. The reaction can, however, contribute strongly to the breakout from the hot CNO cycles under the more extreme conditions found in x-ray bursters.

  7. High Resolution X-Ray and Light Scattering Studies of Bilayer Smectic A Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litster, J. D.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Birgeneau, R. J.;

    1979-01-01

    We summarize the results of high resolution X-ray and light scattering studies of the smectic A-nematic transition in cyanobenzylidene-octyloxyaniline, octyloxy-cyanobiphenyl, and octyl-cyanobiphenyl. Pretransitional behavior in the nematic phase is essentially consistent with the He4 analogue pr...... proposed by de Gennes with subtle effects arising from the lack of true long range order in the smectic phase. Elastic constants in the smectic phase show anomalous behavior probably associated with the logarithmically divergent phase fluctuations....

  8. Structural Investigation of SBGESE Glasses by High Resolution X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golovchak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the structure of Sb8Ge32Se60 (Z=2.72 and Sb20Ge20Se60 (Z=2.60 chalcogenide glasses is determined by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Glasses with Z=2.60 the structure consists of deformed tetrahedra and pyramids, in which at least one Se atom is substituted by Ge or Sb atom. For the Z=2.72 structure consisting of shared pyramids and tetrahedra with two or more Se atoms substituted by the cations. At the same time, Se-Se dimers are present in both compositions.

  9. High resolution x-ray investigation of periodically poled lithium tantalate crystals with short periodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Bazzan, Marco; Argiolas, Nicola; Busacca, Alessandro C; Oliveri, Roberto L; Stivala, Salvatore; Curcio, Luciano; Sanseverino, Stefano Riva; 10.1063/1.3264620

    2012-01-01

    Domain engineering technology in lithium tantalate is a well studied approach for nonlinear optical applications. However, for several cases of interest, the realization of short period structures (< 2 \\mu m) is required, which make their characterization difficult with standard techniques. In this work, we show that high resolution x-ray diffraction is a convenient approach for the characterization of such structures, allowing us to obtain in a nondestructive fashion information such as the average domain period, the domain wall inclination, and the overall structure quality.

  10. Disordered crystal structure of pentamethylcyclopentadienylsodium as seen by high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, C; Dinnebier, R E; Olbrich, F; van Smaalen, S

    2001-10-01

    The crystal structure of pentamethylcyclopentadienylsodium, [NaC10H15] (NaCp*), has been determined from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in space group Cmcm with lattice parameters a = 4.61030 (3), b = 16.4621 (3), c = 14.6751 (2) A, V = 1113.77 (4) A(3) (Z = 4). NaCp* forms polymeric multidecker chains along the a axis. The Rietveld refinement (R(p) = 0.050 and R(F) = 0.163) shows that the Cp* moieties occupy, with disorder, two different orientations rotated away from the eclipsed conformation by +/-13.8 degrees.

  11. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  12. Characterization and modeling of transition edge sensors for high resolution X-ray calorimeter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, T. E-mail: tsaab@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov; Apodacas, E.; Bandler, S.R.; Boyce, K.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Hammock, C.; Kelley, R.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F.S.; Stahle, C.K

    2004-03-11

    Characterizing and understanding, in detail, the behavior of a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) is required for achieving an energy resolution of 2 eV at 6 keV desired for future X-ray observatory missions. This paper will report on a suite of measurements (e.g. impedance and I-V among others) and simulations that were developed to extract a comprehensive set of TES parameters such as heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and R(T,I), {alpha}(T,I), and {beta}{sub i}(T,I) surfaces. These parameters allow for the study of the TES calorimeter behavior at and beyond the small signal regime.

  13. Soft X-ray microscope with nanometer spatial resolution and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fok, T.; Patron, Z.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2016-12-01

    A compact size microscope based on nitrogen double stream gas puff target soft X-ray source, which emits radiation in water-window spectral range at the wavelength of λ = 2.88 nm is presented. The microscope employs ellipsoidal grazing incidence condenser mirror for sample illumination and silicon nitride Fresnel zone plate objective for object magnification and imaging. The microscope is capable of capturing water-window images of objects with 60 nm spatial resolution and exposure time as low as a few seconds. Details about the microscopy system as well as some examples of different applications from various fields of science, are presented and discussed.

  14. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. Hitomi made another major step forward, in yielding for the first time a high-quality spectrum of an extended source, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. For point sources with the proposed Arcus mission, and for all sources with the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  15. Structural analysis of advanced polymeric foams by means of high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacucchi, M.; De Pascalis, F.; Scatto, M.; Capodieci, L.; Albertoni, R.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced polymeric foams with enhanced thermal insulation and mechanical properties are used in a wide range of industrial applications. The properties of a foam strongly depend upon its cell structure. Traditionally, their microstructure has been studied using 2D imaging systems based on optical or electron microscopy, with the obvious disadvantage that only the surface of the sample can be analysed. To overcome this shortcoming, the adoption of X-ray micro-tomography imaging is here suggested to allow for a complete 3D, non-destructive analysis of advanced polymeric foams. Unlike metallic foams, the resolution of the reconstructed structural features is hampered by the low contrast in the images due to weak X-ray absorption in the polymer. In this work an advanced methodology based on high-resolution and low-contrast techniques is used to perform quantitative analyses on both closed and open cells foams. Local structural features of individual cells such as equivalent diameter, sphericity, anisotropy and orientation are statistically evaluated. In addition, thickness and length of the struts are determined, underlining the key role played by the achieved resolution. In perspective, the quantitative description of these structural features will be used to evaluate the results of in situ mechanical and thermal test on foam samples.

  16. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, J. F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M. R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W. J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R. S.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterise anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution ~5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  17. Determination of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel using high resolution X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Kathryn G., E-mail: kmcintosh@lanl.gov; Reilly, Sean D.; Havrilla, George J.

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of Pu is an essential aspect of safeguards operations at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. A novel analysis technique called hiRX (high resolution X-ray) has been developed for the direct measurement of Pu in spent nuclear fuel dissolver solutions. hiRX is based on monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF), which provides enhanced sensitivity and specificity compared with conventional XRF techniques. A breadboard setup of the hiRX instrument was calibrated using spiked surrogate spent fuel (SSF) standards prepared as dried residues. Samples of actual spent fuel were utilized to evaluate the performance of the hiRX. The direct detection of just 39 ng of Pu is demonstrated. Initial quantitative results, with error of 4–27% and precision of 2% relative standard deviation (RSD), were obtained for spent fuel samples. The limit of detection for Pu (100 s) within an excitation spot of 200 μm diameter was 375 pg. This study demonstrates the potential for the hiRX technique to be utilized for the rapid, accurate, and precise determination of Pu. The results highlight the analytical capability of hiRX for other applications requiring sensitive and selective nondestructive analyses. - Highlights: • Description of high resolution X-ray (hiRX) instrument, based on monochromatic WDXRF • Calibration performed by mapping Pu in dried residues of spiked surrogate spent fuel • Direct, nondestructive determination of Pu in spent nuclear fuel samples • Detection limit of 375 pg Pu in 200 μm excitation spot, 100 s.

  18. Examining the angular resolution of the ASTRO-H's soft x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiki; Iizuka, Ryo; Ishida, Manabu; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Kurashima, Sho; Nakaniwa, Nozomi; Tomikawa, Kazuki; Hayashi, Takayuki; Mori, Hideyuki; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Soong, Yang; Izumiya, Takanori; Minami, Sari

    2016-10-01

    The international x-ray observatory ASTRO-H was renamed "Hitomi" after launch. It covers a wide energy range from a few hundred eV to 600 keV. It is equipped with two soft x-ray telescopes (SXTs: SXT-I and SXT-S) for imaging the soft x-ray sky up to ˜12 keV, which focus an image onto the respective focal-plane detectors: CCD camera (SXI) and a calorimeter (SXS). The SXTs are fabricated in a quadrant unit. The angular resolution in half-power diameter (HPD) of each quadrant of the SXTs ranges between 1.1 and 1.4 arc min at 4.51 keV. It was also found that one quadrant has an energy dependence on the HPD. We examine the angular resolution with "spot scan" measurements. In order to understand the cause of imaging capability deterioration and to reflect it to the future telescope development, we carried out spot scan measurements, in which we illuminate all over the aperture of each quadrant with a square beam 8 mm on a side. Based on the scan results, we made "maps" of image blurring and a focus position. The former and the latter reflect figure error and positioning error, respectively, of the foils that are within the incident 8 mm×8 mm beam. As a result, we estimated those errors in a quadrant to be ˜0.9 to 1.0 and ˜0.6 to 0.9 arc min, respectively. We found that the larger the positioning error in a quadrant is, the larger its HPD is. The HPD map, which manifests the local image blurring, is very similar from quadrant to quadrant, but the map of the focus position is different from location to location in each telescope. It is also found that the difference in local performance causes energy dependence of the HPD.

  19. Improving the energy resolution of bent crystal X-ray spectrometers with position-sensitive detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, Ari Pekka; Verbeni, Roberto; Simonelli, Laura; Moretti Sala, Marco; Al-Zein, Ali; Krisch, Michael; Monaco, Giulio; Huotari, Simo

    2014-07-01

    Wavelength-dispersive high-resolution X-ray spectrometers often employ elastically bent crystals for the wavelength analysis. In a preceding paper [Honkanen et al. (2014). J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 104-110] a theory for quantifying the internal stress of a macroscopically large spherically curved analyser crystal was presented. Here the theory is applied to compensate for the corresponding decrease of the energy resolution. The technique is demonstrated with a Johann-type spectrometer using a spherically bent Si(660) analyser in near-backscattering geometry, where an improvement in the energy resolution from 1.0 eV down to 0.5 eV at 9.7 keV incident photon energy was observed.

  20. A hard x-ray KB-FZP microscope for tomography with sub-100-nm resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.; Crecea, V.; Richter, C.-P.; Peterson, K.M.; Jemian, P.R.; Neuhausler, U.; Schneider, G.; Yu, X.; Braun, P.V.; Chiang, T.-C.; Robinson, I.K. (UIUC); (NWU); (Bessy); (U Bielefeld)

    2008-08-04

    An instrument for high-resolution imaging and tomography has been built at the APS beamline 34 ID-C, Argonne National Laboratory. In-line phase contrast tomography can be performed with micrometer resolution. For imaging and tomography with resolution better than 100nm a hard X-ray microscope has been integrated to the instrument. It works with a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror as condenser and a Fresnel-Zone plate (FZP) as an objective lens. 50 nm-features have been resolved in a Nickel structure operating the microscope at a photon energy of 9keV. Phase objects with negligible absorption contrast have been imaged. Tomography scans were performed on photonic crystals.

  1. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  2. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  3. High resolution X-ray detector for synchrotron-based microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Stampanoni, M; Wyss, P; Abela, R; Patterson, B; Hunt, S; Vermeulen, D; Rueegsegger, P

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron-based microtomographic devices are powerful, non-destructive, high-resolution research tools. Highly brilliant and coherent X-rays extend the traditional absorption imaging techniques and enable edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements. At the Materials Science Beamline MS of the Swiss Light Source (SLS), the X-ray microtomographic device is now operative. A high performance detector based on a scintillating screen optically coupled to a CCD camera has been developed and tested. Different configurations are available, covering a field of view ranging from 715x715 mu m sup 2 to 7.15x7.15 mm sup 2 with magnifications from 4x to 40x. With the highest magnification 480 lp/mm had been achieved at 10% modulation transfer function which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 1.04 mu m. A low-noise fast-readout CCD camera transfers 2048x2048 pixels within 100-250 ms at a dynamic range of 12-14 bit to the file server. A user-friendly graphical interface gives access to the main parameters needed for ...

  4. X-ray Interferometry with Transmissive Beam Combiners for Ultra-High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, G. K.; Krismanic, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interferometry provides one of the possible routes to ultra-high angular resolution for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Sub-micro-arc-second angular resolution, necessary to achieve objectives such as imaging the regions around the event horizon of a super-massive black hole at the center of an active galaxy, can be achieved if beams from parts of the incoming wavefront separated by 100s of meters can be stably and accurately brought together at small angles. One way of achieving this is by using grazing incidence mirrors. We here investigate an alternative approach in which the beams are recombined by optical elements working in transmission. It is shown that the use of diffractive elements is a particularly attractive option. We report experimental results from a simple 2-beam interferometer using a low-cost commercially available profiled film as the diffractive elements. A rotationally symmetric filled (or mostly filled) aperture variant of such an interferometer, equivalent to an X-ray axicon, is shown to offer a much wider bandpass than either a Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) or a PFL with a refractive lens in an achromatic pair. Simulations of an example system are presented.

  5. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Efthimion, P C; Ellis, R; Gao, L; Maddox, J; Pablant, N A; Schneider, M B; Chen, H; Ayers, S; Kauffman, R L; MacPhee, A G; Beiersdorfer, P; Bettencourt, R; Ma, T; Nora, R C; Scott, H A; Thorn, D B; Kilkenny, J D; Nelson, D; Shoup, M; Maron, Y

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s(2)-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s(2)-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  6. Development of a high resolution x-ray spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ellis, R.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Chen, H.; Ayers, S.; Kauffman, R. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bettencourt, R.; Ma, T.; Nora, R. C.; Scott, H. A.; Thorn, D. B.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nelson, D.; Shoup, M.; Maron, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution (E/ΔE = 1200-1800) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer is being developed to measure plasma parameters in National Ignition Facility experiments. The instrument will be a diagnostic instrument manipulator positioned cassette designed mainly to infer electron density in compressed capsules from Stark broadening of the helium-β (1s2-1s3p) lines of krypton and electron temperature from the relative intensities of dielectronic satellites. Two conically shaped crystals will diffract and focus (1) the Kr Heβ complex and (2) the Heα (1s2-1s2p) and Lyα (1s-2p) complexes onto a streak camera photocathode for time resolved measurement, and a third cylindrical or conical crystal will focus the full Heα to Heβ spectral range onto an image plate to provide a time integrated calibration spectrum. Calculations of source x-ray intensity, spectrometer throughput, and spectral resolution are presented. Details of the conical-crystal focusing properties as well as the status of the instrumental design are also presented.

  7. X-ray Interferometry with Transmissive Beam Combiners for Ultra-High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, G. K.; Krismanic, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interferometry provides one of the possible routes to ultra-high angular resolution for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Sub-micro-arc-second angular resolution, necessary to achieve objectives such as imaging the regions around the event horizon of a super-massive black hole at the center of an active galaxy, can be achieved if beams from parts of the incoming wavefront separated by 100s of meters can be stably and accurately brought together at small angles. One way of achieving this is by using grazing incidence mirrors. We here investigate an alternative approach in which the beams are recombined by optical elements working in transmission. It is shown that the use of diffractive elements is a particularly attractive option. We report experimental results from a simple 2-beam interferometer using a low-cost commercially available profiled film as the diffractive elements. A rotationally symmetric filled (or mostly filled) aperture variant of such an interferometer, equivalent to an X-ray axicon, is shown to offer a much wider bandpass than either a Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) or a PFL with a refractive lens in an achromatic pair. Simulations of an example system are presented.

  8. Improvement of the detector resolution in X-ray spectrometry by using the maximum entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Giulio, Eugenio Di; Sabbatucci, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    In every X-ray spectroscopy measurement the influence of the detection system causes loss of information. Different mechanisms contribute to form the so-called detector response function (DRF): the detector efficiency, the escape of photons as a consequence of photoelectric or scattering interactions, the spectrum smearing due to the energy resolution, and, in solid states detectors (SSD), the charge collection artifacts. To recover the original spectrum, it is necessary to remove the detector influence by solving the so-called inverse problem. The maximum entropy unfolding technique solves this problem by imposing a set of constraints, taking advantage of the known a priori information and preserving the positive-defined character of the X-ray spectrum. This method has been included in the tool UMESTRAT (Unfolding Maximum Entropy STRATegy), which adopts a semi-automatic strategy to solve the unfolding problem based on a suitable combination of the codes MAXED and GRAVEL, developed at PTB. In the past UMESTRAT proved the capability to resolve characteristic peaks which were revealed as overlapped by a Si SSD, giving good qualitative results. In order to obtain quantitative results, UMESTRAT has been modified to include the additional constraint of the total number of photons of the spectrum, which can be easily determined by inverting the diagonal efficiency matrix. The features of the improved code are illustrated with some examples of unfolding from three commonly used SSD like Si, Ge, and CdTe. The quantitative unfolding can be considered as a software improvement of the detector resolution.

  9. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  10. The High Resolution Microcalorimeter Soft X-ray Spectrometer for the Astro-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, K.; International SXS Team

    2013-04-01

    We are developing the Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS) for the JAXA Astro-H mission. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of semiconductor micro calorimeters that provides high spectral resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror, giving a 3 x 3 arcmin field of view and more than 200 cm2 of collecting area at 6 keV. The instrument is a collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and their partners in Japan, the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Wisconsin, the Space Research Organization of the Netherlands, and Geneva University. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, low-temperature anticoincidence detector, 3-stage ADR and dewar. The dewar is a long-life, hybrid design with a superfluid helium cryostat, Joule-Thomson cooler, and Stirling coolers. The instrument is capable of achieving 4-5 eV resolution across the array and is designed to operate for at least three years in orbit, and can operate either without liquid helium or the cooling power of the Joule-Thomson cooler. In this presentation we describe the design and status of the Astro-H/SXS instrument.

  11. X-ray interferometry with transmissive beam combiners for ultra-high angular resolution astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, G K; 10.1007/s10686-009-9175-4

    2009-01-01

    Interferometry provides one of the possible routes to ultra-high angular resolution for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Sub-micro-arc-second angular resolution, necessary to achieve objectives such as imaging the regions around the event horizon of a super-massive black hole at the center of an active galaxy, can be achieved if beams from parts of the incoming wavefront separated by 100s of meters can be stably and accurately brought together at small angles. One way of achieving this is by using grazing incidence mirrors. We here investigate an alternative approach in which the beams are recombined by optical elements working in transmission. It is shown that the use of diffractive elements is a particularly attractive option. We report experimental results from a simple 2-beam interferometer using a low-cost commercially available profiled film as the diffractive elements. A rotationally symmetric filled (or mostly filled) aperture variant of such an interferometer, equivalent to an X-ray axicon, is shown to...

  12. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigations of highly mismatched II-VI quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, T.; Leonardi, K.; Stockmann, A.; Selke, H.; Heinke, H.; Hommel, D.

    1999-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to systematically investigate CdSe and ZnTe quantum wells one to three monolayers thick sandwiched between a ZnSe buffer and cap layer grown at different substrate temperatures. For comparison high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements were performed which were evaluated by digital analysis of lattice images. The x-ray diffraction profiles show typically two main layer peaks. Their intensity ratio depends critically on the quantum well thickness and varies only weakly with the thickness of the ZnSe layers. The total Cd or Te content determined from comparisons of experimental and simulated (004) icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans is well confirmed by the results from digital analysis of HRTEM lattice images. For quantum well thicknesses larger than 1.5 (ZnTe) or 2.0 (CdSe) monolayers, no simulation parameters could be found to achieve good agreement between theoretical and measured diffraction profiles. This transition is more clearly visible in diffraction profiles of asymmetrical reflections. By HRTEM measurements, this could be correlated to the occurrence of stacking faults at these thicknesses. The formation of quantum islands detected by HRTEM was not reflected in the HRXRD icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans.

  13. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnota, M.; Banaś, D; Berset, Michel; Chmielewska, D; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Hoszowska, Joanna; Maillard, Yves-Patrick; Mauron, Olivier; Pajek, M.; Polasik, M.; Raboud, Pierre-Alexandre; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Słabkowska, K.; Sujkowski, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lα1,2 X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place pr...

  14. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics with sub-eV spectral resolution and large format capability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to develop a revolutionary x-ray camera for astrophysical imaging spectroscopy. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the...

  15. Ultrafast probing of the x-ray-induced lattice and electron dynamics in graphite at atomic-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau-Riege, S

    2010-10-07

    We used LCLS pulses to excite thin-film and bulk graphite with various different microstructures, and probed the ultrafast ion and electron dynamics through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS). We pioneered XRTS at LCLS, making this technique viable for other users. We demonstrated for the first time that the LCLS can be used to characterize warm-dense-matter through Bragg and x-ray Thomson scattering. The warm-dense-matter conditions were created using the LCLS beam. Representative examples of the results are shown in the Figure above. In our experiment, we utilized simultaneously both Bragg and two Thomson spectrometers. The Bragg measurements as a function of x-ray fluence and pulse length allows us to characterize the onset of atomic motion at 2 keV with the highest resolution to date. The Bragg detector was positioned in back-reflection, providing us access to scattering data with large scattering vectors (nearly 4{pi}/{lambda}). We found a clear difference between the atomic dynamics for 70 and 300 fs pulses, and we are currently in the process of comparing these results to our models. The outcome of this comparison will have important consequences for ultrafast diffractive imaging, for which it is still not clear if atomic resolution can truly be achieved. The backward x-ray Thomson scattering data suggests that the average graphite temperature and ionization was 10 eV and 1.0, respectively, which agrees with our models. In the forward scattering data, we observed an inelastic feature in the Thomson spectrum that our models currently do not reproduce, so there is food for thought. We are in the process of writing these results up. Depending on if we can combine the Bragg and Thomson data or not, we plan to publish them in a single paper (e.g. Nature or Science) or as two separate papers (e.g. two Phys. Rev. Lett.). We will present the first analysis of the results at the APS Plasma Meeting in November 2010. We had a fantastic experience performing our

  16. Efficient high-resolution X-ray emission spectrometry using synchrotron radiation; Effiziente hochaufloesende Roentgenemissionssprektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterumsberger, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    .10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2} to 5.10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2}, respectively). With the spectrometer extended by the refocusing, XES at different titanium oxides could be performed. Using the high-resolution XES, the chemical species of the different titanium oxides could be identified. In addition to the chemical speciation, it is now possible to do Resonance Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (RIXS). With this method, information about the occupied and unoccupied electronic states of the valence electrons can be revealed. For a quantitative analysis of the titanium L-fluorescence lines, the WDS had to be calibrated. For this purpose, the response behavior of the spectrometer was experimental determined using direct undulator radiation. By means of a model function for the response behavior, the response functions could be modeled and parameterized for the whole covered energy range. The response functions lead to a reliable deconvolution of the emission spectra and thereby allow an accurate determination of the fluorescence intensities. In this work, the relative uncertainties of the intensities are estimated with about 15 %. The transition probabilities of the titanium L3-fluorescence lines were determined as a function of the chemical state. For metallic titanium, the transition probability of the titanium Ll-fluorescence line amounts to 0.59(6) and decreases with increasing oxidation state of the titanium. For titanium dioxide, the transition probability of the titanium Ll-fluorescence line only amounts to 0.46(7).

  17. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field of...

  18. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field...

  19. MOSFET dosimetry with high spatial resolution in intense synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegbahn, E. A.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2009-04-15

    Various dosimeters have been tested for assessing absorbed doses with microscopic spatial resolution in targets irradiated by high-flux, synchrotron-generated, low-energy ({approx}30-300 keV) x-ray microbeams. A MOSFET detector has been used for this study since its radio sensitive element, which is extraordinarily narrow ({approx}1 {mu}m), suits the main applications of interest, microbeam radiation biology and microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In MRT, micrometer-wide, centimeter-high, and vertically oriented swaths of tissue are irradiated by arrays of rectangular x-ray microbeams produced by a multislit collimator (MSC). We used MOSFETs to measure the dose distribution, produced by arrays of x-ray microbeams shaped by two different MSCs, in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Doses were measured near the center of the arrays and maximum/minimum (peak/valley) dose ratios (PVDRs) were calculated to determine how variations in heights and in widths of the microbeams influenced this for the therapy, potentially important parameter. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the absorbed dose distribution in the phantom were also performed. The results show that when the heights of the irradiated swaths were below those applicable to clinical therapy (<1 mm) the MC simulations produce estimates of PVDRs that are up to a factor of 3 higher than the measured values. For arrays of higher microbeams (i.e., 25 {mu}mx1 cm instead of 25x500 {mu}m{sup 2}), this difference between measured and simulated PVDRs becomes less than 50%. Closer agreement was observed between the measured and simulated PVDRs for the Tecomet MSC (current collimator design) than for the Archer MSC. Sources of discrepancies between measured and simulated doses are discussed, of which the energy dependent response of the MOSFET was shown to be among the most important.

  20. On reachable energy resolution of SiPM based scintillation counters for X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, K. E.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.; Drozdowski, W.

    2017-01-01

    Presently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are very attractive devices to replace photomultipliers for light detection in many different fields. For example, they could be used in detectors of photons with energies of 20-150 keV for medical and nondestructive testing applications. The small size and high electron gain of SiPMs make them very attractive candidates for pixelated X-ray detectors operating in a photon counting mode. In this research we evaluated the detector performance that can be reached with up-to-date Lu-based scintillators. Application of LYSO:Ce and LFS-3 scintillators provides high count rate capability because of a short scintillator decay time of ~ 40 ns but enables reaching just a moderate energy resolution. Meanwhile, with a LuYAG:Pr scintillator of quite low non-proportionality one can attain much better energy resolution at a reduced rate.

  1. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI) for a Prototype 12U CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Harrison, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    Our High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI) program is developing an Engineering Model (EM) for a 12U CubeSat wide-field hard X-ray (3-200 keV) coded-aperture imaging telescope. HREXI employs an array of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (each 2 x 2 x 0.3 cm) with a fine-pixellated Tungsten coded aperture mask. The detector assembly utilizes the new technology of Through-Silicon-Vias (TSVs) to control and readout signals from the ASIC bonded to each CZT. TSVs eliminate the need for conventional wire-bonds for electric connections between the ASIC and back end electronics, greatly lowering the assembly complexity and cost, and thus enabling close-tiling of HREXI detectors in a small form factor with comfortable margins. For HREXI EM, we have successfully implemented TSVs on NuSTAR ASICs, which can cover an energy range of 3-200 keV with a FWHM spectral resolution of 1-2 keV. The 12U CubeSat HREXI EM prototype with 64 CZT detectors would image 0.5 sr of sky with FWHM field of view with 11 arcmin resolution for the current generation of the TSV-ASIC and a 20 cm mask - detector plane separation. A flight test of this 12U-HREXI will be proposed after full development and environmental testing to enable a future proposed array of SmallSat-HREXI telescopes with ~2 arcmin resolution for simultaneous full-sky studies of high redshift GRBs and a wide range of transients in the post-Swift era. (This work is supported by NASA grant NNX17AE62G)

  2. The sub-micron resolution X-ray spectroscopy beamline at NSLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, V.; Thieme, J.; Northrup, P.; Yao, Y.; Lanzirotti, A.; Eng, P.; Shen, Q.

    2011-09-01

    For many research areas such as life, environmental, earth or material sciences, novel analytical resources have to be developed for an advance understanding of complex natural and engineered systems that are heterogeneous on the micron to the tenths of microns scale. NSLS-II at BNL will be a synchrotron radiation source with an ultra-high brilliance delivering a high current (500 mA). One of the 1st six NSLS-II beamlines will be the Sub-micron Resolution X-ray spectroscopy beamline (SRX), dedicated as an analytical tool to study complex systems on a sub-micron length scale. SRX will comprise two branches thanks to a canted setup with two undulators: the first branch using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors as focusing optics will cover the energy range of 4.65-23 keV, allowing for XANES experiments from the Ti to the Rh K-edge. Thanks to a horizontally deflecting double crystal monochromator with maximum stability, a set of slits located on the secondary source, and two sets of complementary and quickly interchangeable KB mirrors, spectroscopy with very high spectral and spatial resolution will be achieved. The spot size will almost fully cover a range from 60×60 to 1300×500 nm 2, providing an attractive adaptability of the observation scale. A 1.5 m long IVU21 will serve as a light source. The expected high flux in a sub-micron-spot (5×10 12 and 7×10 13 ph s -1 at maximum and lowest resolutions) will open new possibilities for spectromicroscopy of trace elements. The 2nd canted undulator will serve as an independent light source for the second branch designed for experiments with X-ray energies in the range of 2-15 keV. Using Fresnel zone plates, the spatial resolution aimed for is around 30 nm with up to 7×10 9 ph s -1 in the spot. This branch would be attractive for many biological applications from life and environmental science due to low-Z elements of interest within that energy range. In both experimental stations, X-ray fluorescence will be used for imaging

  3. Adjustable Grazing Incidence X-ray Optics with 0.5 Arc Second Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Paul

    We seek to develop adjustable grazing incidence optics for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this development is thin, lightweight mirrors with angular resolution of 0.5 arc seconds, comparable to the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The new mirror design consists of thin segments of a Wolter-I grazing incidence mirror, with piezo-electric material deposited directly on the back surface of the mirror. Depositing a pattern of independently addressable electrodes on top of the piezoelectric material produces an array of independent piezo cells. Energizing a particular cell introduces a localized deformation in the mirror without the need for a reaction structure. By applying the appropriate voltage to the piezo cells, it is possible to correct mirror figure errors that result from mirror fabrication, gravity release, mounting, and thermal effects. Because the thin mirrors segments are lightweight, they can be densely nested to produce collecting area thirty times that of Chandra, on an affordably priced mission. This Supporting Technology program is a follow-on to an existing APRA program. In the existing program we demonstrated the first successful deposition of piezoelectric material on thermally formed glass substrates. We showed that the localized deformations produced by the piezo cells match finite element predictions, and the piezo cell adjustment range meets requirements necessary to achieve the desired figure correction. We have also shown through simulation that representative mirror figure errors can be corrected via modeled influence functions to achieve 0.5 arc sec imaging performance. This provides a firm foundation on which to develop further the technology. We will continue to optimize the deposition of thin piezoelectric films onto thermally formed glass and electroplated metal mirror segments to improve yield and manufacturability. We will deposit piezoelectric material onto conical mirror segments and demonstrate figure correction in agreement with prediction

  4. Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High Resolution Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial SOT spectropolarimeter and XRT coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the contentious issue of the relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray intensity. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data are used for this study. We find that there is no pixel-to-pixel correlation between the observed loop brightness and magnetic quantities. However, the X-ray brightness is well correlated with the integrated magnetic quantities such as total unsigned magnetic flux, total unsigned vertical current, area integrated square of the vertical magnetic field and horizontal magnetic fields. Comparing all these quantities we find that the total magnetic flux correlates well with the observed integrated X-ray brightness, though there is some differences in the strength of the correlation when we use the X-ray data from different filters. While we get a good correlation between X-ray brightness and total unsigned vertic...

  5. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  7. BALLOON-BASED HIGH-TIME RESOLUTION MEASUREMENTS OF X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LIGHTNING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. EACK; D. SUSZCYNSKY; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project consisted of a series of balloon flights to collect high-time-resolution x-ray and electric-field-change measurements in thunderstorms in order to validate the existence of the runaway air-breakdown mechanism during lightning and/or sprite production. The runaway air-breakdown mechanism is currently the leading theory to account for unexplained balloon and aircraft-based measurements of x-ray enhancements associated with sprites. Balloon-borne gamma-ray and electric-field-change instruments were launched into a daytime summer thunderstorm. A greater than three-fold increase in the gamma-ray flux was observed as the balloon descended through a thunderstorm anvil where a strong electric field was present. These observations suggest that gamma-ray production in thunderstorms may not be as uncommon as previously believed.

  8. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cas A with Chandra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Juan Yang; Fang-Jun Lu; Li Chen

    2008-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra observations. The X-ray emitting region of this remnant was divided into 38 × 34 pixels of 10″× 10″ each. Spectra of 960 pixels were created and fitted with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. From the results of the spectral analysis we obtained maps of absorbing column density, temperatures, ionization ages, and the abundances of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. The Si, S and possibly Ca abundance maps show obvious jet structures, while Fe does not follow the jet but seems to be distributed perpendicular to it. The abundances of Si, S and Ca show tight correlations between one another over a range of about two dex. This suggests that they are ejecta from explosive Oburning and incomplete Si-buming. Meanwhile, the Ne abundance is well correlated with that of Mg, indicating them to be the ashes of explosive C/Ne burning. The Fe abundance is positively correlated with that of Si when the latter is lower than 3 times the solar value, and is negatively correlated when higher. We suggest that such a two phase correlation is due to the different ways in which Fe was synthesized.

  9. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yan; Lin, Xiaojie; Yuan, Falei; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  10. Revisit of alpha-chitin crystal structure using high resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Pawel; Hori, Ritsuko; Wada, Masahisa

    2009-05-11

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray fiber diffraction data recorded from crab tendon chitin have been used to describe the crystal structure of alpha-chitin. Crystal structures at 100 and 300 K have been solved using restrained crystallographic refinement against diffraction intensities measured from the fiber diffraction patterns. The unit cell contains two polymer chains in a 2(1) helix conformation and in the antiparallel orientation. The best agreement between predicated and observed X-ray diffraction intensities is obtained for a model that includes two distinctive conformations of C6-O6 hydroxymethl group. Those conformations are different from what is proposed in the generally accepted alpha-chitin crystal structure (J. Mol. Biol. 1978, 120, 167-181). Based on refined positions of the O6 atoms, a network of hydrogen bonds involving O6 is proposed. This network of hydrogen bonds can explain the main features of the polarized FTIR spectra of alpha-chitin and sheds some light on the origin of splitting of the amide I band observed on alpha-chitin IR spectra.

  11. Arcus: an ISS-attached high-resolution x-ray grating spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. K.; Ackermann, M.; Allured, R.; Bautz, M. W.; Bregman, J.; Bookbinder, J.; Burrows, D.; Brenneman, L.; Brickhouse, N.; Cheimets, P.; Carrier, A.; Freeman, M.; Kaastra, J.; McEntaffer, R.; Miller, J.; Ptak, A.; Petre, R.; Vacanti, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. The mission requirements will be R>2500 and >600 cm2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, values similar to the goals of the IXO X-ray Grating Spectrometer. The full bandpass will range from 8-52Å (0.25-1.5 keV), with an overall minimum resolution of 1300 and effective area >150 cm2. We will use the silicon pore optics developed at cosine Research and proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. This mission achieves key science goals of the New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal survey while making effective use of the International Space Station (ISS).

  12. Ultrasensitive Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Pushing the Limits of Time Resolution and Magnetic Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    Understanding magnetic properties at ultrafast timescales is crucial for the development of new magnetic devices. Samples of interest are often thin film magnetic multilayers with thicknesses in the range of a few atomic layers. This fact alone presents a sensitivity challenge in STXM microscopy, which is more suited toward studying thicker samples. In addition the relevant time scale is of the order of 10 ps, which is well below the typical x-ray pulse length of 50 - 100 ps. The SSRL STXM is equipped with a single photon counting electronics that effectively allows using a double lock-in detection at 476MHz (the x-ray pulse frequency) and 1.28MHz (the synchrotron revelation frequency) to provide the required sensitivity. In the first year of operation the excellent spatial resolution, temporal stability and sensitivity of the detection electronics of this microscope has enabled researchers to acquire time resolved images of standing as well as traveling spin waves in a spin torque oscillator in real space as well as detect the real time spin accumulation in non magnetic Copper once a spin polarized current is injected into this material. The total magnetic moment is comparable to that of a single nanocube of magnetic Fe buried under a micron of non-magnetic material.

  13. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid development (e.g. X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, Mauer spectroscopy and element imaging), space and its evolution (astronomy and astrophysics) can be explored through observation of X-rays...

  14. High resolution transmission soft X-ray microscopy of deterioration products developed in large concrete dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtis; Monteiro; Brown; Meyer-Ilse

    1999-12-01

    In concrete structures, the reaction of certain siliceous aggregates with the highly alkaline concrete pore solution produces an alkali-silicate gel that can absorb water and expand. This reaction can lead to expansion, cracking, increased permeability, and decreased strength of the concrete. Massive concrete structures, such as dams, are particularly susceptible to the damage caused by the alkali-silica reaction because of the availability of water and because massive gravity dams usually do not contain steel reinforcement to restrain the expansion. Both the cement hydration products and alkali-silica reaction products are extremely sensitive to humidity. Consequently, characterization techniques that require high vacuum or drying, as many existing techniques do, are not particularly appropriate for the study of the alkali-silica reaction because artefacts are introduced. Environmental scanning electron micrographs and scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive X-ray analysis results demonstrate the effect of drying on the morphology and chemical composition of the alkali-silicate reaction gel. Thus, the impetus for this research was the need to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction and its gel product on a microscopic level in a wet environment (i.e. without introducing artefacts due to drying). Only soft X-ray transmission microscopy provides the required high spatial resolution needed to observe the reaction process in situ. The alkali-silica reaction can be observed over time, in a wet condition, and at normal pressures, features unavailable with most other high resolution techniques. Soft X-rays also reveal information on the internal structure of the sample. The purpose of this paper is to present research, obtained using transmission soft X-ray microscopy, on the effect of concrete pore solution cations, namely sodium and calcium, on the product formed as a result of alkali attack. Alkali-silicate reaction (ASR) gel was obtained from

  15. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-01-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of ∼100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to ...

  16. Analysis of axial spatial resolution in a variable resolution x-ray cone beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahi, Bahram; Keyes, Gary S.; Rendon, David A.; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2008-03-01

    The Variable Resolution X-ray (VRX) technique has been successfully used in a Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) system to increase the spatial resolution of CT images in the transverse plane. This was achieved by tilting the Flat Panel Detector (FPD) to smaller vrx y angles in a VRX Cone Beam CT (VRX-CBCT) system. In this paper, the effect on the axial spatial resolution of CT images created by the VRX-CBCT system is examined at different vrx x angles, where vrx x is the tilting angle of the FPD about its x-axis. An amorphous silicon FPD with a CsI scintillator is coupled with a micro-focus x-ray tube to form a CBCT. The FPD is installed on a rotating frame that allows rotation of up to 90° about x and y axes of the FPD. There is no rotation about the z-axis (i.e. normal to the imaging surface). Tilting the FPD about its x-axis (i.e. decreasing the vrx x angle) reduces both the width of the line-spread function and the sampling distance by a factor of sin vrx x, thereby increasing the theoretical detector pre-sampling spatial resolution proportionately. This results in thinner CT slices that in turn help increase the axial spatial resolution of the CT images. An in-house phantom is used to measure the MTF of the reconstructed CT images at different vrx x angles.

  17. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  18. Improvement of density resolution in short-pulse hard x-ray radiographic imaging using detector stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borm, B.; Gärtner, F.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that stacking several imaging plates (IPs) constitutes an easy method to increase hard x-ray detection efficiency. Used to record x-ray radiographic images produced by an intense-laser driven hard x-ray backlighter source, the IP stacks resulted in a significant improvement of the radiograph density resolution. We attribute this to the higher quantum efficiency of the combined detectors, leading to a reduced photon noise. Electron-photon transport simulations of the interaction processes in the detector reproduce the observed contrast improvement. Increasing the detection efficiency to enhance radiographic imaging capabilities is equally effective as increasing the x-ray source yield, e.g., by a larger drive laser energy.

  19. Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Marmotti, M; Kampmann, R

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors have been developed at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffractometry. They are multi-wire proportional counters with delay-line readout and sensitive areas of 300 mm x 300 mm or 500 mm x 500 mm. For detecting X-rays, neutrons and hard X-rays the counters are filled with Ar/CO sub 2 , sup 3 He/CF sub 4 and Xe/CO sub 2 , respectively. One neutron detector is used at the ARES diffractometer at GKSS, which is dedicated to the analysis of residual stresses. Further ones are used for analysing textures and residual stresses at the hard-X-ray beamline PETRA-2 at HASYLAB, and one detector is being developed for the neutron reflectometer REFSANS at the research reactor FRM-II in Munich, Germany. (orig.)

  20. Improvement of density resolution in short-pulse hard x-ray radiographic imaging using detector stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borm, B.; Gärtner, F.; Khaghani, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Neumayer, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    We demonstrate that stacking several imaging plates (IPs) constitutes an easy method to increase hard x-ray detection efficiency. Used to record x-ray radiographic images produced by an intense-laser driven hard x-ray backlighter source, the IP stacks resulted in a significant improvement of the radiograph density resolution. We attribute this to the higher quantum efficiency of the combined detectors, leading to a reduced photon noise. Electron-photon transport simulations of the interaction processes in the detector reproduce the observed contrast improvement. Increasing the detection efficiency to enhance radiographic imaging capabilities is equally effective as increasing the x-ray source yield, e.g., by a larger drive laser energy.

  1. Towards tender X-rays with Zernike phase-contrast imaging of biological samples at 50 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Warmer, Martin; Goeries, Dennis; Herker, Eva; Reimer, Rudolph; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microscopy is a commonly used method especially in material science application, where the large penetration depth of X-rays is necessary for three-dimensional structural studies of thick specimens with high-Z elements. In this paper it is shown that full-field X-ray microscopy at 6.2 keV can be utilized for imaging of biological specimens with high resolution. A full-field Zernike phase-contrast microscope based on diffractive optics is used to study lipid droplet formation in hepatoma cells. It is shown that the contrast of the images is comparable with that of electron microscopy, and even better contrast at tender X-ray energies between 2.5 keV and 4 keV is expected.

  2. Note: significant increase to the temporal resolution of 2D X-ray detectors using a novel beam chopper system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchemann, Stefan; Mahn, Carsten; Samwer, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of short time dynamics using X-ray scattering techniques is commonly limited either by the read out frequency of the detector or by a low intensity. In this paper, we present a chopper system, which can increase the temporal resolution of 2D X-ray detectors by a factor of 13. This technique only applies to amorphous or polycrystalline samples due to their circular diffraction patterns. Using the chopper, we successfully increased the temporal resolution up to 5.1 ms during synchrotron experiments. For the construction, we provide a mathematical formalism, which, in principle, allows an even higher increase of the temporal resolution.

  3. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Efthimion, P; Pablant, N A; Lu, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Magee, E

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10,000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  4. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  5. Technology Requirements for a Square Meter, Arcsecond Resolution Telescope for X-Rays: The SMART-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Allured, Ryan; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Forman, William R.; Freeman, Mark D.; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul B.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Ramirez, J. Israel; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; ODell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the astrophysical problems of the 2020's requires sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with square meter effective area. Such requirements can be derived, for example, by considering deep x-ray surveys to find the young black holes in the early universe (large redshifts) which will grow into the first super-massive black holes. We have envisioned a mission, the Square Meter Arcsecond Resolution Telescope for X-rays (SMART-X), based on adjustable x-ray optics technology, incorporating mirrors with the required small ratio of mass to collecting area. We are pursuing technology which achieves sub-arcsecond resolution by on-orbit adjustment via thin film piezoelectric "cells" deposited directly on the non-reflecting sides of thin, slumped glass. While SMART-X will also incorporate state-of-the-art x-ray cameras, the remaining spacecraft systems have no requirements more stringent than those which are well understood and proven on the current Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  6. High resolution Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer with high throughput rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacso, J.; Kalinka, G.; Kertesz, Zs.; Kovacs, P.; Lakatos, T. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia Atommag Kutato Intezete, Debrecen)

    1982-06-01

    The paper presents the description of a modern Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer developed in ATOMKI. The Si(Li) detectors are single-grooved with an active area of 20-50 mm/sup 2/. The Be window is coated with a special protective layer against corrosion. A small getter-ion pump maintains the high vacuum in the cryostat chamber. The preamplifier employs pulsed drain feedback; in its first stage selected, teflon-encapsulated field effect transistors are used. The analogue signal processor is direct coupled and employs time variant pulse shaping. This construction provides high resolution (150-170 eV), high throughput rate, excellent stability, effective pile-up elimination, accurate live-time correction and simplicity in the applications. The live-time correction is performed by a random pulse generator, its average frequency is stabilized and the corresponding peak appears at zero energy in the spectra.

  7. Conception of broadband stigmatic high-resolution spectrometers for the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnyakov, E A; Shatokhin, A N; Ragozin, E N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    We formulate an approach to the development of stigmatic high-resolution spectral instruments for the soft X-ray range (λ ≤ 300 Å), which is based on the combined operation of normalincidence multilayer mirrors (including broadband aperiodic ones) and grazing-incidence reflection gratings with nonequidistant grooves (so-called VLS gratings). A concave multilayer mirror serves to produce a slightly astigmatic image of the radiation source (for instance, an entrance slit), and the diffraction grating produces a set of its dispersed stigmatic spectral images. The width of the operating spectral region is determined by the aperiodic structure of the multilayer mirror and may range up to an octave in wavelength. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Arcus: The next generation of high-resolution X-ray grating spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    2014-11-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission requirements will be R>2500 and >600 cm^2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from 8-52Å, with an overall minimum resolution of 1300 and effective area >150 cm^2. We will use the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs.

  9. High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron carbonyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2015-06-07

    We apply high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to study iron carbonyl complexes. Mono-, bi-, and tri-nuclear carbonyl complexes and pure carbonyl complexes as well as carbonyl complexes containing hydrocarbon ligands are considered. The HERFD-XANES spectra reveal multiple pre-edge peaks with individual signatures for each complex, which could not be detected previously with conventional XANES spectroscopy. These peaks are assigned and analysed with the help of TD-DFT calculations. We demonstrate that the pre-edge peaks can be used to distinguish the different types of iron-iron interactions in carbonyl complexes. This opens up new possibilities for applying HERFD-XANES spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of iron catalysts.

  10. HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY PINHOLE CAMERA FOR HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON BEAM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Morgan, J.; Lee, S.H.; Shang, H.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is developing a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice based storage ring as the next major upgrade, featuring a 20-fold reduction in emittance. Combining the reduction of beta functions, the electron beam sizes at bend magnet sources may be reduced to reach 5 – 10 µm for 10% vertical coupling. The x-ray pinhole camera currently used for beam size monitoring will not be adequate for the new task. By increasing the operating photon energy to 120 – 200 keV, the pinhole camera’s resolution is expected to reach below 4 µm. The peak height of the pinhole image will be used to monitor relative changes of the beam sizes and enable the feedback control of the emittance. We present the simulation and the design of a beam size monitor for the APS storage ring.

  11. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  12. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashiura, Akifumi, E-mail: hgsur-a@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods and Biosciences Inc., Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroaki [Confocal Science Inc., Tokyo 101-0032 (Japan); Nakagawa, Atsushi [Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. This is the first ultra-high-resolution structure obtained from a high-pressure cryocooled crystal. Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005 ▶) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

  13. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, Clemens; Denlinger, Jonathan; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, Wayne; Hussain, Zahid; Gullikson, Eric; Jones, M.; Batson, Phil; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-03-09

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as 30x3000 mu m2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  14. High-resolution X-ray imaging in fast ignition experiment using Gekko and LFEX lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We improved diagnostic instruments to measure X-ray images in a hard X-ray harsh environment and succeeded in obtaining clear images with X-ray framing camera and X-ray streak camera in fast ignition experiment conducted in 2011 (FG-02 Experimental Campaign. We found that high-energy X-ray signals could be used as an indicator of the LFEX laser injection time relative to the imploded core. The LFEX laser injection time was estimated with better than 10 ps accuracy. Time-resolved 2D X-ray images suggested that shapes and motions of imploded core plasmas were improved by changing the configuration of the implosion lasers.

  15. Observation of momentum-dependent charge excitations in hole-doped cuprates using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the oxygen K edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Asano, Shun; Sato, Kentaro; Fujita, Masaki; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Tustsui, Kenji; Sota, Shigetoshi; Miyawaki, Jun; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Pelliciari, Jonathan; Huang, Yaobo; Schmitt, Thorsten; Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2017-09-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in La2 -x(Br,Sr ) xCuO4 using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the oxygen K edge. RIXS spectra of the hole-doped cuprates show clear momentum dependence below 1 eV. The broad spectral weight exhibits positive dispersion and shifts to higher energy with increasing hole concentration. Theoretical calculation of the dynamical charge structure factor on oxygen orbitals in a three-band Hubbard model is consistent with the experimental observation of the momentum and doping dependence, and therefore the momentum-dependent spectral weight is ascribed to intraband charge excitations which have been observed in electron-doped cuprates. Our results confirm that the momentum-dependent charge excitations exist on the order of the transfer energy (t ), and the broad spectral line shape indicates damped and incoherent character of the charge excitations at the energy range in the doped Mott insulators.

  16. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang (Jilin); (Stanford); (CIW)

    2011-09-15

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressure diamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained {approx}80 {micro}m at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, {approx}20 {micro}m away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C{sub 60} sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} was observed at 27 GPa.

  17. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho Kwang

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressurediamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained ~80 μm at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, ~20 μm away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C₆₀ sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp² to sp³ was observed at 27 GPa.

  18. Application of a new composite cubic-boron nitride gasket assembly for high pressure inelastic x-ray scattering studies of carbon related materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenge; Xiao, Yuming; Liu, Bingbing; Chow, Paul; Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Wendy L; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new composite cubic-boron nitride (c-BN) gasket assembly for high pressure diamond anvil cell studies, and applied it to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of carbon related materials in order to maintain a larger sample thickness and avoid the interference from the diamond anvils. The gap size between the two diamond anvils remained ~80 μm at 48.0 GPa with this new composite c-BN gasket assembly. The sample can be located at the center of the gap, ~20 μm away from the surface of both diamond anvils, which provides ample distance to separate the sample signal from the diamond anvils. The high pressure IXS of a solvated C(60) sample was studied up to 48 GPa, and a pressure induced bonding transition from sp(2) to sp(3) was observed at 27 GPa.

  19. dd excitations in CPO-27-Ni metal-organic framework: comparison between resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and UV-vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Erik; Lamberti, Carlo; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-05-20

    We identify the dd excitations in the metal-organic framework CPO-27-Ni by coupling resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and UV-vis spectroscopy, and we show that the element selectivity of RIXS is crucial to observing the full dd multiplet structure, which is not visible in UV-vis. The combination of calculations using crystal-field multiplet theory and density functional theory can reproduce the RIXS spectral features, crucially improving interpretation of the experimental data. We obtain the crystal-field splitting and magnitude of the electron-electron interactions and correct previously reported values. RIXS instruments at synchrotron radiation sources are accessible to all researchers, and the technique can be applied to a broad range of systems.

  20. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  1. Benchmarking Membrane Protein Detergent Stability for Improving Throughput of High-Resolution X-ray Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Yo; Newstead, Simon; Hu, Nien-Jen; Alguel, Yilmaz; Nji, Emmanuel; Beis, Konstantinos; Yashiro, Shoko; Lee, Chiara; Leung, James; Cameron, Alexander D.; Byrne, Bernadette; Iwata, So; Drew, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Obtaining well-ordered crystals is a major hurdle to X-ray structure determination of membrane proteins. To facilitate crystal optimization, we investigated the detergent stability of 24 eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins, predominantly transporters, using a fluorescent-based unfolding assay. We have benchmarked the stability required for crystallization in small micelle detergents, as they are statistically more likely to lead to high-resolution structures. Using this information, we have been able to obtain well-diffracting crystals for a number of sodium and proton-dependent transporters. By including in the analysis seven membrane proteins for which structures are already known, AmtB, GlpG, Mhp1, GlpT, EmrD, NhaA, and LacY, it was further possible to demonstrate an overall trend between protein stability and structural resolution. We suggest that by monitoring membrane protein stability with reference to the benchmarks described here, greater efforts can be placed on constructs and conditions more likely to yield high-resolution structures. PMID:21220112

  2. A High Spectral Resolution Observation of the Soft X-ray Diffuse Background with Thermal Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McCammon, D; Apodaca, E; Tiest, W B; Cui, W; Deiker, S W; Galeazzi, M; Juda, M; Lesser, A; Mihara, T; Morgenthaler, J P; Sanders, W T; Zhang, J; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Kelley, R L; Moseley, S H; Mushotzky, R F; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Szymkowiak, A E

    2002-01-01

    A high spectral resolution observation of the diffuse X-ray background in the 60 - 1000 eV energy range has been made using an array of thirty-six 1 mm^2 micro-calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. Detector energy resolution ranged from 5-12 eV FWHM, and a composite spectrum of ~ 1 steradian of the background centered at l = 90, b = +60 was obtained with a net resolution of ~ 9 eV. The target area includes bright 1/4 keV regions, but avoids Loop I and the North Polar Spur. Lines of C VI, O VII, and O VIII are clearly detected with intensities of 5.4 +/- 2.3, 4.8 +/- 0.8, and 1.6 +/- 0.4 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1, respectively. The oxygen lines alone account for a majority of the diffuse background observed in the ROSAT R4 band that is not due to resolved extragalactic discrete sources. We also have a positive detection of the Fe-M line complex near 70 eV at an intensity consistent with previous upper limits that indicate substantial gas phase depletion of iron. We include a detailed description of the instr...

  3. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Katsuda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs, based on grating spectrometers onboard XMM-Newton and Chandra, has been revealing a variety of new astrophysical phenomena. Broadened oxygen lines for a northwestern compact knot in SN 1006 clearly show a high oxygen temperature of ~300 keV. The high temperature together with a lower electron temperature (kTe ~ 1 keV can be reasonably interpreted as temperature non-equilibration between electrons and oxygen behind a collisionless shock. An ejecta knot in the Puppis A SNR shows blueshifted line emission by ~ 1500kms-1. The line widths are fairly narrow in contrast to the SN 1006's knot; an upper limit of 0.9 eV is obtained for O VIII Lyα, which translates to an oxygen temperature of kTO < 30 keV. The low temperature suggests that the knot was heated by a reverse shock whose velocity is 4 times slower than that of a forward shock. Anomalous intensity ratios in O VII Heα lines, i.e., a stronger forbidden line than a resonance line, is found in a cloud-shock interaction region in Puppis A. The line ratio can be best explained by the charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. There are several other targets for which we plan to analyze high-quality grating data prior to the operation of the soft X-ray spectrometer onboard Astro-H.

  4. Development of in-line furnace for in-situ nanoscale resolution x-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Christopher; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen K.; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) is a newly developed x-ray imaging technique to provide quantitative and non-destructive 3D characterization of the complex microstructure of materials at nanometer resolution. A key missing component is an in situ apparatus enabling the imaging of the complex structural evolution of the materials and to correlate the structural change with a material's functionality under real operating conditions. This work describes the design of an environmental cell which satisfies the requirements for in situ TXM studies. The limited space within the TXM presents a spatial constraint which prohibits the use of conventional heaters, as well as requiring consideration in designing for safe and controlled operation of the system and alignment of the cell with the beam. A gravity drip-fed water cooling jacket was installed in place around the heating module to maintain critical components of the microscope at safe operating temperatures. A motion control system consisting of pulse width modulated DC motor driven XYZ translation stages was developed to facilitate fine alignment of the cell. Temperature of the sample can be controlled remotely and accurately through a controller to temperatures as high as 1200 K. Heating zone measurement was carried out and shows a 500 x 500 x 500 μm3 homogeneous zone volume for sample area, which is a critical parameter to ensure accurate observation of structural evolution at nanometer scale with a sample in size of tens of microns. Application on Ni particles for in situ oxidation experiment and dehydrogenation of aluminum hydride is also discussed.

  5. Dark Matter Inelastic Up-Scattering with the Interstellar Plasma: An Exciting New Source of X-Ray Lines, including at 3.5 keV

    CERN Document Server

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of a class of models where the dark matter particle can inelastically up-scatter to a heavier excited state via off-diagonal dipolar interactions with the interstellar plasma (gas or free electrons). The heavier particle then rapidly decays back to the dark matter particle plus a quasi-monochromatic photon. For the process to occur at appreciable rates, the mass splitting between the heavier state and the dark matter must be comparable to, or smaller than, the kinetic energy of particles in the plasma. As a result, the predicted photon line falls in the soft X-ray range, or, potentially, at arbitrarily lower energies. We explore experimental constraints from cosmology and particle physics, and present accurate calculations of the dark matter thermal relic density and of the flux of monochromatic X-rays from thermal plasma excitation. We find that the model provides a natural explanation for the observed 3.5 keV line from clusters of galaxies and from the Galactic center, and is co...

  6. Mechanical design of a high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, D.; Lee, P. L.; Preissner, C.; Ramanathan, M.; Beno, M.; Von Dreele, R. B.; Wang, J.; Ranay, R.; Ribaud, L.; Kurtz, C.; Jiao, X.; Kline, D.; Jemian, P.; Toby, B. H.

    2007-09-01

    A novel high-resolution x-ray powder diffractometer has been designed and commissioned at the bending magnet beamline 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This state-of-the-art instrument is designed to meet challenging mechanical and optical specifications for producing high-quality powder diffraction data with high throughput. The 2600 mm (H) X 2100 mm (L) X 1700 mm (W) diffractometer consists of five subassemblies: a customized two-circle goniometer with a 3-D adjustable supporting base; a twelve-channel high-resolution crystal analyzer system with an array of precision x-ray slits; a manipulator system for a twelve scintillator x-ray detectors; a 4-D sample manipulator with cryo-cooling capability; and a robot-based sample exchange automation system. The mechanical design of the diffractometer as well as the test results of its positioning performance are presented in this paper.

  7. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoss, Stephen; Stahl, Claudia; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The penetration of magnetic flux into the high-temperature superconductor YBCO has been observed using a new high-resolution technique based on X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Superconductors coated with thin soft magnetic layers of CoFeB are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope providing cooling of the sample down to 83 K under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electrical currents create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor which leads to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. X-ray absorption measurements with circular polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor via the ferromagnetic layer. In this work we present first images taken at 83K with high spatial resolution in the nanoscale.

  8. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 microm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 microm x 50 microm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 microm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  9. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  10. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid

  11. Multi-anode linear SDDs for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonsky, J.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation detectors are used in a variety of fields to sense X-rays and y-rays, visible, UV and IR photons, neutrons or charged particles. With their help, advanced medical diagnostics can be performed (e.g. X-ray radiography, computed tomography, fluoroscopy), material research can undergo a rapid

  12. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Huaidong, E-mail: hdjiang@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huang, Qingjie [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ∼1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  13. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Qingjie; Xiao, Tiqiao; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ˜1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  14. FRONT-END ASIC FOR HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROMETERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE GERONIMO,G.; CHEN, W.; FRIED, J.; LI, Z.; PINELLI, D.A.; REHAK, P.; VERNON, E.; GASKIN, J.A.; RAMSEY, B.D.; ANELLI, G.

    2007-10-27

    We present an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers. The ASIC is designed to read out signals from a pixelated silicon drift detector (SDD). Each hexagonal pixel has an area of 15 mmz and an anode capacitance of less than 100 fF. There is no integrated Field Effect transistor (FET) in the pixel, rather, the readout is done by wirebonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC provides 14 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, and peak detection with analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on low voltage differential signaling. An interposer provides all the interconnections required to bias and operate the system. The channel dissipates 1.6 mW. The complete 14-pixel unit covers an area of 210 mm{sup 2}, dissipates 12 mW cm{sup -2}, and can be tiled to cover an arbitrarily large detection area. We measured a preliminary resolution of 172 eV at -35 C on the 6 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source.

  15. Resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering on the spin-ladder/spin-chain system Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappa, Justina; Schmitt, T.; Bendounan, A.; Strocov, V.; Delley, B.; Patthey, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Wang, X.; Ronnow, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (Switzerland); Piazzalunga, A.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Grioni, M.; Braicovich, L.; Dallera, C. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Thielemann, B.; Mesot, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    The layered system (Sr,Ca){sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41}, is a low-dimensional cuprate system that has been studied recently with large interest. It is mixed-valent and built up of two different cupper-oxygen layers: 1-dim CuO{sub 2} chains and quasi 1-dim Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3} 2-leg ladders. When cooling below 200 K a full range of interesting phenomena is observed, as structural changes, formation of charge order and formation of AF-dimers on the chains. We investigated the electronic structure of Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41} by inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu M{sub 2,3} edge (3p{yields}3d transition). The spectra show well-pronounced inelastic signal in the constant energy loss of 1.5-2.5 eV, which originates from crystal field excitations. Differences between the different crystallographic directions and between the high- and low-temperature phase are revealed.

  16. Influence of backscattering on the spatial resolution of semiconductor X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, M.; Korn, A.; Giersch, J.

    2005-07-01

    Pixelated X-ray detectors using semiconductor layers or scintillators as absorbers are widely used in high-energy physics, medical diagnosis, or non-destructive testing. Their good spatial resolution performance makes them particularly suitable for applications where fine details have to be resolved. Intrinsic limitations of the spatial resolution have been studied in previous simulations. These simulations focused on interactions inside the conversion layer. Transmitted photons were treated as a loss. In this work, we also implemented the structure behind the conversion layer to investigate the impact of backscattering inside the detector setup. We performed Monte Carlo simulations with the program ROSI ( Roentgen Simulation) which is based on the well-established EGS4 algorithm. Line-spread functions of different fully implemented detectors were simulated. In order to characterize the detectors' spatial resolution, the modulation transfer functions (MTF) were calculated. The additional broadening of the line-spread function by carrier transport has been ignored in this work. We investigated two different detector types: a directly absorbing pixel detector where a semiconductor slab is bump-bonded to a readout ASIC such as the Medipix-2 setup with Si or GaAs as an absorbing semiconductor layer, and flat-panel detectors with a Se or a CsI converter. We found a significant degradation of the MTF compared to the case without backscattering. At energies above the K-edge of the backscattering material the spatial resolution drops and can account for the observed low-frequency drop of the MTF. Ignoring this backscatter effect might lead to misinterpretations of the charge sharing effect in counting pixel detectors.

  17. Stability of dislocation structures in copper towards stress relaxation investigated by high angular resolution 3D X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    A 300 µm thick tensile specimen of OFHC copper is subjected to a tensile loading sequence and deformed to a maximal strain of 3.11%. Using the novel three-dimensional X-ray diffraction method High angular resolution 3DXRD', the evolution of the microstructure within a deeply embedded grain is cha...

  18. Determination of the resolution of the x-ray microscope XM-1 at beamline 6.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, J.M.; Meyer-Ilse, W.; Attwood, D.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Resolution determination in x-ray microscopy is a complex issue which depends on many factors. Many different criteria and experimental setups are used to characterize resolution. Some of the important factors affecting resolution include the partial coherence and spectrum of the illumination. The purpose of this research has been to measure the resolution of XM-1 at beamline 6.1 taking into account these factors, and to compare the measurements to theoretical calculations. The x-ray microscope XM-1, built by the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO), has been operational since 1994 at the Advanced Light Source at E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is of the conventional (i.e. full-field) type, utilizing zone plate optics. ALS bending magnet radiation is focused by a condenser zone plate onto a monochromator pinhole immediately in front of the sample. X-rays transmitted through the sample are focused by a micro-zone plate onto a CCD camera. The pinhole and the condenser with a central stop constitute a linear monochromator. The spectral distribution of the light illuminating the sample has been calculated assuming geometrical optics.

  19. X-ray bang-time and fusion reaction history at ~ps resolution using RadOptic detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E; Baker, K L; Bennett, C V; Celeste, J R; Cerjan, C; Haynes, S; Hernandez, V J; Hsing, W W; London, R A; Moran, B; von Wittenau, A S; Steele, P T; Stewart, R E

    2012-05-01

    We report recent progress in the development of RadOptic detectors, radiation to optical converters, that rely upon x-ray absorption induced modulation of the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium to amplitude modulate an optical probe beam. The sensor temporal response is determined by the dynamics of the electron-hole pair creation and subsequent relaxation in the sensor medium. Response times of a few ps have been demonstrated in a series of experiments conducted at the LLNL Jupiter Laser Facility. This technology will enable x-ray bang-time and fusion burn-history measurements with {approx} ps resolution.

  20. Fresnel zone-plate based X-ray microscopy in Zernike phase contrast with sub-50 nm resolution at NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Jie; Li Wenjie; Tian Jinping; Liu Longhua; Xiong Ying; Liu Gang; Wu Ziyu; Tian Yangchao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (China); Liu Yijin [School of Physics (China); Yue Zhengbo; Yu Hanqing [Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230029 (China); Wang Chunru, E-mail: ychtian@ustc.edu.c [Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10060 (China)

    2009-09-01

    A transmission X-ray microscope using Fresnel zone-plates (FZPs) has been installed at U7A beamline of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The objective FZP with 45 nm outermost zone width delivers a sub-50 nm resolution. A gold phase ring with 2.5 {mu}m thickness and 4 {mu}m width was placed at the focal plane of the objective FZP at 8 keV to produce a negative Zernike phase contrast. A series of samples were used to test the performance of the Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy.

  1. High-resolution x-ray crystal structures of the villin headpiece subdomain, an ultrafast folding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Thang K.; Kubelka, Jan; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Eaton, William A.; Hofrichter, James; Davies, David R.

    2005-01-01

    The 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece (HP35) is a small ultrafast folding protein that is being intensely studied by experiments, theory, and simulations. We have solved the x-ray structures of HP35 and its fastest folding mutant [K24 norleucine (nL)] to atomic resolution and compared their experimentally measured folding kinetics by using laser temperature jump. The structures, which are in different space groups, are almost identical to each other but differ significantly from previously solved NMR structures. Hence, the differences between the x-ray and NMR structures are probably not caused by lattice contacts or crystal/solution differences, but reflect the higher accuracy of the x-ray structures. The x-ray structures reveal important details of packing of the hydrophobic core and some additional features, such as cross-helical H bonds. Comparison of the x-ray structures indicates that the nL substitution produces only local perturbations. Consequently, the finding that the small stabilization by the mutation is completely reflected in an increased folding rate suggests that this region of the protein is as structured in the transition state as in the folded structure. It is therefore a target for engineering to increase the folding rate of the subdomain from ≈0.5 μs–1 for the nL mutant to the estimated theoretical speed limit of ≈3 μs–1. PMID:15894611

  2. Large-angle OBServaTory with Energy Resolution for Synoptic X-ray Studies (LOBSTER-SXS)

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenstein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The soft X-ray band hosts a larger, more diverse range of variable sources than any other region of the electromagnetic spectrum. They are stars, compact binaries, SMBH's, the X-ray components of Gamma-Ray Bursts, their X-ray afterglows, and soft X-ray flares from supernova. We describe a concept for a very wide field (~ 4 ster) modular hybrid X-ray telescope system that can measure positions of bursts and fast transients with as good as arc second accuracy, the precision required to identify fainter and increasingly more distant events. The dimensions and materials of all telescope modules are identical. All but two are part of a cylindrical lobster-eye telescope with flat double sided mirrors that focus in one dimension and utilize a coded mask for resolution in the other. Their positioning accuracy is about an arc minute. The two remaining modules are made from the same materials but configured as a Kirkpatrick-Baez telescope with longer focal length that focuses in two dimensions. When pointed it refines ...

  3. Development of high spatial resolution X-ray CT system at BL47XU in SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, K; Yagi, N; Tsuchiyama, A; Nakano, T

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution, micrometer range, X-ray CT system has been developed at SPring-8. The experiments were performed at the undulator beam line BL47XU. An 'in-vacuum type' undulator is employed as an X-ray source, and the X-rays are monochromatized with a liquid nitrogen cooled Si(1 1 1) double crystal monochromator. High precision rotation stage with air bearing was used for sample rotation. The transmitted images were obtained with a two-dimensional image detector, which consists of a single crystal phosphor screen (Lu sub 2 SiO sub 5 : Ce), an objective lens and a cooled CCD camera. In this system the smallest effective pixel size was set to 0.5 mu mx0.5 mu m. As a result of the experiments, three-dimensional images of a few micrometer-order texture has been successfully obtained with the developed CT system.

  4. Observation of immuno-labeled cells at high resolution using soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, A [Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266, Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga, 526-0829 (Japan); Takemoto, K; Kihara, H [Department of Physics, Kansai Medical University, 18-89 Uyamahigashi, Hirakata, Osaka, 573-1136 (Japan); Fukui, T; Yoshimura, Y; Namba, H [Department of Physical Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Okuno, K, E-mail: takemoto@makino.kmu.ac.j [SR Center, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Noji-Higashi Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells were labeled with the heavy metal (silver and gold) and observed intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope. Microtubules, Golgi apparatus and early endosomes of NIH3T3 cells were stained with immuno-gold nanoparticles, and immuno-staining was intensified by silver or gold enhancement procedure. Using a transmission soft X-ray microscope beamline (BL12) at Ritsumeikan University SR center, we observed immuno-stained NIH3T3 cells with several wavelengths just below and above oxygen edge ({lambda} = 2.32 nm). Using this method, cytoskeleton (microtubules) and organelles (Golgi apparatus and early endosomes) were successfully imaged with high resolution. Thus, immuno-gold silver and gold enhancement technique is useful for specific labeling of intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope.

  5. Observation of immuno-labeled cells at high resolution using soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Takemoto, K.; Fukui, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Okuno, K.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2009-09-01

    Mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells were labeled with the heavy metal (silver and gold) and observed intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope. Microtubules, Golgi apparatus and early endosomes of NIH3T3 cells were stained with immuno-gold nanoparticles, and immuno-staining was intensified by silver or gold enhancement procedure. Using a transmission soft X-ray microscope beamline (BL12) at Ritsumeikan University SR center, we observed immuno-stained NIH3T3 cells with several wavelengths just below and above oxygen edge (λ = 2.32 nm). Using this method, cytoskeleton (microtubules) and organelles (Golgi apparatus and early endosomes) were successfully imaged with high resolution. Thus, immuno-gold silver and gold enhancement technique is useful for specific labeling of intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope.

  6. High-resolution x-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in highly correlated electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghazi, M E

    2002-01-01

    addition, another very weak satellites with wavevector (1/2, 1, 1/2) were observed possibly due to spin ordering. two-dimensional in nature both by measurements of their correlation lengths and by measurement of the critical exponents of the charge stripe melting transition with an anomaly at x = 0.25. The results show by decreasing the hole concentration from the x = 0.33 to 0.2, the well-correlated charge stripes change to a glassy state at x = 0.25. The electronic transition into the charge stripe phase is second-order without any corresponding structural transition. Above the second-order transition critical scattering was observed due to fluctuations into the charge stripe phase. In a single-crystal of Nd sub 1 sub / sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub / sub 2 MnO sub 3 a series of phase transitions were observed using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering. Above the charge ordering transition temperature, T sub C sub O , by measuring the peak profiles of Bragg reflections as a function of temperature, it was foun...

  7. A high resolution large x-ray mission based on thin glass: optomechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Stefano; Buratti, Enrico; Civitani, Marta; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Spiga, Daniele; Ghigo, Mauro; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Eder, Josef

    2014-07-01

    The technology of X-ray optics based on very thin glass sheets curved on mandrels figured to an optical quality have been quickly developed in these last years, as the on flight NUSTAR or the glass solutions for the IXO mission have demonstrated. Different possibilities to freeze the correct shape can be chosen and the constrains to the glass can widely affect the response in term of strength and quality. This study shows the opto-mechanical performances of the design based on the hot slumped glass sheets stiffed with reinforcing ribs. With this concept a glass stack can be integrated into a mechanical structure in order to form a module that can be assembled in a large structure. The considered input data and requirements are those specified for the proposed Athena mission. Different types of materials are considered following the latest progress in the slumping and the availability of alternative tougher glass. Static and dynamic FE analyses coupled with ray-tracing are performed in order to reach a high resolution (less than 5 arcsec). Also an optimization of the ribs distribution is implemented in function of the radius of curvature.

  8. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the magnetic Of?p star HD148937

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Y; Walborn, N R

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution data of the peculiar magnetic massive star HD148937 were obtained with Chandra-HETGS, and are presented here in combination with a re-analysis of the older XMM-RGS data. The lines of the high-Z elements (Mg, Si, S) were found to be unshifted and relatively narrow (FWHM of about 800km/s), i.e. narrower than the O line recorded by RGS, which possibly indicates that the hot plasma is multi-thermal and has several origins. These data further indicate a main plasma temperature of about 0.6keV and a formation of the X-ray emission at about one stellar radius above the photosphere. From the spectral fits and the H-to-He line ratios, the presence of very hot plasma is however confirmed, though with a smaller relative strength than for the prototype magnetic oblique rotator $\\theta^1$\\,Ori\\,C. Both stars thus share many similarities, but HD148937 appears less extreme than $\\theta^1$\\,Ori\\,C despite having also a large magnetic confinement parameter.

  9. Quasi-zero dimensional CuB2O4: a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, J.N.

    2010-04-29

    We explore the general phenomenology of resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) using CuB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, a network of CuO{sub 4} plaquettes electronically isolated by B{sup +3} ions. Spectra show a small number of well-separated features, and we exploit the simple electronic structure to explore RIXS phenomenology by developing a calculation which allows for intermediate-state effects ignored in standard approaches. These effects are found to be non-negligible and good correspondence between our model and experiment leads to a simple picture of such phenomenology as the genesis of d {yields} d excitations at the K edge and intermediate-state interference effects.

  10. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  11. High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

    2009-10-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

  12. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 x 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  13. X-ray High-resolution Spectroscopy for Laser-produced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, F.; Scarpellini, D.; Malizia, A.; Gaudio, P.; Richetta, M.; Antonelli, L.

    The study of the emission spectrum gives information about the material generating the spectrum itself and the condition in which this is generated. The wavelength spectra lines are linked to the specific element and plasma conditions (electron temperature, density), while their shape is influenced by several physical effects like Stark and Doppler ones. In this work we study the X-ray emission spectra of a copper laser-produced plasma by using a spherical bent crystal spectrometer to measure the electron temperature. The facility used is the laser TVLPS, at the Tor Vergata University in Rome. It consists of a Nd:Glass source (in first harmonic - 1064 nm) whose pulse parameters are: 8 J in energy, time duration of 15 ns and a focal spot diameter of 200 μm. The adopted spectrometer is based on a spherical bent crystal of muscovite. The device combines the focusing property of a spherical mirror with the Bragg's law. This allows to obtain a great power resolution but a limited range of analysis. In our case the resolution is on average 80 eV. As it is well-known, the position of the detector on the Rowland's circle is linked to the specific spectral range which has been studied. To select the area to be investigated, we acquired spectra by means of a flat spectrometer. The selected area is centered on 8.88 Å. To calibrate the spectrum we wrote a ray-tracing MATLAB code, which calculates the detector alignment parameters and calibration curve. We used the method of line ratio to measure the electron temperature. This is possible because we assumed the plasma to be in LTE condition. The temperature value was obtained comparing the experimental one, given by the line ratio, with the theoretical one, preceded by FLYCHK simulations.

  14. Position resolution limits in pure noble gaseous detectors for X-ray energies from 1 to 60 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D.R. Azevedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The calculated position resolutions for X-ray photons (1–60 keV in pure noble gases at atmospheric pressure are presented. In this work we show the influence of the atomic shells and the detector dimensions on the intrinsic position resolution of the used noble gas. The calculated results were obtained by using a new software tool, Degrad, and compared to the available experimental data.

  15. A high spatial resolution X-ray and H-alpha study of hot gas in the halos of star-forming disk galaxies. I. Spatial and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2003-01-01

    We present arcsecond resolution Chandra X-ray and ground-based optical H-alpha imaging of a sample of ten edge-on star-forming disk galaxies (seven starburst and three ``normal'' spiral galaxies), a sample which covers the full range of star-formation intensity found in disk galaxies. We use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory to robustly remove point sources, and hence obtain the X-ray properties of the diffuse thermal emission alone. The X-ray observations are combined with comparable-resolution H-alpha and R-band imaging, and presented as a mini-atlas of images on a common spatial and surface brightness scale. The vertical distribution of the halo-region X-ray surface brightness is best described as an exponential, with the observed scale heights lying in the range H_eff = 2 -- 4 kpc. The ACIS X-ray spectra of extra-planar emission from all these galaxies can be fit with a common two-temperature spectral model with an enhanced alpha-to-iron element ratio. This is consisten...

  16. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering on Ferrous and Ferric Bis-imidazole Porphyrin and Cytochrome c: Nature and Role of the Axial Methionine–Fe Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Axial Cu–S(Met) bonds in electron transfer (ET) active sites are generally found to lower their reduction potentials. An axial S(Met) bond is also present in cytochrome c (cyt c) and is generally thought to increase the reduction potential. The highly covalent nature of the porphyrin environment in heme proteins precludes using many spectroscopic approaches to directly study the Fe site to experimentally quantify this bond. Alternatively, L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) enables one to directly focus on the 3d-orbitals in a highly covalent environment and has previously been successfully applied to porphyrin model complexes. However, this technique cannot be extended to metalloproteins in solution. Here, we use metal K-edge XAS to obtain L-edge like data through 1s2p resonance inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). It has been applied here to a bis-imidazole porphyrin model complex and cyt c. The RIXS data on the model complex are directly correlated to L-edge XAS data to develop the complementary nature of these two spectroscopic methods. Comparison between the bis-imidazole model complex and cyt c in ferrous and ferric oxidation states show quantitative differences that reflect differences in axial ligand covalency. The data reveal an increased covalency for the S(Met) relative to N(His) axial ligand and a higher degree of covalency for the ferric states relative to the ferrous states. These results are reproduced by DFT calculations, which are used to evaluate the thermodynamics of the Fe–S(Met) bond and its dependence on redox state. These results provide insight into a number of previous chemical and physical results on cyt c. PMID:25475739

  17. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  18. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  19. Non-thermal emission from extragalactic radio sources a high resolution broad band (radio to X-rays) approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the study of extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on the importance of the spatial resolution at different wavelengths, and of the combination of observations at different frequency bands. In particular, a substantial step forward in this field is now provided by the new generation X-ray telescopes which are able to image radio sources in between 0.1--10 keV with a spatial resolution comparable with that of the radio telescopes (VLA) and of the optical telescopes. After a brief description of some basic aspects of acceleration mechanisms and of the radiative processes at work in the extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on a number of recent radio, optical and X-ray observations with arcsec resolution, and discuss the deriving constraints on the physics of these sources.

  20. Rapid prototyping of Fresnel zone plates via direct Ga(+) ion beam lithography for high-resolution X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Eigenthaler, Ulrike; Weigand, Markus; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-11-26

    A significant challenge to the wide utilization of X-ray microscopy lies in the difficulty in fabricating adequate high-resolution optics. To date, electron beam lithography has been the dominant technique for the fabrication of diffractive focusing optics called Fresnel zone plates (FZP), even though this preparation method is usually very complicated and is composed of many fabrication steps. In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method that allows the direct, simple, and fast fabrication of FZPs using focused Ga(+) beam lithography practically, in a single step. This method enabled us to prepare a high-resolution FZP in less than 13 min. The performance of the FZP was evaluated in a scanning transmission soft X-ray microscope where nanostructures as small as sub-29 nm in width were clearly resolved, with an ultimate cutoff resolution of 24.25 nm, demonstrating the highest first-order resolution for any FZP fabricated by the ion beam lithography technique. This rapid and simple fabrication scheme illustrates the capabilities and the potential of direct ion beam lithography (IBL) and is expected to increase the accessibility of high-resolution optics to a wider community of researchers working on soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet microscopy using synchrotron radiation and advanced laboratory sources.

  1. Development of high angular resolution x-ray telescopes based on slumped glass foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Borsa, F.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Pagano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Salmaso, B.; Sironi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zambra, A.; Parodi, G.; Martelli, F.; Gallieni, D.; Tintori, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.

    2012-09-01

    The mirrors of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) were based on a large number of high quality segments, aiming at achieving a global spatial resolution better than 5” HEW while giving a large collecting area (around 3m2@ 1 keV). A study concerning the hot slumping of thin glass foils was started in Europe, funded by ESA and led by the Brera Astronomical Observatory (INAF-OAB), for the development of a replication technology based on glass material. The study is currently continuing even after the IXO program has been descoped and renamed ATHENA, in the perspective of using the technology under development for other future missions or applications. INAF-OAB efforts have been focused on the "Direct" slumping approach with convex moulds, meaning that during the thermal cycle the optical surface of the glass is in direct contact with the mould surface. The single mirror segments are made of thin glass plates (0.4 mm thick), with a reflecting area of 200 mm × 200 mm. The adopted integration process foresees the use of glass reinforcing ribs for bonding together the plates in such a way to form a rigid and stiff stack of segmented mirror shells; the stack is supported by a thick backplane. During the bonding process, the plates are constrained in close contact with the surface of a precisely figured integration master by the application of vacuum pump suction. In this way, the springback deformations and the low frequency errors still present in the plates' profile after slumping can be corrected. The status of the technology development is presented in this paper, together with the description and metrology of the prototypes already realized or under construction at the Observatory laboratories.

  2. High-resolution soft x-ray photoionization studies of selected molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    Near-edge soft x-ray photoionization spectra were measured for CO, SF{sub 6}, H{sub 2}S, and D{sub 2}S in the gas phase, using the Free University of Berlin plane-grating SX-700-II monochromator at the synchrotron radiation source BESSY. Photoionization spectra of carbon monoxide were measured near the carbon and oxygen K edges. Vibrational spacings and bond lengths are derived for several resonances. Results are consistent with equivalent-core model and indicate the different influences of the carbon and oxygen Is core holes. Corresponding spectra of H{sub 2}CO and D{sub 2}CO were also measured. Assignment of complex vibrational structure in valence-shell and Rydberg resonances is facilitated by comparison of spectra for the two isotopic species. Geometric and vibrational parameters are derived for several carbon 1s core-excited states. Isotopic shifts are observed in the energies and linewidths of some core-excited states. Sulfur hexafluoride photoionization spectra, measured near the sulfur L{sub 2,3} edges, show several series of weak, narrow Rydberg resonances. High resolution and good counting statistics allow a complete assignment of these states. Lineshapes of the broad inner-well resonances are analyzed to establish the magnitudes of vibrational and lifetime broadening in these states. Spectra of the H{sub 2}S and D{sub 2}S molecules were also measured near the sulfur L{sub 2,3} edges. Besides lower-energy transitions to inner-well states, a complex manifold of overlapping Rydberg resonances is observed. The rich fine structure of these states arises mainly from removal of orbital degeneracies in molecular field. Additional structure due to vibrational excitations in the final state is identified by comparison of the spectra for the two isotopic species.

  3. Perspectives on heterococcolith geochemical proxies based on high-resolution X-ray fluorescence mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchéras-Marx, B; Giraud, F; Simionovici, A; Daniel, I; Tucoulou, R

    2016-07-01

    Heterococcoliths are micron-scale calcite platelets produced by coccolithophores. They have been the most abundant and continuous fossil record over the last 215 million years (Myr), offering great potential for geochemical studies, although the heterococcolith fossil record remains underutilised in this domain. We have mapped heterococcoliths' composition using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) with a 100-nm resolution beam to decipher element distributions in heterococcoliths and to investigate the potential development of geochemical proxies for palaeoceanography. The study presents two Middle Jurassic Watznaueria britannica heterococcoliths from Cabo Mondego, Portugal. XRF analysis was performed with a 17 keV incident energy beam at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ID22NI beamline to study elements from Sr down to S. Ca, Sr and Mn are distributed following the heterococcolith crystalline arrangement. Cl, Br and S display an homogeneous distribution, whereas K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb are concentrated at the edges and in the central area of the heterococcoliths. Distributions of K, Fe, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and to a lesser extent V and Cr are highly influenced by clay contamination and peripheral diagenetic overgrowth. Mn is related to diagenetic Mn-rich CaCO3 overgrowth on top of or between heterococcoliths shields. Cl and Br are likely to be present in heterococcoliths inside interstitial nano-domains. We assume that the cytoplasm [Cl(-) ] and [Br(-) ] are mediated and constant during heterococcolithogenesis. Assuming a linear correlation between cytoplasm [Cl(-) ] and sea water [Cl(-) ], heterococcolith Cl may have potential as a salinity proxy. As S is incorporated into heterococcoliths by sulphated polysaccharides, our study suggests a role for such polysaccharides in heterococcolithogenesis for at least 170 Myr. The low Sr/Ca in the W. britannica specimens studied here may either highlight an unusual cellular physiology of Mesozoic coccolithophores or result

  4. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Bursting Pulsar GRO J1744-28

    CERN Document Server

    Degenaar, N; Harrison, F A; Kennea, J A; Kouveliotou, C; Younes, G

    2014-01-01

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/HETG observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E_l ~ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ~ 52 degrees and an inner disk radius of R_in ~ 85 GM/c^2, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ~ (2-6)E10 G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature nea...

  5. High Resolution X-ray Imaging Observations of two low luminosity Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P

    1999-01-01

    An extended component of X-ray emission has been detected in Seyfert galaxies - NGC 1365 and NGC 4051, using the ROSAT HRI. Its size is about 2 kpc and it contains 56% +- 8% of the total observed flux in NGC 1365, and 21% +- 6% in NGC 4051. Extended emission in NGC 1365 is aligned with the inner disk structure, has wings along the east and west direction aligned with the inner spiral arms, and has an elongated edge-brightened structure (``chimney'') breaking out of the disk in the north-west direction. In NGC 4051 it is co-spatial with the disk of the galaxy, and shows an elongation coincident with a ``banana''-like feature in the north-east seen in the 6 cm radio band. Starburst activity driving strong winds through the disk of NGC 1365 can account for most of the extended soft X-ray emission in it. Both nuclear activity and starburst induced activity maybe needed to explain extended X-ray emission in NGC 4051. The nuclear component of NGC 4051 shows soft X-ray variability with X-ray intensity changing by a ...

  6. Theoretical consideration of the energy resolution in planar HPGe detectors for low energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samedov, Victor V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    In this work, theoretical consideration of the processes in planar High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors for low energy X-rays using the random stochastic processes formalism was carried out. Using the random stochastic processes formalism, the generating function of the processes of X-rays registration in a planar HPGe detector was derived. The power serial expansions of the detector amplitude and the variance in terms of the inverse bias voltage were derived. The coefficients of these expansions allow determining the Fano factor, electron mobility lifetime product, nonuniformity of the trap density, and other characteristics of the semiconductor material. (authors)

  7. Determination of Hund's coupling in 5d oxides using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo; Clancy, J. P.; Cook, A. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Greedan, J.; Cao, G.; Jeon, B. C.; Noh, T. W.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Young-June

    2017-06-01

    We report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on ordered double-perovskite samples containing Re5+ and Ir5+ with 5d(2) and 5d(4) electronic configurations, respectively. In particular, the observedRIXS spectra of Ba2YReO6 and Sr2MIrO6 (M = Y, Gd) show sharp intra-t(2g) transitions, which can be quantitatively understood using a minimal "atomic" Hamiltonian incorporating spin-orbit coupling. and Hund's coupling J(H). Our analysis yields lambda = 0.38(2) eV with J(H) = 0.26(2) eV for Re5+ and lambda = 0.42(2) eV with J(H) = 0.25(4) eV for Ir5+. Our results provide sharp estimates for Hund's coupling in 5d oxides and suggest that it should be treated on equal footing with spin-orbit interaction in multiorbital 5d transition-metal compounds.

  8. Interstitial pneumonitis in patients with systemic sclerosis. Analysis by chest x-ray high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kana [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a severe systemic collagen vascular disease of unknown cause characterized by marked vascular and connective tissue abnormalities in the skin and other organs. The lungs are frequently involved in patients with SSc, and pulmonary disease continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is a sensitive technique potentially useful in detecting occult interstitial lung disease in patients with SSc. In the present study, chest X-ray HRCT findings were analyzed in 26 SSc patients in order to identify the characteristic morphological changes of interstitial pneumonitis in SSc patients. Interstitial pneumonitis was found in 21 patients (81%) with SSc. Chest X-ray CT findings in SSc patients were quite uniform and were characterized by sharply bordering dense attenuation and the predominance of ring-like lesions. Main lesions were located in the lower and posterior lung fields in a peripheral lobular pattern. There was no correlation between the extent of the interstitial lung disease and the duration from onset of SSc. In conclusion, it was found that, in patients with SSc, interstitial pneumonitis can be identified by characteristic chest X-ray CT findings. Furthermore, analysis of chest X-ray CT findings is useful in assessing the severity, clinical course and prognosis of patients with SSc. (author)

  9. Evidence for Accretion High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of the Classical T Tauri Star TW Hydrae

    CERN Document Server

    Kästner, J H; Schulz, N S; Canizares, C R; Weintraub, D A; Kastner, Joel H.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Canizares, Claude R.; Weintraub, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We present high resolution X-ray spectra of the X-ray bright classical T Tauri star, TW Hydrae, covering the wavelength range of 1.5-25 AA. The differential emission measure derived from fluxes of temperature-sensitive emission lines shows a plasma with a sharply peaked temperature distribution, peaking at log T = 6.5. Abundance anomalies are apparent, with iron very deficient relative to oxygen, while neon is enhanced relative to oxygen. Density-sensitive line ratios of Ne IX and O VII indicate densities near log n_e = 13. A flare with rapid (~1 ks) rise time was detected during our 48 ksec observation; however, based on analysis of the emission-line spectrum during quiescent and flaring states, the derived plasma parameters do not appear strongly time-dependent. The inferred plasma temperature distribution and densities are consistent with a model in which the bulk of the X-ray emission from TW Hya is generated via mass accretion from its circumstellar disk. Assuming accretion powers the X-ray emission, our...

  10. The first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a Herbig Star: The case of AB Aurigae

    CERN Document Server

    Telleschi, A; Briggs, K R; Skinner, S L; Audard, M; Franciosini, E

    2006-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a prototypical Herbig star (AB Aurigae), measure and interpret various spectral features, and compare our results with model predictions. We use X-ray spectroscopy data from XMM-Newton. The spectra are interpreted using thermal, optically thin emission models with variable element abundances and a photoelectric absorption component. We interpret line flux ratios in He-like triplet of O VII as a function of electron density and the UV radiation field. We use the nearby co-eval classical T Tauri star SU Aur as a comparison. AB Aurigae reveals a soft X-ray spectrum, most plasma being concentrated at 1-6 MK. The He-like triplet reveals no signatures of increased densities and there are no clear indications for strong abundance anomalies. The light curve displays modulated variability, with a period of ~ 42 hr. It is unlikely that a nearby, undetected lower-mass companion is the source of the X-rays. Accretion shocks close to the star should be irradiated by t...

  11. Applications of non-periodic multilayer optics for high-resolution x-ray microscopes below 30 keVa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussel, Ph.; Dennetiere, D.; Rousseau, A.; Darbon, S.; Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S.; Krumrey, M.

    2012-10-01

    Multilayer mirrors with enhanced bandwidth were developed with special performances for dense plasma diagnostics and mainly for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging. The multilayer coatings are designed to provide broadband x-ray reflectance at low grazing incidence angles. They are deposited onto toroidal mirror substrates. Our research is directed at the development of non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer specifically designed for use in the 1 to 30 keV photon energy band. First, we present a study for a 5 to 22 keV x-ray spectral window at 0.45° grazing angle. The goal is to obtain a high and constant reflectivity. Second, we have modeled a broadband mirror coating for harder x-rays in the range from 10 to 30 keV, with a non-periodic structure containing 300 W/SiC layers with periods in the range from 0.8 to 4 nm, designed for 0.35° grazing incidence angle.

  12. High-resolution X-ray study of the multiple ionization of Pd atoms by fast oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnota, M.; Banas, D.; Pajek, M. [Jan Kochanowski Univ., Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.P.; Mauron, O.; Raboud, P.A. [Fribourg Univ., Dept. of Physics (Switzerland); Chmielewska, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Polasik, M.; Slabkowska, K. [Nicholas Copernicus Univ., Faculty of Chemistry, Torun (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    The multiple ionization of the L- and M-shells of Pd by fast oxygen ions has been studied by measuring with high-resolution the satellite structures of the Lalpha{sub 1,2} X-ray transitions. Relativistic multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations were used to interpret the complex X-ray spectrum, allowing to derive the number of L- and M-shell spectator vacancies at the moment of the X-ray emission. After correcting these numbers for the atomic vacancy rearrangement processes that take place prior to the X-ray emission, the ionization probabilities corresponding to the collision time were obtained. The latter were compared to predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the geometrical model. The SCA calculations were performed using relativistic hydrogenic and self-consistent Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) electronic wave functions. It was found that the use of the more realistic DHF wave functions in the SCA calculations leads to a much better description of the measured ionization probabilities for both the L- and M-shells. (authors)

  13. High-resolution membrane protein structure by joint calculations with solid-state NMR and X-ray experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ming; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Berthold, Deborah A. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology (United States); Nesbitt, Anna E.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Gennis, Robert B.; Rienstra, Chad M., E-mail: rienstra@scs.illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2011-11-15

    X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are the staple methods for revealing atomic structures of proteins. Since crystals of biomolecular assemblies and membrane proteins often diffract weakly and such large systems encroach upon the molecular tumbling limit of solution NMR, new methods are essential to extend structures of such systems to high resolution. Here we present a method that incorporates solid-state NMR restraints alongside of X-ray reflections to the conventional model building and refinement steps of structure calculations. Using the 3.7 A crystal structure of the integral membrane protein complex DsbB-DsbA as a test case yielded a significantly improved backbone precision of 0.92 A in the transmembrane region, a 58% enhancement from using X-ray reflections alone. Furthermore, addition of solid-state NMR restraints greatly improved the overall quality of the structure by promoting 22% of DsbB transmembrane residues into the most favored regions of Ramachandran space in comparison to the crystal structure. This method is widely applicable to any protein system where X-ray data are available, and is particularly useful for the study of weakly diffracting crystals.

  14. Hot-Electron Tunneling sensors for high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; Netel, H.

    1997-02-07

    Over the past 2 years, we have been studying the use of Hot Electron Tunneling sensors for use in high-energy-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. These sensors promise several advantages over existing cryogenic sensors, including simultaneous high count rate and high resolution capability, and relative ease of use. Using simple shadow mask lithography, we verified the basic principles of operation of these devices and discovered new physics in their thermal behavior as a function applied voltage bias. We also began to develop ways to use this new sensor in practical x-ray and gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting absorbers. This requires the use of quasiparticle trapping to concentrate the signal in the sensing elements.

  15. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  16. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  17. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-10-21

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions.

  18. Energy resolution of a silicon detector with the RX64 ASIC designed for X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollini, D.; Cabal Rodriguez, A.E.; Dabrowski, W.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Giubellino, P.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Montano, L.M.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L. E-mail: ramello@to.infn.it; Sitta, M.; Swientek, K.; Wheadon, R.; Wiacek, P

    2003-12-11

    Results from a silicon microstrip detector coupled to the RX64 ASIC are presented. The system is capable of single photon counting in digital X-ray imaging, with foreseen applications to dual energy mammography and angiography. The main features of the detecting system are low noise (operation with threshold as low as {approx}4 keV is possible), good spatial resolution (a pixel of 100 {mu}mx300 {mu}m when oriented edge-on) and good counting rate capability (up to one million counts per channel with a maximum rate of about 200 kHz per channel). The energy resolution of the system, as obtained with several fluorescence X-ray lines, is described.

  19. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Welgand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, C.; Denlinger, J.; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, W.; Hussain, Z.; Gullikson, E.; Jones, M.; Batson, P.; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-06-11

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft s-rays that coverst the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite is slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as (30 x 3000) micrometers squared, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scatters (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken with 10 min.

  20. Winds in the AGN environment : new perspectives from high resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gesu, L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, winds were recognized as an important ingredient in the AGN picture. Outflows of photoionized gas, which produce blueshifted absorption features detectable in the X-ray and in the UV band, are present in about 50% of Seyfert 1 galaxies. Combining observations at high spectral resolu

  1. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of a high-resolution X-ray CT system for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, A.; Thierry, R.; Flisch, A.; Sennhauser, U.; Casali, F.; Simon, M.

    2007-12-01

    An X-ray computed tomography (CT) model based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was developed for simulation of a cone-beam CT system for industrial applications. The full simulation of the X-ray tube, object, and area detector was considered. The model was validated through comparison with experimental measurements of different test objects. There is good agreement between the simulated and measured projections. To validate the model we reduced the beam aperture of the X-ray tube, using a source-collimator, to decrease the scattered radiation from the CT system structure and from the walls of the X-ray shielding room. The degradation of the image contrast using larger beam apertures is also shown. Thereafter, the CT model was used to calculate the spatial distribution and the magnitude of the scattered radiation from different objects. It has been assessed that the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) is below 5% for small aluminum objects (approx. 5 cm path length), and in the case of large aluminum objects (approx. 20 cm path length) it can reach up to a factor of 3 in the region corresponding to the maximum path length. Therefore, the scatter from the object significantly affects quantitative accuracy. The model was also used to evaluate the degradation of the image contrast due to the detector box.

  3. Using x-ray computed tomography in hydrology: Systems, resolutions, and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Hopmans, J.W.; Vaz, C.M.P.;

    2002-01-01

    A combination of advances in experimental techniques and mathematical analysis has made it possible to characterize phase distribution and pore geometry in porous media using non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT). We present qualitative and quantitative CT results for partially saturated...

  4. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  5. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Chris [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2011-04-14

    This project helped pioneer the core capabilities of coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using X rays at synchrotron light source facilities. We developed an apparatus that was used for CDI at the Advanced Light Source, and applied it to 2D and 3D imaging of nanostructures. We also explored a number of conceptual and computational issues on the reconstruction of CDI data.

  6. Fabrication of high resolution and lightweight monocrystalline silicon x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Kolos, Linette D.; Mazzarella, James R.; McKeon, Kevin P.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-09-01

    Monocrystalline silicon as an x-ray mirror substrate material promises significant improvements over the x- ray mirror technologies used to date, since it is mechanically stiff, stress-free, highly thermally conductive, and widely commercially available. Producing highly accurate and lightweight x-ray mirrors from monocrystalline silicon requires a unique and specialized manufacturing process capable of producing mirrors quickly and cost effectively. The identification, development, and testing of this process is the focus of the work described in this proceeding. Monocrystalline silicon blocks were obtained, and a variety of processes (wire electro-discharge machining, etching, polishing) were applied to generate an accurate and stress-free cylindrical or Wolter-I mirror surface. The mirror surface is then sliced off at a thickness of mirror segment with mirror production process requires ~2 days to produce a mirror segment and is easily integrated into a cost-reducing parallel processing scheme. Presently, there is strong evidence that the mirror production process described in this paper will meet the stringent requirements of future x-ray missions.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray tests of an L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror for the analyzer system of the ultra-high-resolution IXS spectrometer at NSLS-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnicke, Marcelo G; Keister, Jeffrey W; Conley, Raymond; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Takacs, Peter Z; Coburn, David Scott; Reffi, Leo; Cai, Yong Q

    2011-11-01

    Characterization and testing of an L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror are presented. This mirror is designed as a two-dimensional collimating optics for the analyzer system of the ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) spectrometer at National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The characterization includes point-to-point reflectivity measurements, lattice parameter determination and mirror metrology (figure, slope error and roughness). The synchrotron X-ray test of the mirror was carried out reversely as a focusing device. The results show that the L-shaped laterally graded multilayer mirror is suitable to be used, with high efficiency, for the analyzer system of the IXS spectrometer at NSLS-II.

  8. Analysis of X-ray Spectra of High-Z Elements obtained on Nike with high spectral and spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Yefim; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The spectra of multi-charged ions of Hf, Ta, W, Pt, Au and Bi have been studied on Nike krypton-fluoride laser facility with the help of two kinds of X-ray spectrometers. First, survey instrument covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms which allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of above mentioned elements with high spectral resolution. Second, an imaging spectrometer with interchangeable spherically bent Quartz crystals that added higher efficiency, higher spectral resolution and high spatial resolution to the qualities of the former one. Multiple spectral lines with X-ray energies as high as 4 keV that belong to the isoelectronic sequences of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were identified with the help of NOMAD package developed by Dr. Yu. Ralchenko and colleagues. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, this campaign covered a wide range of plasma conditions that result in production of relatively energetic X-rays. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BURSTING PULSAR GRO J1744-28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kennea, J. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Younes, G., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E {sub l} ≅ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ≅ 52° and an inner disk radius of R {sub in} ≅ 85 GM/c {sup 2}, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ≅ (2-6) × 10{sup 10} G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature near ≅ 6.85 keV that could correspond to blue-shifted Fe XXV and point to a fast disk wind with an outflow velocity of v {sub out} ≅ (7.5-8.2) × 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (≅ 0.025c-0.027c). If the covering fraction and filling factor are large, this wind could be energetically important and perhaps account for the fact that the companion star lost significant mass while the magnetic field of the neutron star remained strong.

  10. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  11. Frontiers in x-ray components for high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging laminar type varied-line-spacing holographic gratings for soft x-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, K

    2003-01-01

    Laminar-type varied-line-spacing gratings have been widely used for soft x-ray monochromator recently because of the features of low stray lights and higher order lights. We have developed and advanced holographic recording and an ion-beam etching methods for the laminar type varied-line spacing gratings. This report describes a short review of the soft x-ray spectrometers using varied-line-spacing gratings, the fabrication process of the laminar-type holographic gratings, and the performance of the flat field spectrographs equipped with the laminar type varied-line spacing gratings comparing with the mechanically ruled replica gratings. It is concluded that, for the sake of the advanced design and fabrication processes and excellent spectroscopic performance, laminar-type holographic gratings will be widely used for soft x-ray spectrometers for various purposes in the near future. (author)

  12. Development of a Laboratory Micron-Resolution X-ray Microprobe to Map Mineralogy and Trace Elements at PPM Sensitivity for Digital Rock, Magma, and Mining Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, W.; Lewis, S.; Stripe, B.; Chen, S.; Reynolds, D.; Spink, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    We are developing a patent-pending x-ray microprobe with substantially unprecedented performance attributes: working distances of >2 cm, narrow spectral bandwidth, and large x-ray flux. The outstanding performance is enabled by: (1) a revolutionary new type of high flux x-ray source designed to be >10X brighter than the brightest rotating anode x-ray source available; (2) an axially symmetric x-ray mirror lens with large solid angle collection and high focusing efficiency; and (3) a detector configuration that enables the collection of 10X more x-rays than current microXRF designs. The sensitivity will be ppm-scale, far surpassing charged particle analysis (e.g. EPMA and SEM-EDS), and >1000X throughput over the leading micro-XRFs. Despite the introduction of a number of laboratory microXRF systems in the past decade, the state-of-the-art has been limited primarily by low resolution (~30 μm) and low throughput. This is substantially attributable to a combination of low x-ray source brightness and poor performance x-ray optics. Here we present our initial results in removing the x-ray source bottleneck, in which we use a novel x-ray source using Fine Anode Array Source Technology (Sigray FAAST™). When coupled with our proprietary high efficiency x-ray mirror lens, the throughput achieved is comparable to that of many synchrotron microXRF beamlines. Potential applications of the x-ray microprobe include high throughput mapping of mineralogy at high resolution, including trace elements, such as rare earth metals, and deposits (e.g. siderite, clays), with ppm sensitivity, providing information for properties such as permeability and elastic/mechanical properties, and to provide compositional information for Digital Rock. Additional applications include those in which the limited penetration of electrons limits achieving adequate statistics, such as determining the concentration of precious minerals in mine tailings.

  13. Investigation of slow collisions for (quasi) symmetric heavy systems: what can be extracted from high resolution X-ray spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, Martino; Lamour, Emily; Mezdari, Férid; Merot, Jacques; Reuschl, Regina; Rozet, Jean-Pierre; Steydli, S; Vernhet, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    We present a new experiment on (quasi) symmetric collision systems at low-velocity, namely Ar$^{17+}$ ions ($v=0.53$ a.u.) on gaseous Ar and N$_2$ targets, using low- and high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. Thanks to an accurate efficiency calibration of the spectrometers, we extract absolute X-ray emission cross sections combining low-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and a complete determination of the ion beam - gas jet target overlap. Values with improved uncertainty are found in agreement with previous results \\cite{Tawara2001}. Resolving the whole He-like Ar$^{16+}$ Lyman series from $n=2$ to 10 with our crystal spectrometer enables to determine precisely the distribution ${\\mathcal{P}_n}$ of the electron capture probability and the preferential $n_{pref}$ level of the selective single-electron capture. Evaluation of cross sections for this process as well as for the contribution of multiple-capture is carried out. Their sensitivity to the $\\ell$-distribution of $n$ levels populated by single-electron captu...

  14. Slumped glass optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray astronomy: a progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Breunig, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G. D.; Menz, B.

    2015-09-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, as e.g. the proposed Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration, and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The achievable global angular resolution of the optics relies on the surface shape accuracy of the slumped foils, on the smoothness of the mirror surfaces and on the correct integration and co-alignment of the mirror segments achieved with a dedicated Integration Machine (IMA). In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we will present the results obtained with full illumination X-ray tests for the last developed prototypes.

  15. A High Position Resolution X-ray Detector: an Edge on Illuminated Capillary Plate Combined with a Gas Amplification Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Ostling, J; Pavlopoulos, P; Peskov, Vladimir; Tokanai, F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested a prototype of a new type of high position resolution hybrid X-ray detector. It contains a thin wall lead glass capillary plate converter of X-rays combined with a microgap parallel-plate avalanche chamber filled with gas at 1 atm. The operation of these converters was studied in a wide range of X-ray energies (from 6 to 60 keV) at incident angles varying from 0-90 degree. The detection efficiency, depending on the geometry, photon energy, incident angle and the mode of operation, was between 5-30 percent in a single step mode and up to 50 percent in a multi-layered combination. Depending on the capillary geometry, the position resolution achieved was between 0.050-0.250 mm in digital form and was practically independent of the photon energy or gas mixture. The usual lead glass capillary plates operated without noticeable charging up effects at counting rates of 50 Hz/mm2, and hydrogen treated capillaries up to 10E5 Hz/mm2. The developed detector may open new possibil...

  16. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  17. Simple and robust synchrotron and laboratory solutions for high-resolution multimodal X-ray phase-based imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, M.; Vittoria, F. A.; Diemoz, P. C.; Kallon, G. K.; Basta, D.; Zamir, A.; Hagen, C. K.; Wagner, U. H.; Rau, C.; Robinson, I. K.; Olivo, A.

    2017-06-01

    Edge illumination X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques are capable of quantitative retrieval of differential phase, absorption and X-ray scattering. We have recently developed a series of approaches enabling high-resolution implementations, both using synchrotron radiation and laboratory-based set-ups. Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorption, phase and dark-field can be achieved with a simple rotation of the sample. All these approaches share a common trait which consists in the use of an absorber that shapes the radiation field, in order to make the phase modulations introduced by the sample detectable. This enables a well-defined and high-contrast structuring of the radiation field as well as an accurate modelling of the effects that are related to the simultaneous use of a wide range of energies. Moreover, it can also be adapted for use with detectors featuring large pixel sizes, which could be desirable when a high detection efficiency is important.

  18. Study of laser deposited W/Si multilayers for high-resolution transmission X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, Christian; Doering, Florian; Liese, Tobias; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Georg-August-University, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    High quality non-periodic W/Si multilayers were pulsed laser deposited (PLD) at 248 nm for the use as high-resolution transmission X-ray optics (multilayer Laue lenses) and studied by thickness monitoring, SEM, TEM, and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Due to the large difference in melting point, the ablation threshold, deposition rate as well as droplet formation of the both components W and Si strongly differ. Furthermore, during deposition of W/Si multilayers thickness deficits up to 2 nm due to resputtering and WSi{sub 2} interlayers occur. Thus, in order to ensure a defined deposition of high-quality multilayers, two distinct element specific sets of optimized preparation conditions had to be worked out. In this contribution, this process of optimization is described in detail and the underlying mechanisms are discussed, also in comparison with SRIM simulations.

  19. Structural properties of GaN(0001) epitaxial layers revealed by high resolution X-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction has been used to analyze GaN(0001) epitaxial layers on sapphire substrates. Several structural properties of GaN, including the lattice constants, strains, and dislocation densities are revealed by the technique of X-ray dffraction (XRD). Lattice constants calculated from the omega/2theta scan are c=0.5185 nm and a=0.3157 nm. Also, the in-plane strain is -1.003%, while out of the plane, the epitaxial film is almost relaxed. Several methods are used to deduce the mosaicity and dislocation density of GaN, showing that the edge type dislocations are the overwhelming majority.

  20. Influence of spatial resolution on SiC industrial foams structural parameters obtained by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Rodrigo; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Marques, Leonardo C.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: X-rays microtomography is a non-destructive technique that generates digital images of samples internal structure by attenuation of an X-rays beam. The samples structural parameters are obtained from these images by specific software analysis. This means that the image quality is essential to perform a suitable structural characterization. The spatial resolution is one of the main parameters that contribute to image quality. In this work the influence of spatial resolution for industrial SiC ceramic foams analysis was evaluated. The samples pore density was 60 pores per inch (ppi). This kind of foam can operate at high temperatures, which allow them to be used as liquid metal filters, heat exchangers or composite of rocket nozzles, for example. The measurements were performed with a Sky Scan micro tomograph, model 1172. It was operated at 50 kV and 60 kV high tension for measurements with 24.8 mum and 2.5 mum spatial resolution, respectively. The total porosity and the pore size distribution were the structural parameters studied. They were obtained by Imago software. The total porosity results were statistically equivalent for both resolutions, but the comparison of the micro tomographic images datasets and pore size distributions of both resolutions showed differences that enhances the importance of the spatial resolution for a complete characterization of the sample internal microstructure. (author)

  1. Hard X-ray Spectrographs with Resolution Beyond 100 micro-eV

    OpenAIRE

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav; Mundboth, Kiran; Kim, Jungho

    2012-01-01

    Spectrographs take snapshots of photon spectra with array detectors by dispersing photons of different energies into distinct directions and spacial locations. Spectrographs require optics with a large angular dispersion rate as the key component. In visible light optics diffraction gratings are used for this purpose. In the hard x-ray regime, achieving large dispersion rates is a challenge. Here we show that multi-crystal, multi-Bragg-reflection arrangements feature cumulative angular disper...

  2. Design of the high-resolution soft X-ray imaging system on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianchao; Ding, Yonghua, E-mail: yhding@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xiao, Zhengyu; Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A new soft X-ray diagnostic system has been designed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) aiming to observe and survey the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities. The system consists of five cameras located at the same toroidal position. Each camera has 16 photodiode elements. Three imaging cameras view the internal plasma region (r/a < 0.7) with a spatial resolution about 2 cm. By tomographic method, heat transport outside from the 1/1 mode X-point during the sawtooth collapse is found. The other two cameras with a higher spatial resolution 1 cm are designed for monitoring local MHD activities respectively in plasma core and boundary.

  3. Objectives and Layout of a High-Resolution X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Gates, D; Monticello, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H

    2010-07-29

    A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose concept was tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is being designed for LHD. This instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of < 2 cm and ≥ 10 ms. The stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES, will be used for the tomographic inversion of the spectral data. The spectrometer layout and instrumental features are largely determined by the magnetic field structure of LHD.

  4. Accurate Measurements of Dielectric and Optical Functions of Liquid Water and Liquid Benzene in the VUV Region (1-100 eV) Using Small-Angle Inelastic X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisashi; Hiraoka, Nozomu

    2015-04-30

    Using a third-generation synchrotron source (the BL12XU beamline at SPring-8), inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) spectra of liquid water and liquid benzene were measured at energy losses of 1-100 eV with 0.24 eV resolution for small momentum transfers (q) of 0.23 and 0.32 au with ±0.06 au uncertainty for q. For both liquids, the IXS profiles at these values of q converged well after we corrected for multiple scattering, and these results confirmed the dipole approximation for q ≤ ∼0.3 au. Several dielectric and optical functions [including the optical oscillator strength distribution (OOS), the optical energy-loss function (OLF), the complex dielectric function, the complex index of refraction, and the reflectance] in the vacuum ultraviolet region were derived and tabulated from these small-angle (small q) IXS spectra. These new data were compared with previously obtained results, and this comparison demonstrated the strong reproducibility and accuracy of IXS spectroscopy. For both water and benzene, there was a notable similarity between the OOSs of the liquids and amorphous solids, and there was no evidence of plasmon excitation in the OLF. The static structure factor [S(q)] for q ≤ ∼0.3 au was also deduced and suggests that molecular models that include electron correlation effects can serve as a good approximation for the liquid S(q) values over the full range of q.

  5. A directly converting high-resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Spartiotis, K; Schulman, T; Puhakka, K; Muukkonen, K

    2003-01-01

    A digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor with an active area of 3.6x2.9 cm sup 2 and consisting of six charge-integrating CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to one high-resistivity silicon pixel detector has been developed and tested. The pixel size is 35 mu m. The X-rays entering the sensor window are converted directly to electrical charge in the depleted detector material yielding minimum lateral signal spread and maximum image sharpness. The signal charge is collected on the gates of the input field effect transistors of the CMOS signal readout circuits. The analog signal readout is performed by multiplexing in the current mode independent of the signal charge collection enabling multiple readout cycles with negligible dead time and thus imaging with wide dynamic range. Since no intermediate conversion material of X-rays to visible light is needed, the sensor structure is very compact. The analog image signals are guided from the sensor output through a thin cable to signal processing, AD conversio...

  6. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-15

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  7. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and heavy-ion impact atomic collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajay Kumar; D Misra; A H Kelkar; U R Kadhane; K V Thulasiram; Lokesh C Tribedi

    2007-06-01

    We have studied fast ion–atom and electron–atom collision processes using a reconditioned high resolution X-ray spectrometer. The X-rays, generated by the collisions, are dispersed by a curved ADP crystal (Johansson geometry) and detected by a gas proportional counter. A self-written LabVIEW based program has been used to give precise and controlled movement to the crystal and for data acquisition. The performance was tested by detecting the K diagram and satellite lines of several elements. The K satellite lines of Al have been studied in collision with 3–12 keV electrons and 40 MeV C4+ ions. In ion collisions as large as four L-vacancies are created simultaneously with the K-vacancy, compared to two satellites in case of the e-impact. In addition, we have measured the X-rays from H-, He- and Li-like Si ions which arise due to the electron loss/capture process in highly charged 80 MeV Si7+ ions in collision with thin carbon foil. Approximate charge state distribution has been obtained using this new technique.

  8. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; B& #228; r, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

    2008-06-17

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

  9. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct Polishing of Full-Shell, High-Resolution X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Jacqueline M.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Smith, W. Scott; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray telescopes will likely require lightweight mirrors to attain the large collecting areas needed to accomplish the science objectives. Understanding and demonstrating processes now is critical to achieving sub-arcsecond performance in the future. Consequently, designs not only of the mirrors but of fixtures for supporting them during fabrication, metrology, handling, assembly, and testing must be adequately modeled and verified. To this end, MSFC is using finite-element modeling to study the effects of mounting on thin, full-shell grazing-incidence mirrors, during all processes leading to a flight.

  11. X-ray diffuse scattering measurements of nucleation dynamics at femtosecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberg, A M; Engemann, S; Gaffney, K J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Larsson, J; Hillyard, P B; Reis, D A; Fritz, D M; Arthur, J; Akre, R A; George, M J; Deb, A; Bucksbaum, P H; Hajdu, J; Meyer, D A; Nicoul, M; Blome, C; Tschentscher, Th; Cavalieri, A L; Falcone, R W; Lee, S H; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Nelson, A J; Krejcik, P; Siddons, D P; Lorazo, P; Hastings, J B

    2008-04-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved small and wide angle x-ray diffuse scattering techniques are applied to investigate the ultrafast nucleation processes that occur during the ablation process in semiconducting materials. Following intense optical excitation, a transient liquid state of high compressibility characterized by large-amplitude density fluctuations is observed and the buildup of these fluctuations is measured in real time. Small-angle scattering measurements reveal snapshots of the spontaneous nucleation of nanoscale voids within a metastable liquid and support theoretical predictions of the ablation process.

  12. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  13. Thickness measurement of GaN epilayer using high resolution X-ray diffraction technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯淦; 朱建军; 沈晓明; 张宝顺; 赵德刚; 王玉田; 杨辉; 梁骏吾

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for measuring the thickness of the GaN epilayer, by using the ratio of the integrated intensity of the GaN epilayer X-ray diffraction peaks to that of the sapphire substrate ones. This ratio shows a linear dependence on the GaN epilayer thickness up to 2 μm. The new method is more accurate and convenient than those of using the relationship between the integrated intensity of GaN epilayer diffraction peaks and the GaN thickness. Besides, it can eliminate the absorption effect of the GaN epilayer.

  14. X-ray diffuse scattering measurements of nucleation dynamics at femtosecond resolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberg, A. M.; Engemann, S.; Gaffney, K. J.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Larsson, J.; Rudati, J.; Fuoss, P. H. (Advanced Photon Source); ( MSD); (Stanford Linear Acelerator Center); (Stanford Univ.); (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); (Univ. Duisberg-Essen); (Lund Inst. of Tech.); (Univ. of Michigan); (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY); (Max-Planck Inst. Quantum Optics); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Korea Research Inst. Standards and Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (LLNL); (BNL); (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal)

    2008-03-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved small and wide angle x-ray diffuse scattering techniques are applied to investigate the ultrafast nucleation processes that occur during the ablation process in semiconducting materials. Following intense optical excitation, a transient liquid state of high compressibility characterized by large-amplitude density fluctuations is observed and the buildup of these fluctuations is measured in real time. Small-angle scattering measurements reveal snapshots of the spontaneous nucleation of nanoscale voids within a metastable liquid and support theoretical predictions of the ablation process.

  15. Three-Dimensional High-Resolution Optical/X-Ray Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Soyoung S.; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of three-dimensional (3-D) three-component velocity fields is of great importance in a variety of research and industrial applications for understanding materials processing, fluid physics, and strain/displacement measurements. The 3-D experiments in these fields most likely inhibit the use of conventional techniques, which are based only on planar and optically-transparent-field observation. Here, we briefly review the current status of 3-D diagnostics for motion/velocity detection, for both optical and x-ray systems. As an initial step for providing 3-D capabilities, we nave developed stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) to measure 3-D flow/deformation through optical observation. The STV is advantageous in system simplicity, for continually observing 3- D phenomena in near real-time. In an effort to enhance the data processing through automation and to avoid the confusion in tracking numerous markers or particles, artificial neural networks are employed to incorporate human intelligence. Our initial optical investigations have proven the STV to be a very viable candidate for reliably measuring 3-D flow motions. With previous activities are focused on improving the processing efficiency, overall accuracy, and automation based on the optical system, the current efforts is directed to the concurrent expansion to the x-ray system for broader experimental applications.

  16. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy with a Grating Spectrometer Explorer on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    We present the design and scientific motivation for a X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be deployed on the International Space Station. This mission would observe the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, feedback from supermassive black holes, and the structure of the interstellar medium and halo of the Milky Way, amongst other goals. The mission requirements are similar to those of the IXO X-ray Grating Spectrometer of R=3000 and 1000 cm(2) \\ of effective area at 0.5 keV, with a full bandpass covering at least between 0.3-1 keV. Our initial design baselines the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission with a 4.3 m focal length, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs. This mission would achieve core science described in the 2010 New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal survey performed by the US National Research Council while effectively using the ISS and at low cost and low risk.

  17. Resolution effect in X-ray microcomputed tomography imaging and small pore's contribution to permeability for a Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Marone, Federica; Dultz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Resolution selection when using X-ray microcomputed tomography should be made based on the compromise between accuracy and representativeness. The question is then how accurate is accurate enough, that is, how small a pore is small enough to be ignored without generating misleading results on pore representation and subsequent flow properties such as permeability. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomographic scans of a Berea sandstone sample were acquired for two resolutions (with 1.85 and 5.92 μm pixel width). Higher resolution images resolve more small pores, and have similar large pores as the lower resolution images. Pore characterization and permeability estimation were conducted based on these two sets of images. The pore parameters and permeability were also measured for another larger sample from the same rock fragment through laboratory experiments. The comparison between the different resolution image analyses and the laboratory measurement indicates that small pores contribute to larger porosity, smaller tortuosity, and larger surface area, but do not influence permeability significantly. Therefore, relatively low resolution (pixel width up to 5.92 μm) can be used for Berea sandstone when permeability is the focus. However, use of even lower resolution needs to be careful since lower resolution not only excludes more small pores, but also has the potential to overestimate the pore size and thereby the permeability. Kozeny-Carman equation was used to estimate the permeability with geometric and diffusional tortuosity. The results indicate that the latter tortuosity can serve better for the permeability estimation than the former.

  18. High resolution X-ray scattering techniques for studying the sliding CDWS distortions, in NbSe sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Rideau, D; Currat, R; Requardt, H; Nad, F Y; Lorenzo, J E; Brazovskii, S; Detlefs, C; Grübel, G

    2001-01-01

    The phase gradient in a sliding-charge density wave (CDW), which is observable as a longitudinal shift, q propor to partial deriv phi/partial deriv x, of the CDW satellite peak position, is due to the conversion free-electrons CDW-condensate, at the current electrodes. Using high resolution X-ray scattering techniques and time-resolved techniques, we monitor, on thin NbSe sub 3 whiskers, the shift, q(x), and its relaxation, q(t), upon switching off the current.

  19. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A G; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L; Hares, J D; Hassett, J; Hatch, B W; Meadowcroft, A L; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Datte, P S; Landen, O L; Palmer, N E; Piston, K W; Rekow, V V; Hilsabeck, T J; Kilkenny, J D

    2016-11-01

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  20. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hares, J. D.; Hassett, J.; Hatch, B. W.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Datte, P. S.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K. W.; Rekow, V. V.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  1. Improving the off-axis spatial resolution and dynamic range of the NIF X-ray streak cameras (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPhee, A. G., E-mail: macphee2@llnl.gov; Hatch, B. W.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Datte, P. S.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K. W.; Rekow, V. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hares, J. D. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Isis Building, Howbery Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BD (United Kingdom); Hassett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Meadowcroft, A. L. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report simulations and experiments that demonstrate an increase in spatial resolution of the NIF core diagnostic x-ray streak cameras by at least a factor of two, especially off axis. A design was achieved by using a corrector electron optic to flatten the field curvature at the detector plane and corroborated by measurement. In addition, particle in cell simulations were performed to identify the regions in the streak camera that contribute the most to space charge blurring. These simulations provide a tool for convolving synthetic pre-shot spectra with the instrument function so signal levels can be set to maximize dynamic range for the relevant part of the streak record.

  2. Pixel readout ASIC for an APD based 2D X-ray hybrid pixel detector with sub-nanosecond resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thil, Ch., E-mail: christophe.thil@ziti.uni-heidelberg.d [Heidelberg University, Institute of Computer Engineering, B6, 26, 68161 Mannheim (Germany); Baron, A.Q.R. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Fajardo, P. [ESRF, Polygone Scientifique Louis Neel, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Fischer, P. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Computer Engineering, B6, 26, 68161 Mannheim (Germany); Graafsma, H. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Rueffer, R. [ESRF, Polygone Scientifique Louis Neel, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2011-02-01

    The fast response and the short recovery time of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in linear mode make those devices ideal for direct X-ray detection in applications requiring high time resolution or counting rate. In order to provide position sensitivity, the XNAP project aims at creating a hybrid pixel detector with nanosecond time resolution based on a monolithic APD sensor array with 32 x32 pixels covering about 1 cm{sup 2} active area. The readout is implemented in a pixelated front-end ASIC suited for the readout of such arrays, matched to pixels of 280{mu}mx280{mu}m size. Every single channel features a fast transimpedance amplifier, a discriminator with locally adjustable threshold and two counters with high dynamic range and counting speed able to accumulate X-ray hits with no readout dead time. Additionally, the detector can be operated in list mode by time-stamping every single event with sub-nanosecond resolution. In a first phase of the project, a 4x4 pixel test module is built to validate the conceptual design of the detector. The XNAP project is briefly presented and the performance of the readout ASIC is discussed.

  3. Structural characterization of three crystalline modifications of telmisartan by single crystal and high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnebier, R E; Sieger, P; Nar, H; Shankland, K; David, W I

    2000-11-01

    Three crystalline modifications (A, B, and C) of 4'-[[2-n-propyl-4-methyl-6-(1-methyl-benzimidazol-2-yl)benzi midazol-1-yl]methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid (INN name, telmisartan) have been detected and their crystal structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (pseudopolymorph C) and the method of simulated annealing from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data (polymorphs A and B). The compound is of interest because of its use as an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Polymorph A crystallizes in space group P2(I)/c, Z = 4, with unit cell parameters a = 18.7798(3), b = 18.1043(2), and c = 8.00578(7) A, beta = 97.066(1) degrees, and V = 2701.31 A(3). Polymorph B crystallizes in space group P2(I)/a, Z = 4, with unit cell parameters a = 16.0646(5), b = 13.0909(3), and c = 13.3231(3) A, beta = 99.402(1) degrees, and V = 2764.2(1) A(3). The solvated form C crystallizes in space group C2/c, Z = 8, with unit cell parameters a = 30.990(5), b = 13.130(3), and c = 16.381(3) A, beta = 95.02(2) degrees, and V = 6639(2) A(3). For the structure solutions of polymorphs A and B, 13 degrees of freedom (3 translational, 3 orientational, 7 torsion angles) were determined in approximately 2 h of computer time, demonstrating that the crystal packing and the molecular conformation of medium-sized (MW approximately 500) pharmaceutical compounds can now be solved quickly and routinely from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data.

  4. High-resolution short-exposure small-animal laboratory x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Vågberg, William; Yaroshenko, Andre; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography of small animals and their organs is an essential tool in basic and preclinical biomedical research. In both phase-contrast and absorption tomography high spatial resolution and short exposure times are of key importance. However, the observable spatial resolutions and achievable exposure times are presently limited by system parameters rather than more fundamental constraints like, e.g., dose. Here we demonstrate laboratory tomography with few-ten μm spatial resolution and few-minute exposure time at an acceptable dose for small-animal imaging, both with absorption contrast and phase contrast. The method relies on a magnifying imaging scheme in combination with a high-power small-spot liquid-metal-jet electron-impact source. The tomographic imaging is demonstrated on intact mouse, phantoms and excised lungs, both healthy and with pulmonary emphysema.

  5. Resonant X-ray diffraction using high-resolution image-plate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, H.; Knapp, M.; Hartmann, T.; Fuess, H. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Fachbereich Materialwissenschaften; Wroblewski, T. [Hamburger Synchrotron Lab., Hamburg (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    The experimental setup for the collection of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data from samples with high absorption ({mu}R > 10) is described. It consists of a combination of a vacuum chamber with an image-plate system. A numerical absorption correction for the applied geometry has been derived and the data were corrected accordingly. Values for f'(Er) and f{sup ''}(Er) were refined from eight measurements on Er{sub 5}Re{sub 2}O{sub 12} above and below the Er L{sub III} absorption edge. Successful refinement of the crystallographic data has verified the high quality of the collected intensities. (orig.)

  6. Phonon density of states of Sn in textured SnO under high pressure: Comparison of nuclear inelastic x-ray scattering spectra to a shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giefers, H.; Koval, S.; Wortmann, G.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.

    2006-09-01

    The local phonon density of states (DOS) at the Sn site in tin monoxide (SnO) is studied at pressures up to 8GPa with Sn119 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) of synchrotron radiation at 23.88keV . The preferred orientation (texture) of the SnO crystallites in the investigated samples is used to measure NRIXS spectra preferentially parallel and almost perpendicular to the c axis of tetragonal SnO . A subtraction method is applied to these NRIXS spectra to produce projected local Sn DOS spectra as seen parallel and perpendicular to the c axis of SnO . These experimentally obtained local Sn DOS spectra, both in the polycrystalline case as well as projected parallel and perpendicular to the c axis, are compared with corresponding theoretical phonon DOS spectra, derived from dispersion relations calculated with a recently developed shell model. Comparison between the experimental projected Sn DOS spectra and the corresponding theoretical DOS spectra enables us to follow the pressure-induced shifts of several acoustic and optic phonon modes. While the principal spectral features of the experimental and theoretical phonon DOS agree well at energies above 10meV , the pressure behavior of the low-energy part of the DOS is not well reproduced by the theoretical calculations. In fact, they exhibit, in contrast to the experimental data, a dramatic softening of two low-energy modes, their energies approaching zero around 2.5GPa , clearly indicating the limitations of the applied shell model. These difficulties are obviously connected with the complex Sn-O and Sn-Sn bindings within and between the Sn-O-Sn layers in the litharge structure of SnO . We derived from the experimental and theoretical DOS spectra a variety of elastic and thermodynamic parameters of the Sn sublattice, such as the Lamb-Mössbauer factor, the mean force constant, and Debye temperatures, as well as the vibrational contributions to the Helmholtz free energy, specific heat, entropy, and

  7. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  8. Measurement of e{sup +}p neutral current deep inelastic scattering with a longitudinally polarised positron beam and X-ray radiation damage for silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januschek, Friederike

    2012-05-15

    The cross sections for Neutral Current e{sup +}p Deep Inelastic Scattering (NC DIS) with longitudinally polarised positron beams were measured at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}(s)=318 GeV using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Single-differential cross sections as a function of the virtuality of the exchanged boson, Q{sup 2}, of the inelasticity, y, and of the Bjorken scaling variable, x, and reduced cross sections (as a function of x and Q{sup 2}) were measured in the phase space region defined as Q{sup 2}>185 GeV{sup 2}, y<0.9 and y(1-x){sup 2}>0.004. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 135.5 pb{sup -1}, are given for zero polarisation for the whole sample, as well as for both positive and negative values of the longitudinal polarisation of the positron beam. The measured cross sections are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. The proton structure function xF{sub 3} is measured and the interference term xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3} is extracted as a function of x at Q{sup 2}=1500 GeV{sup 2} by extrapolating the measurements done at different Q{sup 2} values. The presented measurements of the polarised e{sup +}p NC DIS cross sections, the xF{sub 3} structure function and the xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3} interference term exceed the precision of previous ZEUS measurements. The uncertainties of the Parton Density Functions (PDFs) for the gluon and the u-valence quark are expected to be reduced at high-x values when the presented results are included in the PDF fits of the proton. A study is presented to further reduce PDF uncertainties for the gluon at very high x (above 10{sup -1}) through the inclusion of DIS dijet cross sections in a ZEUS-JETS-like PDF fit. An irradiation facility to study the X-ray-induced radiation damage of silicon sensors for the European XFEL was set up at HASYLAB. Nine gate-controlled diodes were irradiated with doses from 1 kGy to 1 GGy in several irradiation steps and the surface current I

  9. High-resolution spectroscopic diagnostics of very high-temperature plasmas in the hard x-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, K

    1999-12-06

    Motivated by the need for establishing a reliable database useful for the application of x-ray spectroscopic tools for the diagnostic of very high temperature plasmas, high-resolution crystal spectrometer measurements have been performed investigating the characteristic K-shell radiation of highly charged krypton and xenon. The measurements, which have been performed at the Electron-Beam-Ion-Trap (EBIT) facility of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, include the investigation of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike krypton (Kr{sup 34+}) and innershell excited lithiumlike krypton (Kr{sup 33+}) utilizing a conventional reflection-type crystal spectrometer of von Hamos geometry. The electron-excitation-energy selective measurements map the contribution of the dielectronic recombination lines providing the means of accurate interpretation of the line profiles of the characteristic K{alpha} x-ray emission of plasmas. The high-resolution measurements of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike xenon (Xe{sup 52+}) and hydrogenlike xenon (Xe{sup 53+}) were based on a new transmission-type crystal spectrometer of DuMond geometry. The resolving power of the developed spectrometer was sufficient for charge state specific observation allowing the determination of the electron-impact excitation cross section for the hydrogen- and heliumlike K{alpha} transitions. The disagreement with theoretically predicted values is a measure of the magnitude of the Breit interaction for the highly charged high-Z ions.

  10. Germanium Collimating micro-Channel Arrays For High Resolution, High Energy Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agyeman-Budu, David N; Coulthard, Ian; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Woll, Arthur R

    2016-01-01

    Confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy (CXRF) allows direct detection of x-ray fluorescence from a micron-scale 3D volume of an extended, unthinned sample. We have previously demonstrated the use of a novel collection optic, fabricated from silicon, that improves the spatial resolution of this approach by an order of magnitude over CXRF using polycapillaries. The optic, called a collimating channel array (CCA), consists of micron-scale, lithographically-fabricated arrays of collimating channels, all directed towards a single source position. Due to the limited absorbing power of silicon, the useful energy range of these optics was limited to fluorescence emission below about 10 keV. Here, we report fabrication of CCAs from germanium substrates, and demonstrate their practical use for CXRF up to 20 keV. Specifically we demonstrate a nearly energy-independent critical spatial resolution $d_R$ of 2.1$\\pm$0.17 \\um from 2-20 keV, as well as excellent background reduction compared to silicon-based CCAs throughout t...

  11. Atomic-resolution chemical mapping of ordered precipitates in Al alloys using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Sigurd; Jones, Lewys; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2017-05-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a common technique for chemical mapping in thin samples. Obtaining high-resolution elemental maps in the STEM is jointly dependent on stepping the sharply focused electron probe in a precise raster, on collecting a significant number of characteristic X-rays over time, and on avoiding damage to the sample. In this work, 80kV aberration-corrected STEM-EDS mapping was performed on ordered precipitates in aluminium alloys. Probe and sample instability problems are handled by acquiring series of annular dark-field (ADF) images and simultaneous EDS volumes, which are aligned and non-rigidly registered after acquisition. The summed EDS volumes yield elemental maps of Al, Mg, Si, and Cu, with sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise ratio to determine the elemental species of each atomic column in a periodic structure, and in some cases the species of single atomic columns. Within the uncertainty of the technique, S and β" phases were found to have pure elemental atomic columns with compositions Al2CuMg and Al2Mg5Si4, respectively. The Q' phase showed some variation in chemistry across a single precipitate, although the majority of unit cells had a composition Al6Mg6Si7.2Cu2.

  12. Microfabric and anisotropy of elastic waves in sandstone - An observation using high-resolution X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Hinkes, Robert; Feeser, Volker; Holzheid, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Petrophysical experiments, using acoustic velocities to characterise anisotropies of mechanical behaviour of rocks are of essential relevance to understand the geomechanical behaviour of sandstone reservoirs under changing stress fields. Here, we present high-resolution X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) as a supplementary research tool to interpret anisotropic ultrasound velocities in sandstones with variation of isotopic stress. Specimens of two Lower Cretaceous sandstones (localities Bentheim and Obernkirchen, both Germany) have been used in petrophysical laboratory experiments under dry conditions to study ultrasonic sound velocities (frequency of signal input 1 MHz). Subsequently, oriented micro-plugs drilled from the sandstone samples were investigated using high-resolution X-ray microtomography. By means of image processing of the reconstructed scan images, geometric attributes such as mean structural thickness, orientation and tortuosity were evaluated from the μ-CT data for both pore space and grain skeleton. Our observations clearly indicate the different roles of pore space and grain skeleton in regard to the propagation of ultrasonic waves: because the pores do not transmit the waves, it was sufficient to investigate the average thickness of this fabric element. In contrast, as the ultrasonic waves traverse the rock via the adjacent grains, it was necessary to survey the actual travel lengths of seismic waves in the sandstone grain skeleton.

  13. High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy of 2.3 keV/u N sup 7 sup + ions through a microcapillary target

    CERN Document Server

    Iwai, Y; Kanai, Y; Oyama, H; Ando, K; Masuda, H; Nishio, K; Nakao, M; Tamamura, T; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2002-01-01

    X-rays emitted from 2.3 keV/u sup 1 sup 5 N sup 7 sup + ions transmitted through a highly ordered Ni microcapillary were measured with a high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer. The highly ordered microcapillary has recently become available employing a nano-lithographic technique. A transmission ratio and charge state distribution of ions through the microcapillary target were found to be consistent with theoretical predictions. A preliminary analysis showed that a series of X-rays from np-1s transitions with n as high as 8 were identified, which is consistent with the classical over barrier model.

  14. Three-dimensional coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of molten iron in mantle olivine at nanoscale resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaidong; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Yang, Wenge; Fan, Jiadong; Tao, Xutang; Song, Changyong; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yong; Fei, Yingwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mao, Wendy L; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-05-17

    We report quantitative 3D coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of a molten Fe-rich alloy and crystalline olivine sample, synthesized at 6 GPa and 1800 °C, with nanoscale resolution. The 3D mass density map is determined and the 3D distribution of the Fe-rich and Fe-S phases in the olivine-Fe-S sample is observed. Our results indicate that the Fe-rich melt exhibits varied 3D shapes and sizes in the olivine matrix. This work has potential for not only improving our understanding of the complex interactions between Fe-rich core-forming melts and mantle silicate phases but also paves the way for quantitative 3D imaging of materials at nanoscale resolution under extreme pressures and temperatures.

  15. Toward two-dimensional nanometer resolution hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast imaging using modified photon sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Shi, Lina; Hua, Yilei; Liu, Ming

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we report a significant step forward in the design of single-optical-element optics for two-dimensional (2D) hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast (DIC) imaging based on modified photon sieves (MPSs). MPSs were obtained by a modified optic, i.e., combining two overlaid binary gratings and a photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The superior performance of MPSs was demonstrated. Compared to Fresnel zone plates-based DIC diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which help to improve contrast only in one direction, MPSs can provide better resolution and 2D DIC imaging. Compared to normal photon sieves, MPSs are capable of imaging at a significantly higher image contrast. We anticipate that MPSs can provide a complementary and versatile high-resolution nondestructive imaging tool for ultra-large-scale integrated circuits at 45 nm node and below.

  16. 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Bharat G.; Moates, Derek B. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Kim, Heung-Bok [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Green, Todd J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Kim, Chang-Yub; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); DeLucas, Lawrence J., E-mail: duke2@uab.edu [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from M. tuberculosis reveals a novel fold. The crystallographic structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) protein Rv3902c (176 residues; molecular mass of 19.8 kDa) was determined at 1.55 Å resolution. The function of Rv3902c is unknown, although several TB genes involved in bacterial pathogenesis are expressed from the operon containing the Rv3902c gene. The unique structural fold of Rv3902c contains two domains, each consisting of antiparallel β-sheets and α-helices, creating a hand-like binding motif with a small binding pocket in the palm. Structural homology searches reveal that Rv3902c has an overall structure similar to that of the Salmonella virulence-factor chaperone InvB, with an r.m.s.d. for main-chain atoms of 2.3 Å along an aligned domain.

  17. A novel technique combining high-resolution synchrotron x-ray microtomography and x-ray diffraction for characterization of micro particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, David R.; Ramachandran, Vasuki; Roberts, Kevin J.; Armour, Wesley; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Evans, Gwyndaf; McAuley, Katherine E.; Owen, Robin L.; Sandy, James

    2011-11-01

    The processing of solids, such as crystals, is strongly influenced by the surface properties of the material. In recent years the pharmaceutical industry has shown great interest in identifying, or chemically speciating, the molecular components of crystal faces. Formerly, characterization of the molecular identity of crystal faces was restricted to the study of large single crystals. This would have been primarily for structure determination as part of the drug registration process. Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire is a new synchrotron facility in the UK, having 18 operational beamlines with 4 more in the construction phase. Beamlines at this medium energy light source enable the study of micron-sized objects in great detail. It is well known that x-ray microtomography (XMT) can be used to investigate the external morphology of a crystal whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) is used to study the molecular orientation, structure and packing within the crystal. The objective of this research is to assess the feasibility of, and thereby develop a new methodology for, characterizing the molecular identity of a particular face of a crystalline particle at a scale of scrutiny of 20-50 µm by combining these two powerful techniques. This work demonstrates the application of XMT and XRD to investigate respectively the shape and crystalline phase/orientation of relevant test crystals. This research has applications in the pharmaceutical industry in that when the exact molecular nature of a particular face is known, the important physico-pharmaceutical properties stemming from that can be better understood. Some initial data are presented and discussed.

  18. HIGH RESOLUTION X-RAY FLUORESCENCE MICRO-TOMOGRAPHY ON SINGLE SEDIMENT PARTICLES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VINCZE,L.; VEKEMANS,B.; SZALOKI,I.; JANSSENS,K.; VAN GRIEKEN,R.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; ADAMS,F.

    2002-07-29

    This work focuses on the investigation of the distribution of contaminants in individual sediment particles from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the particles is needed to enable (1) more sophisticated approaches to the understanding of the fate and transport of the contaminants in the environment and (2) more refined methods for cleaning the sediments. The size of the investigated particles ranges from 30-80 microns. Due to the low concentration of the elements of interest and the microscopic size of the environmental particles in these measurements, the small size and high intensity of the analyzing X-ray beam was critical. The high photon flux at the ESRF Microfocus beam line (ID13) was used as the basis for fluorescence tomography to investigate whether the inorganic compounds are taken upon the surface organic coating or whether they are distributed through the volume of the grains being analyzed. The experiments were done using a 13 keV monochromatic beam of approximately 2 {micro}m in size having an intensity of 10{sup 10} ph/s, allowing absolute detection limits on the 0.04-1 fg level for Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn.

  19. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E. [Departamento de Astronomia Extragalactica y Cosmologia, Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Nicastro, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF, Via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone, RM (Italy); Mathur, S. [Astronomy Department, The Ohio State University, Enarson Hall, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Longinotti, A. L. [European Space Astronomy Centre of ESA, E-28691, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  20. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  1. High-resolution imaging X-ray detector. [using microchannel plates and electronic readout for spaceborne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, E.; Henry, P.; Murray, S.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an X-ray detector using microchannel plates as a photocathode surface and imaging photoelectron multiplier, and a crossed wire grid as a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The position resolution is 10 microns. The crossed wire grid consists of 100-micron-diam wires on 200-micron centers. Position sensing is accomplished by electronic interpolation to 1/20 of the wire spacing. The quantum efficiency of the microchannel plates varies from 29% at 0.28 keV to 5% at 3 keV. This detector will provide second-of-arc X-ray imaging in the focal plane of the 342.9-cm focal length grazing-incidence telescope being prepared for the HEAO-B observatory. By addition of suitable photocathodes, it can be used for single-photon imaging light detection in the UV, visible, and near-IR-ranges. In all cases, it gives a very low dark counting rate, allows timing of individual events to 1 microsec or less, and can handle counting rates up to 10,000 per sec.

  2. Cold and Hot Slumped Glass Optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Banham, R.; Breuning, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G.; Menz, B.

    2016-07-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, e.g. the approved Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The latest advancements in the production of thin glass substrates may allow a great simplification of this process, avoiding the preforming step via hot slumping. In fact, the strength and the flexibility of glass foils with thickness lower than 0.1 mm allow their bending up to very small radius of curvature without breaking. In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we present the results obtained on several prototypes that have been assembled with different integration approaches.

  3. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  4. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the ultracompact LMXB pulsar 4U 1626-67

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, M I; Chakraborty, D; Juett, A M; Cottam, J; Krauss, Miriam I.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Juett, Adrienne M.; Cottam, Jean

    2006-01-01

    [abridged] We report results from four recent observations of the ultracompact LMXB pulsar 4U 1626-67. All the observations obtained high-resolution X-ray spectra of the system, two from the Chandra X-ray Observatory using the HETGS, and two from the XMM-Newton Observatory using the RGS as well as the EPIC PN and MOS. These data allow us to study in detail the prominent Ne and O emission line complexes which make 4U 1626-67 unique among LMXBs. The observations were spaced over a period of 3 years for a total observing time of 238 ks, allowing us to monitor the line regions as well as the overall source flux, continuum spectrum, and timing properties. The structure of the emission lines and the ratios of the components of the helium-like Ne IX and O VII triplets support the hypothesis that they are formed in the high-density environment of the accretion disk. We do not find any significant changes in the line widths or ratios over this time period, though we note that the line equivalent widths decrease. We ar...

  5. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of the Interstellar Medium II: Neon and Iron Absorption Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Juett, A M; Chakraborty, D; Gorczyca, T W; Juett, Adrienne M.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Gorczyca, Thomas W.

    2006-01-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of the neon K-shell and iron L-shell interstellar absorption edges in nine X-ray binaries using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We found that the iron absorption is well fit by an experimental determination of the cross-section for metallic iron, although with a slight wavelength shift of ~20 mA. The neon edge region is best fit by a model that includes the neutral neon edge and three Gaussian absorption lines. We identify these lines as due to the 1s-2p transitions from Ne II, Ne III, and Ne IX. As we found in our oxygen edge study, the theoretical predictions for neutral and low-ionization lines all require shifts of ~20 mA to match our data. Combined with our earlier oxygen edge study, we find that a best fit O/Ne ratio of 5.4+/-1.6, consistent with standard interstellar abundances. Our best fit Fe/Ne ratio of 0.20+/-0.03 is significantly lower than the interstellar value. We attribute this difference t...

  6. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  7. Inelastic x-ray scattering study of superconducting SmFeAsO1-xFy single crystals: Evidence for strong momentum-dependent doping-induced renormalizations of optical phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T. R.; Rüegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Walters, A. C.; Mittal, R.; Rønnow, H. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Hill, J. P.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D. F.

    2009-12-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on the lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO0.60F0.35 single crystals. Particular attention was paid to the dispersions along the [100] direction of three optical modes close to 23 meV, polarized out of the FeAs planes. Remarkably, two of these modes are strongly renormalized upon fluorine doping. These results provide significant insight into the energy and momentum dependence of the coupling of the lattice to the electron system and underline the importance of spin-phonon coupling in the superconducting iron pnictides.

  8. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study of SmFeAs(O1−xFy) Single Crystals: Evidence for Strong Momentum-Dependent Doping-Induced Renormalizations of Optical Phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J.P.; Le Tacon, M.; Forrest, T.R.; Ruegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Walters, A.C.; Mittal, R.; Rønnow, H.M.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2009-12-01

    We report inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on the lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO{sub 0.60}F{sub 0.35} single crystals. Particular attention was paid to the dispersions along the [100] direction of three optical modes close to 23 meV, polarized out of the FeAs planes. Remarkably, two of these modes are strongly renormalized upon fluorine doping. These results provide significant insight into the energy and momentum dependence of the coupling of the lattice to the electron system and underline the importance of spin-phonon coupling in the superconducting iron pnictides.

  9. Resolution model of KBA X-ray microscope%KBAX射线显微镜分辨力模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玲玲; 胡家升; 孙德林; 王刚

    2011-01-01

    The spatial resolution model of KBA X-ray microscope is built, taking into account geometrical aberration, diffraction effect, etc. Through ray-tracing, the edge response function(ERF) of different fields of view is got, and the geometrical aberration resolution based on the criterion of the ERF between 20% and 80% of its peak-valley value is determined. According to our model, the ideal resolution is obtained. In all the field of view, the geometrical aberration resolution, ideal resolution and experimental resolution are in good agreement. Using the X-ray image from the single film KBA microscope, the resolution is calculated to be about 4 um in central field and better than 6um in ±100 um range. The experiment result shows that, geometrical aberration is the key factor that determines the spatial resolution.%综合考虑了几何像差、衍射效应和加工精度等因素对KBAX射线显微镜分辨力的影响,构建了分辨力模型.通过光线追迹模拟得到了不同视场位置的边缘响应函数,以20%~80%的评价标准确定了几何像差分辨力.由构建的空间分辨力模型得到理论分辨力.KBA X射线显微镜整个视场几何像差分辨力、理论分辨力和实测分辨力基本一致.用单层膜KBA显微镜获得的X射线成像结果,得出中心视场的分辨力约为4μm,±100 μm视场的分辨力优于5μm.实验结果表明,几何像差对空间分辨力影响权重相对较大,是影响空间分辨力的决定性因素,其它因素的影响相对较小.

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction and refractive index analyses of Ti-doped lithium niobate (Ti:LiNbO3) nonlinear optical single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kumar; S Moorthy Babu; S Perero; Rajamaniccam L Sai; I Bhaumik; S Ganesamoorthy; A K Karnal

    2010-11-01

    Congruent LiNbO3 single crystals with Ti ion dopants (2 and 5 mol%) were successfully grown by Czochralski technique in the automatic diameter control facility. As-grown crystal boules were oriented into (0 0 1) direction cut and optically polished for all measurements. Influence of Ti-ion incorporation into LiNbO3 was studied by core level XPS analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on doped lithium niobate for phase identification. High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique was used to study the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. The refractive index values are more for doped samples than for pure sample as determined by prism coupling technique with different laser sources.

  11. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  12. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G.T.; Webb, Z.W.; Bradley, J.A.; Nagle, K.P.; Heald, S.M.; Gordon, R.A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed ???1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K?? x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L??2 partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary. ?? 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  13. X-ray micro-diffraction analysis of reconstructed bone at Zr prosthetic surface with sub-micrometre spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedola, A [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, V Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); Stanic, V [Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita di Ancona, INFM-Unita di Ancona, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Burghammer, M [ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Lagomarsino, S [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, V Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); Rustichelli, F [Institute of Physical Sciences, University of Ancona, Via Ranieri 65, I60131 Ancona and INFM-Unita di Ancona (Italy); Giardino, R [Chair of Surgical Pathophysiology, University of Bologna Medical School, Bologna (Italy); Aldini, N Nicoli [Experimental Surgery Department, Research Institute Codivilla Putti-Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136, Bologna (Italy); Fini, M [Experimental Surgery Department, Research Institute Codivilla Putti-Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, via di Barbiano 1/10, 40136, Bologna (Italy); Komlev, V [Institute of Physical Sciences, University of Ancona, Via Ranieri 65, I60131 Ancona and INFM-Unita di Ancona (Italy); Fonzo, S Di [Sincrotrone Trieste, SS14 km 163.5 in Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza - Trieste (Italy)

    2003-02-07

    The purpose of the present investigation is to demonstrate the power of the x-ray micro-diffraction technique in biological studies. In particular the reported experiment concerns the study of the interface between a Zr prosthetic device implanted in a rat femur and the newly-formed bone, with a spatial resolution of 0.5 {mu}m. The obtained results give interesting information on the Zr deformation and on the crystallographic phase, the grain size and the orientation of the new bone. Moreover the study reveals a marked difference in the structure of the reconstructed bone with respect to the native bone, which cannot be appreciated with other techniques. (note)

  14. Degradation of spatial resolution in thin-foil x-ray microchemical analysis due to plural scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twigg, Mark Erickson

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based Monte Carlo simulation of incoherent plural scattering of electrons has been developed in order to estimate the broadening of an electron probe as it propagates through a solid. By applying this approach to modeling the spreading of a fine (50 A) probe focused on a thin foil in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we have estimated the spatial resolution of the compositional analysis obtainable using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Specifically, an attempt has been made to determine how the apparent microchemistry of a feature of finer dimensions than the broadened beam differs from the actual composition of the given feature. The apparent Ge concentration profile in the vicinity of a 200 A wide Ge platelet in a 5000 A thick Al foil was measured, using STEM and EDS, and compared with the profile predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Results are presented and discussed.

  15. Structural characterization of anhydrous naloxone- and naltrexone hydrochloride by high resolution laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Dinnebier, Robert E; Zakrzewski, Marek

    2007-12-01

    The crystal structures of the analgesic compounds anhydrous naloxone and naltrexone hydrochloride were determined ab initio from high resolution laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with lattice parameters of a = 14.6588(10) A, b = 17.4363(9) A, c = 7.96200(22) A, and V = 2035.06(23) A(3) for naloxone hydrochloride and a = 15.4560(5) A, b = 14.9809(4) A, c = 7.84121(18) A, and V = 1815.58(11) A(3) for naltrexone hydrochloride. The crystal structure of anhydrous naloxone hydrochloride forms one-dimensional chains through hydrogen bonds. In the crystal structure of anhydrous naltrexone hydrochloride, two-dimensional sheets are formed by hydrogen bonds. The dehydration processes of naloxone hydrochloride dehydrate and naltrexone hydrochloride tetrahydrate was analyzed by DTA, DSC, TG, and MG.

  16. SRX - a X-ray spectroscopy beamline with sub-100nm spatial resolution at NSLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, J.

    2011-12-01

    J. Thieme, V. deAndrade, Y. Yao, J. Prietzel* (NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA; *TU Munich, Germany) The new electron storage ring NSLS-II will be a source of synchrotron radiation with an unmatched low emittance. Such a facility is very well suited for hosting experiments in need of coherent radiation. One of first six beamlines to be constructed at NSLS-II will be a high resolution spectroscopy station, dedicated especially for environmental and geo-sciences. A canted setup of two undulators will serve as independent light sources for two branches of this beamline. One branch line is planned to address the energy range from 4.65 keV to 24 keV focusing the beam down to a small spot size with Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The expected photon flux in the spot is in the range of above 10^13 phot/sec. A horizontally deflecting double crystal monochromator with maximum stability will ensure the possibility of spectroscopy with very high spectral resolution. The second branch is planned for reaching lower X-ray energies, addressing the range of 2 keV up to 15 keV, but with a higher spatial resolution. Using a Fresnel zoneplate, the spatial resolution aimed for is in the range of 30 nm. It can be expected that this branch would be attractive for more biological applications from environmental science due to the many elements of interest within that energy range. The experimental station will be designed to not only host X-ray fluorescence experiments but diffraction imaging experiments as well. The commissioning of this beamline will start in 2014, therefore a detailed design description will be presented here. As an example of what is achievable at this NSLS-II beamline we will present a spatially resolved study on the co-localization of iron and sulfur in a forest soil. The scientific topic to be addressed was to identify unambiguously the relationship between the speciation of iron and sulfur as a function of the chemical state of the surrounding soil when

  17. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Sheng; Hu, Qinhong; Dultz, Stefan; Zhang, Ming

    2012-11-23

    X-raycomputedtomography (XCT) is a powerful tool for detecting the micro-scale porestructure and has been applied to many natural and synthetic porous media. However, due to the resolution limitations, either non-representative view of the sample or inaccurate results can be produced from the XCT image processing. In this paper, two XCT (micro-CT and CT with synchrotron radiation) with different resolutions of 12.7 μm and 0.35 μm, as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) with a minimum detection limit of 3 nm, were used for Berea sandstone to investigate the effect of detecting resolution on the porestructure. Several key porestructure parameters, including porosity, pore size distribution, pore connectivity, surface area, hydraulic radius, and aspect ratio were analyzed in a manner of quantitative comparison between different resolutions of XCT and MIP. The low resolution XCT can capture the large-pore porosity, while overestimates the pore size and pore connectivity. The high resolution XCT is more accurate in describing the pore shape, porosity, pore size; however, it is not representative since narrower detecting pore size range and small volume represented. A representative element volume related to large-pore porosity and probably large-pore connectivity with diameter and height of 2.8 mm is obtained through scale effect analysis. Therefore, selecting an appropriate resolution should be a compromise between the pore size and the representative element volume for the specific property or process of interest.

  18. Bulk Crystal Growth, and High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction Results of LiZnAs Semiconductor Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Sunder, Madhana; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Nelson, Kyle A.; Henson, Luke C.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2017-08-01

    LiZnAs is being explored as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. The compact form, solid-state device would have greater efficiency than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. Devices fabricated from LiZnAs having either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) as constituent atoms may provide a material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. The 6Li( n, t)4He reaction yields a total Q-value of 4.78 MeV, an energy larger than that of the 10B reaction, which can easily be identified above background radiations. LiZnAs material was synthesized by preparing equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules lined with boron nitride and subsequently reacted in a compounding furnace (Montag et al. in J Cryst Growth 412:103, 2015). The raw synthesized LiZnAs was purified by a static vacuum sublimation in quartz (Montag et al. in J Cryst Growth 438:99, 2016). Bulk crystalline LiZnAs ingots were grown from the purified material with a high-temperature Bridgman-style growth process described here. One of the largest LiZnAs ingots harvested was 9.6 mm in diameter and 4.2 mm in length. Samples were harvested from the ingot and were characterized for crystallinity using a Bruker AXS Inc. D8 AXS Inc. D2 CRYSO, energy dispersive x-ray diffractometer, and a Bruker AXS Inc. D8 DISCOVER, high-resolution x-ray diffractometer equipped with molybdenum radiation, Gobel mirror, four bounce germanium monochromator and a scintillation detector. The primary beam divergence was determined to be 0.004°, using a single crystal Si standard. The x-ray based characterization revealed that the samples nucleated in the (110) direction and a high-resolution open detector rocking curve recorded on the (220) LiZnAs yielded a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.235°. Sectional pole figures using off-axis reflections of the (211) LiZnAs confirmed in-plane ordering, and also indicated the presence of multiple

  19. Strain and crystalline defects in epitaxial GaN layers studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chierchia, Rosa

    2007-07-01

    This thesis treats strain and dislocations in MOVPE GaN layers. The mosaic structure of metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE)-grown GaN layers was studied in dependence on the grain diameter utilizing high-resolution XRD. Different models for the defect structure were analyzed, the edge type TD densities were calculated under the assumption that the dislocations are not randomly distributed but localized at the grain boundaries. Moreover, in situ measurements have shown that the layers are under tension in the c-plane when a nucleation layer is used. The second part of this thesis treats a particular approach to reduce dislocations in MOVPE GaN layers, i.e. maskless pendeo epitaxial growth of MOVPE GAN layers. FE simulations assuming the strain to be completely induced during cooling of the structures after growth agree only partly with experimental data. The strain state of single layers and stripes of GaN grown on SiC was studied to exploit the evolution of the strain in the different phases of the PE growth. The biaxial compressive stress, due to the lattice mismatch between the GaN layer and the AlN nucleation layer is plastically relieved before overgrowth. Temperature dependent measurements show a linear reduction of the wing tilt with increasing temperature varying from sample to sample. Bent TDs have been observed in TEM images of maskless PE samples. Stress induced from the mismatch between the AlN buffer layer and the GaN also contributes to the remaining part of the wing tilt not relieved thermally. It has to be noted that the rest tilt value varies from sample to sample at the growth temperature. In fact some of the data indicate that the wing tilt decreases with increasing V/III ratio. In the last Chapter the application of X-ray techniques for the analysis of strain and composition in layers of inhomogeneous composition is explored. In the first part of the Chapter the strain state and the Al content of AlGaN buffer layers grown directly on (0001

  20. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick M Staedler

    Full Text Available Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of

  1. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  2. Overcoming x-ray tube small focal spot output limitations for high resolution region of interest imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    We investigate methods to increase x-ray tube output to enable improved quantum image quality with a higher generalized-NEQ (GNEQ) while maintaining a small focal-spot size for the new high-resolution Micro-angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) Region of Interest (ROI) imaging system. Rather than using a larger focal spot to increase tubeloading capacity with degraded resolution, we evaluated separately or in combination three methods to increase tube output: 1) reducing the anode angle and lengthening the filament to maintain a constant effective small focal-spot size, 2) using the standard medium focal spot viewed from a direction on the anode side of the field and 3) increasing the frame rate (frames/second) in combination with temporal filter. The GNEQ was compared for the MAF for the small focal-spot at the central axis, and for the medium focal-spot with a higher output on the anode side as well as for the small focal spot with different temporal recursive filtering weights. A net output increase of about 4.0 times could be achieved with a 2-degree anode angle (without the added filtration) and a 4 times longer filament compared to that of the standard 8-degree target. The GNEQ was also increased for the medium focal-spot due to its higher output capacity and for the temporally filtered higher frame rate. Thus higher tube output, while maintaining a small effective focal-spot, should be achievable using one or more of the three methods described with only small modifications of standard x-ray tube geometry.

  3. Preliminary test results of a new high-energy-resolution silicon and CdZnTe pixel detectors for application to x-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, V. V.; Hamilton, William J.; Hurley, Kevin; Maeding, Dale G.; Ogelman, Hakki; Paulos, Robert J.; Puetter, Richard C.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Zweerink, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    New, high spatial resolution CdZnTe (CZT) and silicon (Si) pixel detectors are highly suitable for x-ray astronomy. These detectors are planned for use in wide field of view, imaging x-ray, and low energy gamma-ray all-sky monitor (AXGAM) in a future space mission. The high stopping power of CZT detectors combined with low-noise front-end readout makes possible an order of magnitude improvement in spatial and energy resolution in x-ray detection. The AXGAM instrument will be built in the form of a fine coded aperture placed over two-dimensional, high spatial resolution and low energy threshold CZT pixel detector array. The preliminary result of CZT and silicon pixel detector test with low-noise readout electronics system are presented. These detectors may also be used with or without modification for medical and industrial imaging.

  4. Pressure effect in the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C.D.R.

    2016-01-01

    A study of the gas pressure effect in the position resolution of an interacting X- or gamma-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 were calculated for several gas pressures (1-10bar) and for photon energies between 5.4 and 60.0 keV, being possible to establish a linear match between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in that energy range. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and the calculated one in this work, is done and discussed. In the majority of the cases, a strong agreement is observed.

  5. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, R.; Reinhardt, J.; Hofmann, G.

    2013-01-01

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L3 absorption edge. From...... these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way...

  6. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on iso-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} around the chlorine K-edge: Structural and dynamical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawerk, Elie, E-mail: eliekawerk@hotmail.com, E-mail: ekawerk@units.it [CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Laboratoire de Physique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences II, Université Libanaise, 90656 Jdeidet el Metn, Liban (Libya); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Carniato, Stéphane; Journel, Loïc; Marchenko, Tatiana; Simon, Marc [CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, Maria Novella [CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Bohnic, Rok [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); and others

    2014-10-14

    We report a theoretical and experimental study of the high resolution resonant K{sub α} X-ray emission lines around the chlorine K-edge in gas phase 1,1-dichloroethylene. With the help of ab initio electronic structure calculations and cross section evaluation, we interpret the lowest lying peak in the X-ray absorption and emission spectra. The behavior of the K{sub α} emission lines with respect to frequency detuning highlights the existence of femtosecond nuclear dynamics on the dissociative Potential Energy Surface of the first K-shell core-excited state.

  7. High Resolution X-ray CMT Imaging of Supercritical CO2 in Porous Media: Experimental Challenges, Solutions, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Newell, D. L.; Carey, J. W.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. Capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2), wherein the CO2 is held within the pore structure of the geologic matrix by capillary forces, is a more secure form of subsurface storage than structural trapping, which relies on an impermeable caprock to contain the buoyant CO2 plume. To understand the multiphase physics of CO2 transport, and to subsequently produce quantitative estimates of potential CO2 capillary trapping, it is necessary to study field, core, and pore-scale processes. X-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) allows for three-dimensional (3D) in-situ visualization of fluid phases within and the physical structure of a porous medium at the pore-scale. We have designed and built a mobile experimental set-up capable of running at pressures up to 2000 PSI and temperatures up to 50°C, made with materials that are compatible with corrosive fluids. Our experimental procedure includes pressurizing, mixing, and separating fluids; and subsequently running immiscible drainage and imbibition flow experiments with brine and supercritical CO2. With this set-up and procedure, we successfully conducted a brine-scCO2 drainage experiment in Bentheimer sandstone at 1200 PSI and 36°C, and confirmed and quantified CO2 flow in the sandstone core via synchrotron-based x-ray CMT with a resolution of 4.65 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We have proven that we can observe, on a pore-scale basis, the movement of supercritical CO2 within a porous media. The properties of supercritical CO2 (e.g. viscosity, density, interfacial tension and solubility in brine) vary significantly with changes in pressure and temperature; consequently, precise

  8. Pressure effects on the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, C. D. R.; González-Díaz, D.; Correia, P. M. M.; Biagi, S.; Silva, A. L. M.; Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2016-12-01

    A study of the effect of gas pressure in the position resolution of an interacting X or γ-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 was calculated for several gas pressures (1-10 bar) and for photon energies between 1 and 60 keV, being possible to establish a linear relation between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in the indicated energy range, as intuitively expected. We show how, at high pressures and low photoelectron energies, this intrinsic 1/P scaling is modified due to the diffusion of the primary ionization in the direction perpendicular to the electric field. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and microscopic simulations is presented in this work and discussed. In the majority of cases, a good agreement is observed. The conditions to achieve position resolutions down to 10 μm in a realistic detector are shown and discussed.

  9. High resolution grazing-incidence in-plane x-ray diffraction for measuring the strain of a Si thin layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omote, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the strain of a thin Si layer deposited on a SiGe layer using a high resolution x-ray diffraction system. The Si layer was deposited on the SiGe layer in order to introduce a tensile strain to the Si layer. To measure the in-plane lattice constant accurately, we have employed so-called grazing-incidence in-plane diffraction. For this measurement, we have made a new five-axis x-ray goniometer which has four ordinal circles (ω, 2θ, χ, φ) plus a counter-χ-axis for selecting the exit angle of the diffracted x-rays. In grazing-incidence geometry, an incident x-ray is focused on the sample surface in order to obtain good diffraction intensity even though the layer thickness is less than 5 nm. Because diffracted x-rays are detected through analyzer crystals, the diffraction angle can be determined with an accuracy of ± 0.0003°. This indicates that the strain sensitivity is about 10( - 5) when we measure in-plane Si 220 diffraction. Use of x-ray diffraction could be the best standard metrology method for determining strain in thin layers. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that incident/exit angle selected in-plane diffraction is very useful for height/depth selective strain determination.

  10. Preliminary neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the aspartic proteinase endothiapepsin cocrystallized with a gem-diol inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan, Han-Fang [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Erskine, Peter [Laboratory for Protein Crystallography, Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins, UCL Department of Medicine (Hampstead Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Langan, Paul [Bioscience Division, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 53606 (United States); Cooper, Jon [Laboratory for Protein Crystallography, Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins, UCL Department of Medicine (Hampstead Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Coates, Leighton, E-mail: coatesl@sns.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 53606 (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Three data sets have been collected on endothiapepsin complexed with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040: a high-resolution synchrotron X-ray data set, a room-temperature X-ray data set and a neutron diffraction data set. Until recently, it has been impossible to grow large protein crystals of endothiapepsin with any gem-diol inhibitor that are suitable for neutron diffraction. Endothiapepsin has been cocrystallized with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040 in a low solvent-content (39%) unit cell, which is unprecedented for this enzyme–inhibitor complex and enables ultrahigh-resolution (1.0 Å) X-ray diffraction data to be collected. This atomic resolution X-ray data set will be used to deduce the protonation states of the catalytic aspartate residues. A room-temperature neutron data set has also been collected for joint refinement with a room-temperature X-ray data set in order to locate the H/D atoms at the active site.

  11. The dust scattering component of X-ray extinction: Effects on continuum fitting and high-resolution absorption edge structure

    CERN Document Server

    Corrales, L; Wilms, J; Baganoff, F

    2016-01-01

    Small angle scattering by dust grains causes a significant contribution to the total interstellar extinction for any X-ray instrument with sub-arcminute resolution (Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton). However, the dust scattering component is not included in the current absorption models: phabs, tbabs, and tbnew. We simulate a large number of Chandra spectra to explore the bias in the spectral fit and NH measurements obtained without including extinction from dust scattering. We find that without incorporating dust scattering, the measured NH will be too large by a baseline level of 25%. This effect is modulated by the imaging resolution of the telescope, because some amount of unresolved scattered light will be captured within the aperture used to extract point source information. In high resolution spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and the shape of the photoelectric absorption edges. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge at 0.7 keV, showing that the total ext...

  12. High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Shin; Aono, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu

    2008-01-01

    We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was ob...

  13. Thin monolithic glass shells for future high angular resolution and large collecting area x-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M. M.; Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.; Mattaini, E.; Pareschi, G.; Parodi, G.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most difficult requests to be accomplished from the technological point of view for next generation x-ray telescopes is to combine high angular resolution and effective area. A significant increase of effective area can be reached with high precision but at the same time thin (2-3 mm thickness for mirror diameters of 30-110 cm) glass mirror shells. In the last few years the Brera Observatory has lead a development program for realizing this kind of monolithic thin glass shell. The fused silica has been chosen as shell substrate due to its thermal and mechanical properties. To bring the mirror shells to the needed accuracy, we have adopted a deterministic direct polishing method (already used for past missions as Einstein, Rosat, Chandra) to ten time thinner shells. The technological challenge has been solved using a temporary stiffening structure that allows the handling and the machining of so thin glass shells. The results obtained with a prototype shell at an intermediate stage of its development (17'' HEW measured in full illumination mode with x-ray) indicate that the working concept is feasible and can be further exploited using the very large Ion Beam Facility available in our labs for the final high accuracy figuring of the thin shells. In this paper we present the required tolerances for the shell realization, the shells production chain flow and the ion beam facility up grading. Forecast on figuring time and expected performances of the figuring will also be given on the basis on the metrological data collected during past shell development.

  14. High resolution laboratory grating-based x-ray phase-contrast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viermetz, Manuel P.; Birnbacher, Lorenz J. B.; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Noel, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) is a promising imaging method for imaging of soft tissue contrast without the need of any contrast agent. The focus of this study is the increase in spatial resolution without loss in sensitivity to allow visualization of pathologies comparable to the convincing results obtained at the synchrotron. To improve the effective pixel size a super-resolution reconstruction based on subpixel shifts involving a deconvolution of the image is applied on differential phase-contrast data. In our study we could achieve an effective pixel sizes of 28mm without any drawback in terms of sensitivity or the ability to measure quantitative data.

  15. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  16. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  17. The effect of limited spatial resolution of stellar surface magnetic field maps on MHD wind and coronal X-ray emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, C; Drake, J J; Downs, C

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of the spatial resolution on scales of $5\\deg$ and smaller of solar surface magnetic field maps on global magnetohydrodynamic solar wind models, and on a model of coronal heating and X-ray emission. We compare the solutions driven by a low-resolution Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetic map, the same map with spatial resolution artificially increased by a refinement algorithm, and a high-resolution Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager map. We find that both the wind structure and the X-ray morphology are affected by the fine-scale surface magnetic structure. Moreover, the X-ray morphology is dominated by the closed loop structure between mixed polarities on smaller scales and shows significant changes between high and low resolution maps. We conclude that three-dimensional modeling of coronal X-ray emission has greater surface magnetic field spatial resolution requirements than wind modeling, and can be unreliable unless the dominant mixed polarity magnetic flux is p...

  18. Analysis of the high resolution Mg XI x-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw. Centrum Badan Kosmicznych); Bromboszcz, G. (Wrolaw Univ. (Poland). Astronomical Inst.); Korneev, V.V.; Mandelshtam, S.L.; Oparin, S.N.; Urnov, A.M.; Zhitnik, I.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.); Vasha, S. (Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Bator (USSR). Inst. of Physics and Technics)

    1982-04-01

    In this paper, the second in a series dealing with high-resolution spectra (9.14-9.33 A) measured on board the INTERCOSMOS-16 satellite, the analysis of the physical conditions in the coronal part of the McMath 14352 active regions is performed. The temperature structure of the emitting plasma is investigated on the basis of the photon fluxes measured in six selected wavelength bands involving the resonance, intercombination, and forbidden lines of the Mg XI ion and a number of satellite lines. Relative line intensities are discussed in terms of the active region plasma density.

  19. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  20. Continued Development of Small-Pixel CZT and CdTe Detectors for Future High-Angular-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, Henric

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Small Explorer Mission was launched in June 2012 and has demonstrated the technical feasibility and high scientific impact of hard X-ray astronomy. We propose to continue our current R&D program to develop finely pixelated semiconductor detectors and the associated readout electronics for the focal plane of a NuSTAR follow-up mission. The detector-ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) package will be ideally matched to the new generation of low-cost, low-mass X-ray mirrors which achieve an order of magnitude better angular resolution than the NuSTAR mirrors. As part of this program, the Washington University group will optimize the contacts of 2x2 cm^2 footprint Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors contacted with 100x116 hexagonal pixels at a next-neighbor pitch of 200 microns. The Brookhaven National Laboratory group will design, fabricate, and test the next generation of the HEXID ASIC matched to the new X-ray mirrors and the detectors, providing a low-power 100x116 channel ASIC with extremely low readout noise (i.e. with a root mean square noise of 13 electrons). The detectors will be tested with radioactive sources and in the focal plane of high-angular-resolution X-ray mirrors at the X-ray beam facilities at the Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

  1. Technology Requirements For a Square-Meter, Arcsecond-Resolution Telescope for X-Rays: The SMART-X Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Allured, Ryan; Bookbinder, Jay; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Forman, William; Freeman, Mark; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; O'Dell, Steve; Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Addressing the astrophysical problems of the 2020's requires sub-arcsecond x-ray imaging with square meter effective area. Such requirements can be derived, for example, by considering deep x-ray surveys to find the young black holes in the early universe (large redshifts) which will grow into the first supermassive black holes. We have envisioned a mission based on adjustable x-ray optics technology, in order to achieve the required reduction of mass to collecting area for the mirrors. We are pursuing technology which effects this adjustment via thin film piezoelectric "cells" deposited directly on the non-reflecting sides of thin, slumped glass. While SMARTX will also incorporate state-of-the-art x-ray cameras, the remaining spacecraft systems have no more stringent requirements than those which are well understood and proven on the current Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  2. Petrophysical analysis of limestone rocks by nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.F.S. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE-PEN, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, I., E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE-PEN, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy, IPRJ-UERJ, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Ferrucio, P.L.; Abreu, C.J.; Borghi, L. [Geology Department, Geosciences Institute, Rio de Janeiro Federal University, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE-PEN, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    This study presents the pore-space system analysis of the 2-ITAB-1-RJ well cores, which were drilled in the Sao Jose do Itaborai Basin, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. The analysis presented herein has been developed based on two techniques: nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography. Nuclear logging has been proven to be the technique that provides better quality and more quantitative information about the porosity using radioactive sources. The Density Gamma Probe and the Neutron Sonde used in this work provide qualitative information about bulk density variations and compensated porosity of the geological formation. The samples obtained from the well cores were analyzed by microtomography. The use of this technique in sedimentary rocks allows quantitative evaluation of pore system and generates high-resolution 3D images ({approx}microns order). The images and data obtained by microtomography were integrated with the response obtained by nuclear logging. The results obtained by these two techniques allow the understanding of the pore-size distribution and connectivity, as well as the porosity values. Both techniques are important and they complement each other.

  3. Changes in bone macro- and microstructure in diabetic obese mice revealed by high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhofs, G.; Durand, M.; Vangoitsenhoven, R.; Marin, C.; van der Schueren, B.; Carmeliet, G.; Luyten, F. P.; Geris, L.; Vandamme, K.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (HR-microCT) was employed to characterize the structural alterations of the cortical and trabecular bone in a mouse model of obesity-driven type 2 diabetes (T2DM). C57Bl/6J mice were randomly assigned for 14 weeks to either a control diet-fed (CTRL) or a high fat diet (HFD)-fed group developing obesity, hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. The HFD group showed an increased trabecular thickness and a decreased trabecular number compared to CTRL animals. Midshaft tibia intracortical porosity was assessed at two spatial image resolutions. At 2 μm scale, no change was observed in the intracortical structure. At 1 μm scale, a decrease in the cortical vascular porosity of the HFD bone was evidenced. The study of a group of 8 week old animals corresponding to animals at the start of the diet challenge revealed that the decreased vascular porosity was T2DM-dependant and not related to the ageing process. Our results offer an unprecedented ultra-characterization of the T2DM compromised skeletal micro-architecture and highlight an unrevealed T2DM-related decrease in the cortical vascular porosity, potentially affecting the bone health and fragility. Additionally, it provides some insights into the technical challenge facing the assessment of the rodent bone structure using HR-microCT imaging.

  4. X-ray structure of a dihydropyrimidinase from Thermus sp. at 1.3 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendroth, Jan; Niefind, Karsten; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2002-06-28

    Dihydropyrimidinases (hydantoinases) catalyse the reversible hydrolytic ring-opening of cyclic diamides such as dihydropyrimidines in the catabolism of pyrimidines. In biotechnology, these enzymes find application in the enantiospecific production of amino acids from racemic hydantoins. The crystal structure of a D-enantio-specific dihydropyrimidinase from Thermus sp. (D-hydantoinase) was solved de novo by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. In spite of a large unit cell the D-hydantoinase crystals exhibit excellent diffraction properties. The structure was subsequently refined at 1.30 A resolution against native data. The core of D-hydantoinase consists of a (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel, which is flanked by a beta-sheet domain and some additional helices. In the active site, a carboxylated lysine residue and the catalytically active hydroxide ion bridge a binuclear zinc centre. The tertiary structure and shape of the active site show strong homology to that of ureases, dihydroorotases, and phosphotriesterases. The homology of the active site was exploited for in silicio docking of substrates in the active site. This could shed light both on the substrate binding in hydantoinases and on the recently highly discussed origin of the proton in the course of hydantoinase catalysis.

  5. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  6. X-ray structure of antistasin at 1.9 angstrom resolution and its modelled complex with blood coagulation factor Xa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapatto, R; Krengel, U; Schreuder, HA; Arkema, A; deBoer, B; Kalk, KH; Hol, WGJ; Grootenhuis, PDJ; Mulders, JWM; Dijkema, R; Theunissen, HJM; Dijkstra, BW

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of antistasin, a potent inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa, from the Mexican leech Haementeria officinalis was determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution by X-ray crystallography, The structure reveals a novel protein fold composed of two homologous domains, each res

  7. Direct observation of strain in bulk subgrains and dislocation walls by high angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo; Lienert, U.; Almer, J.;

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) method "high angular resolution 3DXRD" is briefly introduced, and results are presented for a single bulk grain in a polycrystalline copper sample deformed in tension. It is found that the three-dimensional reciprocal-space intensity distribution of a 400 reflection...

  8. Radiation-damage-free quantum crystallography and resolution-enhanced x-ray imaging techniques using quantum multipath interference of thermal light

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Medvedev, Nikita; Wang, Fenglin; Chapman, Henry N; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Using higher order coherence of thermal light sources, we can achieve enhancement of resolution of standard x-ray imaging techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and phase contrast imaging. The cost of implementing such schemes is minimal comparing to the schemes using entangled two-photon pairs. The proposed diffractive quan- tum crystallography using multipath interference of thermal light can be eventually free of radiation damage, because the diffraction pattern could be formed by using low energy photons of optical wavelength. Thus it is promising to apply the proposed quantum crystallography scheme to nanocrystalline or non-crystalline samples that are too difficult to be crystallized.

  9. High resolution synchrotron-based radiography and tomography using hard X-rays at the BAM line (BESSY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, A.; Zabler, S.; Müller, B. R.; Riesemeier, H.; Weidemann, G.; Lange, A.; Goebbels, J.; Hentschel, M.; Görner, W.

    2008-02-01

    The use of high brilliance and partial coherent synchrotron light for radiography and computed tomography (CT) allows to image micro-structured, multi-component specimens with different contrast modes and resolutions up to submicrometer range. This is of high interest for materials research, life science and non-destructive evaluation applications. An imaging setup for microtomography and radiography installed at BESSY II (a third generation synchrotron light source located in Berlin, Germany) as part of its first hard X-ray beamline (BAM line) can now be used for absorption, refraction as well as phase contrast — dedicated to inhouse research and applications by external users. Monochromatic synchrotron light between 6 keV and 80 keV is attained via a fully automated double multilayer monochromator. For imaging applications the synchrotron beam transmitted by the sample is converted with a scintillator into visible light. By use of microscope optics this luminescence image is then projected onto, e.g., a CCD chip. Several scintillating materials are used in order to optimise the performance of the detector system. Different optical systems are available for imaging ranging from a larger field of view and moderate resolutions (macroscope — up to 14 mm×14 mm field of view) to high resolution (microscope — down to 0.35 μm pixel size), offering magnifications from 1.8× to 40×. Additionally asymmetric cut Bragg crystals in front of the scintillator can be used for a further magnification in one dimension by a factor of about 20. Slow and fast cameras are available, with up to 16 bit dynamic range. We show the suitability of the setup for numerous applications from materials research and life science.

  10. High-speed classification of coherent X-ray diffraction patterns on the K computer for high-resolution single biomolecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Arai, Junya [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Kameyama, Toyohisa; Yamamoto, Keiji; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Gerofi, Balazs; Shimada, Akio; Kurokawa, Motoyoshi; Shoji, Fumiyoshi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Okada, Kensuke [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sugimoto, Takashi [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Ryotaro [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Hori, Atsushi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yutaka, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Go, Nobuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A code with an algorithm for high-speed classification of X-ray diffraction patterns has been developed. Results obtained for a set of 1 × 10{sup 6} simulated diffraction patterns are also reported. Single-particle coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using an X-ray free-electron laser has the potential to reveal the three-dimensional structure of a biological supra-molecule at sub-nanometer resolution. In order to realise this method, it is necessary to analyze as many as 1 × 10{sup 6} noisy X-ray diffraction patterns, each for an unknown random target orientation. To cope with the severe quantum noise, patterns need to be classified according to their similarities and average similar patterns to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-speed scalable scheme has been developed to carry out classification on the K computer, a 10PFLOPS supercomputer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science. It is designed to work on the real-time basis with the experimental diffraction pattern collection at the X-ray free-electron laser facility SACLA so that the result of classification can be feedback for optimizing experimental parameters during the experiment. The present status of our effort developing the system and also a result of application to a set of simulated diffraction patterns is reported. About 1 × 10{sup 6} diffraction patterns were successfully classificatied by running 255 separate 1 h jobs in 385-node mode.

  11. A High-Resolution Very Large Array Observation of a Protostar in OMC-3: Shock-induced X-ray Emission by a Protostellar Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, M; Kobayashi, N; Saitó, M; Tsuboi, Y; Chandler, C J

    2004-01-01

    Using the Very Large Array (VLA) in the A-configuration, we have obtained a high-resolution 3.6 cm map of a hard X-ray source detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in a protostellar clump in Orion molecular cloud 3. Two radio continuum sources were detected in the vicinity of the X-ray source, both of which have NIR counterparts. We conclude that these VLA sources are free-free emission produced by shocks in protostellar jets from the NIR class I protostars. Using the centimeter data, we determined the power and orientation of the protostellar jets. The center position of the X-ray emission was found to be ~1--2" offset from the exciting sources of the jets, and the displacement is in the direction of the jets and molecular outflows. We discuss the nature of the X-ray emission as the shock-excited plasma at the shock front where the jet propagates through interstellar medium at a speed of ~1000 km/s.

  12. Characterization of transfer function, resolution and depth of field of a soft X-ray microscope applied to tomography enhancement by Wiener deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otón, Joaquín; Pereiro, Eva; Pérez-Berná, Ana J; Millach, Laia; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Marabini, Roberto; Carazo, José M

    2016-12-01

    Full field soft X-ray microscopy is becoming a powerful imaging technique to analyze whole cells preserved under cryo conditions. Images obtained in these X-ray microscopes can be combined by tomographic reconstruction to quantitatively estimate the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of absorption coefficients inside the cell. The impulse response of an imaging system is one of the factors that limits the quality of the X-ray microscope reconstructions. The main goal of this work is to experimentally measure the 3D impulse response and to assess the optical resolution and depth of field of the Mistral microscope at ALBA synchrotron (Barcelona, Spain). To this end we measure the microscope apparent transfer function (ATF) and we use it to design a deblurring Wiener filter, obtaining an increase in the image quality when applied to experimental datasets collected at ALBA.

  13. Simulation, optimization and testing of a novel high spatial resolution X-ray imager based on Zinc Oxide nanowires in Anodic Aluminium Oxide membrane using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandi, F.; Saramad, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers based on ZnO nanowires in Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) nanoporous template is characterized. The optical response of ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous AAO template under low energy X-ray illumination is simulated by the Geant4 Monte Carlo code and compared with experimental results. The results show that for 10 keV X-ray photons, by considering the light guiding properties of zinc oxide inside the AAO template and suitable selection of detector thickness and pore diameter, the spatial resolution less than one micrometer and the detector detection efficiency of 66% are accessible. This novel nano scintillator detector can have many advantages for medical applications in the future.

  14. Non-invasive predictors of human cortical bone mechanical properties: T(2-discriminated H NMR compared with high resolution X-ray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Adam Horch

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have enabled clinical imaging of human cortical bone, providing a potentially powerful new means for assessing bone health with molecular-scale sensitivities unavailable to conventional X-ray-based diagnostics. To this end, (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and high-resolution X-ray signals from human cortical bone samples were correlated with mechanical properties of bone. Results showed that (1H NMR signals were better predictors of yield stress, peak stress, and pre-yield toughness than were the X-ray derived signals. These (1H NMR signals can, in principle, be extracted from clinical MRI, thus offering the potential for improved clinical assessment of fracture risk.

  15. High Resolution Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of M87 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Sakelliou, I; Tamura, T; Paerels, F B S; Kaastra, J S; Belsole, E; Böhringer, H; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Ferrigno, C; Den Herder, J W A; Kennea, J; Mushotzky, R F; Vestrand, W T; Worrall, D M

    2002-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of M87 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton. We detect strong K-shell line emission from N, O, Ne, Mg, some emission from He-like Si, a fully resolved set of Fe L-shell emission spectra, and some emission from C. The angular intensity distributions of the strong emission lines are detectably resolved on scales (15-160) arcsec. The gas in the inner arcmin of M87 has a multi-phase structure, as indicated by the similarity of the emission line profiles of Fe L shell ions with widely separated ionization potentials. The global Fe L spectrum is approximately consistent with an isothermal plasma at kT_e ~ 1.8 keV, in addition to a component with a temperature distribution appropriate to an isobaric cooling flow, but with a minimum temperature cutoff of kT_min ~ 600 eV. The behaviour of this cooling-flow component is qualitatively similar to what is seen in other cooling flow clusters. Finally, we do not find any strong evidence for a spa...

  16. Localization of iron in rice grain using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kyriacou, Bianca

    2014-03-01

    Cereal crops accumulate low levels of iron (Fe) of which only a small fraction (5-10%) is bioavailable in human diets. Extensive co-localization of Fe in outer grain tissues with phytic acid, a strong chelator of metal ions, results in the formation of insoluble complexes that cannot be digested by humans. Here we describe the use of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to map the distribution of Fe, zinc (Zn), phosphorus (P) and other elements in the aleurone and subaleurone layers of mature grain from wild-type and an Fe-enriched line of rice (Oryza sativa L.). The results obtained from both XFM and NanoSIMS indicated that most Fe was co-localized with P (indicative of phytic acid) in the aleurone layer but that a small amount of Fe, often present as "hotspots", extended further into the subaleurone and outer endosperm in a pattern that was not co-localized with P. We hypothesize that Fe in subaleurone and outer endosperm layers of rice grain could be bound to low molecular weight chelators such as nicotianamine and/or deoxymugineic acid. © 2014.

  17. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems.

  18. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  19. Beyond Chandra (towards the X-ray Surveyor mission): possible solutions for the implementation of very high angular resolution X-ray telescopes in the new millennium based on fused silica segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M. M.; Ghigo, M.; Parodi, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.

    2016-07-01

    An important challenge for the X-ray astronomy of the new millennium is represented by the implementation of an Xray telescope able to maintain the exquisite angular resolution of Chandra (with a sub-arcsec HEW, on-axis) but, at the same time, being characterized by a much larger throughput and grasp. A mission with similar characteristics is represented by the X-ray Surveyor Mission. The project has been recently proposed in USA and is being currently studied by NASA. It will host an X-ray telescope with an effective area of more than 2 square meters at 1 keV (i.e. 30 times greater than Chandra) and a 15-arcminutes field-of-view, with 1-arcsecond or better half-power diameter (versus the 4 arcmin diameter of Chandra). While the scientific reasons for implementing a similar mission are clear, being related to compelling problems like e.g. the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift or the identification of the first galaxy groups and proto-clusters, the realization of a grazing-angle optics system able to fulfil these specs remain highly challenging. Different technologies are being envisaged, like e.g. the use of adjustable segmented mirrors (with use of piezoelectric or magneto-restrictive film actuators on the back surface) or the direct polishing of a variety of thin substrates or the use of innovative correction methods like e.g. differential deposition, ionfiguring or the correction of the profile via controlled stress films. In this paper we present a possible approach based on the direct polishing (with final ion figuring correction of the profile) of thin SiO2 segmented substrates (typically 2 mm thick), discussing different aspects of the technology under implementation and presenting some preliminary results.

  20. Advancement and New Optimizations of Microcalorimeter Arrays for High-Resolution Imaging X-ray Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We propose to continue our successful research program in developing x-ray microcalorimeter arrays for astrophysics. This development will directly benefit not only...